0107-19 NY Times Crossword 7 Jan 19, Monday

Constructed by: Andrew Kingsley
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): Pat to Put, Nat to Nut

Themed answers are paired. On the left side of the grid, themed answers start with a vowel progression PAT through PUT. On the right side of the grid, themed answers start with a vowel progression NAT through NUT:

  • 17A. Five-time N.B.A. championship-winning coach with the Lakers and the Heat : PAT RILEY
  • 24A. Garfield, to Jon Arbuckle : PET CAT
  • 37A. Casino floor V.I.P. : PIT BOSS
  • 51A. Road hazards that need filling : POTHOLES
  • 60A. Peeved : PUT OUT
  • 19A. Cable channel with many science shows, familiarly : NAT GEO
  • 27A. Notable statistic for Jeff Bezos or Bill Gates : NET WORTH
  • 40A. Make tiny criticisms : NITPICK
  • 54A. “Be patient!” : NOT YET!
  • 62A. Dessert loaf : NUT BREAD

Bill’s time: 5m 30s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. ___ San Lucas (Baja resort city) : CABO

Cabo San Lucas is a major tourist destination at the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico. “Cabo” is sometimes referred to as the “Fort Lauderdale of Mexico”.

5. Chew the fat : GAB

Back in the day, a wealthy man would “bring home the bacon”, and sit around with guests “chewing the fat”.

15. Pitcher’s stat : ERA

Earned run average (ERA)

16. “Uncle!” : ENOUGH!

“To say uncle” is an American expression meaning “to submit, yield”. Its usage dates back to the early 1900s, but nobody seems to know how “uncle!” came to mean “stop!”

17. Five-time N.B.A. championship-winning coach with the Lakers and the Heat : PAT RILEY

Pat Riley is a former professional basketball player and NBA head coach. Off the court, Riley is quite the celebrity and is noted as a snappy dresser. He is friend of Giorgio Armani and wears Armani suits at all his games. Riley even modeled suits at an Armani fashion show.

19. Cable channel with many science shows, familiarly : NAT GEO

The National Geographic Channel (Nat Geo) is jointly owned by Fox and the National Geographic Society, and was launched in 2001.

24. Garfield, to Jon Arbuckle : PET CAT

Jon Arbuckle is a fictional character, and the owner of Odie from Jim Davis’s comic strip “Garfield”. Garfield is Arbuckle’s orange tabby cat. Odie is his less-than-smart beagle.

27. Notable statistic for Jeff Bezos or Bill Gates : NET WORTH

Jeff Bezos is the founder and CEO of Amazon.com, a company that he set up in his garage in 1994. Bezos used some of the fortune that he made with Amazon to purchase “The Washington Post” in 2013.

Bill Gates is the former CEO of Microsoft, a company that he co-founded with Paul Allen. Gates has been listed as the wealthiest man in the world on several occasion over the past two decades. He now works full-time as co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, alongside his wife Melinda. The Gates’ foundation is the largest transparently-operated charitable foundation in the world.

30. Prosciutto, e.g. : CURED HAM

The word “prosciutto” is used in Italian to mean “ham”, however it is prepared. In English, we use the word to describe the dry-cured ham that is served raw, in thin slices. Apparently, prosciutto can be made out of the meat from the leg of a pig, or from the thigh of a wild horse!

32. Physicians, for short : MDS

One might find a medical doctor (MD) in an operating room (OR).

34. Mountain overlooking Tokyo : FUJI

Mount Fuji is Japan’s highest and most famous mountain. It is an active volcano situated just west of Tokyo.

37. Casino floor V.I.P. : PIT BOSS

The pit is part of a casino that usually holds the tables for craps, blackjack and roulette, and perhaps some other games. The tables are arranged around the pit, with players on the outside and dealers on the inside. The area is supervised by a pit manager (often “pit boss”).

45. ___ tai (cocktail) : MAI

The mai tai cocktail is strongly associated with the Polynesian islands, but the drink was supposedly invented in 1944 in Trader Vic’s restaurant in Oakland, California. One recipe is 6 parts white rum, 3 parts orange curaçao, 3 parts Orgeat syrup, 1 part rock candy syrup, 2 parts fresh lime juice, all mixed with ice and then a float added of 6 parts dark rum. “Maita’i” is the Tahitian word for “good”.

46. Bygone monthly for the 12-to-20 set : TEEN BEAT

“Teen Beat” was a fan magazine geared towards teenagers that was published from 1967 to 2007. It was a follow-on publication to “16 Magazine” that was launched in 1956, and “Tiger Beat” launched in 1965.

