0822-21 NY Times Crossword 22 Aug 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Stephen McCarthy
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme Resettling Letterings

Themed answers are anagrams of a word(s) shown in uppercase letters in the clue. Clever …

  • 23A 2004 film about a group of MALIGNERS : MEAN GIRLS
  • 25A It might be put on for stage PAGEANTRIES : GREASEPAINT
  • 42A You might be MARVELING AT this as it whizzes by : MAGLEV TRAIN
  • 46A Sort of SCHEMATIC for Christian education : CATECHISM
  • 64A Many relationships are INSTIGATED on one : DATING SITE
  • 68A Healthy eaters may give this A WIDE BERTH : WHITE BREAD
  • 72A Disrupt an online meeting, in a way : ZOOMBOMB
  • 90A They can be NOISELESS while stalking prey : LIONESSES
  • 93A Explorers of the UNTRAVERSED : ADVENTURERS
  • 111A Writing done GRAPHICALLY : CALLIGRAPHY
  • 115A The Trojans lacked the FORESIGHT to turn this down : GIFT HORSE

Bill’s time: 20m 42s (I promise to stop whining about the online solving app soon!)

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 What a drawbridge may bridge : MOAT

A moat is a protective trench that surrounds a castle, say, or an exhibit in a zoo. A moat may or may not be filled with water.

9 Control tower installation : RADAR

Scientists have been using radio waves to detect the presence of objects since the late 1800s, but it was the demands of WWII that accelerated the practical application of the technology. The British called their system RDF standing for Range and Direction Finding. The system used by the US Navy was called “Radio Detection And Ranging”, which was shortened to the acronym “RADAR”.

20 Amelia Bedelia, e.g. : MAID

The “Amelia Bedelia” series of children’s books was written by Peggy Parish until she passed away in 1988. Her nephew, Herman Parish took over and has been writing them since 1995. The Amelia character is based on a maid in Cameroon where Parish had lived during her formative years.

22 Member of a noble family : XENON

The element xenon was the first of the noble gases to be made into a compound, which was somewhat remarkable in that the noble gases were thought by many to be completely inert, unreactive.

23 2004 film about a group of MALIGNERS : MEAN GIRLS

“Mean Girls” is a teen comedy movie released in 2004 starring Lindsay Lohan. Tina Fey also puts in an appearance, which really isn’t surprising as Fey wrote the screenplay.

27 Annual film festival where “Saw” and “Get Out” premiered : SUNDANCE

The Sundance Film Festival is the largest independent film event in the country, and takes place every year around the Sundance Resort near Provo, Utah. The festival has its roots in the Utah/US Film Festival which started in Salt Lake City in 1978. Management of the festival was taken over by Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute in 1985. The festival has become a bit of a media feeding frenzy in recent years, as a lot of A-list celebrities attend. The Festival organizers introduced a “Focus on Film” campaign in 2007 in an attempt to offset some of the madness.

I know just enough about the “Saw” series of films that I won’t be watching them. They fall into the horror genre and there is a lot of blood, gore and cruelty.

“Get Out” is a 2017 horror film written and directed by Jordan Peele. I don’t do horror, but I do hear that this one is well made …

28 “___ La La” (1964 hit) : SHA

“Sha La La” was a hit for the British band Manfred Mann in 1964. It was a cover version of a song released earlier in the same year by the Shirelles over in the US.

29 Senator, e.g., for short : NHL’ER

The Senators are the NHL hockey team based in Ottawa, Canada. The current team, founded in the 1992-93 season, is the second NHL team in the city to use the name “Senators”. The original team was founded in 1917, and had a very successful run until the league expanded into the US in the late twenties. The cost of operating in what became the smallest NHL city eventually drove the Senators to St. Louis where they played for a year as the Eagles before finally folding.

30 Avoids a bogey, perhaps : PARS

The golfing term “bogey” originated at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in England in 1890, and was used to indicate a total round that was one-over-par (and not one-over-par on a particular hole, as it is today). The name “bogey” came from a music hall song of the time “Here Comes the Bogeyman”. In the following years it became popular for players trying to stay at par to be “playing against Colonel Bogey”. Then, during WWI, the marching tune “Colonel Bogey” was written and named after the golfing term. If you don’t recognize the name of the tune, it’s the one that’s whistled by the soldiers marching in the great movie “The Bridge on the River Kwai”.

