0424-22 NY Times Crossword 24 Apr 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Sam Ezersky
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Magazine Racket

Themed answers are common phrases ending (or nearly ending) with -CK, but that ending is extended to -CKET:

  • 23A Bit of company swag for a Genius Bar staffer? : APPLE JACKET (from “applejack”)
  • 25A With 114-Across, exasperated question to parking enforcement? : WHAT MAKES …
  • 114A See 25-Across : … YOU TICKET? (from “What makes you tick?”)
  • 28A Elements of a Sherlock Holmes sports mystery? : WATSON AND CRICKET (from “Watson and Crick”)
  • 48A Today’s plans: watchin’ someone’s kids? : SITTIN’ ON THE DOCKET (from “sittin’ on the dock”)
  • 65A How much Michael Jordan or Wilt Chamberlain could score, hyperbolically? : LIKE A MILLION BUCKETS (from “like a million bucks”)
  • 86A Missile silo’s holding? : UNDERGROUND ROCKET (from “underground rock”)
  • 107A Where Sweet’N Low displays its logo? : FRONT OF THE PACKET (from “front of the pack”)
  • 115A Cry following an electrical malfunction? : DARN SOCKETS (from “darn socks”)

Bill’s time: 27m 51s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Make a bust, say : SCULPT

A bust is a sculpture of the upper torso and head. We imported the word from Italy, where the word “busto” means “upper body”.

20 Contemporary of Picasso : MIRO

Joan Miró was a Spanish artist. He immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miró was “the most Surrealist of us all”. There are two museums dedicated to Miró’s work. The Fundació Joan Miró is in his native Barcelona, and the Fundació Miró Mallorca is in Palma de Mallorca, where the artist spent much of his life.

Artist Pablo Picasso’s full name was Pablo Diego José Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno María de los Remedios Cipriano de la Santísima Trinidad Ruiz y Picasso, a name he was given right from birth. Got that?

21 Factory watchdog, in brief : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. It is a direct successor to the Bureau of Labor Standards that dealt with some work safety issues since its founding in 1934. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

22 Native of the country whose national sport is oil wrestling : TURK

Turkey is a country that straddles the border between the continents of Europe and Asia. Even though most of Turkey lies geographically in Asia, in recent decades the country has been strengthening its ties with its European neighbors. Turkey is a member of NATO, and was well on the way to becoming a member of the European Union until EU members started calling out human rights violations in recent years.

23 Bit of company swag for a Genius Bar staffer? : APPLE JACKET (from “applejack”)

The technical support desk found in Apple Retail Stores is rather inventively called the Genius Bar. The certified support technicians are known as “Geniuses”. The trainees are called GYOs: Grow-Your-Own-Geniuses.

Applejack is a concentrated alcoholic cider that was particularly popular in colonial times. The name comes from the apples used to make the cider, and the “jacking” or freeze distillation that increases the alcohol content.

25 With 114-Across, exasperated question to parking enforcement? : WHAT MAKES …
114 See 25-Across : … YOU TICKET? (from “What makes you tick?”)

An early patent for a parking meter, dated 1928, was for a device that required the driver of the parked car to connect the battery of his or her car to the meter in order for it to operate!

28 Elements of a Sherlock Holmes sports mystery? : WATSON AND CRICKET (from “Watson and Crick”)

In the marvelous Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Holmes’ sidekick Dr. Watson is referred to only by his family name, except for two occasions when it is revealed that his first name is John. However, in a third and final mention, Dr. Watson is called “James” by his wife, perhaps indicating a lapse in memory on the part of the author.

Cricket is the national game of England. The term “cricket” apparently comes from the Old French word “criquet” meaning “goalpost, stick”.

Francis Crick and James Watson discovered that DNA had a double-helix, chain-like structure, and published their results in Cambridge in 1953. To this day the discovery is mired in controversy, as some crucial results collected by fellow researcher Rosalind Franklin were used without her permission or even knowledge. In 1962, along with molecular biologist Maurice Wilkins, Watson and Crick were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine.

30 A small part of who you are : GENE

A gene is a section of a chromosome that is responsible for a particular characteristic in an organism. For example, one gene may determine eye color and another balding pattern. We have two copies of each gene, one from each of our parents, with each copy known as an allele.

