0419-20 NY Times Crossword 19 Apr 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Jack Mowat & Jeff Chen
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Of Course!

Themed answers are common phrases reinterpreted as problems encountered by a duffer on a golf course:

  • 23A Duffer’s approach shots that barely go anywhere? : MICROCHIPS
  • 33A Duffer’s putt that just misses? : A STROKE OF BAD LUCK
  • 46A Nickname for a duffer who can’t hit straight? : CAPTAIN HOOK
  • 66A Result of spectators heckling a duffer? : DISTRACTED DRIVING
  • 88A Duffer’s problems with an angled club? : WEDGE ISSUES
  • 100A Duffer’s reasons to choose a wood? : IRON DEFICIENCIES
  • 115A Like the duffer in this puzzle? : NOT UP TO PAR

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 20m 50s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Big inits. in news : NPR

National Public Radio (now just called “NPR”) was established in 1970 after President Johnson signed into law the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967. The station’s first broadcast took place in April of 1971, coverage of the US Senate hearings on the Vietnam War. The intent of the act was to provide funding for radio and television broadcasting that wasn’t simply driven by profit. As a longtime fan of the state-funded BBC in the UK, I’d have to agree with that intent …

4 Place to visit in a suit : APIARY

An apiary is an area where bees are kept, apiculture is beekeeping, and an apiphobe has a fear of bees. The Latin word for “bee” is “apis”.

10 Sign of winter’s end : PISCES

The astrological sign of the zodiac called Pisces is named for the Pisces constellation. “Pisces” is the Latin word for “fish” in the plural (singular “piscis”).

21 Fleet : ARMADA

The most famous armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England in order to overthrow Queen Elizabeth I in 1588. It failed in its mission, partly due to bad weather encountered en route. Ironically, the English mounted a similar naval attack against Spain the following year, and it failed as well.

22 Low-___ : CAL

I wish we’d stop using the term “calorie”, because it is so confusing. In terms of physics, a calorie is the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree celsius (at one atmosphere of pressure). The so-called “food calorie” is one thousand times as large, as it is defined in terms of kilograms instead of grams. In attempts to differentiate between these two definitions, the former is sometimes referred to as the “small calorie” and is given the symbol “cal”. The latter is referred to as the “large calorie” and given the symbol “Cal”, with a capital C. If only we’d use the SI system of units, we’d be think in just joules, instead of large and small and food calories.

26 Gaza grp. : PLO

The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) was founded in 1964. The PLO’s early stated goal was the liberation of Palestine, with Palestine defined as the geographic entity that existed under the terms of the British Mandate granted by the League of Nations back in 1923. The PLO was granted observer status (i.e. no voting rights) at the United Nations in 1974.

After the 1948 Arab-Israeli War, the boundaries of the strip of land on the Mediterranean around Gaza were fixed in the Israel-Egypt Armistice Agreement. The boundaries were specifically defined but were not to be recognized as an international border. From 1948, the Gaza Strip was occupied and administered by Egypt, until 1967 when Israel took over occupation following the Six-Day War. In 1993, Israel and the PLO signed the Oslo Accords which handed over administration to the Palestinian Authority, but with Israel retaining control of the Gaza Strip’s airspace, some land borders and its territorial waters. The intent was to further this agreement, but discussions between the parties broke down. Israel withdrew from Gaza in 2005.

27 Bad position for a server : AD OUT

In tennis, if the score reaches deuce (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the advantage. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

30 CD follower : -ROM

“CD-ROM” stands for “compact disc read only memory”. The name indicates that you can read information from the disc (like a standard music CD for example), but you cannot write to it. You can also buy a CD-RW, which stands for “compact disc – rewritable”, with which you can read data and also write over it multiple times using a suitable CD drive.

31 Flair : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

32 Post-Mao Chinese leader : DENG

Deng Xiaoping was the Paramount Leader of the People’s Republic of China from 1978 to 1992. It was Deng Xiaoping who is given the credit for setting policies that led to China’s current economic boom. He moved the country towards a market economy and opened the borders to allow foreign investment.