37 W.W. II hero, informally : IKE

General Dwight D. Eisenhower (“Ike”) was in command of the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during WWII. If you’re a WWII buff like me, then I recommend you take a look at a great, made-for-TV movie starring Tom Selleck as Eisenhower called “Ike: Countdown to D-Day” that came out in 2004.

39 Muletas are waved at them : TOROS

The muleta is the red flannel cloth that a matador uses towards the end of a bull fight, instead of a cape. The muleta serves to distract the bull and also to hide the sword that is used for the kill. The term “matador” is only used in English, and translates aptly enough as “killer”.

40 Canon camera : EOS

I’ve been using Canon EOS cameras for decades now, and have nothing but good things to say about both the cameras and the lenses. The EOS name stands for Electro-Optical System, and was chosen because it evokes the name of Eos, the Titan goddess of dawn from Greek mythology.

41 Branch of Islam : SHIA

The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favored the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

42 You might be MARVELING AT this as it whizzes by : MAGLEV TRAIN

Maglev (magnetic levitation)

49 City nicknamed “The Old Pueblo” : TUCSON

Tucson is the second largest city in Arizona (after Phoenix). The founding father of the city was Hugh O’Conor, yet another Irishman, but one who was raised in Spain. O’Conor was a mercenary working for Spain when he authorized the construction of a military fort called Presidio San Augustín del Tucsón in 1775, which eventually grew into the city that we know today. The Spanish name “Tucsón” comes from the local name “Cuk Ṣon”, which translates as “(at the) base of the black (hill)”.

51 French city near the Belgian border : LILLE

Lille is a large city in the very north of France that sits right on the border with Belgium. The name “Lille” is a derivation of the term “l’isle” meaning “the island”. The former name “L’Isle” dates back to 1066, and is a reference to a castle that once stood on an island in the Deûle river that runs through the city. The city grew around the island and the castle.

55 Toni Morrison title heroine : SULA

“Sula” is a 1973 novel by Toni Morrison. The title character is a young woman who returns to her hometown in Ohio. Sula’s return disrupts the community as she defies social norms.

56 Annual British acting award : OLIVIER

The Laurence Olivier Award is the British equivalent to Broadway’s Tony Award, and is presented to recognize excellence in theatre in London’s West End. The Oliviers were inaugurated in 1976 as the Society of West End Theatre Awards and were renamed to honor British actor Laurence Olivier in 1984.

60 Counterpart of elles : ILS

“Ils” is the French for “they”, if not referring to feminine nouns (when “they” translates as “elles”).

72 Disrupt an online meeting, in a way : ZOOMBOMB

Zoom is a videoconferencing app that became remarkably popular in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. The market deemed Zoom to be the easiest to use of the free videoconferencing apps. I’ve been using it, but really prefer Google’s Meet offering …

74 Mauna ___ : KEA

Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed.

75 Grp. that hasn’t yet found what it’s looking for : SETI

“SETI” is the name given to a number of projects searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

76 Wonder Woman and others : AMAZONS

The Amazons of Greek mythology were a tribe of female warriors who were the daughters of Ares and Harmonia.

Superhero Wonder Woman first appeared in print in 1941, in a publication from DC Comics. As she was created during WWII, Wonder Woman’s first foes were the axis powers. In the less realistic world her biggest foe was and still is Ares, a “baddie” named after the Greek mythological figure. Wonder Woman had several signature expressions, including “Merciful Minerva!”, “Suffering Sappho!” and “Great Hera!”. She also has several devices that she uses in her quest for justice, e.g. the Lasso of Truth, a pair of indestructible bracelets and a tiara that can be used as a deadly projectile. Wonder Woman uses the name “Diana Prince” when “out of uniform”.

79 Valuable load for a mule : KILO

A drug mule is someone employed to smuggle illegal substances across a border.

