0507-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 May 13, Tuesday

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Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Jeff Chen
THEME: H2O … the circled letters in today’s grid are water molecules (HOH … H2O), so we have “water, water everywhere”, like in the poem “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Coleridge:

17A. See 40-/42-Across WATER, WATER
65A. See 40-/42-Across EVERYWHERE

40A. With 42-Across, subject of the poem that contains the line 17-/65-Across ANCIENT
42A. See 40-Across MARINER

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 09m 09s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Scolding, nagging sort HARPY
A harpy is a shrewish woman or a predatory person. The term comes from Greek mythology in which a harpy was a winged spirit noted for stealing food from a king called Phineus. Phineus angered the god Zeus and so was punished by being exiled to an island with a buffet of food that he could never eat. Every time he tried to eat, harpies would arrive and steal the food

14. John who wrote “Appointment in Samarra” O’HARA
“Appointment in Samarra” was John O’Hara’s first novel, published in 1934. Samarra is a city north of Baghdad in Iraq, although the story itself takes place in a fictional town in Pennsylvania. The novel deals with the last three days in the life of Julian English, describing how he destroys himself with a series compulsive acts leading up to his suicide. This one doesn’t qualify as light reading for the plane …

16. Vagrant HOBO
No one seems to know for sure how the term “hobo” originated, although there are lots of colorful theories. My favorite is that “hobo” comes from the first letters in the words “ho-meward bo-und”, but it doesn’t seem very plausible. A kind blog reader tells me that according to Click and Clack from PBS’s “Car Talk” (a great source!), “hobo” comes from “hoe boy”. Hoe boys were young men with hoes looking for work after the Civil War. Hobos differed from “tramps” and “bums”, in that “bums” refused to work, “tramps” worked when they had to, while “hobos” traveled in search of work.

19. Key of Haydn’s Symphony No. 12 or 29 E MAJ
Josef Haydn was an Austrian composer, often called the “Father of the Symphony” due to his prolific output of symphonies that helped define the form. Haydn was also the father figure among “the big three” composers of the Classical Period: Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. Hayden was a good friend to Mozart, and a teacher of Beethoven.

21. Word after sports or training BRA
The word “brassière” is of course French in origin, but it isn’t the word the French use for a “bra”. In France what we call a bra is known as a “soutien-gorge”, translating to “held under the neck”. The word “brassière” is indeed used in France but there it describes a baby’s undershirt, a lifebelt or a harness. “Brassière” comes from the Old French word for an “arm protector” in a military uniform (“bras” is the French for “arm”). Later “brassière” came to mean “breastplate” and from there the word was used for a type of woman’s corset. The word jumped into English around 1900.

23. Seven-time All-Star Sammy SOSA
Sammy Sosa was right in the public eye in 1998 when he and Mark McGwire were vying to be the first to surpass the home run record held by Roger Maris. McGwire fell out of public favor due to stories of steroid abuse (stories which he later admitted were true) while Sosa fell out of favor when he was found to be using a corked bat in a 2003 game.

25. Cop’s target PERP
“Perp” is short for perpetrator.

31. Latvia neighbor: Abbr. LITH
The nation of Lithuania is a former Soviet Socialist Republic sitting on the Baltic Sea in Northern Europe.

Latvia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics. People from Latvia are called Letts.

33. Contemporary of Gandhi NEHRU
Jawaharlal Nehru was the very first prime minister of India, serving from 1947-64. Nehru was basically the heir to his mentor, Mahatma Gandhi. Nehru’s only daughter, Indira, also became prime minister (known as Indira Gandhi, though she was no relation to Mahatma).

36. Hellmann’s product, informally MAYO
Mayonnaise originated in the town of Mahon in Menorca, a Mediterranean island belonging to Spain. The Spanish called the sauce “salsa mahonesa” after the town, and this morphed into the French word “mayonnaise” that we use in English today.

39. Quaker cereal brand OH’S
There used to be two varieties of Oh’s made by Quaker Oats Company. One was Honey Nut Oh’s, later known as Crunchy Nut Oh’s, but it was phased out. The second type was called Crunchy Graham Oh’s, and is still available today as Honey Graham Oh’s.

40. With 42-Across, subject of the poem that contains the line 17-/65-Across ANCIENT
42. See 40-Across MARINER
17. See 40-/42-Across WATER, WATER
65. See 40-/42-Across EVERYWHERE
“The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is an epic poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge first published in 1798. The publication of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period of British literature. Perhaps the lines most often quoted from the poem are:

Water, water, every where,
And all the boards did shrink;
Water, water, every where
Nor any drop to drink

44. N.E.A. concern SCH
School (sch.)

The National Education Association (NEA) is the largest labor union in the country, and mainly represents public school teachers.

45. Depth charge, in slang ASHCAN
Depth charges, especially older ones used during WWII, are metallic cylindrical devices resembling ashcans, and so they are known familiarly as “ashcans”.