32 “Duck Dynasty” network : A AND E

“Duck Dynasty” is a reality television show on the A&E cable channel. The show is centered on the Robertson family from Monroe, Louisiana who made a lot of money selling products to duck hunters. Phil Robertson was in the news in 2013 for views he expressed on homeosexuality and other subjects in an interview with “GQ” magazine.

33 Irish ___, popular St. Patrick’s Day cocktail : CAR BOMB

The first Saint Patrick’s Day celebration in the US was held in 1600, in St. Augustine, Florida. There is some evidence that the first St. Paddy’s Day parade was held the following year, in the same locale. The annual parade in Boston dates back to 1737, in New York City dates back to 1762, and in Chicago dates back to 1843.

36 Like much toothpaste : MINTY

The first toothpaste in a tube was introduced by Johnson & Johnson, in 1889. Back then, toothpaste tubes were made from tin, zinc or lead.

38 Mountain mammal : IBEX

“Ibex” is a common name for various species of mountain goat. “Ibex” is a Latin name that was used for wild goats found in the Alps and Apennines in Europe.

42 Plant cultivated by the Incas : COCA

The coca plant is native to South America and is similar in appearance to a blackthorn bush. Coca leaves have been chewed by humans for centuries, perhaps even as far back as 3,000 years ago. Chewing the leaves apparently produces a pleasurable numb sensation in the mouth and a pleasant taste. The most famous alkaloid in the leaf is cocaine, but this wasn’t extracted in its pure form until the mid-1800s. The extracted cocaine was used in medicines and tonics and other beverages.

48 Today’s plans: watchin’ someone’s kids? : SITTIN’ ON THE DOCKET (from “sittin’ on the dock”)

“(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay” is a song that Otis Redding started composing in 1967 while sitting on a houseboat in Sausalito, on San Francisco Bay. Redding finished the song soon after, with the help of co-writer Steve Cooper. “The Dock of the Bay” was released in January of 1968, just one month after Redding was killed in a plane crash. The song became the first posthumous single to reach number in the US charts. As an aside, Janis Joplin’s recording of “Me and Bobby McGee” achieved the same feat in 1971.

54 Broadband inits. : DSL

The initialism “DSL” originally stood for Digital Subscriber Loop, but is now accepted to mean (Asymmetric) Digital Subscriber Line. It is a technology that allows Internet service to be delivered down the same telephone line as voice service, by separating the two into different frequency signals.

In Internet terms, the word “broadband” is used to describe Internet access that is faster than dialup. In more broad (pun!) telecommunication terms, “broadband” is used to describe “bandwidth” data transmission that is “broad” enough to carry several signals and several different types of traffic at the same time.

56 “Mr. Mom” actress Teri : GARR

Actress Teri Garr had a whole host of minor roles in her youth, including appearances in nine Elvis movies. Garr’s big break came with the role of Inga in “Young Frankenstein”, and her supporting role in “Tootsie” earned Garr an Academy Award nomination. Sadly, Teri Garr suffers from multiple sclerosis. She is a National Ambassador for the National Multiple Sclerosis Society.

“Mr. Mom” is a 1983 comedy written by John Hughes that stars Michael Keaton and the great Teri Garr. The movie is all about an engineer in the auto industry in Detroit who loses his job and then takes over the running of the household while his wife heads back to work. It’s funny stuff …

59 Super Bowl in 2022 : LVI

Super Bowl LVI was played at the end of the 2021 season between the Cincinnati Bengals and the LA Rams. The Rams had home team advantage as the game was played at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, California. The Rams emerged victorious, winning 23-20. Apparently, the Super Bowl LVI broadcast was the second-most watched in the history of the NFL.

64 It may be measured in both feet and meters : POEM

In poetry, a foot is a metrical unit comprising usually two, three or four syllables. Lines of verse are often classified by the number of feet that they contain, e.g. pentameter: containing five feet.

The meter of a poem is its rhythmic structure.

65 How much Michael Jordan or Wilt Chamberlain could score, hyperbolically? : LIKE A MILLION BUCKETS (from “like a million bucks”)

Michael Jordan is considered by some to be the greatest basketball player of all time. Not only is he a talented sportsman, but he is also very successful in the business world. He became the majority owner of the Charlotte Hornets NBA team in 2010. Fans refer to Jordan as “His Airness”.

