0906-20 NY Times Crossword 6 Sep 20, Sunday

Constructed by: David Kwong
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Could You Repeat That Number?

Themed answers all have double-digit clues (and one triple-digit), and so we must prefix those clues with “DOUBLE” (or “TRIPLE”):

  • 11A (Double) Dutch requirements : ROPES
  • 22A (Double) Result, maybe, in brief : RBI
  • 33A (Double) 07 film : YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE
  • 44A (Double) U preceder : VEE
  • 55A (Double) Day competitor : LITTLE BROWN AND COMPANY
  • 66A (Double) “Fantasy” Grammy winner : ONO
  • 77A (Double) Play combo of old : TINKER TO EVERS TO CHANCE
  • 88A (Double) Dealers do this : LIE
  • 99A (Double) Tree alternative : INTERCONTINENTAL
  • 111A (Triple) A suggestion : RTE

Bill’s time: 43m 33s!

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11 (Double) Dutch requirements : ROPES

Double Dutch is a skipping game that uses two jump ropes that are turned in opposite directions.

16 Evan : Welsh :: ___ : Scottish : IAN

The name “John” translates into Scottish as “Ian”, into Russian as “Ivan”, into Italian as “Giovanni”, into Spanish as “Juan”, into Welsh as “Evan”, and into Irish as “Seán”.

19 One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” : IRINA

Olga, Masha and Irina are the “Three Sisters” in the play by Anton Chekhov. The three title characters were inspired by the three Brontë sisters, the English authors.

20 Hunter of myth : ORION

According to Greek mythology, Orion was a giant hunter who was placed in the night sky by Zeus, the king of the gods. Orion is very recognizable as a constellation, especially with the three bright stars known as “Orion’s Belt”. The brightest star in the sky, Sirius, is said to be Orion’s hunting dog, and this star sits at Orion’s “foot”.

22 (Double) Result, maybe, in brief : RBI

Run batted in (RBI)

24 Japanese comics style : MANGA

The Japanese word “manga” means “whimsical pictures” and is an apt term to describe the Japanese style of comic book. Manga publications are more diverse than American comic books and have a larger audience. Manga cover many subjects including romance, sports, business, horror, and mystery.

25 Labor Day baby, e.g. : VIRGO

The astrological sign of Virgo is associated with the constellation of the same name. The Virgo constellation is related to maidens (virgins), purity and fertility.

Labor Day is a federal holiday observed every year on the first Monday in September. The tradition of honoring workers with a holiday started in Boston in 1878, when a day of observance was organized by the Central Labor Union, the major trade union at the time. There was a bloody dispute in 1894 between labor unions and the railroads called the Pullman Strike, which led to the death of some workers when the US Military and US Marshals were instructed to maintain order. President Grover Cleveland submitted a “Labor Day” bill to Congress which was signed into law just six days after the end of the strike. The introduction of a federal holiday to honor the worker was a move designed to promote reconciliation between management and unions after the bitter conflict.

30 Writer Tarbell who took on Standard Oil : IDA

Ida Tarbell was a teacher and what we would call today an “investigative journalist”, although back in her day she was known as a “muckraker”. Her most famous work is her 1904 book “The History of the Standard Oil Company”. It is an exposé that is credited with hastening the breakup of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil in 1911.

31 Pins are placed at the end of them : LANES

Bowling has been around for an awfully long time. The oldest known reference to the game is in Egypt, where pins and balls were found in an ancient tomb that is over 5,000 years old. The first form of the game to come to America was nine-pin bowling, which had been very popular in Europe for centuries. In 1841 in Connecticut, nine-pin bowling was banned due to its association with gambling. Supposedly, an additional pin was added to get around the ban, and ten-pin bowling was born.

37 Some E.M.T. cases : ODS

Overdose (OD)

41 Count in music : BASIE

“Count” Basie’s real given name was “William”. Count Basie perhaps picked up his love for the piano from his mother, who played and gave him his first lessons. Basie’s first paying job as a musician was in a movie theater, where he learned to improvise a suitable accompaniment for the silent movies that were being shown. Basie was given the nickname “Count” as he became lauded as one of the so-called “Jazz royalty”. Others so honored are Nat “King” Cole and Duke Ellington.

53 Maven : WIZ

I’ve always loved the term “maven”, which is another word for “expert”. Maven comes into English from the Yiddish “meyvn” describing someone who appreciates and is a connoisseur.