50. “The A-Team” actor with a mohawk : MR T

Mr. T’s real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie “Rocky III”. In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, “No, I don’t hate Balboa, but I pity the fool”. He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called “I Pity the Fool”, and produced a motivational video called “Be Somebody … or Be Somebody’s Fool!”.

“The A-Team” is an action television series that originally ran in the eighties. The A-Team was a group of ex-US special forces personnel who became mercenaries. Star of the show was Hollywood actor George Peppard (as “Hannibal” Smith), ably assisted by Mr. T (as “B.A.” Baracus) and Robert Vaughn (as Hunt Stockwell).

Here is another example of a difference in terminology on either side of the Atlantic. What we call the Mohawk hairstyle in the US is known as a Mohican in the British Isles. The Mohawk hairstyle is named after the Mohawk nation, who wore their hair in the same fashion. The Mohawk style has been around for a long time elsewhere in the world. There was a well-preserved male body found in a bog near Dublin in Ireland in 2003. The body is about 2,000 years old, and has the Mohawk haircut.

56. “Your turn,” on a walkie-talkie : OVER

The more formal name for a walkie-talkie is “handheld transceiver”. A walkie-talkie is a handheld, two-way radio, and a device first developed for military use during WWII by Motorola (although others developed similar designs soon after). The first walkie-talkie was portable, but large. It was back-mounted and was carried around the battlefield by a radio officer.

66. Cheap cigar, slangily : EL ROPO

“El ropo” is American slang not only for a cheap cigar, but also for a cannabis cigarette, so I am told …

67. CBS forensics franchise : CSI

The “CSI” franchise of TV shows has been tremendously successful, but has finally wound down. “CSI: Miami” (the “worst” of the franchise, I think) was cancelled in 2012 after ten seasons. “CSI: NY” (the “best” of the franchise) was cancelled in 2013 after nine seasons. The original “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”, set in Las Vegas, hung in there until 2015 when it ended with a two-hour TV movie. The youngest show in the series was “CSI: Cyber”. It lasted for two seasons, before being canceled in 2016.

68. Midwife’s delivery : BABY

A midwife is someone trained to assist women in childbirth. The term comes from Middle English “mid wif” meaning “with woman”.

70. “I know what you’re thinking” feeling, for short : ESP

Extrasensory perception (ESP)

71. First word in a fairy tale : ONCE

The stock phrase “Once upon a time” has been used in various forms as the start of a narrative at least since 1380. The stock phrase at the end of stories such as folktales is often “and they all lived happily ever after”. The earlier version of this ending was “happily until their deaths”.

Down

2. ___ carte : A LA

On a restaurant menu, items that are “à la carte” are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked “table d’hôte” (also called “prix fixe”) is a fixed-price menu with limited choice. “Table d’hôte” translates as “table of the host”.

3. Software trial runs : BETA TESTS

In the world of software development, the first tested issue of a new program is usually called the alpha version. Expected to have a lot of bugs that need to be fixed, the alpha release is usually distributed to a small number of testers. After reported bugs have been eliminated, the refined version is called a beta and is released to a wider audience, but with the program clearly labeled as “beta”. The users generally check functionality and report further bugs that are encountered. The beta version feeds into a release candidate, the version that is tested just prior to the software being sold into the market, hopefully bug-free.

4. Duel overseer in “Hamlet” : OSRIC

In William Shakespeare’s play “Hamlet”, Osric is the courtier that Claudius dispatches to invite Hamlet to participate in a duel.

5. Do stuff? : GEL

That would be a hairdo.

6. Warlike Greek god : ARES

The Greek god Ares is often referred to as the Olympian god of warfare, but originally he was regarded as the god of bloodlust and slaughter. Ares united with Aphrodite to create several gods, including Phobos (Fear), Deimos (Terror) and Eros (Desire). Ares was the son of Zeus and Hera, and the Roman equivalent to Ares was Mars.

7. Musket attachment : BAYONET

A bayonet is a blade that is attached to the muzzle end of a rifle. It’s thought that the term “bayonet” derives from the French city of Bayonne in Gascony, where perhaps bayonets were first made.

9. Santa ___ winds : ANA

The Santa Ana winds are the very dry air currents that sweep offshore late in the year in Southern California. Because these air currents are so dry, they are noted for their influence over forest fires in the area, especially in the heat of the fall. The winds arise from a buildup of air pressure in the Great Basin that lies between the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada. Under the right conditions, that air spills over the peaks of the Sierra Nevada and basically “falls” down the side of the Sierra range, heading for the ocean. As the air falls it becomes drier and heats up so that relative humidity can fall to below 10% by the time it hits the coast.

