1116-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Nov 14, Sunday


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CROSSWORD SETTER: Andrew J. Ries
THEME: Don’t Quit Your Day Job … each of today’s themed answers is the name of a celebrity. The clue is a pun on the celebrity’s family name, suggesting a job that wouldn’t suit such a name:

23A. Oscar winner who would make a lousy anesthesiologist? : WILLIAM HURT
33A. Punk rocker who would make a lousy grocer? : JOHNNY ROTTEN
39A. Horror author who would make a lousy firefighter? : BRAM STOKER
57A. Action star who would make a lousy free-range farmer? : NICOLAS CAGE
76A. Bygone comic who would make a lousy baker? : GEORGE BURNS
90A. Cabaret pianist who would make a lousy electrician? : BOBBY SHORT
97A. Lawyer who would make a lousy anti-Communist leader? : GLORIA ALLRED
112A. Singer who would make a lousy mohel? : STEVIE NICKS

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 37s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

5. Actress Normand of the silents : MABEL
Mabel Normand was a comedy actress in the days of silent films. perhaps more importantly, later in her career she became one of the first female screenwriters, producers and directors. Normand was so successful off the screen that she had her own movie studio and production company in the twenties.

10. Like some textbook publishers : ELHI
“Elhi” is an informal word used to describe anything related to schooling from grades 1 through 12, i.e. elementary through high school.

20. Perfume with an accent in its name : ESTEE
Estée Lauder was quite the successful businesswoman, with a reputation as a great salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

22. Motorola smartphone : RAZR
RAZR is a line of flip phones introduced by Motorola in 2004.

23. Oscar winner who would make a lousy anesthesiologist? : WILLIAM HURT
Hollywood actor William Hurt was born in Washington, D.C., where his father worked for the State Department. As a result of his father’s job assignments, William lived in Pakistan, Somalia and the Sudan growing up. Later he studied at Juilliard, and there was a classmate of Christopher Reeve and Robin Williams.

31. It’s faster than the blink of an eye: Abbr. : NSEC
“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns”, and really is a tiny amount of time … one billionth of a second.

32. Scrubs wearers, for short : RNS
Registered nurses (RNs) might be found in an operating room (OR) or emergency room (ER).

33. Punk rocker who would make a lousy grocer? : JOHNNY ROTTEN
Johnny Rotten is the former stage name of English punk rock singer John Lydon. Lydon was most famous as the lead singer for the Sex Pistols in the seventies. Apparently he was given the name “Rotten” as he had very poor oral hygiene as a teenage, which turned his teeth green. So, one of the Sex Pistols declared, “You’re rotten, you are!”

37. Bieber Fever, e.g. : MANIA
Justin Bieber is a young pop singer from London, Ontario. Bieber was actually discovered on YouTube by talent manager Scooter Braun. Fans of Bieber call themselves “Beliebers”. Personally, I’m no believer in Bieber …

38. Piano-playing cat, once : MEME
A “meme” (short for “mineme”) is a cultural practice or idea that is passed on verbally or by repetition from one person to another. The term lends itself very well to the online world where links, emails, files etc. are so easily propagated.

39. Horror author who would make a lousy firefighter? : BRAM STOKER
“Dracula” is a novel written by the Irish author Bram Stoker and first published in 1897. Dracula wasn’t the first vampire of literature, but he certainly was the one who spawned the popularity of vampires in theater, film and television, and indeed more novels. Personally, I can’t stand vampire fiction …

43. Fr. title : MLLE
Señorita (Srta.) is Spanish, and mademoiselle (Mlle.), is French for “Miss”.

45. Cold : ALGID
“Algid” is another word for chilly or cold, from the Latin “algere” meaning “to be cold”.

49. Red Baron, e.g. : AIR ACE
Manfred von Richthofen was a famous WWI fighter pilot flying for the Germans and was known as the Red Baron. Von Richthofen was credited with more kills than any other pilot fighting on either side of the conflict, recording over 80 combat victories. He didn’t survive the war though, as he was shot down near Amiens in France in 1918.

50. Pitcher of milk? : ELSIE
Elsie the Cow is the mascot of the Borden Company. Elsie first appeared at the New York World’s Fair in 1939, introduced to symbolize the perfect dairy product. Elsie was also given a husband named Elmer the Bull. Elmer eventually moved over to the chemical division of Borden where he gave his name to Elmer’s Glue.