37 Goes on a tweetstorm : RANTS

In the wonderful world of Twitter (said he, sarcastically), a tweetstorm is a series of related tweets by a single user on a related subject.

39 ___ Reader : UTNE

The “Utne Reader” is known for aggregation and republishing of articles on politics, culture and the environment from other sources in the media. It was founded in 1984 by Eric Utne, with management taken over by Eric’s wife Nina Rothschild Utne in 1990.

40 Tiny insects in a swarm : MIDGES

“Midge” is a familiar term used for many different kinds of small flies.

41 Founder of WikiLeaks : ASSANGE

Julian Assange founded WikiLeaks, the website that is notorious for publishing information that governments and individuals would rather remain secret. Assange is currently in England and lost an appeal to avoid extradition to Sweden to face charges of sexual assault. Assange entered the Ecuadorian Embassy in London seeking political asylum in 2012. He was granted asylum and lived at the embassy for almost seven years before being arrested and incarcerated in a UK prison.

57 King Midas’s downfall : GREED

King Midas of Greek mythology might be termed an alchemist as he had the power to turn everything he touched into gold i.e. the Midas touch. That power became a curse, as everything he touched turned to gold, including his food and drink, and even his children.

60 Showing signs of neglect : SEEDY

We use the word “seedy” to mean “shabby”. The usage probably arose from the appearance of a flowering plant that has gone to seed.

62 Orphan girl in Byron’s “Don Juan” : LEILA

Lord Byron wrote the poem “Don Juan” based on the legend of Don Juan the libertine. For the poem, Byron created the character Leila, a 10-year-old Muslim orphan girl whom Juan rescues from the city of Ismail.

71 Rope holding down a bowsprit : BOBSTAY

A bowsprit is a spar that sticks out at the bow of a boat, extending the vessel’s length and hence moving the stays for the foremast as far forward as possible.

74 It was “a no-go” in Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start the Fire” : EDSEL

The Edsel brand of automobile was named for Edsel Ford, son of Henry. Sadly, the name “Edsel” has become synonymous with “failure”, which was no fault of Edsel himself who had died several years before the Edsel line was introduced. When the Ford Motor Company introduced the Edsel on 4 September 1957, Ford proclaimed the day to be “E Day”.

“We Didn’t Start the Fire” is a 1989 song by Billy Joel. The lyrics are really quite unique, consisting mainly of over a hundred newspaper headlines from 1949 to 1989. Joel chose 1949 as it was the year of his birth.

78 Foaming at the mouth : RABID

“Rabies” is actually the Latin word for “madness”. The name is a good choice for the viral disease, as once the virus spreads to the brain the infected person or animal exhibits very tortured and bizarre behavior including hydrophobia, a fear of water. The virus is passed on to humans most often through a bite from an infected dog. It is curable if it is caught in time, basically before symptoms develop. Once the virus passes up the peripheral nervous system to the spine and the brain, there isn’t much that can be done. We can also use the derivative term “rabid” figuratively, to mean extremely violent, to have extreme views.

85 Protection : AEGIS

Someone is said to be under the aegis (also “egis”) of someone else if that other person provides protection, or perhaps sponsorship. The word “aegis” comes from the Greek word for a goat (“aigis”). The idea is that the goatskin shield or breastplate, worn by both Zeus and Athena, gave some measure of protection.

87 Rapper Lil ___ X : NAS

“Lil Nas X” is the stage name of rapper Montero Lamar Hill. He was born and raised just outside of Atlanta. His first hit was “Old Town Road”, which is classified as country rap.