Wilt Chamberlain was one of the best basketball players of all time, certainly based on the number of records that he still holds. Chamberlain is the only player to have scored 100 points in a single NBA game, and the only player to average more than 40 points in a season. He was given many nicknames during his career, but the one that he preferred was “the Big Dipper”, a reference to his need to dip his head to pass his 7ft 1in frame through doorways.

“Buck” is a slang word meaning “dollar”. The term has been around at least since 1856, and is thought to derive from the tradition of using buckskin as a unit of trade with Native Americans during the frontier days.

72 Happy companion : DOC

In the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale called “Snow White”, the seven dwarfs were not given any names. The names were added for the 1937 classic Disney film “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. The seven dwarfs are:

  • Doc (the leader of the group)
  • Grumpy (that would be me, according to my wife …)
  • Happy
  • Sleepy
  • Bashful
  • Sneezy
  • Dopey

73 Focus of the website Brickipedia : LEGO

Lego produces some wonderful specialized sets with which you can build models of celebrated structures, including:

  • The Statue of Liberty (2,882 pieces)
  • The Sydney Opera House (2,989 pieces)
  • The Eiffel Tower (3,428 pieces)
  • Tower Bridge (4,295 pieces)
  • The Taj Mahal (5,922 pieces)

74 “The Hangover” character who wakes up with a missing tooth : STU

“The Hangover” is a comedy film released in 2009. The action revolves around a bachelor party in Las Vegas. The critics liked this one, although I didn’t really enjoy it too much.

75 Eschews grains and processed foods, perhaps : EATS PALEO

The paleolithic (or “paleo, caveman”) diet is a fad diet that became popular in the 2000s. The idea is to eat wild plants and animals that would have been available to humans during the Paleolithic era (roughly the Stone Age). This period precedes the introduction of agriculture and the domestication of animals. As a result, someone on the diet avoids consuming grains, legumes, dairy and processed foods. The diet consists mainly of lean meat (about 45-65% of the total calorie intake), non-starchy vegetables, fruits, berries and nuts.

“To eschew”, meaning “to avoid, shun”, comes from the Old French word “eschiver” that means the same thing.

80 Writers such as Sappho : ODISTS

Sappho was an Ancient Greek poet born on the Greek island of Lesbos. Sappho was much admired for her work, although very little of it survives today. She was renowned for writing erotic and romantic verse that dealt with the love of women as well as men. It was because of this poetry that the word “lesbian” (someone from Lesbos) is used to describe a gay woman.

85 Waze way: Abbr. : RTE

Waze is a navigation app that is similar to Google Maps and Apple Maps. Waze was developed in Israel, and was acquired by Google in 2013.

89 Pie slices might be displayed in one : CHART

A pie chart can also be referred to as a circle graph. It is often stated that Florence Nightingale invented the pie chart. While this is not in fact true, she is due credit for popularizing it, and for developing the pie chart variation known as the polar area diagram. The earliest known pie chart appears in a book published in 1801 by Scottish engineer William Playfair.

92 Guacamole go-with? : HOLY …

Holy guacamole!

93 Engine type, informally : HEMI

“Hemi” is short for “hemisphere”, and is the name given to an internal combustion engine with hemispherical combustion chambers. Chrysler is famous for using hemi engines in many of its models.

94 Playwright Edward : ALBEE

Playwright Edward Albee’s most famous play is “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” Albee won three Pulitzer Prizes for Drama:

  • 1967: “A Delicate Balance”
  • 1975: “Seascape”
  • 1994: “Three Tall Women”

Albee also won three Tony Awards:

  • 1963: “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (Best Play)
  • 2002: “The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?”
  • 2005: Special Tony Award for Lifetime Achievement

100 Transport on a river : CANOE

The boat known as a canoe takes its name from the Carib word “kenu” meaning “dugout”. It was Christopher Columbus who brought “kenu” into Spanish as “canoa”, which evolved into our English “canoe”.

107 Where Sweet’N Low displays its logo? : FRONT OF THE PACKET (from “front of the pack”)

Sweet’n Low is an artificial sweetener with saccharin as the main ingredient. At least that’s in the US. In Canada the main ingredient is sodium cyclamate. Saccharin was banned in Canada in 1977 due to fears that the sweetener causes cancer. The original studies showing the incidence of cancer in lab rats were eventually shown to be faulty, and so the ban was lifted in 2014.

