1012-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 12 Oct 14, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Pawel Fludzinski
THEME: Inner Workings … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase in the form “X in a Y”. The trick is that the “X” is actually written in the middle of the “Y” in the answer in the grid:

23A. Leading indicator? COAL (CANARY) MINE i.e “canary in a coal mine”
31A. Misfit ROUND (SQUARE PEG) HOLE i.e. “square peg in a round hole”
49A. One who’s enthralled, metaphorically CANDY (KID) STORE i.e. “kid in a candy store”
66A. Never MILLION (NOT) YEARS i.e. “not in a million years”
84A. Much ado about nothing TEA(TEMPEST)POT i.e. “tempest in a teapot”
97A. Deteriorate rapidly HAND(GO TO HELL)BASKET i.e. “go to hell in a handbasket”
112A. It’s hard to find HAY(NEEDLE)STACK i.e. “needle in a haystack”

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 23m 29s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. 1960s dance WATUSI
The Watusi was almost as popular as the twist in the early sixties. The dance took its name from the Batutsi tribe in Rwanda.

14. French port just up the coast from Boulogne CALAIS
Calais is a major ferry port in northern France that overlooks the Strait of Dover, which is the narrowest point in the English Channel. The strait is just over 20 miles wide, making Calais the nearest French town to England.

21. Key of Grieg’s only piano concerto A MINOR
Edvard Grieg is Norway’s best known composer, active in the Romantic Era. Grieg’s most famous works are the gorgeous “Piano Concerto in A minor:”, and his incidental music for the play “Peer Gynt” by Henrik Ibsen.

23. Leading indicator? COAL (CANARY) MINE i.e “canary in a coal mine”
Canaries were used in coal mines to warn miners of the presence of deadly carbon monoxide. The birds were most susceptible to the toxic effects of the gas and so became sick before the miners when the carbon monoxide was present, giving the men the time to escape.

26. Sinus specialist, succinctly ENT
Ear, Nose and Throat specialist (ENT)

28. Bacalao and boquerones TAPAS
“Tapa” is the Spanish word for “lid”, and there is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one’s glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

“Bacalao” is the Spanish term for dried and salted cod and the dishes that are made from it.

“Boquerones en vinagre” is a type of appetizer served mainly in the south of Spain. “Boquerones” is the Spanish for fresh anchovies. The dish is prepared by marinating the anchovies in vinegar and olive oil, and seasoning with garlic and parsley.

36. “American Pie” songwriter MCLEAN
Don McLean released his greatest hit, “American Pie”, back in 1971. Despite the song’s iconic position in the pop repertoire, McLean has been remarkably reticent about its origins and the meaning of the lyrics. We do know that it was inspired by the death of Buddy Holly in a plane crash (“the day the music died”). McLean has also told us that he first read about the death of his idol when delivering newspapers the day after the crash (“February made me shiver/with every paper I’d deliver”). Although the lyrics have been analyzed and interpreted by many, McLean’s stance remains that it is just a poem set to music …

40. “___ Grows in Brooklyn” A TREE
Betty Smith’s novel “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” is a story that is largely autobiographical. The tree referenced in the title and the story is the “tree of heaven”, a deciduous variety native to China, brought into the US in 1784. The tree is so successful here in America that it takes over vacant lots and many “waste” spaces of land, and is now considered to be a weed. Awfully big weed, I’d say …

42. Like a pilot that’s working again RELIT
A pilot light is a small gas flame, one using a relatively small amount of fuel, that remains lit as an ignition source for larger gas burners.

45. Locale that made Hillary famous MT EVEREST
Mount Everest was first summited in 1953 by New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Nepali sherpa Tenzing Norgay. Hillary and Norgay were part of an expedition from which two pairs of climbers were selected to make a summit attempt. The first pair were Tom Bourdillon and Charles Evans, and they came within 330 feet of their goal but had to turn back. The expedition sent up the second pair two days later, and history was made on 29 May 1953.

52. French possessive SES
“Ses” is the French word for “his”, “her” or “its”, when referring to a group of items.

54. Botanist Gray ASA
Asa Gray was an important American botanist in the nineteenth century. He was a lifelong friend of Charles Darwin, albeit mainly through correspondence. Darwin’s book “Forms of Flowers”, was dedicated to Gray.