90 Scale starter, per “The Sound of Music” : DOE

Doe, a deer, a female deer
Ray, a drop of golden sun
Me, a name I call myself
Far, a long, long way to run
Sew, a needle pulling thread
La, a note to follow Sew
Tea, a drink with jam and bread
That will bring us back to Do

98 Physician Jonas : SALK

Jonas Salk was an American medical researcher who developed the first safe polio vaccine. In the fifties, especially after the 1952 epidemic, polio was the biggest health fear in the US. It killed thousands and left even more with disabilities, and most of the victims were children. The situation was dire and the authorities immediately quarantined the family of any polio victim. That quarantine was so strict that in many cases the families were not even permitted to attend the funeral of a family member who died from the disease.

99 Actress Davis : GEENA

As well as being a successful Hollywood actress, Geena Davis is an accomplished archer and came close to qualifying for the US archery team for the 2000 Summer Olympics. Davis is also a member of American Mensa. She is quite the lady …

104 Turntable rates, in brief : RPMS

The first vinyl records designed to play at 33⅓ rpm were introduced by RCA Victor in 1931, but were discontinued due to quality problems. The first long play (LP) 33⅓ rpm disc was introduced by Columbia Records many years later in 1948, with RCA Victor following up with a 45 rpm “single” the following year, in 1949.

110 Wolf (down) : SNARF

To snarf down is to gobble up, to eat voraciously. “Snarf” is a slang term that is probably related to “scarf”, which has the same meaning.

120 Cause of fatigue : ANEMIA

The term “anemia” (or “anaemia”, as we write it back in Ireland) comes from a Greek word meaning “lack of blood”. Anemia is a lack of iron in the blood, or a low red blood cell count. Tiredness is a symptom of the condition, and so we use the term “anemic” figuratively to mean “lacking in vitality or substance”.

121 VW predecessors? : STU

… S,T,U,V,W …

122 New York city on Long Island Sound : RYE

The New York city of Rye is the youngest in the state, having received its charter in 1942. Rye is home to the historic amusement park called Playland, which in 1987 was designated a National Historic Landmark. Opened in 1928, today’s Playland is actually owned and operated by Westchester County, making it one of the only government-operated amusement parks in the whole country.

123 Like the “Mona Lisa” in 1911 : STOLEN

Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece that we know in English as the “Mona Lisa” is called “La Gioconda” in Italian, the language of the artist. It’s also known as “La Joconde” by the Government of France which owns the painting and displays it in the Louvre Museum in Paris. The title comes from the name of the subject, almost certainly Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo. Giocondo was a wealthy silk merchant in Florence who commissioned the painting for the couple’s new home to celebrate the birth of their second son.

124 Civics and Accords : SEDANS

The American sedan car is the equivalent of the British saloon car. By definition, a sedan car has two rows of seating and a separate trunk (boot in the UK), although in some models the engine can be at the rear of the car.

Down

2 ___ Parade, annual June celebration : PRIDE

The first gay pride parades were held all on the same weekend in 1970, in New York City, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

The police raided a gay bar called the Stonewall Inn on June 29th, 1969. That raid triggered to a spate of violent demonstrations led by the LGBT community. Now known as the Stonewall riots, those demonstrations are viewed by many as a significant event leading to the modern-day fight for LGBT rights in the US. Since then, June has been chosen as LGBT Pride Month in recognition of the Stonewall riots.

3 Intel producer : RECON

A “recon” (reconnaissance) might provide “intel” (intelligence).

4 Scads : A LOT

The origin of the word “scads”, meaning “lots and lots”, is unclear. That said, “scads” was used to mean “dollars” back in the mid-1800s.

5 Part of the upper bod : PEC

“Pecs” is the familiar name for the chest muscle, which is more correctly known as the pectoralis major muscle. “Pectus” is the Latin word for “breast, chest”.

10 Capital of French Polynesia : PAPEETE

French Polynesia (Polynésie française) is a vast overseas territory of France that is located in the South Pacific Ocean. It comprises 118 islands and atolls dispersed over 1,609 square miles, the most populous being Tahiti.