62 Bailiwicks : AREAS

“Bailiwick” is a word dating back to the mid-1600s. The term originally meant “district of a bailiff”.

64 Chief Chirpa and others, in sci-fi : EWOKS

The Ewoks are creatures that live on the moon of Endor in the “Star Wars” universe. First appearing in “Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi”, they’re the cute and cuddly little guys that look like teddy bears.

66 “(Double) Fantasy” Grammy winner : ONO

“Double Fantasy” is an album released by John Lennon and Yoko Ono on 17 November 1980. Three weeks later, John Lennon was gunned down by Mark Chapman outside Lennon’s apartment building in New York City.

76 Grammy-winning country singer Black : CLINT

Clint Black is a country music singer. Black was born in New Jersey, but grew up in Texas.

77 (Double) Play combo of old : TINKER TO EVERS TO CHANCE

“Baseball’s Sad Lexicon” is a poem written by Franklin Pierce Adams in 1910

These are the saddest of possible words:
“Tinker to Evers to Chance.”
Trio of bear cubs, and fleeter than birds,
Tinker and Evers and Chance.
Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble,
Making a Giant hit into a double –
Words that are heavy with nothing but trouble:
“Tinker to Evers to Chance.”

83 Mark ___, winner of the 1998 Masters : O’MEARA

Mark O’Meara is an American golfer from Goldsboro, North Carolina. He is known as one of the American players who competes in international tournaments more than most, and has a reputation as a real gentleman all around the world.

84 George Carlin was its first host, for short : SNL

The first seven hosts of “Saturday Night Live” (in 1975) were

  1. George Carlin
  2. Paul Simon
  3. Rob Reiner
  4. Candice Bergen
  5. Robert Klein
  6. Lily Tomlin
  7. Richard Pryor

George Carlin was a stand-up comic famous for pushing the envelope of comedy in the broadcast media. Despite all the controversies surrounding his act, his passing in 2008 occasioned major tributes by networks and fellow entertainers alike.

85 State capital on the Colorado River : AUSTIN

Austin is the capital of the state of Texas. When the area was chosen to be the capital of the Republic of Texas, it was known as Waterloo. The name was changed in honor of Stephen F. Austin, a native of Virginia who was raised in Missouri and led the first successful colonization of Texas.

86 Subject of Newton’s first law of motion : INERTIA

Newton’s first law of motion states that a body that is moving maintains the same velocity unless it is acted upon by an external force. That resistance to changing velocity is known as “inertia”.

92 QB’s pass: Abbr. : ATT

In football, one statistic (stat) used to track the performance of a quarterback (QB) is attempts (ATT).

93 “___ to My Socks,” Pablo Neruda poem : ODE

“Odes to Common Things” is a collection of poems by Chilean poet Pablo Neruda. Included in the list of 25 odes is “Ode to the Table”, “Ode to the Dog”, Ode to the Artichoke” and “Ode to French Fries”.

“Pablo Neruda” was the pen name, and eventually the legal name, used by Chilean writer Neftali Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Basoalto chose the name as an homage to Czech poet Jan Neruda.

94 Larsson who wrote “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” : STIEG

Stieg Larsson was a Swedish journalist and writer. Indeed, one of the main characters in his “Millennium” series of novels is a journalist as well. The first two titles in the series are “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” and “The Girl Who Played with Fire”. The last of the three titles in the Millennium series is “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest”, which was the most-sold book in the US in 2010. All of the books in the series were published after Larsson’s death. He passed away from a heart attack while climbing several flights of stairs, when he was just 50 years old.

96 Additionally : TO BOOT

The noun “boot” was used once to describe something of advantage in trying to accomplish a goal. This obsolete term really only exists in the adverb “to boot” meaning “in addition, over and above”, literally “to advantage”.

103 Kind of salami : GENOA

Genoa salami is made using preservation techniques that originated in ancient Rome.

105 N.Y.C.’s first subway line : IRT

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the original private operator of the New York Subway when it opened in 1904. The city took over ownership of the system in 1940, but the lines originally operated by the IRT are still known by the IRT moniker.

111 (Triple) A suggestion : RTE

Route (rte.)

The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

112 World capital whose name comes from the Greek for “wisdom” : SOFIA

Sofia is the capital of Bulgaria. Natives pronounce the name “Sofia” with the emphasis on the “o”, while the rest of us tend to stress the “i”. Bulgarians do agree with us though when it comes to the girl’s name “Sofia”, then they stress the “i” like we do!