51. It is, in Ibiza ESTA
The Pine Islands is an autonomous community of Spain in the Mediterranean with two main islands, Ibiza and Formentera. Ibiza has for some decades been a pretty wild tourist destination for European tourists as it is noted for its frantic nightlife, although recently attempts have been made to calm things down and develop a more family-oriented vacation destination. Formentera is a less accessible island and is a quieter spot that is renowned for its nude beaches.

60. One of the ABC islands ARUBA
Aruba is one of the so-called ABC Islands. The ABC Islands is the nickname given to the three westernmost islands of the Leeward Antilles in the Caribbean. The nickname comes from the first letters of the island names: Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao. All three of the ABC Islands are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

64. Eastern nurse AMAH
“Amah” is an interesting word in that we associate it so much with Asian culture and yet it actually comes from the Portuguese “ama” meaning “nurse”. Ama was imported into English in the days of the British Raj in India when a wet-nurse became known as an amah.

68. Texter’s disclaimer IMHO
In my humble opinion (IMHO).

70. Tribe with a lake named after it HURON
Lake Huron takes its name from the Huron Native American people that lived by its shores. Early French explorers often called the lake “La Mer Douce”, meaning “the freshwater sea”.

Down
1. First word of “Blowin’ in the Wind” HOW
Bob Dylan wrote the famous song “Blowin’ in the Wind” in 1963, apparently taking all of ten minutes to finish the whole composition.

3. Pro ___ RATA
“Pro rata” is a Latin phrase meaning “in proportion”.

6. “___ Crossroads” (1996 Grammy-winning rap song) THA
“Tha Crossroads” is a song recorded in 1995 by the hip hop group Bone Thugs-n-Harmony. The band’s members are Layzie Bone, Flesh-n-Bone, Bizzy Bone, Krayzie Bone and Wish Bone. That’s all I know …

11. Read and blew, for red and blue HOMOPHONES
Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but have different meanings and possibly different spellings.

12. Fortune 500 company founded in 1995 EBAY
eBay was founded in 1995 as AuctionWeb as part of a computer programmer’s personal website. One of the first items purchased was a broken laser pointer, for $14.83. The buyer collected broken laser pointers …

13. Austin Powers’s power MOJO
The word “mojo”, meaning magical charm or magnetism, is probably of Creole origin.

The character of Austin Powers was created by the actor who plays him, Mike Myers. Apparently Myers came up with the idea for Powers while listening to the Burt Bacharach song “The Look of Love”.

24. Trivial Pursuit wedges, e.g. SIXTHS
Trivial Pursuit was invented in 1979 by two Canadians from Montreal. The pair decided to come up with their own game after they discovered that there were pieces missing from the game of Scrabble that they wanted to play. There was a full blown launch of a commercial version of the game in 1982. In 2008, Hasbro bought the complete rights to Trivial Pursuit, for US$80 million! On a personal note, I met my lovely wife over a game of Trivial Pursuit …

26. ___’acte ENTR
The term entr’acte comes to us from French, and is the interval between two acts (“entre” deux “actes”) of a theatrical performance. It often describes some entertainment provided during that interval.

28. Dressing choice RANCH
Ranch dressing has been the best selling salad dressing in the country since 1992. The recipe was developed by Steve Henson who introduced it in the fifties to guests on his dude ranch, Hidden Valley Ranch in Northern California. His ranch dressing became so popular that he opened a factory to produce packets of ranch seasoning that could be mixed with mayonnaise and buttermilk. Henson sold the brand for $8 million in 1972.

29. Astronomer who coined the word “nova” TYCHO BRAHE
Tycho Brahe was an astronomer and contemporary of Galileo. Brahe lost his nose in a duel, and wore a replacement made of either silver or gold that was pasted onto his face!

34. Butler of “Gone With the Wind” RHETT
In Margaret Mitchell’s novel “Gone with the Wind”, when Rhett Butler finally walks out on Scarlett O’Hara he utters the words “My dear, I don’t give a damn”. Most of us are more familiar with the slightly different words spoken by Clark Gable in the film adaption of the story: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

35. Nutritional fig. US RDA
Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

41. Bridge position EAST
The four people playing a game of bridge are positioned around a table at seats called north, east, south and west.

46. West Coast engineering institution, informally CALTECH
Caltech is more properly known as the California Institute of Technology, and is a private research-oriented school in Pasadena. One of Caltech’s responsibilities is the management and operation of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. If you watch “The Big Bang Theory” on television like me, you might know that the four lead characters all work at Caltech.

55. BBC sci-fi show DR WHO
The iconic science-fiction television show “Doctor Who” was first aired in 1963, and relaunched in 2005 by the BBC. The relaunched series is produced in-house by the BBC in Cardiff in Wales, the location that is the setting of the successful “Doctor Who” spin-off called “Torchwood”. The new show is about the Cardiff branch of the Torchwood Institute which investigates incidents involving extraterrestrials.