84 Pioneering gangsta rap group : NWA

NWA was a hip hop group from Compton, California. The original five group members included rappers who have made a name for themselves as solo acts, including: Dr. Dre and Ice Cube. The story of NWA is told in a 2015 film, also called “Straight Outta Compton”. I hear that the movie was well received, although hip hop is not my cup of tea. I’m just too old …

96 Old cable TV inits. : TNN

The Nashville Network (TNN) was a country music cable channel that operated from 1983 to 2003. When TNN closed down it was relaunched with a completely different format as Spike, which was marketed as “the first television channel for men”.

98 Word repeated in “I ___, I ___, it’s off to work I go” : OWE

“Heigh-Ho” is one of the best known songs in the classic Disney animated feature “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. It is sung by the seven dwarfs as they head off to mine diamonds and rubies.

107 1980s gaming inits. : NES

The Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) was sold in North America from 1985 to 1995. The NES was the biggest selling gaming console of the era. Nintendo replaced the NES with Wii, which is also the biggest-selling game console in the world.

111 Writing done GRAPHICALLY : CALLIGRAPHY

Calligraphy is the art of fine handwriting. The term “calligraphy” comes from the Greek “kallos” meaning “beauty” and “graphein” meaning “to write”.

115 The Trojans lacked the FORESIGHT to turn this down : GIFT HORSE

Someone using the idiom “don’t look a gift horse in the mouth” is giving a warning not to be ungrateful on receiving a gift. One way to be ungrateful, if being given a horse, is to immediately verify the horse’s age by looking in its mouth and checking the shape and size of its teeth. The phrase is ancient, and a form of it can be found in a letter penned circa 400 CE. In the missive, St. Jerome says “Noli equi dentes inspicere donati” (Never inspect the teeth of a given horse).

The ancient city of Troy was located on the west coast of modern-day Turkey. The Trojan War of Greek mythology was precipitated by the elopement of Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, with Paris of Troy. The war itself largely consisted of a nine-year siege of Troy by the Greeks. We know most about the final year of that siege, as it is described extensively in Homer’s “Iliad”. The city eventually fell when the Greeks hid soldiers inside the Trojan Horse, which the Trojans brought inside the city’s walls. Beware of Greeks bearing gifts …

118 Children’s author Blyton : ENID

Enid Blyton wrote stories for children that were very popular when I was growing up in Britain and Ireland. Some time back, I purchased and reread my favorite of her stories growing up, a children’s novel called “The Secret Island”.

120 One way to cook a 116-Across : SAUTE
(116A It’s multilayered : ONION)

“Sauté” is a French word. The literal translation from the French is “jumped” or “bounced”, a reference to the tossing of food while cooking it in a frying pan.

122 They know the drill: Abbr. : SGTS

Sergeant (sgt.) is a rank above corporal (cpl.).

Down

3 Appliance brand since 1934 : AMANA

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

4 Pea shooters? : TENDRILS

A tendril is a specialized leaf or stem that is shaped like a spiral thread. Tendrils are used for support by climbing plants.

6 Complete travesty : FARCE

Back in the 17th century, a travesty was a burlesque or artistic imitation of a serious work, a parody. The term “travesty” has come to mean a distorted representation in general, a sham or a mockery.

8 Binges too much, for short : ODS

Overdose (OD)

12 Fourth person to walk on the moon : ALAN BEAN

Alan Bean is a former astronaut. Bean was the fourth man to walk on the moon, roaming the moon’s surface with Pete Conrad as part of the Apollo 12 mission. Bean resigned from NASA in 1981 and turned to painting. He is the only artist in the world to have incorporated real moon dust into his works.

16 What makes Shrek shriek? : AN I

The name “Shrek” turns into the word “shriek” with the addition of a letter I.

18 It may be blown : TNT

“TNT” is an abbreviation for “trinitrotoluene”. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

26 House Republican V.I.P. Stefanik : ELISE

Republican Elise Stefanik was elected to the House of Representatives in 2014 at the age of 30, making her the youngest woman to be elected to Congress at the time.

28 Star in Canis Major : SIRIUS

When you look up at the night sky, the brightest star you can see is Sirius. Sirius appears so bright to us because it is relatively close to the Earth. Sirius is commonly known as the “Dog Star” because it can be seen in the constellation Canis Major, the “Big Dog”.