111 T as in Tartarus : TAU

In Greek mythology, Tartarus was a deep abyss in Hades used to punish the wicked. Tartarus was also one of the Greek primordial deities, the first generation of gods and goddesses.

117 Rufus and Chaka Khan’s “___ Nobody” : AIN’T

Chaka Khan is the stage name of singer Yvette Stevens from Chicago. Chaka Khan was the front woman for the band Rufus before she launched her very successful solo career.

121 Jumbo : MEGA

James Anthony Bailey collaborated with P. T. Barnum to establish Barnum and Bailey’s Circus. It was Bailey who negotiated the deal to buy a famous elephant from London Zoo in 1882, the one called “Jumbo”. It was the exposure Jumbo got with the circus that brought into common usage our term “jumbo” meaning “huge”.

123 Music score abbr. : STAC

Staccato (stac.) is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, indicating long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

124 Jaguar two-seaters starting in 2013 : F-TYPES

Auto manufacturer Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters “SS” in that era (i.e. the Nazi paramilitary organization).

Down

3 They call ’em as they see ’em : UMPS

Back in the 15th century, “an umpire” was referred to as “a noumpere”, which was misheard and hence causing the dropping of the initial letter N. The term “noumpere” came from Old French “nonper” meaning “not even, odd number”. The idea was that the original umpire was a third person called on to arbitrate between two, providing that “odd number” needed to decide the dispute.

4 Text back and forth? : LOL

Laugh out loud (LOL)

5 Like pioneering search engines of the 1980s : PRE-WEB

In essence, the World Wide Web (WWW) is a vast collection of documents that is accessible using the Internet, with each document containing hyperlinks which point to other documents in the collection. So the “Web” is different from the Internet, although the terms are often used interchangeably. The Web is a collection of documents, and the Internet is a global network of computers on which the documents reside. The Web was effectively the invention of British computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee. The key to Berner-Lee’s invention was bringing together two technologies that already existed: hypertext and the Internet. I, for one, am very grateful …

6 Polka-influenced music style : TEJANO

“Tejano” is the Spanish word for “Texan”. Tejano music is strongly influenced by Cajun culture, because of the proximity of Texas to Louisiana. The other strong influence came with immigrants from Poland and what is now the Czech Republic. These immigrants brought with them the waltz, polka … and the accordion.

7 Yukon and Acadia, for two : GMCS

GMC is a division of General Motors (GM) that was established in 1901 and started out as “GMC Truck”.

The GMC Yukon is basically the same vehicle as the Chevrolet Tahoe.

The GMC Acadia is an SUV made by General Motors that was introduced in 2006.

8 Canon competitor : NIKON

The Japanese company Nikon was founded in 1917 with the merger of three manufacturers of various optical devices. After the merger, Nikon’s main output was lenses (including the first lenses for Canon cameras, before Canon made its own). During the war, Nikon sales grew rapidly as the company focused on (pun!) equipment for the military including periscopes and bomb sights.

10 King of the gods in Wagner’s “Der Ring des Nibelungen” : WOTAN

“Wotan” is an alternative (High German) spelling of the name Woden, the Anglo-Saxon version of the Norse god Odin. Wotan is the head god in the pagan tradition, but as paganism was gradually replaced by Christianity in the 7th and 8th centuries, Wotan moved from his place in religion and into the realm of folklore. Indeed, he is a precursor of our modern day Father Christmas. Wotan (Woden) also gave his name to Wednesday, Woden’s Day …

Richard Wagner’s “Ring Cycle” is more properly called “Der Ring des Nibelungen” (The Ring of Nibelung), and comprises four very, very long operas. The individual operas are:

  1. “Das Rheingold”
  2. “Die Walkure”
  3. “Siegfried”
  4. “Gotterdammerung”

11 Ann of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” : DOWD

“The Handmaid’s Tale” is a remarkably well-received television adaptation of the 1985 novel of the same name by Margaret Atwood. The story is set in a future United State after the Second American Civil War. The “Handmaids” are the few remaining fertile women in the world, who are ritually raped and forced to bear children by their masters.

16 Zap : NUKE

One might rewarm a meal by nuking it, by zapping it in the microwave.

17 Line on a neck : FRET

A fret is a metal strip embedded in the neck of a stringed instrument, a guitar perhaps. The fingers press on the frets, shortening a string and hence changing the note played. The note increases by one semitone as a finger shortens a string by one fret.