54. Cosmetician ___ Laszlo : ERNO
Ernő László was a dermatologist from Hungary who became sought out by celebrities for treatment of both serious and cosmetic skin issues. He founded the Ernő László Institute in New York in 1939, which soon had an impressive list of clients that included the Duchess of Windsor, Greta Garbo, Grace Kelly, Ava Gardner, Katharine Hepburn, Audrey Hepburn, Marilyn Monroe and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

55. La Scala segment : SCENA
A scene in an opera is usually called a “scena”, the Italian term for “scene”.

La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its name: “Teatro alla Scala” in Italian.

57. Action star who would make a lousy free-range farmer? : NICOLAS CAGE
The actor Nicolas “Nic” Cage was born Nicolas Coppola. Cage is the nephew of director Francis Ford Coppola and actress Talia Shire, both of whom are his father’s siblings.

60. Singers do it : SEW
Isaac Singer was not only an inventor, but also an actor. For much of his life, profits made from his inventions supported him while he pursued his acting career. Singer didn’t actually invent the sewing machine, and never claimed to have done so. What he did do though, was invent a version of the machine that was practical and easily used in the home.

64. Scholarship name : RHODES
Cecil Rhodes (famous in America as the founder of the Rhodes Scholarship), was a very successful English businessman and South African politician. He founded the De Beers diamond mining company, and also founded the state of Rhodesia which was named after him. The British colony gained its independence over time in the latter half of the 20th century, and is known today as the countries of Zambia and Zimbabwe. The Rhodesian capital of Salisbury was renamed in 1982 to Harare, the current capital of Zimbabwe.

65. “The Hunger Games” and others : EPICS
“The Hunger Games” is a 2008 novel by Suzanne Collins, the first in a trilogy of titles that also includes “Catching Fire” (2009) and “Mockingjay” (2010). “The Hunger Games” was adapted into a very successful movie released in 2012, with the sequels following soon after.

67. Theme park with a spherical landmark : EPCOT
Spaceship Earth is perhaps the structure that comes to mind when we think of Epcot in the Walt Disney World Resort. It is the large white, 18-story geodesic sphere.

71. Jones of the original Stones : BRIAN
Even though Mick Jagger and Keith Richards have been the driving force behind the Rolling Stones for decades, they didn’t start the group. The band was the idea of guitarist and harmonica player Brian Jones, and it was he who invited Richards and Jagger to join, as well as Ian Stewart, Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts to make an original lineup of six band members. Jones called the band “Rollin’ Stone” back then in 1962, named for the song by Muddy Waters. Jones was the leader, manager and decision maker for the first few years until songs written by Richards and Jagger became hits and he started to lose artistic control. In 1967, Jones was arrested for drug possession, and again in 1968. When his trouble with the law prevented him from getting a US work visa, Jones wasn’t able to accompany the Stones on a 1969 US tour. That was the last straw, it seems, and Jones and the Stones parted company. Famously, one month later, Jones was found dead, at the bottom of his swimming pool.

76. Bygone comic who would make a lousy baker? : GEORGE BURNS
George Burns was the stage name of comedian and actor Nathan Birnbaum. Famously, Burns was married to Gracie Allen, who initially acted as “straight man” in their double act. The duo found that they got more laughs with Gracie acting as “Dumb Dora”, an arrangement that Burns and Allen stuck to for decades.

79. Byzantine emperor known as “The Philosopher” : LEO VI
The Byzantine Emperor Leo VI was also known as Leo the Wise and Leo the Philosopher. He was so called because he was extremely well-read.

82. French nobleman : DUC
“Duc” is French for “duke”.

83. Early eight-bit computer maker : ATARI
At one point, the electronics and video game manufacturer Atari was the fastest growing company in US history. However, Atari never really recovered from the video game industry crash of 1983.

85. Tom ___, big role in “The Purple Rose of Cairo” : BAXTER
“The Purple Rose of Cairo” is a fictional movie that features within the 1985 Woody Allen film that bears the same name. Very confusing …

86. Blades that sound like an allergic reaction : SNEES
“Snick or snee” is the name given to cut and thrust while fighting with a knife. The phrase is rooted in a pair of Dutch words and it gave its name to a “snee”, a light sword-like knife.