34 Hot dog topper : CHILI

The full name of the dish that is often called simply “chili” is “chili con carne”, Spanish for “peppers with meat”. The dish was created by immigrants from the Spanish Canary Islands in the city of San Antonio, Texas (a city which the islanders founded). The San Antonio Chili Stand was a popular attraction at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, and that stand introduced the dish to the rest of America and to the world.

38 “Dear ___ Hansen” (2017 Tony-winning musical) : EVAN

“Dear Evan Hansen” is a 2015 stage musical about a young man with awkward social skills and his efforts to make friends.

43 Voice with an Echo : ALEXA

Alexa is a personal assistant application that is most associated with Amazon Echo smart speakers. Apparently, one reason the name “Alexa” was chosen is because it might remind one of the Library of Alexandria, the “keeper of all knowledge”.

46 Mike Krzyzewski, to Duke basketball fans : COACH K

Mike Krzyzewski is a coach and former basketball player from Chicago, Illinois. As a young man, Krzyzewski captained the Army Cadets basketball team, before serving in the Army for five years. After resigning from active duty, Coach K (as he is called) eventually took the head coaching job with the Army Cadets followed by the head coach’s position with Duke, where he has been since 1980. Today, Coach K also coaches the US International team.

50 Hot dog topper : SLAW

The term “coleslaw” is an Anglicized version of the Dutch term “koolsla”, which in itself is a shortened form of “Koolsalade” meaning “cabbage salad”.

56 Justin Trudeau, by birth : OTTAWAN

Ottawa is the second-largest city in the Province of Ontario (after Toronto) and is the capital city of Canada. The name “Ottawa” comes from an Algonquin word “adawe”, which means “to trade”.

Justin Trudeau ascended to the leadership of Canada’s Liberal Party in 2013, He led the Liberals to a decisive victory in the federal election of 2015, after which he assumed the office of Prime Minister of Canada. Justin is the eldest son of former Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, who led Canada for 15 years starting in 1968.

59 Aftmost masts on ships : MIZZENS

A mizzenmast is found aft of the main mast on a vessel having more than one mast. The sail on a mizzenmast is a mizzen sail, and is smaller than the mainsail.

67 Title meaning “commander” : EMIR

An emir is a prince or chieftain, one most notably from the Middle East in Islamic countries. In English, “emir” can also be written variously as “emeer, amir, ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

73 Showing the effects of an all-nighter, say : BLEARY-EYED

To blear is to dim the vision, usually with watery eyes.

77 It has more coastline than California, surprisingly : MAINE

The coast of Maine is often referred to as “Down East” by the people of New England. There is even a monthly magazine aimed at the people of Maine called “Down East”, that is published in Camden, Maine.

78 Score after seven points, maybe : AD OUT

In tennis, if the score reaches deuce (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the advantage. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. The player calling out the score announces “ad in”, or more formally “advantage in”, if he/she has the advantage. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

82 Apropos of : AS TO

“Apropos”, meaning “relevant, opportune”, comes into English directly from French, in which language “à propos” means “to the purpose”. Note that we use the term as one word (apropos), whereas the original French is two words (à propos).

87 International cosmetics company ___ Rocher : YVES

Yves Rocher is a cosmetics company that was founded in 1959 by Yves Rocher in La Gacilly, France.

91 Larsson who wrote “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” : STIEG

“The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” is a sensational hit novel by the Swedish author Stieg Larsson, originally titled in Swedish as “Men Who Hate Women”. It is the first in a trilogy of successful books, all of which were only published after Larsson’s death.

Stieg Larsson was a Swedish journalist and writer. Indeed, one of the main characters in his “Millennium” series of novels is a journalist as well. The first two titles in the series are “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and “The Girl Who Played with Fire”. The last of the three titles in the Millennium series is “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest”, which was the most-sold book in the US in 2010. All of the books in the series were published after Larsson’s death. He passed away from a heart attack while climbing several flights of stairs, when he was just 50 years old.

94 Common April activity, nowadays : E-FILING

E-file: that’s certainly what I do with my tax return …

97 Vietnamese sandwich : BANH MI

The French introduced the baguette into Vietnam in the days the country was a French colony. Today, a single-serving baguette is known in Vietnam as “bánh mì” (meaning “wheat bread”). The term has been extended, particularly here in the US, to describe a Vietnamese sandwich.