116 Jazz composer with an Egyptian-inspired name : SUN RA

“Sun Ra” was the stage name of jazz composer and performer Herman Blount. Sun Ra was a bit “out there”, and claimed that he wasn’t from Earth, but rather was of the Angel Race from the planet Saturn.

118 “Elements of Algebra” author, 1770 : EULER

Leonhard Euler was a brilliant Swiss mathematician and physicist, and a pioneer in the fields of logarithms and graph theory. Euler’s eyesight deteriorated during his working life, and eventually became almost totally blind.

119 First lady of the 1950s : MAMIE

Mamie Eisenhower was surely one of the most charming of all the First Ladies of the United States. Ms. Eisenhower suffered from an inner ear complaint called Ménière’s disease which caused her to lose her balance quite often. Because she was unsteady on her feet there were unfounded rumors floating around Washington that Ms. Eisenhower had a drinking problem. People can be very unkind …

121 Rapper with the 2003 hit “I Can” : NAS

Rapper Nas used to go by an earlier stage name “Nasty Nas”, and before that by his real name “Nasir bin Olu Dara Jones”. Nas released his first album “Illmatic” in 1994, and inventively titled his fifth studio album “Stillmatic”, released in 2001. Not my cup of tea, I would say …

122 “Judge ___” (1995 Stallone movie) : DREDD

The 1995 movie “Judge Dredd”, starring Sylvester Stallone in the title role, was loosely based on the comic book character of the same name. Judge Dredd may be an American hero from the future in an American city, but the comic is written and published in the UK.

Down

1 Tower over the field : SILO

“Silo” is a Spanish word that we absorbed into English. The term ultimately derives from the Greek “siros”, which described a pit in which one kept corn.

2 Sci-fi film with vehicles called “light cycles” : TRON

Released in 1982, Disney’s “Tron” was one of the first mainstream films to make extensive use of computer graphics. The main role in the movie is played by Jeff Bridges. The original spawned a 2010 sequel called “Tron: Legacy”, as well as a 2012 TV show called “Tron: Uprising”.

4 Prone to fidgeting : ANTSY

The word “antsy” embodies the concept of “having ants in one’s pants”, meaning being nervous and fidgety. However, “antsy” has been used in English since the 1830s, whereas “ants in the pants” originated a century later.

5 Some 1990s Toyotas : PASEOS

The Paseo is a compact car sold in the US by Toyota from 1991 to 1997. “Paseo” is Spanish for “walk, stroll”.

6 American fashion designer who once served as the creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent : TOM FORD

Tom Ford is a fashion designer, as well as a successful film director. Ford’s designs are credited with almost doubling the sales of Gucci in the mid-nineties. Ford launched his own film production company in 2005, and made his directorial debut with the 2009 movie “A Single Man” starring Colin Firth and Julianne Moore.

7 ___ pro nobis : ORA

“Ora pro nobis” translates from Latin as “pray for us”. It is a common phrase used in the Roman Catholic tradition and is often shortened to “OPN”.

9 Gets one over on : BOGEYS

The golfing term “bogey” originated at the Great Yarmouth Golf Club in England in 1890, and was used to indicate a total round that was one-over-par (and not one-over-par on a particular hole, as it is today). The name “bogey” came from a music hall song of the time “Here Comes the Bogeyman”. In the following years it became popular for players trying to stay at par to be “playing against Colonel Bogey”. Then, during WWI, the marching tune “Colonel Bogey” was written and named after the golfing term. If you don’t recognize the name of the tune, it’s the one that’s whistled by the soldiers marching in the great movie “The Bridge on the River Kwai”.

12 Rust and quartz : OXIDES

Rust is iron oxide. Rust forms when iron oxidizes, reacts with oxygen.

Quartz is a form of silicon oxide and is the second most abundant mineral found in the Earth’s crust, after feldspar. The name “quartz” comes into English via German, and probably ultimately derives from a Slavic word meaning “hard”.

13 Equity valuation stat : P/E RATIO

The P/E (price-to-earnings) ratio of a stock is the stock’s price compared to the earnings of the company per share (EPS). The idea behind the P/E ratio is that a stock with a relatively low P/E is usually a good buy, an indicator that the stock price should rise on the strength of solid earnings.