57. Cousin of a Golden Globe EMMY
The Emmy Awards are the television equivalent of the Oscars in the world of film, the Grammy Awards in music and the Tony Awards for the stage. Emmy Awards are presented throughout the year, depending on the sector of television being honored. The most famous of these ceremonies are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards. The distinctive name of “Emmy” is a softened version of the word “immy”, the nickname given to the video camera tubes found in old television cameras.

The first Golden Globe Awards ceremony was held in 1944 to honor the best in filmmaking. The award was created by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, which had been formed the year before by a group of writers in Los Angeles. One of the most famous of the Golden Globes is the Cecil B. DeMille Award.

62. Arctic Ocean sighting BERG
An iceberg is a large piece of freshwater ice that is floating freely after having broken off from a glacier or ice shelf. Out use of “iceberg” comes from the Dutch word for the same phenomenon “ijsberg”, which translates literally as “ice mountain”.

63. Suffix with buck -AROO
The American English word “buckaroo” comes from “vaquero”, the Spanish for cowboy.

66. Sigma preceder RHO
Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Scolding, nagging sort HARPY
6. Hence THUS
10. The opposition THEM
14. John who wrote “Appointment in Samarra” O’HARA
15. Invitation sender HOST
16. Vagrant HOBO
17. See 40-/42-Across WATER, WATER
19. Key of Haydn’s Symphony No. 12 or 29 E MAJ
20. Refuse SAY NO
21. Word after sports or training BRA
22. Dummy YO-YO
23. Seven-time All-Star Sammy SOSA
25. Cop’s target PERP
27. The “A” of B.A. ARTS
31. Latvia neighbor: Abbr. LITH
33. Contemporary of Gandhi NEHRU
36. Hellmann’s product, informally MAYO
37. Urge strongly EXHORT
39. Quaker cereal brand OH’S
40. With 42-Across, subject of the poem that contains the line 17-/65-Across ANCIENT
42. See 40-Across MARINER
44. N.E.A. concern SCH
45. Depth charge, in slang ASHCAN
47. Collecting a pension: Abbr. RETD
48. Bakery and pharmacy SHOPS
50. Story that goes on and on SAGA
51. It is, in Ibiza ESTA
52. Flutters, as eyelashes BATS
54. Indecent LEWD
56. Smart-mouthed PERT
58. Down a sub, e.g. EAT
60. One of the ABC islands ARUBA
64. Eastern nurse AMAH
65. See 40-/42-Across EVERYWHERE
68. Texter’s disclaimer IMHO
69. Branch of engineering: Abbr. MECH
70. Tribe with a lake named after it HURON
71. Colors DYES
72. Long hallway effect ECHO
73. “This looks bad!” OH GOD!

Down
1. First word of “Blowin’ in the Wind” HOW
2. Cries of discovery AHAS
3. Pro ___ RATA
4. Mice, to cats PREY
5. Elaborate stories YARNS
6. “___ Crossroads” (1996 Grammy-winning rap song) THA
7. Relaxing conclusion to a long, hard day HOT BATH
8. Manipulator USER
9. Rein, e.g. STRAP
10. “And ___ off!” THEY’RE
11. Read and blew, for red and blue HOMOPHONES
12. Fortune 500 company founded in 1995 EBAY
13. Austin Powers’s power MOJO
18. Some winter garments WOOLENS
24. Trivial Pursuit wedges, e.g. SIXTHS
26. ___’acte ENTR
27. Gather over time AMASS
28. Dressing choice RANCH
29. Astronomer who coined the word “nova” TYCHO BRAHE
30. “___ hear” SO I
32. Show of respect HOMAGE
34. Butler of “Gone With the Wind” RHETT
35. Nutritional fig. US RDA
38. Fled RAN AWAY
41. Bridge position EAST
43. Tick off IRE
46. West Coast engineering institution, informally CALTECH
49. Pity PATHOS
53. Note accompanying an F, maybe SEE ME
55. BBC sci-fi show DR WHO
56. Invoice stamp PAID
57. Cousin of a Golden Globe EMMY
59. With: Fr. AVEC
61. “Ain’t gonna happen!” UH-UH!
62. Arctic Ocean sighting BERG
63. Suffix with buck -AROO
66. Sigma preceder RHO
67. Conclusion END

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Posted by Bill Butler
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4 thoughts on “0507-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 7 May 13, Tuesday”

  1. I have never played Trivial Pursuit so I don't understand the answer "sixths" for wedges(24D), could you explain? I too really enjoy "The Big Bang Theory but somehow didn't realize they worked at CalTech.

  2. The game pieces that move around the board in Trivial Pursuit are circular and divided into six empty compartments. As you make progress in answering questions correctly, you win colored wedges that fit into the six empty holes. Hope that's clear 🙂

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