11. America’s largest firearm manufacturer : RUGER

Ruger is an American firearm manufacturer that is based in Fairfield, Connecticut. Apparently, Ruger are not a favorite with the NRA as the company founder, William Ruger, wrote a letter to Congress in 1989 defending the lawful use of firearms, but proposing a complete ban on large capacity magazines. The magazine would be the banned item, and not the firearm itself. Such a move would in effect “ban” assault rifles and semi-automatic rifles.

12. Secret ___ (007, for one) : AGENT

The character James Bond was the creation of writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was “stolen” from the real-life, 16th century English spy called John Dee. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized “007” to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”. There’s an entertaining miniseries that aired on BBC America called “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond” that details Ian Fleming’s military career, and draws some nice parallels between Fleming’s experiences and aspirations and those of his hero James Bond. Recommended …

18. Apple computer : IMAC

The iMac is a desktop computer platform that Apple introduced in 1998. One of the main features of the iMac is an “all-in-one” design, with the computer console and monitor integrated. The iMac also came in a range of colors, that Apple marketed as “flavors”, such strawberry, blueberry and lime.

22. Neighbor of Homer on “The Simpsons” : NED

Ned Flanders lives next door to Homer on TV’s “The Simpsons”. Ned is voiced by actor Harry Shearer and has been around since the very first episode aired in 1989.

24. “___ and Circumstance” : POMP

Sir Edward Elgar’s “Pomp and Circumstance Marches” is a work that takes its name from a line in William Shakespeare’s “Othello”.

Farewell the neighing steed and the shrill trump,
The spirit-stirring drum, th’ear-piercing fife,
The royal banner, and all quality,
Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war!

The most famous part of the whole work is the trio section of March No. 1, also known as “Land of Hope and Glory”. Here in the US, that trio section is often referred to simply as “Pomp and Circumstance”, or sometimes as “The Graduation March” as it is a staple at school graduations across the country.

35. Singer with the 1961 hit “Big Bad John” : JIMMY DEAN

The Jimmy Dean brand of sausage was introduced in 1969 by singer and actor Jimmy Dean. Although he was at the height of his singing and acting career in 1950s and 1960s, I best remember Dean for playing reclusive billionaire Willard Whyte in the 1971 James Bond film “Diamonds Are Forever”.

39. Cookie with creme in the middle : OREO

There is an “official” competition involving Oreo cookies, in case anyone is interested in participating. A competitor has to take several steps to finish an OREO Lick Race:

  1. Twist open the cookie.
  2. Lick each half clean of creme.
  3. Show the clean cookie halves to the fellow competitors.
  4. Dunk the cookie halves in a glass of milk.
  5. Eat the cookie halves.
  6. Drink the milk.
  7. Ready, set, go …

40. Never, in Nuremberg : NIE

Nürnberg (anglicized as “Nuremberg”) is a Bavarian city located north of Munich. Historically it is remembered for the huge Nazi Nuremberg rallies, and the Nuremberg trials that took place at the end of WWII. Nürnberg is sometimes confused with the city of Nürburg in the west of Germany that is famous for the Nürburgring race track.

41. Tehran’s land : IRAN

Tehran is the capital of Iran and is the largest city in the Middle East, with a population of about 8.5 million. Iran has been around a really long time and Tehran is actually the country’s 31st national capital.

42. Eartha who sang “C’est Si Bon” : KITT

Eartha Kitt really did have a unique voice and singing style. Her rendition of “Santa Baby” has to be one of the most distinctive and memorable recordings in the popular repertoire. Some of you will no doubt remember Eartha playing Catwoman on the final series of the 1960s TV show “Batman”.

47. Yankees legend ___ Howard : ELSTON

Elston Howard was the first African American to play for the New York Yankees, and was the first African American to become the American League’s MVP, an honor he received in 1963. Howard also goes down in history as the inventor of the batting donut, the lead weight that slips around a bat to make it feel heavier.

48. Originally named : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

51. John, Paul and John Paul : POPES

The Pope is the Bishop of Rome and the leader of the Roman Catholic Church. The term “pope” comes from the Latin “papa”, and ultimately from the Greek “pappas”, with both terms being a child’s word for “father”.

52. Undeveloped seed : OVULE

As we all remember from botany class (don’t we?), an ovule is a small structure in many plants that develops into the seed after fertilization.