14 Tiny bit of work : ERG

An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, with one joule comprising 10 million ergs. It has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off. The term comes from “ergon”, the Greek word for work.

15 Vodka brand, informally : STOLI

Stolichnaya is a brand of “Russian” vodka made from wheat and rye grain. “Stoli” originated in Russia, but now it’s made in Latvia. Latvia is of course a completely different country, so you won’t see the word “Russian” on the label anymore.

16 She gained fame from her leading role in “Fame” : IRENE CARA

“Fame” is a 1980 musical film that follows students at New York’s High School of Performing Arts. Irene Cara sings the hugely successful theme song “Fame”, and stars as one of the students. Cara had in fact attended the High School of Performing Arts in real life. The movie “Fame” was so successful that it led to a spinoff TV series, stage shows and a 2009 remake.

18 ___ Lofgren, guitarist for the E Street Band : NILS

The musician Nils Lofgren was a member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band for over 25 years. Lofgren provided vocals and played guitar, and was hired as the replacement for Steven Van Zandt.

28 Wolflike : LUPINE

The term “lupine” means “wolf-like”, coming from the Latin “lupus” meaning “wolf”.

35 Spanish resort island : IBIZA

Ibiza is a Mediterranean island located almost 100 miles off the Spanish coast. It is a very popular tourist destination, largely for its legendary nightlife.

38 Actor who won a 2016 Presidential Medal of Freedom : DE NIRO

Robert De Niro is noted for his longtime and highly successful collaboration with the director Martin Scorsese, in such films as “Taxi Driver” (1976), “Raging Bull” (1980), “Goodfellas” (1990) and “Casino” (1995). De Niro is also noted for his commitment as a method actor. Famously, he gained a full 60 pounds in order to play Jake Lamotta in “Raging Bull”.

43 Wilson of “Meet the Parents” : OWEN

Actor Owen Wilson was nominated for an Oscar, but not for his acting. He was nominated for co-writing the screenplay for “The Royal Tenenbaums” along with Wes Anderson.

“Meet the Parents” is a funny comedy released in 2000, starring Robert De Niro and Ben Stiller. “Meet the Parents” is actually a remake of a 1992 independent comedy film of the same name that enjoyed much less success.

51 Greek H’s : ETAS

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

52 Golfer Ernie : ELS

Ernie Els is a South African golfer. He is a big guy but he has an easy fluid golf swing that has earned him the nickname “The Big Easy”. Els is a former World No. 1 and has won four majors: the US Open (1994 & 1997) and the British Open (2002 & 2012).

53 It ended on Nov. 11, 1918 : WWI

Veterans Day used to be known as Armistice Day, and is observed on November 11th each year. This particular date was chosen as the Armistice that ended WWI was signed on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918.

57 Laundry soap since 1908 : RINSO

Rinso was a laundry detergent that was first manufactured in England in 1908 by a company called Hudson’s Soap. It was introduced into the US in 1918. In America, Rinso took to radio advertising and sponsorship in the days of “soap operas”. Their most famous program association was with “The Amos ‘n’ Andy Show” in the forties. One of the brand’s slogans was “Solium, the sunlight ingredient”. I have no idea what Solium is, but it certainly did sell a lot of soap!

58 “___, all ye faithful” : O COME

The lovely Christmas hymn “Adeste Fideles” (entitled “O Come, All Ye Faithful” in English) was written by one John Francis Wade in the 13th century. Well, he wrote the original four verses, with four more verses being added over time. A kind blog reader pointed out to me that the English translation is in fact a little “off”. The term “adeste” best translates from Latin as “be present, attend”, rather than “come”. The verb “come” appears later in the lyrics in “venite adoremus”, meaning “come, let us worship”.

59 Classic fruity sodas : NEHIS

Claude A. Hatcher ran a grocery store in Columbus, Georgia. He decided to develop his own soft drink formula when he balked at the price his store was being charged for Coca-Cola syrup. Hatcher launched the Union Bottling Works in his own grocery store, and introduced Royal Crown Ginger Ale in 1905. The Union Bottling Works was renamed to Chero-Cola in 1910, the Nehi Corporation in 1925, and Royal Crown Company in the mid-fifties. The first RC Cola hit the market in 1934.

71 Surgical inserts : STENTS

In the world of surgical medicine, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, in order to reduce the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

72 Painter José María ___ : SERT

José Maria Sert was a painter of murals from Catalan. He was a good friend of fellow-artist Salvador Dali.