100 Group trying to sack a QB : D-LINE

Defensive line (D-line)

104 A crowd, they say : THREE

105 It has 104-Down legs : EASEL

The word “easel” comes from an old Dutch word meaning “donkey”, would you believe? The idea is that an easel carries its load (an oil painting, say) just as a donkey would be made to carry a load.

110 Girl in “The Old Curiosity Shop” : NELL

“The Old Curiosity Shop” by Charles Dickens tells the story of 14-year-old “Little Nell” Trent and her grandfather who live in the Old Curiosity Shop in London. If you visit London, there actually is an “Old Curiosity Shop”, in Westminster. It is an establishment selling odds and ends, old curiosities, and is believed to have been the inspiration for the shop in the Dickens story. The building has been around since the 1500s, but the name “The Old Curiosity Shop” was added after the book was published.

111 sin/tan : COS

The most familiar trigonometric functions are sine, cosine and tangent (abbreviated to “sin, cos and tan”). Each of these is a ratio: a ratio of two sides of a right-angled triangle. The “reciprocal” of these three functions are cosecant, secant and cotangent. The reciprocal functions are simply the inverted ratios, the inverted sine, cosine and tangent. These inverted ratios should not be confused with the “inverse” trigonometric functions e.g. arcsine, arccosine and arctangent. These inverse functions are the reverse of the sine, cosine and tangent.

112 Major Japanese carrier : ANA

All Nippon Airways (ANA) is a Japanese airline, one that is now larger in size than the nation’s flag carrier Japan Airlines (JAL).

113 “Kill Bill” co-star : LIU

Lucy Liu is an actress from Queens, New York. Liu’s big break came when she was chosen to play the Ling Woo character in “Ally McBeal”. I liked her in the 2000 film “Charlie’s Angels” but as I am no fan of Quentin Tarantino, I did not enjoy the movie “Kill Bill”. I do enjoy one of Liu’s more recent projects in which she plays Joan Watson, one of the two lead characters in the TV crime drama “Elementary”.

“Kill Bill” is a 3-part Quentin Tarantino movie (I haven’t seen it, as I really don’t do Tarantino). “Kill Bill” started off as one film, but as the running time was over four hours, it was split into two “volumes”, released several months apart in 2003 and 2004. There has been a lot of talk about making “Kill Bill: Volume 3”.

114 You can chew on it : PAP

One use of the term “pap” is to describe soft or semi-liquid food for babies and small children. “Pap” comes into English, via French, from the Latin word used by children for “food”. In the 1500s, “pap” also came to mean “an oversimplified” idea. This gives us a usage that’s common today, describing literature or perhaps TV programming that lacks real value or substance. Hands up those who think there’s a lot of pap out there, especially on television …