56. Quod ___ demonstrandum ERAT
QED is used at the end of a mathematical proof or a philosophical argument. The QED acronym stands for the Latin “quod erat demonstrandum” meaning “that which was to be demonstrated”.

58. First steamship with a planned circumnavigation of the globe ARGO
The Argo was a steamship that sailed from Southampton, England in May 1853 and reached Melbourne, Australia 64 days later. The Argo then returned to Southampton via Cape Horn in a journey taking 63 days. That made the vessel the first steamship to circumnavigate the globe.

59. Something on a hero, maybe WHITE HAT
The tradition in old westerns was for the bad guys to be given black hats, and the good guys white hats.

64. Pitbull or Snoop Dogg RAPPER
Pitbull is the stage name of Cuban-American rap artist Armando Perez. Pitbull is from Miami and was born to Cuban immigrants.

The rap star Snoop Dogg’s real name is Cordozar Calvin Broadus. He is the most famous protege of the notorious rapper Dr. Dre. Sadly, Snoop Dogg has had numerous run-ins with police all round the world, even after he started to live the good life that came with his fame.

69. 1998 Winter Olympics host NAGANO
Nagano is a city on Japan’s largest island, Honshu. Nagano was host to the 1998 Winter Olympic Games.

72. Studio behind “Amadeus” and “Platoon” ORION
Orion Pictures is a film studio that was relaunched in 2014, after having operated originally from 1978 to 1999. Orion is a relatively small studio, but has produced four Best Picture Oscar winners:

– Amadeus (1984)
– Platoon (1986)
– Dances with Wolves (1990)
– The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

73. Winning an Oscar, Emmy and Tony, e.g. TRIFECTA
To win a bet called an exacta, the person betting must name the horses that finish first and second and in the exact order. The related bet called the trifecta requires naming of the first, second and third-place finishers in the right order.

77. Activist Brockovich ERIN
Erin Brockovich is an environmental activists who is famous for the role she played in building a case against Pacific Gas & Electric for contaminating drinking water. Her story was told in a 2000 film title “Erin Brockovich” that starred Julia Roberts. Brockovich herself actually appeared in the film as she was given a cameo as a waitress in a restaurant scene.

79. One of a dozen popes PIUS
There have been twelve popes named Pius, the latest being Pope Pius XII who led the Roman Catholic Church until his death in 1958.

82. U.S.N. rank CPO
A Chief Petty Officer (CPO) is a non-commissioned officer in the Navy and Coast Guard. The “Petty” is derived from the French word “petit” meaning “small”.

92. Top of the Eiffel Tower? BERET
The Exposition Universelle (World’s Fair) of 1900 was held in Paris, France. The 1900 fair is remembered for the magnificent entrance arch that was constructed for visitors. That entrance arch was to remain standing for only nine years, but the city decided to keep it and you can visit it today. Today we call that entrance arch the Eiffel Tower.

93. Honduras-to-Guatemala dirección OESTE
“Oeste” (west) is a “dirección” (direction), in Spanish.

95. Blues rocker Chris REA
Chris Rea is a singer-songwriter and respected blues guitar player from England. Rea’s biggest hit is a song that he wrote himself called “Fool (If You Think It’s Over”), released in 1978.

106. Actress Falco EDIE
The actress Edie Falco won her three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO’s outstanding drama series called “The Sopranos”.

107. Neutrinos, symbolically NUS
Neutrinos are small subatomic particles that do not carry an electric charge. The term “neutrino” is Italian for “small neutral one”. There are three types of neutrino: electron neutrinos, muon neutrinos and tau neutrinos.

110. Broccoli-like vegetable RAPINI
Broccoli Rabe is perhaps better known as rapini, and is a vegetable often used in Mediterranean cuisines. It is quite delicious sauteed with garlic …

121. Dinners at which people read at the table SEDERS
The Passover Seder is a ritual feast that marks the beginning of the Jewish Passover holiday, celebrating the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt. One of the traditions at the meal is that the youngest child at the table asks “The Four Questions”, all relating to why this night is different from all other nights in the year:

– Why is it that on all other nights during the year we eat either bread or matzoh, but on this night we eat only matzoh?
– Why is it that on all other nights we eat all kinds of herbs, but on this night we eat only bitter herbs?
– Why is it that on all other nights we do not dip our herbs even once, but on this night we dip them twice?
– Why is it that on all other nights we eat either sitting or reclining, but on this night we eat in a reclining position?