75 Something to bookmark : URL

An Internet address (like NYXCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a Uniform Resource Locator (URL).

80 Lead singer of rock’s Yeah Yeah Yeahs (who uses just the initial of her last name) : KAREN O

Karen O is the stage name of singer and musician Karen Orzolek. Karen O is the singer and pianist of the New York-based indie band Yeah Yeah Yeahs.

81 Churchill’s trademark gesture : V-SIGN

One has to be careful making that V-sign depending where you are in the world. Where I came from, the V-for-victory (or peace) sign has to be made with the palm facing outwards. If the sign is made with the palm facing inwards, it can be interpreted as a very obscene gesture.

82 Author born Truman Streckfus Persons : CAPOTE

The larger-than-life Truman “Tru” Capote was an author and comedian. Capote is perhaps most associated with his novella “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and his true crime novel “In Cold Blood”. Truman Capote grew up in Monroeville, Alabama. There he met, and became lifelong friends with, fellow novelist Harper Lee. Capote was the inspiration for the character “Dill” in Lee’s celebrated work “To Kill a Mockingbird”. In turn, Harper Lee was the inspiration for the character “Idabel” in Capote’s “Other Voices, Other Rooms”.

88 Ballet attire : LEOTARD

The garment known as a leotard was named for French trapeze artist Jules Léotard. Léotard wore such a garment when he was performing.

90 “The Simpsons” grandpa : ABE

In the animated TV show called “The Simpsons”, Grampa Abe Simpson is voiced by Dan Castellaneta, the same actor who provides the voice for Homer.

91 “More of the ___” (1967 #1 album) : MONKEES

The Monkees pop group was assembled in 1966 specifically for a planned television series called “The Monkees”. The show aired from 1966 to 1968, and the band continued to perform in concerts until 1970. 20 years after the band was formed, there was a revival in interest for both the show and the band’s music, so the Monkees got together for several reunion tours. The lead singer of the group was Englishman Davy Jones, who passed away in February 2012.

95 Weepy 1954 Patti Page hit : I CRIED

“Patti Page” is the stage name of Clara Ann Fowler, the best-selling female artist in the 1950s. Patti Page’s signature song is “Tennessee Waltz”, a big hit for her that spent 13 weeks at number one in the charts in 1950. She also had a number one with “(How Much Is That) Doggie in the Window” in 1953.

96 Haberdasher’s clasp : TIE BAR

Back in the 14th century, a haberdasher was a dealer in small wares. By the late 1800s, the term had evolved to mean a purveyor of menswear, and in particular was associated with the sale of hats.

97 Of the ankle : TARSAL

The tarsals (also “tarsi”) are the ankle bones, and are equivalent to the carpals in the wrist.

100 Stunned, in a way : TASED

To tase is to use a taser, a stun gun.

104 Jazz’s James : ETTA

“Etta James” was the stage name of celebrated blues and soul singer Jamesetta Hawkins. James’ most famous recording was her 1960 hit “At Last”, which made it into the pop charts. James performed “At Last” at the age of 71 in 2009 on the reality show “Dancing with the Stars”, which was to be her final television appearance. She passed away in 2012.

108 Condo, e.g. : UNIT

The terms “condominium” and “apartment” tend to describe the same type of residential property, namely a private living space with facilities shared with others residing in the same building or complex. The difference is that a condominium is usually owned, and an apartment is rented. At least that’s how it is in the US. The word “condominium” comes from the Latin “com-” (together) and “dominum” (right of ownership).

109 Kaffiyeh wearer : ARAB

The kaffiyeh is a traditional headdress worn by Arab men and some Kurds. The kaffiyeh is fashioned from a square scarf usually made from cotton. The headdress takes its name from the city of Kufa. Although it has been worn for over a century, the kaffiyeh gained prominence when it was adopted by Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat.