115 Some appliances : GES

The General Electric Company is usually referred to simply as “GE”. One of the precursor companies to GE was Edison General Electric, founded in 1890 by the inventor Thomas Edison. What we know today as GE was formed two years later when Edison merged his company with Charles Coffin’s Thomson-Houston Electric Company. In 1896, GE was selected as one of the 12 companies listed on the newly formed Dow Jones Industrial Average. GE was the last of the original 12 to survive on that list, being replaced by Walgreens in 2018. I spent over ten years with GE at the beginning of my working career, and in fact it was GE that asked me to transfer to the US from Ireland back in the 1980s …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 What a drawbridge may bridge : MOAT
5 In that case : IF SO
9 Control tower installation : RADAR
14 Pass : ENACT
19 “That one’s ___” (“My bad”) : ON ME
20 Amelia Bedelia, e.g. : MAID
21 “Go me!” : I RULE!
22 Member of a noble family : XENON
23 2004 film about a group of MALIGNERS : MEAN GIRLS
25 It might be put on for stage PAGEANTRIES : GREASEPAINT
27 Annual film festival where “Saw” and “Get Out” premiered : SUNDANCE
28 “___ La La” (1964 hit) : SHA
29 Senator, e.g., for short : NHL’ER
30 Avoids a bogey, perhaps : PARS
31 Being : ENTITY
33 Be hopping mad : BOIL
34 Cool one : CAT
37 W.W. II hero, informally : IKE
39 Muletas are waved at them : TOROS
40 Canon camera : EOS
41 Branch of Islam : SHIA
42 You might be MARVELING AT this as it whizzes by : MAGLEV TRAIN
46 Sort of SCHEMATIC for Christian education : CATECHISM
48 Like some casts : ALL-STAR
49 City nicknamed “The Old Pueblo” : TUCSON
51 French city near the Belgian border : LILLE
52 Prefix with colonial : NEO-
53 Tight-fitting : SNUG
55 Toni Morrison title heroine : SULA
56 Annual British acting award : OLIVIER
58 Series of questions, maybe : EXAM
60 Counterpart of elles : ILS
62 Opposite of never : EACH TIME
64 Many relationships are INSTIGATED on one : DATING SITE
68 Healthy eaters may give this A WIDE BERTH : WHITE BREAD
72 Disrupt an online meeting, in a way : ZOOMBOMB
74 Mauna ___ : KEA
75 Grp. that hasn’t yet found what it’s looking for : SETI
76 Wonder Woman and others : AMAZONS
79 Valuable load for a mule : KILO
81 Influence : SWAY
84 Pioneering gangsta rap group : NWA
85 Burdened : LADEN
86 Just : MERELY
88 Preferring one’s own company, perhaps : ASOCIAL
90 They can be NOISELESS while stalking prey : LIONESSES
93 Explorers of the UNTRAVERSED : ADVENTURERS
95 Burden : ONUS
96 Old cable TV inits. : TNN
97 Fill in : BRIEF
98 Word repeated in “I ___, I ___, it’s off to work I go” : OWE
99 Lick, say : WET
100 “___ merci!” (French cry) : DIEU
101 “On it, captain!” : AYE, SIR
103 “No need to make me a plate” : I ATE
106 Five-letter word that replaces a four-letter word? : BLEEP
107 1980s gaming inits. : NES
108 Not even : LESS THAN
111 Writing done GRAPHICALLY : CALLIGRAPHY
115 The Trojans lacked the FORESIGHT to turn this down : GIFT HORSE
116 It’s multilayered : ONION
117 You should always bring it to a competition : A-GAME
118 Children’s author Blyton : ENID
119 Be taken aback : REEL
120 One way to cook a 116-Across : SAUTE
121 Unenthusiastic : TEPID
122 They know the drill: Abbr. : SGTS
123 Word after hard or before short : SELL

Down

1 “My Two ___” (2015 Claudia Harrington children’s book) : MOMS
2 Top : ONE-UP
3 Appliance brand since 1934 : AMANA
4 Pea shooters? : TENDRILS
5 “Sign me up!” : I’M IN!
6 Complete travesty : FARCE
7 Feature of many British accents : SILENT R
8 Binges too much, for short : ODS
9 As if orchestrated : RIGHT ON CUE
10 Indexed data structures : ARRAYS
11 Directly : DUE
12 Fourth person to walk on the moon : ALAN BEAN
13 Do a double take? : RESHOOT
14 Boot : EXPEL
15 Almost : NEAR
16 What makes Shrek shriek? : AN I
17 One side in a debate : CON
18 It may be blown : TNT
24 They may be blown : GASKETS
26 House Republican V.I.P. Stefanik : ELISE
28 Star in Canis Major : SIRIUS
32 Just so : TO A T
34 Hot dog topper : CHILI
35 Airline passenger request : AISLE
36 Lion ___ : TAMER
38 “Dear ___ Hansen” (2017 Tony-winning musical) : EVAN
41 Responds to br-r-r-isk weather? : SHIVERS
42 Like zebras and lions : MANED
43 Voice with an Echo : ALEXA
44 Rub it in : GLOAT
45 “It is what it is” and others : TRUISMS
46 Mike Krzyzewski, to Duke basketball fans : COACH K
47 Rise : CLIMB
50 Hot dog topper : SLAW
54 A little too silky, maybe : GLIB
56 Justin Trudeau, by birth : OTTAWAN
57 Don’t believe it! : LIE!
59 Aftmost masts on ships : MIZZENS
61 Gives fuel to : STOKES
63 Gets a move on, quaintly : HIES
65 Who can hear you scream in space : NO ONE
66 Ending with poly- : -GON
67 Title meaning “commander” : EMIR
69 “___ Meenie” (2010 hit) : EENIE
70 Battling : AT WAR
71 Rings up : DIALS
73 Showing the effects of an all-nighter, say : BLEARY-EYED
76 Give one’s blessing to : ALLOW
77 It has more coastline than California, surprisingly : MAINE
78 Score after seven points, maybe : AD OUT
80 Certain radio format : OLDIES
82 Apropos of : AS TO
83 “Like that’ll ever happen!” : YOU WISH!
86 “Appetizers” or “Desserts,” at a diner : MENU PAGE
87 International cosmetics company ___ Rocher : YVES
89 Content people? : CREATORS
91 Larsson who wrote “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” : STIEG
92 Pooh-pooh : SNEER AT
94 Common April activity, nowadays : E-FILING
97 Vietnamese sandwich : BANH MI
100 Group trying to sack a QB : D-LINE
102 Make over, as a ship : REFIT
104 A crowd, they say : THREE
105 It has 104-Down legs : EASEL
106 Obscure, with “out” : BLOT …
109 They may be set by industry grps. : STDS
110 Girl in “The Old Curiosity Shop” : NELL
111 sin/tan : COS
112 Major Japanese carrier : ANA
113 “Kill Bill” co-star : LIU
114 You can chew on it : PAP
115 Some appliances : GES