Down
1. Sake source RICE
We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as “rice wine”. It is indeed made from rice, but it is a brewed rather than fermented and so is more like a beer than a wine.

2. Like most graffiti, for short ANON
“Graffiti” is the plural of “graffito”, the Italian for “a scribbling”. The word was first used to describe ancient inscriptions on the walls in the ruins of Pompeii.

4. AT&T Stadium team, on scoreboards DAL
“AT&T Stadium” is a stadium owned by the city of Arlington, Texas that is home to the NFL’s Dallas Cowboys. The stadium has a retractable dome roof, and the world’s largest column-free interior space.

7. ___ Peace Prize (award discontinued in 1990) LENIN
The Lenin Peace Prize was inaugurated in 1949 as the Stalin Peace Prize, and was the Soviet Union’s equivalent of the Nobel Peace Prize awarded in the West. Notable recipients of the Lenin Peace Prize include Fidel Castro, Salvador Allende and Nelson Mandela.

10. Goalie Howard of U.S.A.’s 2010 and ’14 World Cup teams TIM
Tim Howard is a soccer player from North Brunswick, New Jersey. Howard plays goalkeeper for the English club Everton, as well as for the US national team. Famously, Howard holds the record for the most saves in a World Cup match, having stopped the ball 16 times in the US defeat by Belgium in the 2014 tournament.

11. QB Johnny UNITAS
Footballer Johnny Unitas was nicknamed “the Golden Arm” as well as “Johnny U”. Unitas played in the fifties through the seventies, mainly for the Baltimore Colts. He held the record for throwing touchdown passes in consecutive games (47 games) for 52 years, until it was surpassed in 2012 by Drew Brees.

12. Ping maker SONAR
The British developed the first underwater detection system that used sound waves. Research was driven by defence demands during WWI, leading to production of working units in 1922. This new sound detection system was described as using “supersonics”, but for the purpose of secrecy the term was dropped in favor of an acronym. The work was done under the auspices of the Royal Navy’s Anti-Submarine Division, so ASD was combined with the IC from “superson-ic-s” to create the name ASDIC. The navy even went as far as renaming the quartz material at the heart of the technology “ASDivite”. By the time WWII came along, the Americans were producing their own systems and coined the term SONAR, playing off the related application, RADAR. And so the name ASDIC was deep-sixed …

15. Michigan, in Chicago: Abbr. AVE
Chicago’s Michigan Avenue is home to many of the city’s landmarks, including the Chicago Water Tower, the Art Institute of Chicago, Millenium Park and the Magnificent Mile shopping district.

17. ___-Detoo (“Star Wars” droid) ARTOO
Artoo’s proper name is R2-D2. R2-D2 is the smaller of the two famous droids from the “Star Wars” movies. British actor Kenny Baker, who stands just 3 ft 8 ins tall, has been the man inside the R2-D2 droid for all six of the “Star Wars” movies.

19. Atmospheric probe SONDE
A sonde is a probe that is sent into the upper atmosphere to make physical observations. “Sonde” is the French word for “sound”, so the idea is that one is “sounding” the atmosphere.

32. Like some chardonnays OAKY
The Chardonnay grape is believed to have originated in the Burgundy wine region of France. Now it’s grown “everywhere”. Drinkers of California “Chards” seem to be particularly fond of “oak” flavor, so most Chardonnay wines are aged in oak barrels.

35. Thousands, in slang GEES
“G” and “thou” are slang terms used for a “thousand”.

36. Avian mimic MACAW
Macaws are beautifully colored birds of native to Central and South America, and are actually a type of parrot. Most species of macaw are now endangered, with several having become extinct in recent decades. The main threats are deforestation and illegal trapping and trafficking of exotic birds.

38. Luau locale LANAI
A lanai is a type of veranda, a design that originated in Hawaii. A kind blog reader tells me that the etymology of “lanai” seems unclear, but that the island name of “Lana’i” is apparently not related.

42. Lakers, to Celtics, e.g. RIVAL
The Los Angeles Lakers basketball team started out in 1947 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The team chose the Lakers name in honor of the nickname of Minnesota, “Land of 10,000 Lakes”. The Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960.

The Boston Celtics NBA basketball team were founded just after WWII in 1946. The Celtics won eight league championships in a row from 1958 to 1966. That’s the longest consecutive championship winning streak of any professional sports team in North America.