110 Christmas tree hanging : CANE

Apparently, candy canes were created at the behest of the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral in Germany in 1672. The sweet sticks were basically used as bribes to keep children quiet during services. The choirmaster specified that the candy sticks should have a crook at the top so that they reminded the children of the three shepherds who visited the infant Jesus just after his birth.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Part of a backpack : STRAP
6 Pyramids, often : TOMBS
11 (Double) Dutch requirements : ROPES
16 Evan : Welsh :: ___ : Scottish : IAN
19 One of Chekhov’s “Three Sisters” : IRINA
20 Hunter of myth : ORION
21 Bring to bear : EXERT
22 (Double) Result, maybe, in brief : RBI
23 Many apartments in old warehouse districts : LOFTS
24 Japanese comics style : MANGA
25 Labor Day baby, e.g. : VIRGO
26 Shape formed by an extended thumb and index fingers : ELL
27 Good person to believe in : ONESELF
29 Switz. neighbor : GER
30 Writer Tarbell who took on Standard Oil : IDA
31 Pins are placed at the end of them : LANES
33 (Double) 07 film : YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE
37 Some E.M.T. cases : ODS
40 Buying binges : SPREES
41 Count in music : BASIE
42 Logical start? : ECO-
44 (Double) U preceder : VEE
45 Picked from a lineup, informally : IDED
46 Hurt : AIL
47 Proverbs : OLD SAWS
50 Like puppeteers, usually : UNSEEN
53 Maven : WIZ
54 Leafy crown material : LAUREL
55 (Double) Day competitor : LITTLE BROWN AND COMPANY
62 Bailiwicks : AREAS
63 Legal : LICIT
64 Chief Chirpa and others, in sci-fi : EWOKS
65 Wastes away : ROTS
66 “(Double) Fantasy” Grammy winner : ONO
67 Cool, in old slang : HEP
68 “The way things are currently going …” : AS IS
72 Muscle problem : SPASM
74 Muscular : BUILT
76 Grammy-winning country singer Black : CLINT
77 (Double) Play combo of old : TINKER TO EVERS TO CHANCE
83 Mark ___, winner of the 1998 Masters : O’MEARA
84 George Carlin was its first host, for short : SNL
85 State capital on the Colorado River : AUSTIN
86 Subject of Newton’s first law of motion : INERTIA
88 (Double) Dealers do this : LIE
89 Have an in-tents experience? : CAMP
92 QB’s pass: Abbr. : ATT
93 “___ to My Socks,” Pablo Neruda poem : ODE
94 Larsson who wrote “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” : STIEG
96 Additionally : TO BOOT
98 Deletes, with “out” : XES
99 (Double) Tree alternative : INTERCONTINENTAL
103 Kind of salami : GENOA
105 N.Y.C.’s first subway line : IRT
106 Like some gas: Abbr. : REG
107 “Big Sur” novelist, 1962 : KEROUAC
111 (Triple) A suggestion : RTE
112 World capital whose name comes from the Greek for “wisdom” : SOFIA
114 Humble : ABASE
116 Jazz composer with an Egyptian-inspired name : SUN RA
117 “___ your call” : IT’S
118 “Elements of Algebra” author, 1770 : EULER
119 First lady of the 1950s : MAMIE
120 Kind of pear that resembles an apple : ASIAN
121 Rapper with the 2003 hit “I Can” : NAS
122 “Judge ___” (1995 Stallone movie) : DREDD
123 ___ and curl (salon treatment) : PRESS
124 Not interfere with : LET BE