24 “Resume speed,” musically : A TEMPO

“A tempo” is Italian for “in time”. The phrase is used on a musical score to instruct a performer to return to the main tempo of the piece, perhaps after slowing down or speeding up.

26 The Golden Arches, on stock tickers : MCD

The McDonald’s fast-food chain uses a stylized letter M as a logo, with the logo going by the name “Golden Arches”. Those Golden Arches are commonly integrated into the architecture of purpose-built McDonald’s restaurants.

30 Persona non ___ : GRATA

A persona non grata (plural “personae non gratae”) is someone who is not welcome. The phrase is Latin for “an unacceptable person”. The opposite phrase is “persona grata”, meaning “acceptable person”.

33 Invent : COIN

To coin a phrase is to invent a new phrase or expression. The greatest “coiner” of them all has to be William Shakespeare. Here are a few everyday expressions that were created by the Bard:

  • The game is afoot (Henry IV, Part I)
  • Brave new world (The Tempest)
  • Break the ice (The Taming of the Shrew)
  • Dead as a doornail (Henry VI, Part II)
  • Eaten me out of house and home (Henry IV, Part II)
  • Forever and a day (As You Like It)
  • For goodness’ sake (Henry VIII)
  • Knock knock! Who’s there? (Macbeth)
  • Set my teeth on edge (Henry IV, Part I)
  • Wild-goose chase (Romeo and Juliet)

34 When Lady Macbeth cries “Out, damned spot!” : ACT V

Lady Macbeth is an evil and treacherous woman in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. The most famous line uttered by Lady Macbeth has to be:

Out, damned spot! Out, I say!

In this line, Lady Macbeth is frantically rubbing at her hand trying to get rid of an imaginary bloodstain left there after she committed four murders.

35 Smoke shop purchase : BONG

A bong is a smaller and more portable version of a hookah, with both being filtration devices for smoking especially tobacco and cannabis. The term “bong” comes from the Thai word “baung” that is used for a wooden pope cut from bamboo.

41 Tissue in a plant stem : XYLEM

Xylem is a vascular tissue in many plants, the function of which is to transport water and some nutrients. It is xylem tissue that makes up what we know as wood.

42 DNA reviewer, in brief : CSI

Crime scene investigator (CSI)

45 State of subjugation : THRALL

To enthrall is to enchant. An obsolete meaning of the term is “to enslave, to hold as a thrall”. “Thrall” is an old word meaning “serf, slave”. So, to enthrall someone is to make them a slave to one’s charm. Quaint …

47 Wheels off the road? : ATV

All-terrain vehicle (ATV)

52 Brother in the Lemony Snicket books : KLAUS

“Lemony Snicket” is a pen name used by Daniel Handler, a novelist from San Francisco, California. Snicket also appears as the narrator of his books, including the best known of the works: “A Series of Unfortunate Events”. Count Olaf is the antagonist in “A Series of Unfortunate Events”.

53 Certain college member : ELECTOR

The Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1804, and redefines procedures used by the Electoral College during a presidential election. Prior to the amendment, each member of the Electoral College cast two electoral votes, after which the candidate with the most votes was elected president, and the candidate with the second-most votes was elected vice president. As a result of the amendment, each member of the Electoral College casts one vote for president, and one vote for vice president. So, the Twelfth Amendment makes it unlikely that we end up with a vice president who is not supportive of the president, as the victorious pair probably campaigned together on the same ticket, and had not been rivals in the election.

58 Great ___ : APE

The tailless primates known as apes (also “hominoids”) are divided into two main branches: gibbons (lesser apes) and hominids (great apes). The hominids are the great apes, and belong to the family of primates called Hominidae. Extant genera that make up the family Hominidae are:

  • chimpanzees
  • gorillas
  • humans
  • orangutans

60 Jokey remark after missing a modern reference : I’M OLD

So am I …

62 Be philanthropic, say : DO GOOD

Philanthropy is a concern for human welfare, and the act of donating to persons or groups who support such concerns. The term “philanthropy” derives from the Greek “phil-” meaning “loving”, and “anthropos” meaning “mankind”.

66 Company computer fixers, informally : IT TEAM

Information technology (IT)

67 Big hits? : KOS

Knockout (KO)

70 Ounce of praise, jocularly : KUDO

Our word “kudos” means “acclaim given for an exceptional achievement”. “Kudos” is both a singular and plural noun, and comes from the Greek “kyddos” meaning “glory, fame”.