90. Cabaret pianist who would make a lousy electrician? : BOBBY SHORT
Bobby Short was a cabaret singer and pianist from Danville, Illinois. Short was a classmate of Dick Van Dyke.

92. The gamut : A TO Z
In medieval times, the musical scale was denoted by the notes “ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la”. The term “gamma ut”, shortened to “gamut”, was used to describe the whole scale. By the 1620s, “gamut” was being used to mean the entire range of anything, the whole gamut.

97. Lawyer who would make a lousy anti-Communist leader? : GLORIA ALLRED
Gloria Allred is a civil rights lawyer who also has a career as a radio and TV personality. In the courtroom, Allred has represented some high-profile clients, including Tommy Lee, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sasha Baron Cohen and Esai Morales.

101. Electronic music’s Daft Punk, e.g. : DUO
Daft Punk is an electronic music duo from France.

102. Junior’s challenge, for short : PSAT
Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT)

106. Org. replaced by the N.R.C. : AEC
The Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was set up right after WWII in 1946, with the aim of promoting the peaceful use of atomic energy. Establishing the AEC was a significant move made by President Truman, as it passed control of atomic energy from the military to the civilian sector. The AEC continued to operate until 1974 when its functions were divided up into two new agencies: the Energy Research and Development Administration and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

112. Singer who would make a lousy mohel? : STEVIE NICKS
Singer Stevie Nicks came to fame as the lead singer of Fleetwood Mac. Nicks has a very distinctive voice, heard at its best in the famous 1977 album “Rumours”.

A mohel is a man who has been trained in the practice of brit milah (circumcision). Brit milah is known as “bris” in Yiddish. The brit milah ceremony is performed on male infants when they are 8-days old.

114. German title : FRAU
In Germany, the lady of the house (haus) is the wife (frau).

115. Michael of “Arrested Development” : CERA
Michael Cera is a Canadian actor, a very talented young man who is riding high right now. Cera played great characters on the TV show “Arrested Development”, and the 2007 comedy-drama film “Juno”.

“Arrested Development” is a sitcom that originally aired on Fox from 2003 to 2006. Ron Howard was heavily involved in the show behind the camera, serving as executive producer and also as the show’s narrator. Fifteen new episodes of “Arrested Development” were filmed specifically for release on Netflix in 2013, and there may even be a movie on the way.

117. Feints : DEKES
A deke, also known as a dangle, is a technique used to get past an opponent in ice hockey. “Deke” is a colloquial shortening of the word “decoy”.

119. Helmeted god : ARES
The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of blood-lust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos, Deimos and Eros. The Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

Down
1. John Wayne or Johnny Carson, by birth : IOWAN
John Wayne was called Marion Mitchell Morrison at birth, named after his grandfather who was a Civil War veteran. When young Marion was a little boy, a local fireman used to call him “Little Duke” because he was always seen walking with his large dog called “Duke”. Marion liked the name “Duke” and so he called himself Duke Morrison for the rest of his life. That said, Duke Morrison also used John Wayne as a stage name.

Johnny Carson hosted “The Tonight Show” for thirty years, from 1962 to 1992. Although Carson was the first choice to take over the show from Jack Paar, he initially declined. Carson eventually took the job, after it had also been declined by Bob Newhart, Jackie Gleason, Groucho Marx and Joey Bishop.

2. Newspaper dept. : OBITS
“Obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”, originally the record of the death of a person, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

3. “Cape Fear” co-star : NOLTE
The actor Nick Nolte got his first big break playing opposite Jacqueline Bisset and Robert Shaw in “The Deep”, released in 1976. Prior to that he had worked as a model, and in fact appeared in a magazine advertisement for Clairol in 1972 alongside fellow model Sigourney Weaver.

The 1991 film called “Cape Fear” is a Martin Scorsese remake of a 1962 movie of the same name. The 1991 version stars Robert De Niro and Nick Nolte, and there are also cameo appearances by Robert Mitchum and Gregory Peck who starred in the 1962 original.

6. Parliaments produce them : ASHES
The Parliament brand of cigarettes has been produced by Philip Morris, since 1931.

7. Air-conditioner fig. : BTUS
In the world of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC), the power of a heating or cooling unit can be measured in British Thermal Units (BTUs). This dated unit is the amount of energy required to heat a pound of water so that the water’s temperature increases by one degree Fahrenheit.

11. Genève’s lake : LEMAN
Lake Geneva straddles the border between France and Switzerland. The lake has a lot of “official” names!