14 thoughts on “0822-21 NY Times Crossword 22 Aug 21, Sunday”

  1. 17:34. I got a bit bogged down on the west side, and for whatever reason LIONESSES took me a while to get. Fortunately for that one I eventually got enough surrounding fill that I could use the untaken letters from NOISELESS to figure it out.

  2. 47:53. Well, at least I finished it. Couldn’t hardly get started. Then struggled. Almost gave up. Finally finished up in the NE corner. Brain not working. 😔

  3. 46:24. Stumbled in a lot of places. Usually anagram themes stump me, but I recognized this one early. Eventually I used it to guess letters in the many MANY answers I didn’t know. Interesting puzzle in that sense – i.e. the answers are in the clues themselves.

    I’m a skeptic by nature so when I heard that MAINE has a longer coastline than California, I doubted it. Superficially, California has over 800 miles of coastline. MAINE has just over 200 miles of coastline. Of course, if you take into account all the scraggy inlets etc you can make a case that MAINE has a longer coastline.

    The problem with that is there is no definitive way of measuring coastlines. You can make a case that the coastline of Britain is millions of miles long if you could every nook, cranny, rock, down to a molecular level as a coastline. So ultimately you have to just arbitrarily define a “resolution” as to what you count as the coastline or you just say it’s infinite.

    There’s an 8 minute video on this page that explains it mathematically. It’s very well done. In the end, it’s like people who claim Utah is the largest state in the U.S. if you flattened it out. The same set of criteria applies – it all depends on how fine you measure.

    Interesting factoid in the puzzle, but it’s only “sorta” true under certain arbitrary mathematical conditions

    https://www.boston.com/news/local-news/2017/08/11/does-maine-really-have-more-shoreline-than-california/

    Best –

    1. That was an interesting video, thanks. Of course, being from Alaska, I claim the longest coastline/shoreline.😁

  4. 24:08. Realizing there were anagrams certainly helped. Contrary to @Tom, LIONESSES was the first one I unscrambled. I got hung up in the NE corner – wasn’t thinking of gases for the noble family, for example. I had a number of fat fingers that messed me up, so I “think” I could have finished a few minutes earlier if only I could type better.

  5. 28:01 after I “finished” by putting an “N” (making “EON” and “ELINE”) where I should have put an “S” (to make “EOS” and “ELISE”) and then spent about a second correcting it. Call it what you will … 🤨😳😜

  6. Don’t y’all, my 55:47 has you all beat! NW was the last to fall, otherwise just attribute it to my traditionally slow self.

  7. A really tough and interesting puzzle. I had never heard of BANH MI, but being a lover of sandwiches (more of the Dagwood variety) I will have to try one.

    Bill, thank you so much for hosting this site and putting in so much time and effort; I thoroughly enjoy it. Just wondering… Why ZOOM BOMB was in with the themed answers answers. A simple oversight, I imagine.

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