44. Subject of some ’50s-’60s experiments LSD
LSD (colloquially known as “acid”) is short for lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist called Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

46. Tombstone figure EARP
Wyatt Earp is famous as one of the participants in the gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Earp was a city policeman in Wichita, Kansas and also in Dodge City, Kansas. Earp was also deputy sheriff in Tombstone, Arizona where the O.K. Corral gunfight took place. Years later, Earp joined the Alaska Gold Rush and with a partner built and operated the Dexter Saloon in Nome.

48. Two-time title role for Chris Hemsworth THOR
Thor is a superhero who was introduced to us by Marvel Comics in 1962. The character is of course based on the Norse god Thor, and comes complete with a magical hammer. Like so many comic book heroes it seems, Thor has made it to the big screen. Actor Chris Hemsworth played the role in the 2011 film “Thor” directed by the great Kenneth Branagh. Branagh must have needed the cash. Thor’s father Odin is played by Anthony Hopkins. He must have needed the cash too …

50. Artist Frida renowned for her self-portraits KAHLO
Frida Kahlo was a Mexican painter, famous for her self-portraits. She was married to the equally famous artist Diego Rivera. Kahlo was portrayed by the actress Salma Hayek in a film about her colorful life called “Frida” released in 2002.

58. Sunday recess? APSE
The apse of a church or cathedral is a semicircular recess in an outer wall, usually with a half-dome as a roof and often where there resides an altar. Originally apses were used as burial places for the clergy and also for storage of important relics.

60. Untouchable, e.g. T-MAN
Eliot Ness was the Treasury agent charged with the task of bringing down the notorious Chicago gangster Al Capone. When Ness took on the job in 1930, Chicago law-enforcement agents were renowned for being corrupt, for being on the take. Ness hand-picked 50 prohibition agents he thought he could rely on, later reducing that to a cadre of 15 and ultimately just 11 trusted men. That group of 11 earned the nickname “the Untouchables”, the agents who couldn’t be bought.

61. Viennese one EIN
Vienna is the capital of Austria. Vienna has a long musical tradition and was home to Franz Schubert, Johann Strauss (I and II), Josef Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms and Gustav Mahler. As such, Vienna is sometimes called the “City of Music”. It is also called the “City of Dreams” as it was home to the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud.

62. Long-billed wading bird SNIPE
Snipes are wading birds with very long and thin bills that they use to search for small invertebrates in mud.

63. 12 months, in Rio ANO
Rio de Janeiro is the second largest city in Brazil (after São Paulo). “Rio de Janeiro” translates as “January River”. The name reflects the discovery of the bay on which Rio sits, on New Years Day in 1502.

65. Chihuahua cry ARF
Chihuahua is a state in northern Mexico that shares a border with Texas and New Mexico. Chihuahua is the largest state in the country, so has the nickname “El Estado Grande”. The state takes its name from the Chihuahuan Desert which lies largely within its borders. And of course the Chihuahua breed of dog takes its name from the state.

69. Gun brand not endorsed by the 111-Down NERF
Nerf is the name given to the soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

78. Beethoven’s “Hammerklavier,” e.g. SONATA
The “Hammerklavier” is the more familiar name for Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 29 in B-flat major. The name comes from the German for “hammer-keyboard”, which is German for the fortepiano, a predecessor of the modern pianoforte.

79. ___ curiam decision PER
Literally, “per curiam” means “by the court” when translated from Latin. In the law, a per curiam decision is one made by a court with multiple judges, with the court acting as a whole. Most of the US Supreme Court decisions and opinions would be described as per curiam.

83. Weird Al Yankovic, e.g. PARODIST
“Weird Al” Yankovich is a singer-songwriter who is noted for writing and performing parodies of popular songs. Of the 150 or so such songs, the best known are probably “Eat It” (parodying “Beat It” by Michael Jackson) and “Like a Surgeon” (parodying “Like a Virgin” by Madonna).

85. Third person masculine? ABEL
Adam was the first man, according to the Bible. Adam’s first son was Cain, and his second was Abel. That would make Abel the “third person masculine”.

86. Relative of turquoise TEAL
The beautiful color of teal takes it name from the duck called a “teal”, which has dark greenish-blue (teal) markings on its head and wings.