– English: Lake Geneva
– French: Lac Léman or Lac de Genève
– German: Genfersee or Genfer See
– Italian: Lago Lemano or Lago di Ginevra

12. Toy holder : HAPPY MEAL
The McDonald’s Happy Meal was introduced in 1977. The Happy Meal was inspired by a selection of food designed in a Guatemala McDonald’s to suit children that was called “Menu Ronald”.

15. Bonnie who sang “Nick of Time” : RAITT
Bonnie Raitt is a blues singer, originally from Burbank, California. Raitt has won nine Grammys for her work, but she is perhaps as well known for her political activism as she is for her music. She was no fan of President George W. Bush while he was in office, and she sure did show it.

16. 15-time All-Star shortstop Smith : OZZIE
Ozzie Smith is a former professional shortstop. Smith played for the San Diego Padres and the St. Louis Cardinals.

19. Trig function : SIN
The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent. Each of these is a ratio, a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The reciprocal of these three functions are secant, cosecant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent.

34. Sprint, e.g. : TELECOM
The modern Sprint Corporation, a giant in the telecommunications industry, can trace its roots back to the Brown Telephone Company which was founded in 1899. C.L. and Jacob Brown created their company to provide a telephone service to the rural parts around the city of Abilene, Kansas.

44. Big producer of 40-Down : LAOS
(40D. See 44-Down : RICE)
The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country’s name is “Meuang Lao”. The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of “Lao” entities united into one, the French added the “S” and so today we tend to use “Laos” instead of “Lao”.

47. “Picnic” playwright : INGE
Playwright William Inge had a run of success on Broadway in the early fifties. Inge’s most celebrated work of that time was the play “Picnic”, for which he was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. The original 1953 cast of “Picnic” included a young male actor making his debut on Broadway. His name was Paul Newman. Many of Inge’s works are set in the American heartland and so he became known as the “Playwright of the Midwest”.

53. Twain contemporary : HARTE
Harte was a storyteller noted for his tales of the American West, even though he himself was from back East, born in Albany, New York.

58. Summer setting in the Midwest: Abbr. : CDT
Central Daylight Savings Time (CDT)

59. Cobbler’s aid : SHOE LAST
A “last” is a tool used by a cobbler that has the shape of a human foot. A last is used as a block on which a shoe is placed for fabrication or for repair.

71. Osso ___ : BUCO
“Osso” is the Italian word for bone as in the name of the dish Osso Buco: braised veal shanks.

74. Asseverate : AVER
“To asseverate” is to aver, to affirm positively and earnestly.

80. Many boomers, now : EX-HIPPIES
A baby boomer is someone who was born in the post-WWII baby boom. The rate of births had been falling fairly steadily in the US at least since 1900, but this trend was sharply reversed in 1946 after WWII. The higher birth rate continued until 1964, when it returned to pre-war levels. Since then the birth rate has continued to decline, although at a slower pace. The period between 1946 and 1964 is defined as the “baby boom”.

89. Caviar sources : BELUGAS
“Caviar” is the roe of a large fish that has been salted and seasoned, and especially the roe of a sturgeon. Beluga caviar comes from the beluga sturgeon, found primarily in the Caspian Sea. It is the most expensive type of caviar in the world. 8 ounces of US-farmed beluga caviar can be purchased through Amazon.com for just over $850, in case you’re feeling peckish …

91. Main source of aluminum : BAUXITE
Bauxite is an aluminum ore. It takes its name from the absolutely beautiful village of Les Baux in southern France, the home of the geologist who first recognized that the mineral was a useful source of the metal.

93. Neighbor of Chiapas : OAXACA
Oaxaca is a state in the southern part of Mexico on the Pacific coast. The state takes the name of Oaxaca, its largest city.

Chiapas is the most southern of the 31 states of Mexico, and its capital city is Tuxtla Gutierrez. As a border state, Chiapas neighbors the country of Guatemala.

95. Modern name of Mare Mecca : RED SEA
The Red Sea (sometimes called the Arabian Gulf) is a stretch of water lying between Africa and Asia. The Gulf of Suez (and the Suez Canal) lies to north, and the Gulf of Aden to the south. According to the Book of Exodus in the Bible, God parted the Red Sea to allow Moses lead the Israelites from Egypt. Historically, the Red Sea was known as Mare Mecca (Sea of Mecca) and “Sinus Arabicus (Gulf of Arabia).