77 “… must all learn to live together as brothers, ___ will all perish together as fools”: M.L.K. Jr. : OR WE

The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. was only 35 years old when he won the Nobel Peace Prize, making him the youngest person to be so honored. King was given the award for his work to end racial segregation and discrimination using non-violent means. The following year he was awarded the American Liberties Medallion by the American Jewish Community.

79 Cakewalk : SNAP

The Cakewalk is a dance that originated in the African-American community from the “Prize Walk”, in the days of slavery. The Prize Walk was a procession in which couples “walked” with as much style as possible, with the intent of winning the big prize, a large cake. Our term “cakewalk”, meaning something easily accomplished, derives from this tradition. The expression “take the cake” has the same etymology.

81 Bygone messaging app : ICHAT

iChat was introduced in 2002, and was Apple’s “instant messaging” application that integrated with the Mac Operating System. iChat was replaced by the Messages app.

82 Cheer for the Vikings : SKOL

“Skoal” (sometimes “skol”) is a Scandinavian toast that has roots in the old Norse word “skaal” meaning “cup”.

The Vikings were a Germanic people from northern Europe who were noted as great seafarers. Key to the success of the Vikings was the design of their famous “longships”. Made from wood, the longship was long and narrow with a shallow hull, It was also light, so that the crew would actually carry it small distances over land and around obstacles. Longships were designed to be propelled by both sail and oars.

90 Stuff in stuffed pasta shells : RICOTTA

Ricotta is an Italian cheese made from the milk of a sheep or a cow. It is produced from the whey of the milk, the liquid left after the curds have been separated out (curds are used to make “traditional” cheese). The whey is heated again so that the remaining protein precipitates out, producing ricotta cheese. The word “ricotta” literally means “recooked”, which makes sense to me now …

99 Tycoon : FAT CAT

Our term “tycoon” meaning powerful business person was originally used by foreigners to describe the shogun of Japan. “Tycoon” is an anglicization of the Japanese “taikun” meaning “great lord or prince”.

105 Name that’s “all the beautiful sounds of the world in a single word,” on Broadway : MARIA

“Maria” is a song from “West Side Story”.

Maria!
Say it loud and there’s music playing,
Say it soft and it’s almost like praying.
Maria,
I’ll never stop saying Maria!

107 Liver, in Le Havre : FOIE

Le Havre is a city on the mouth of the river Seine on the northwest coast of France. The city’s name translates as “The Haven”.

109 “Bye 4 now!” : TTYL!

Talk to you later (ttyl)

110 “Power Lunch” airer : CNBC

“Power Lunch” is a business news program that has aired at lunchtime on weekdays since 1996.

111 Maryland athlete, for short : TERP

The sports teams of the University of Maryland are called the Maryland Terrapins, or “Terps” for short. The name dates back to 1932 when it was coined by the university’s president at the time, Curley Byrd. He took the name from the diamondback terrapins that are native to the Chesapeake Bay.