88. International cricket match TEST
Test matches are played between international teams in the sport of cricket, although the teams have to be ranked as “first-class” in order to play. As of now, there are only ten national teams eligible to play in test matches. The Irish team is leading the charge to be the eleventh team in the elite club. A test match can take five days to produce a result.

90. Ones left holding the bag? CADDIES
“Caddie” is a Scottish word, as one might expect given the history of the game of golf. “Caddie” is a local word derived from the French “cadet”, meaning a younger son or brother, and also a student officer in the military.

91. Gaps are filled with them CLOTHES
The Gap is a San Francisco-based clothing retailer founded in 1969. The name “the Gap” is a homage to the popular sixties term “the generation gap”.

96. Michael of “The Great Santini” O’KEEFE
Michael O’Keefe played Danny Noonan in the film “Caddyshack” (I’m not a big fan of that movie). I saw O’Keefe at the cinema not too long ago in the George Clooney film “Michael Clayton”.

“The Great Santini” is a 1979 film adaptation of a novel of the same name by Pat Conroy. The film stars Robert Duvall as a Marine officer in the early days of the Vietnam War.

98. Andrea or Nicolò, in the music world AMATI
The first of the Amati family to make violins was Andrea Amati, who lived in the 14th century. He was succeeded by his sons, Antonio and Girolamo. In turn, they were succeeded by Girolamo’s son, Nicolo. Nicolo had a few students who achieved fame making musical instruments as well. One was his own son, Girolamo, and another was the famed Antonio Stradivari.

107. Half of Mork’s farewell NANU
“Mork & Mindy” was broadcast from 1978 to 1982. We were first introduced to Mork (played by Robin Williams, of course) in a special episode of “Happy Days”. The particular episode in question has a bizarre storyline culminating in Fonzie and Mork having a thumb-to-finger duel. Eventually Richie wakes up in bed, and alien Mork was just part of a dream! Oh, and “Nanu Nanu” means both “hello” and “goodbye” back on the planet Ork. “I am Mork from Ork, Nanu Nanu”. Great stuff …

108. La Jolla campus, briefly UCSD
The University of California, San Diego is located in La Jolla. The school was founded in 1960 as the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

109. ___-Ball SKEE
Skee Ball is that arcade game where you roll balls up a ramp trying to “bounce” it into rings for varying numbers of points. The game was first introduced in Philadelphia, in 1909.

111. See 69-Down NRA
National Rifle Association (NRA)

114. It. is there EUR
Ital (It.) is in Europe (Eur.)

115. Army E-7: Abbr. SFC
Sergeant First Class (SFC)

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Short end of the stick RAW DEAL
8. 1960s dance WATUSI
14. French port just up the coast from Boulogne CALAIS
20. Speedily IN HASTE
21. Key of Grieg’s only piano concerto A MINOR
22. Belabor, say OVERDO
23. Leading indicator? COAL (CANARY) MINE i.e “canary in a coal mine”
25. Spruce up NEATEN
26. Sinus specialist, succinctly ENT
27. Zest RIND
28. Bacalao and boquerones TAPAS
30. Ugly one TOAD
31. Misfit ROUND (SQUARE PEG) HOLE i.e. “square peg in a round hole”
36. “American Pie” songwriter MCLEAN
39. Boosts UPS
40. “___ Grows in Brooklyn” A TREE
41. Shakespearean lament ALACK
42. Like a pilot that’s working again RELIT
45. Locale that made Hillary famous MT EVEREST
49. One who’s enthralled, metaphorically CANDY (KID) STORE i.e. “kid in a candy store”
52. French possessive SES
53. Response to a 26-Across, perhaps AAH
54. Botanist Gray ASA
55. Dedicated AVID
56. Quod ___ demonstrandum ERAT
58. First steamship with a planned circumnavigation of the globe ARGO
59. Something on a hero, maybe WHITE HAT
62. Greeted and seated SAW IN
64. Pitbull or Snoop Dogg RAPPER
66. Never MILLION (NOT) YEARS i.e. “not in a million years”
69. 1998 Winter Olympics host NAGANO
72. Studio behind “Amadeus” and “Platoon” ORION
73. Winning an Oscar, Emmy and Tony, e.g. TRIFECTA
77. Activist Brockovich ERIN
78. Hypnotist’s signal SNAP
79. One of a dozen popes PIUS
80. Suffix with ball -OON
81. Game warden? REF
82. U.S.N. rank CPO
84. Much ado about nothing TEA(TEMPEST)POT i.e. “tempest in a teapot”
89. “I wouldn’t bet on it!” FAT CHANCE!
92. Top of the Eiffel Tower? BERET
93. Honduras-to-Guatemala dirección OESTE
94. Hearing-related AURAL
95. Blues rocker Chris REA
96. Become fixated OBSESS
97. Deteriorate rapidly HAND(GO TO HELL)BASKET i.e. “go to hell in a handbasket”
104. Make ___ dash for A MAD
105. Went out with DATED
106. Actress Falco EDIE
107. Neutrinos, symbolically NUS
110. Broccoli-like vegetable RAPINI
112. It’s hard to find HAY(NEEDLE)STACK i.e. “needle in a haystack”
117. Directs, as a conversation STEERS
118. True EVEN UP
119. Transgression OFFENSE
120. Show disdain for, in a way HISS AT
121. Dinners at which people read at the table SEDERS
122. Hide SECLUDE