97. Campaign setback : GAFFE
Our word “gaffe” , meaning a social blunder, comes from the French word “gaffe” meaning “clumsy remark”, although it originally was the word for “boat hook”. The exact connection between a boat hook and a blunder seems to be unclear.

99. The planets, now : OCTAD
Pluto was discovered in 1930, and was welcomed as the ninth planet in our solar system. Pluto is relatively small in size, just one fifth of the mass of our own moon. In the seventies, astronomers began to discover more large objects in the solar system, including Eris, a “scattered disc object” at the outer reaches. Given that Eris is actually bigger than Pluto, and other objects really aren’t that much smaller, Pluto’s status as a planet was drawn into question. In 2006 there was a scientific definition for a “planet” agreed for the first time, resulting in Pluto being relegated to the status of “dwarf planet”, along with Eris.

100. Subject of many a Turner landscape : LOIRE
J. M. W. Turner was an English landscape painter. I’ve seen the trailer to the 2014 biographical film about Turner’s life, and it looks really, really interesting.

101. Golfer David : DUVAL
David Duval is a professional golfer from Jacksonville, Florida. The high point of Duval’s career was a victory in the 2001 British Open, but this was followed by a remarkable decline. Duval hasn’t won a PGA Tour event since then, although he often still figures among the leaders.

103. Terrif : SOCKO
“Socko” is a slang term meaning “impressive”.

105. “The Gondoliers” girl : TESSA
“The Gondoliers” is a delightful operetta by Gilbert & Sullivan, first performed in 1889 at the Savoy Theatre in London. Tessa is a maiden selected as a bride in a “line up” by one of the gondoliers. I last saw “The Gondoliers” decades ago, an amateur production in the small town where I was living at the time in Ireland. Great fun!

111. Alpine land: Abbr. : AUS
The name “Austria” is a Latin variant of the German name for the country: “Österreich”. “Österreich” itself means “Eastern borderlands”, a reference to the country’s history as a prefecture of neighboring Bavaria to the west.

113. ___ chi : TAI
More properly called tai chi chuan, tai chi is a martial art mostly practiced to improve overall health and increase longevity.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Charged things : IONS
5. Actress Normand of the silents : MABEL
10. Like some textbook publishers : ELHI
14. Wee bit : DROP
18. Instruments with flared bells : OBOES
20. Perfume with an accent in its name : ESTEE
21. Locker room user : TEAM
22. Motorola smartphone : RAZR
23. Oscar winner who would make a lousy anesthesiologist? : WILLIAM HURT
25. Spotlight : EMPHASIZE
27. Who’s there? : ATTENDEES
28. Glove box item : SCRAPER
30. N.F.L. rarity : TIE
31. It’s faster than the blink of an eye: Abbr. : NSEC
32. Scrubs wearers, for short : RNS
33. Punk rocker who would make a lousy grocer? : JOHNNY ROTTEN
35. Milk dispenser : TEAT
37. Bieber Fever, e.g. : MANIA
38. Piano-playing cat, once : MEME
39. Horror author who would make a lousy firefighter? : BRAM STOKER
43. Fr. title : MLLE
45. Cold : ALGID
49. Red Baron, e.g. : AIR ACE
50. Pitcher of milk? : ELSIE
52. “That feels goo-oo-ood” : AAH
54. Cosmetician ___ Laszlo : ERNO
55. La Scala segment : SCENA
56. Inclined : APT
57. Action star who would make a lousy free-range farmer? : NICOLAS CAGE
60. Singers do it : SEW
61. Historian’s interest : PAST
63. Smooths : SANDS
64. Scholarship name : RHODES
65. “The Hunger Games” and others : EPICS
67. Theme park with a spherical landmark : EPCOT
68. Defeat decisively : STOMP
69. Fiery : ARDENT
71. Jones of the original Stones : BRIAN
72. Contest winner’s feeling : GLEE
73. Consumed : HAD
76. Bygone comic who would make a lousy baker? : GEORGE BURNS
78. Work at : PLY
79. Byzantine emperor known as “The Philosopher” : LEO VI
81. Like dollhouse furniture : TINY
82. French nobleman : DUC
83. Early eight-bit computer maker : ATARI
85. Tom ___, big role in “The Purple Rose of Cairo” : BAXTER
86. Blades that sound like an allergic reaction : SNEES
88. Elapse : GO BY
90. Cabaret pianist who would make a lousy electrician? : BOBBY SHORT
92. The gamut : A TO Z
94. Dog-___ : EARED
96. Where to learn to draw? : ART I
97. Lawyer who would make a lousy anti-Communist leader? : GLORIA ALLRED
101. Electronic music’s Daft Punk, e.g. : DUO
102. Junior’s challenge, for short : PSAT
106. Org. replaced by the N.R.C. : AEC
107. Elaborate : EXPOUND
108. Set side by side : JUXTAPOSE
110. More than plump : FAT AS A PIG
112. Singer who would make a lousy mohel? : STEVIE NICKS
114. German title : FRAU
115. Michael of “Arrested Development” : CERA
116. Bother : EAT AT
117. Feints : DEKES
118. ___ of the earth : ENDS
119. Helmeted god : ARES
120. Window’s counterpart : AISLE
121. Word before or after lime : SODA