55. High-performance engine : TURBO

A turbocharger is a device that is designed to extract more power out of an internal combustion engine. It does so by increasing the pressure of the air entering the intake. The pressure increase comes from the use of a compressor that is powered, cleverly enough, by the engine’s own exhaust gases.

65. Henna, for one : DYE

Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, for leather and wool as wells as hair and skin. In modern days, henna is often used for temporary tattoos.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. ___ San Lucas (Baja resort city) : CABO
5. Chew the fat : GAB
8. Maze runner in an experiment : LAB RAT
14. Brewery products : ALES
15. Pitcher’s stat : ERA
16. “Uncle!” : ENOUGH!
17. Five-time N.B.A. championship-winning coach with the Lakers and the Heat : PAT RILEY
19. Cable channel with many science shows, familiarly : NAT GEO
20. “Ready, ___, fire!” : AIM
21. Ballad, e.g. : SONG
23. Circus enclosure : TENT
24. Garfield, to Jon Arbuckle : PET CAT
27. Notable statistic for Jeff Bezos or Bill Gates : NET WORTH
29. Opening number? : ONE
30. Prosciutto, e.g. : CURED HAM
32. Physicians, for short : MDS
33. Obtain : GET
34. Mountain overlooking Tokyo : FUJI
37. Casino floor V.I.P. : PIT BOSS
40. Make tiny criticisms : NITPICK
43. Ruler of old Russia : TSAR
44. Broadcast : AIR
45. ___ tai (cocktail) : MAI
46. Bygone monthly for the 12-to-20 set : TEEN BEAT
50. “The A-Team” actor with a mohawk : MR T
51. Road hazards that need filling : POTHOLES
54. “Be patient!” : NOT YET!
56. “Your turn,” on a walkie-talkie : OVER
57. Appear to be : SEEM
59. Surface of a sty : MUD
60. Peeved : PUT OUT
62. Dessert loaf : NUT BREAD
66. Cheap cigar, slangily : EL ROPO
67. CBS forensics franchise : CSI
68. Midwife’s delivery : BABY
69. Sailor : SEAMAN
70. “I know what you’re thinking” feeling, for short : ESP
71. First word in a fairy tale : ONCE

Down

1. Salary limit : CAP
2. ___ carte : A LA
3. Software trial runs : BETA TESTS
4. Duel overseer in “Hamlet” : OSRIC
5. Do stuff? : GEL
6. Warlike Greek god : ARES
7. Musket attachment : BAYONET
8. Width’s counterpart : LENGTH
9. Santa ___ winds : ANA
10. Proceeding from low to high : BOTTOM UP
11. America’s largest firearm manufacturer : RUGER
12. Secret ___ (007, for one) : AGENT
13. Egyptian god usually pictured with the head of an ibis : THOTH
18. Apple computer : IMAC
22. Neighbor of Homer on “The Simpsons” : NED
24. “___ and Circumstance” : POMP
25. Break off a relationship : END IT
26. Yanks (on) : TUGS
28. Drift, as an aroma : WAFT
31. Hi-___ screen : RES
35. Singer with the 1961 hit “Big Bad John” : JIMMY DEAN
36. Comforting words : I CARE
38. Place to shower and brush one’s teeth : BATHROOM
39. Cookie with creme in the middle : OREO
40. Never, in Nuremberg : NIE
41. Tehran’s land : IRAN
42. Eartha who sang “C’est Si Bon” : KITT
44. Perfect attendance spoiler : ABSENCE
47. Yankees legend ___ Howard : ELSTON
48. Originally named : NEE
49. Egyptian pyramid, e.g. : TOMB
51. John, Paul and John Paul : POPES
52. Undeveloped seed : OVULE
53. Four: Prefix : TETRA-
55. High-performance engine : TURBO
58. Dishevel, as the hair : MUSS
61. Work ___ sweat : UP A
63. Extra 15% or so for a waiter : TIP
64. Simple as ___ : ABC
65. Henna, for one : DYE

3 thoughts on “0107-19 NY Times Crossword 7 Jan 19, Monday”

  1. 7:28, no errors, but I stumbled through it and fell over the finish line with my shoelaces tied together … 😜

  2. Mostly easy Monday, but an unexpected hang-up in the NE corner with THOTH. Finished, but didn’t even look for the two sets of AEIOUs.

  3. Nor did I notice the AEIOU progressions. I venture to say that most solvers today did not notice either. Once again Bill’s blog points out things I would not have otherwise seen. The constructor might have given us a revealer if he had really wanted us all to see the theme. Otherwise, nice one.

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