Down

1 Tower over the field : SILO
2 Sci-fi film with vehicles called “light cycles” : TRON
3 Loaded (with) : RIFE
4 Prone to fidgeting : ANTSY
5 Some 1990s Toyotas : PASEOS
6 American fashion designer who once served as the creative director at Gucci and Yves Saint Laurent : TOM FORD
7 ___ pro nobis : ORA
8 Mixed together : MINGLED
9 Gets one over on : BOGEYS
10 Junkyard warning, maybe : SNARL
11 Play back? : REVIVAL
12 Rust and quartz : OXIDES
13 Equity valuation stat : P/E RATIO
14 Tiny bit of work : ERG
15 Vodka brand, informally : STOLI
16 She gained fame from her leading role in “Fame” : IRENE CARA
17 Having the means : ABLE
18 ___ Lofgren, guitarist for the E Street Band : NILS
28 Wolflike : LUPINE
32 Great two-pair poker hand : ACES UP
34 Once called : NEE
35 Spanish resort island : IBIZA
36 “Sure, I guess …” : WELL, OK …
37 Relating to egg cells : OVULAR
38 Actor who won a 2016 Presidential Medal of Freedom : DE NIRO
39 Six-line verse : SESTET
43 Wilson of “Meet the Parents” : OWEN
46 Colloquial contraction : AIN’T
48 Stops up : DAMS
49 Surreptitious : SLY
51 Greek H’s : ETAS
52 Golfer Ernie : ELS
53 It ended on Nov. 11, 1918 : WWI
56 Swell up : BLOAT
57 Laundry soap since 1908 : RINSO
58 “___, all ye faithful” : O COME
59 Classic fruity sodas : NEHIS
60 Occupied, with “in” : DWELT …
61 Accept as charged : COP TO
68 “How sad!” : ALAS!
69 Liquor levy, e.g. : SIN TAX
70 Provoke : INCITE
71 Surgical inserts : STENTS
72 Painter José María ___ : SERT
73 Kind words : PRAISE
74 “Va ___” (Italian “All right”) : BENE
75 Something to bookmark : URL
76 Film director Jon : CHU
77 You, to Yves : TOI
78 “___ doctor, but …” : I’M NO
79 Trait of a clingy romantic partner : NEEDINESS
80 Lead singer of rock’s Yeah Yeah Yeahs (who uses just the initial of her last name) : KARENO
81 Churchill’s trademark gesture : V-SIGN
82 Author born Truman Streckfus Persons : CAPOTE
87 Not much at all : A TRIFLE
88 Ballet attire : LEOTARD
89 Pig in a poke or pigeon drop : CON GAME
90 “The Simpsons” grandpa : ABE
91 “More of the ___” (1967 #1 album) : MONKEES
95 Weepy 1954 Patti Page hit : I CRIED
96 Haberdasher’s clasp : TIE BAR
97 Of the ankle : TARSAL
100 Stunned, in a way : TASED
101 Walk heavily : TRAMP
102 Contemptible sort : LOUSE
103 Toothy smile : GRIN
104 Jazz’s James : ETTA
108 Condo, e.g. : UNIT
109 Kaffiyeh wearer : ARAB
110 Christmas tree hanging : CANE
113 Just between us? : OUR
115 Family nickname : SIS

10 thoughts on “0906-20 NY Times Crossword 6 Sep 20, Sunday”

  1. 36:30 with one lookup. Struggled in the SE corner and upper area around 6A, 20A, and 24A. Did not get the theme at all until coming here. Got 33A early, and kept looking for twice, double, or two in the answers, not (Double) “hidden” in the clues. So even tho a number of things were right, they didn’t quite make sense to me. Thus, my overwrites are too numerous to list.

    Uncharacteristically, it seems that Bill struggled as well.

  2. 49:21. I struggled to get traction on this today. Glad to see I wasn’t the only one. I was out of sync this whole week. Maybe next week will be better.

  3. 30:42, no errors. Did it last night, got all the theme entries from crosses, and had no idea what the gimmick was until after I finished, went looking for an explanation, and found a “Wordplay” article about it. A strange and wonderful puzzle … 😜.

    Later on, I did Evan Birnholz’s crossword in the Washington Post, a 27×23 monster that took me 40:18 to finish, with no errors. Definitely another strange and wonderful puzzle. There’s a weird vibe in the crossword universe today … 😜.

    1. I also did the Birnholz puzzle, in 37:33, and it also seemed strange as I fumbled my way thru. Has unusual top-to-bottom symmetry. And then looking at the circles around the edges they spell IDRIS ELBA and LUTHER. Turns out that Elba’s B-day is today Sep 6 and he played a character Luther in a BBC series (I’m unaware of that). Not to mention that each of the answers around the edge are proper names. I looked up a few, but none of them has a Sep 6 B-day.

      The LAT puzzle seems the most straightforward of the 3 I’ve done today.

      1. @Ron F … See the clue for 94-Across (“With 95-Across, NBA star born on Sept. 6, and a hint to this puzzle’s edges”). And, believe it or not, even with the help of the “Word Play” article, I just now figured out the relevance of the answer (“JOHN WALL”) to all of the surnames around the edges of the puzzle. (Consider the first names of the people having those surnames!) Idris Elba’s only (?) connection is that he was also born on Sept. 6 and the name of the (BBC?) series he’s starring in has no relevance that I can think of (but the whole puzzle has me so off-balance that I could simply be missing something else that should have been obvious!)

        1. Thanks – with your hint I also realized that the first name of all those surnames is John. All the more impressive construction!!

  4. 1:07:35 This one just left me in the dust. If not for the crosses, I never would have even solved the puzzle. Figured out the “double oh seven” answer, but it was no help in figuring out the rest of the themed answers…this was about as much fun as my current project of trying to convert MOV files to MP4, or at least something useful….

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