Down
1. John Wayne or Johnny Carson, by birth : IOWAN
2. Newspaper dept. : OBITS
3. “Cape Fear” co-star : NOLTE
4. New England town official : SELECTMAN
5. Class ring, e.g. : MEMENTO
6. Parliaments produce them : ASHES
7. Air-conditioner fig. : BTUS
8. Always, in verse : E’ER
9. Reveals : LETS ON
10. God, with “the” : ETERNAL
11. Genève’s lake : LEMAN
12. Toy holder : HAPPY MEAL
13. “Present” : I’M HERE
14. Residents, eventually: Abbr. : DRS
15. Bonnie who sang “Nick of Time” : RAITT
16. 15-time All-Star shortstop Smith : OZZIE
17. Primp : PREEN
19. Trig function : SIN
24. Cost for some plugs : AD RATE
26. Drifter outside a coffee shop? : AROMA
29. Add one’s two cents about : CHIME IN ON
33. Shocks : JARS
34. Sprint, e.g. : TELECOM
36. Con’s plan : ESCAPING
37. Short-order sandwich : MELT
39. Deepest part : BASS
40. See 44-Down : RICE
41. “Can I leave now?” : ARE WE DONE?
42. Possessed : KEPT
44. Big producer of 40-Down : LAOS
46. Yearbook feature : GRAD PHOTO
47. “Picnic” playwright : INGE
48. “That ___ it!” : DOES
51. Immobilized, as one’s arm : IN A CAST
53. Twain contemporary : HARTE
56. Jerk : ASS
58. Summer setting in the Midwest: Abbr. : CDT
59. Cobbler’s aid : SHOE LAST
62. Wasn’t really : ACTED
63. Fabulize : SPIN A YARN
66. Annually : PER YEAR
67. Fumble, say : ERR
68. Like some grins : SLY
69. Many authors have them: Abbr. : AGTS
70. Horse halter : REIN
71. Osso ___ : BUCO
72. Supersmooth : GLIB
74. Asseverate : AVER
75. Gossip : DIRT
77. Barbecue fryer? : BUG ZAPPER
78. Elbow, maybe : PROD
80. Many boomers, now : EX-HIPPIES
84. Still snoozing, say : ABED
85. One way to learn : BY ROTE
87. Farm homes : STIES
89. Caviar sources : BELUGAS
91. Main source of aluminum : BAUXITE
93. Neighbor of Chiapas : OAXACA
95. Modern name of Mare Mecca : RED SEA
97. Campaign setback : GAFFE
98. Grasp : LEARN
99. The planets, now : OCTAD
100. Subject of many a Turner landscape : LOIRE
101. Golfer David : DUVAL
103. Terrif : SOCKO
104. Posed : ASKED
105. “The Gondoliers” girl : TESSA
108. Things aircraft carriers carry : JETS
109. With : AND
111. Alpine land: Abbr. : AUS
113. ___ chi : TAI

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3 thoughts on “1116-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 16 Nov 14, Sunday”

  1. Down
    97. Campaign setback: Gaffe

    While waiting for a fish to surface, deckhands incidentally step on a gaffe while ironically holding it themselves. Perhaps this is the self inflicted blunder.

    I really appreciate your website. I NEVER had an interest in trivial information until I found it. Thank you!!!

    Lubbock,TX

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