Down
1. Sake source RICE
2. Like most graffiti, for short ANON
3. “Come again?” WHAT!
4. AT&T Stadium team, on scoreboards DAL
5. Corner key ESC
6. Speedily AT A RUN
7. ___ Peace Prize (award discontinued in 1990) LENIN
8. Charges WARDS
9. Girl’s name that becomes a different girl’s name if you switch the first two letters AMY
10. Goalie Howard of U.S.A.’s 2010 and ’14 World Cup teams TIM
11. QB Johnny UNITAS
12. Ping maker SONAR
13. “To reiterate …” I REPEAT …
14. Opposite of waste CONSERVE
15. Michigan, in Chicago: Abbr. AVE
16. Hide stuff LEATHER
17. ___-Detoo (“Star Wars” droid) ARTOO
18. World peace, e.g. IDEAL
19. Atmospheric probe SONDE
24. “But wait, there’s more …” AND …
29. Best suited APTEST
31. Mailroom stamp RECD
32. Like some chardonnays OAKY
33. Relinquish QUIT
34. Plotting UP TO
35. Thousands, in slang GEES
36. Avian mimic MACAW
37. What stripes and polka dots do CLASH
38. Luau locale LANAI
42. Lakers, to Celtics, e.g. RIVAL
43. It may be limited or late EDITION
44. Subject of some ’50s-’60s experiments LSD
45. Excellence MERIT
46. Tombstone figure EARP
47. Brush material SAGE
48. Two-time title role for Chris Hemsworth THOR
50. Artist Frida renowned for her self-portraits KAHLO
51. Took back, as lost territory REWON
57. 24/7 ANYTIME
58. Sunday recess? APSE
60. Untouchable, e.g. T-MAN
61. Viennese one EIN
62. Long-billed wading bird SNIPE
63. 12 months, in Rio ANO
64. Hike RAISE
65. Chihuahua cry ARF
67. Preach, e.g. ORATE
68. Go off ERUPT
69. Gun brand not endorsed by the 111-Down NERF
70. Play ___ AREA
71. Photographic memory, e.g. GIFT
74. Thicket COPSE
75. Sweetie pie TOOTS
76. Gets in the game ANTES
78. Beethoven’s “Hammerklavier,” e.g. SONATA
79. ___ curiam decision PER
82. When repeated, party cry CHUG!
83. Weird Al Yankovic, e.g. PARODIST
85. Third person masculine? ABEL
86. Relative of turquoise TEAL
87. “___ it!” SO BE
88. International cricket match TEST
90. Ones left holding the bag? CADDIES
91. Gaps are filled with them CLOTHES
95. Fixed, as Easter eggs REDYED
96. Michael of “The Great Santini” O’KEEFE
97. Like some truths HARSH
98. Andrea or Nicolò, in the music world AMATI
99. Scruffs NAPES
100. Ho preceder HEAVE
101. Gentle alarms BEEPS
102. Go on to say ADD
103. Some launch sites SILOS
107. Half of Mork’s farewell NANU
108. La Jolla campus, briefly UCSD
109. ___-Ball SKEE
111. See 69-Down NRA
113. Vane dir. NNE
114. It. is there EUR
115. Army E-7: Abbr. SFC
116. Contact info abbr. TEL

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