114 Thanksgiving dinner offering : YAM

Although in the US we sometimes refer to sweet potatoes as “yams”, the yam is actually a completely different family of plants. True yams are more common in other parts of the world than they are in this country, and are especially common in Africa.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Make a bust, say : SCULPT
7 Chew (on) : GNAW
11 Ointment amounts : DABS
15 Modern lead-in to mania : INFO-
19 “Enough!” : NO MORE!
20 Contemporary of Picasso : MIRO
21 Factory watchdog, in brief : OSHA
22 Native of the country whose national sport is oil wrestling : TURK
23 Bit of company swag for a Genius Bar staffer? : APPLE JACKET (from “applejack”)
25 With 114-Across, exasperated question to parking enforcement? : WHAT MAKES …
27 Awesome time : GAS
28 Elements of a Sherlock Holmes sports mystery? : WATSON AND CRICKET (from “Watson and Crick”)
30 A small part of who you are : GENE
31 Prefix with medicine : NANO-
32 “Duck Dynasty” network : A AND E
33 Irish ___, popular St. Patrick’s Day cocktail : CAR BOMB
36 Like much toothpaste : MINTY
38 Mountain mammal : IBEX
42 Plant cultivated by the Incas : COCA
43 Program after undergrad, for some : POST-BAC
47 “___ rate …” : AT ANY
48 Today’s plans: watchin’ someone’s kids? : SITTIN’ ON THE DOCKET (from “sittin’ on the dock”)
54 Broadband inits. : DSL
55 Overrun : INVADE
56 “Mr. Mom” actress Teri : GARR
57 Data output denoted by “N/A” : NULL VALUE
59 Super Bowl in 2022 : LVI
61 Come on down! : LAND!
63 Name that’s a body part in reverse : RAE
64 It may be measured in both feet and meters : POEM
65 How much Michael Jordan or Wilt Chamberlain could score, hyperbolically? : LIKE A MILLION BUCKETS (from “like a million bucks”)
71 Lead-in to cross : MOTO-
72 Happy companion : DOC
73 Focus of the website Brickipedia : LEGO
74 “The Hangover” character who wakes up with a missing tooth : STU
75 Eschews grains and processed foods, perhaps : EATS PALEO
78 Common results of penalties : BOOS
80 Writers such as Sappho : ODISTS
85 Waze way: Abbr. : RTE
86 Missile silo’s holding? : UNDERGROUND ROCKET (from “underground rock”)
89 Pie slices might be displayed in one : CHART
91 Natural application to waterproof a ship’s hull : WOOD TAR
92 Guacamole go-with? : HOLY …
93 Engine type, informally : HEMI
94 Playwright Edward : ALBEE
97 Hidden obstacle : PITFALL
100 Transport on a river : CANOE
102 Transport on a rail : TRAM
106 “Dope!” : NEAT!
107 Where Sweet’N Low displays its logo? : FRONT OF THE PACKET (from “front of the pack”)
111 T as in Tartarus : TAU
114 See 25-Across : … YOU TICKET? (from “What makes you tick?”)
115 Cry following an electrical malfunction? : DARN SOCKETS (from “darn socks”)
117 Rufus and Chaka Khan’s “___ Nobody” : AIN’T
118 Like garage floors, often : OILY
119 Slight amount : DRIB
120 Old English folklore figure : FAERIE
121 Jumbo : MEGA
122 When said three times, “What have we here?!” : WELL
123 Music score abbr. : STAC
124 Jaguar two-seaters starting in 2013 : F-TYPES

Down

1 Catch : SNAG
2 ___ América (soccer tournament) : COPA
3 They call ’em as they see ’em : UMPS
4 Text back and forth? : LOL
5 Like pioneering search engines of the 1980s : PRE-WEB
6 Polka-influenced music style : TEJANO
7 Yukon and Acadia, for two : GMCS
8 Canon competitor : NIKON
9 Sizable urban construction project : ARENA
10 King of the gods in Wagner’s “Der Ring des Nibelungen” : WOTAN
11 Ann of Hulu’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” : DOWD
12 Rubbish receptacle : ASHCAN
13 Hindi name for India : BHARAT
14 Smooth and glossy : SATINY
15 “… per my understanding” : … I TAKE IT
16 Zap : NUKE
17 Line on a neck : FRET
18 Clears : OKS
24 “Resume speed,” musically : A TEMPO
26 The Golden Arches, on stock tickers : MCD
29 One covering plenty of ground : NOMAD
30 Persona non ___ : GRATA
33 Invent : COIN
34 When Lady Macbeth cries “Out, damned spot!” : ACT V
35 Smoke shop purchase : BONG
37 Standout in a field : ICON
39 Bunch of scoundrels : BAD LOT
40 Follows : ENSUES
41 Tissue in a plant stem : XYLEM
42 DNA reviewer, in brief : CSI
44 Buy time : STALL
45 State of subjugation : THRALL
46 Male voter stereotype beginning in the mid-2010s : BERNIE BRO
47 Wheels off the road? : ATV
49 Run in place : IDLE
50 In-state attendee of Great Basin College, e.g. : NEVADAN
51 Check : CURB
52 Brother in the Lemony Snicket books : KLAUS
53 Certain college member : ELECTOR
58 Great ___ : APE
60 Jokey remark after missing a modern reference : I’M OLD
62 Be philanthropic, say : DO GOOD
65 Execrate : LOATHE
66 Company computer fixers, informally : IT TEAM
67 Big hits? : KOS
68 ___ Float (cold treat) : ICEE
69 Like a situation at the start of an inning : NO-OUT
70 Ounce of praise, jocularly : KUDO
71 Slangy stuff to sell : MERCH
76 Placed : PUT
77 “… must all learn to live together as brothers, ___ will all perish together as fools”: M.L.K. Jr. : OR WE
79 Cakewalk : SNAP
81 Bygone messaging app : ICHAT
82 Cheer for the Vikings : SKOL
83 Poker giveaway : TELL
84 Certain outbuilding : STY
87 Doth proceed : GOETH
88 Fun plans after work, say : DRINKS
90 Stuff in stuffed pasta shells : RICOTTA
94 Aphid that produces honeydew : ANT COW
95 “Ooh, check it out!” : LOOKIE!
96 Happened to : BEFELL
98 Really miff : TEE OFF
99 Tycoon : FAT CAT
101 What only one planet, Jupiter, is spelled with : AN I
103 ___ Hard Apple (beer brand) : REDD’S
104 Not connected : APART
105 Name that’s “all the beautiful sounds of the world in a single word,” on Broadway : MARIA
107 Liver, in Le Havre : FOIE
108 Like church bells : RUNG
109 “Bye 4 now!” : TTYL!
110 “Power Lunch” airer : CNBC
111 Maryland athlete, for short : TERP
112 End in ___ : A TIE
113 Doesn’t waste : USES
114 Thanksgiving dinner offering : YAM
116 Very important : KEY

13 thoughts on “0424-22 NY Times Crossword 24 Apr 22, Sunday”

  1. 54:51(!), including a typo on the last square. I think it could be said that I should have gone to bed and left this one for the morning … 😜. Somehow, I managed to confuse myself in every section of it (even though, after the fact, all the answers made perfect sense). C’est la vie … ou/et la guerre … 🤪. (And I don’t speak French, so I’ve probably got that wrong, too … 😳.)

  2. I, apparently, finished in 1:18:25, with no errors. The app simply stopped responding after I entered the A in the WOTAN/WATSON AND CRICKET cross. No ‘Congratulations’ pop up. My current streak is alive, so I assume I got credit for solving.

  3. And sliding in at last? Me, with a 1:25:07, tough slog, but I stuck it out. Still isolating, so what else do I have to do? 🙂

  4. 58:07. As difficult a Sunday puzzle as I can remember. The only reason I finished it this fast was that the lower third was pretty easy. I did it in just a few minutes.

    Brickipedia is a site all about LEGO? Really? Amazing what an entire institution LEGO has become.

    Humans are Great Apes, but how would someone feel if I said they are really showing what a great ape they are rather than telling them that they show great humanity?

    Best –

  5. After 2 hours and 50% finished (and even some of that wrong) I threw in the towel…the setter wins again…it’s puzzles like this that make me think I need a new hobby👎👎👎
    Stay safe😀

  6. Pure STUPIDITY. The “theme” just doesn’t make any damned sense. What does “Magazine” have to do with anything???

    1. Just because you can’t figure something out doesn’t make it stupid. We all have strengths and weaknesses. It is part of what makes life interesting!

  7. The theme works like this: 1) Take a common phrase ending in “ck” – say, “magazine rack”. 2) Add an “et” at the end to get “magazine racket”. 3) Create a silly clue for the manufactured phrase – like, maybe, “Cosmopolitan noise?” Repeat in a similar fashion, using other common phrases ending in “ck”, as many times as necessary to obtain the desired number of entries for the puzzle.

    There’s absolutely nothing “stupid” about it, Allen … 🤨.

  8. Yeah, this took a while. I ended with no errors but I was lucky on several guesses. I still don’t get some of answers.

    How does SITTIN ON THE DOCKET relate to watching kids?
    Never heard of a CARBOMB.
    Didn’t know WATSON AND CRICK.

    Worst of all, how does I MOLD mean “jokey remark…”.. oh wait, IM OLD!

    Well I guess that explains my situation!!! Ha!

    1. How does SITTIN’ ON THE DOCKET relate to watching kids?

      Good question. I have a possible answer, but it seems a bit far-fetched … 😳.

    2. Okay … it must be that, like me, you think of “docket” as a legal term, but it can be used in a more general sense, as a synonym of “agenda”, “calendar”, “program”, “schedule”, or “timetable” (all of which I just copied from Merriam-Webster … 😜). So, “there’s sittin’ on the docket” can become “there’s sittin’ on the agenda” and the connection with “watching kids” is clear.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.