11 Off the internet, to internet users : IRL

In real life (IRL)

12 Blue toon in a white dress : SMURFETTE

The Smurfs are little blue people created in 1958 by the Belgian cartoonist who went by the pen name Peyo. The Smurfs became famous in the US when Hanna-Barbera used them in a children’s cartoon series. The characters are largely a group of males. The original lineup included just one “Smurfette”, who is wooed by almost all of the boy Smurfs. Later, another female was introduced into the mix called Sassette, and still later along came Granny Smurf.

13 Chocolate substitute : CAROB

The carob is a tree or shrub in the pea family that is mainly grown for its seed pods. The carob seeds are dried or roasted, and when powdered or chipped make a good substitute for chocolate.

14 Japanese soybean appetizer : EDAMAME

Edamame is a simple dish made of immature soybeans still in the pod. The pods are boiled and then salted before serving, usually as a snack or side dish. The name “edamame” translates as “twig bean”.

17 Grand dwelling : PALACE

Our word “palace” ultimately comes from the name of Rome’s Palatine Hill, “Mons Palatinus” in Latin. The original “palace” was the house of Augustus Caesar, which stood on the Palatine Hill.

24 Ankle-biter : RUG RAT

“Rug rat” and “ankle-biter” are familiar terms meaning “child”, and especially a child who is not yet walking.

31 Weapon sought by Voldemort : ELDER WAND

Lord Voldemort (born Tom Marvolo Riddle) is the main “bad guy” in the “Harry Potter” series of books. I heard author J. K. Rowling on the radio some time back and she tells us that “Voldemort” is supposed to be pronounced with a silent “t” on the end, so it sounds kind of French. But when the movies came out the actors went with the hard “t”, and that’s the pronunciation that seems to prevail now. It seems to be generally accepted that Rowling chose the name from the French “vol de mort” meaning “flight of death”.

33 Woman with a well-known internet “list” : ANGIE

Angie’s List is a website used by consumers to rate and research local businesses. The “list” was founded in 1995, originally as a call-in service and publication with reviews, by William S. Oesterle and the eponymous Angie Hicks. Angie’s List moved to the Internet in 1996, and by 2013 had 70,000 subscribers.

34 Cardiologist’s tool : STENT

In the world of surgical medicine, a stent is an artificial tube inserted inside a vessel in the body, say an artery, in order to reduce the effects of a local restriction in the body’s conduit.

36 Go full ___ (throw a world-class hissy fit) : DIVA

The term “diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

42 Drink in a little cup : SAKE

We refer to the Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice as “sake”. We’ve gotten things a bit mixed up in the West. “Sake” is actually the word that the Japanese use for all alcoholic drinks. What we know as sake, we sometimes refer to as rice wine. Also, the starch in the rice is first converted to sugars that are then fermented into alcohol. This is more akin to a beer-brewing process than wine production, so the end product is really a rice “beer” rather than a rice “wine”.

44 Put forth, as a theory : POSITED

To “posit” is to assume as fact, to lay down as a “position”.

47 Dance that men often do shirtless : HULA

The hula is a native dance of Hawaii that uses arm movements to relate a story. The hula can be performed while sitting (a noho dance) or while standing (a luna dance).

48 Europe-based grp. with no European members : OPEC

The OPEC cartel was formally established in 1960 and has been headquartered in Vienna since 1965. The US is actually the third largest oil producer in the world (after Russia and Saudi Arabia). One reason America isn’t in OPEC, even though we are a big producer, is that we import a lot more than we export. But we all probably knew that already …

50 Org. that employs radio telescopes : SETI

“SETI” is the name given to a number of projects that are searching for extraterrestrial life. The acronym stands for “search for extraterrestrial intelligence”. One of the main SETI activities is the monitoring of electromagnetic radiation (such as radio waves) reaching the Earth in the hope of finding a transmission from a civilization in another world.

52 Principle of harmonious design : FENG SHUI

Feng shui is the ancient Chinese tradition of arranging objects, buildings and other structures in a manner that is said to improve the lives of the individuals living in or using the space. “Feng shui” translates as “wind-water”, a reference to the belief that positive and negative life forces ride the wind and scatter, but are retained when they encounter water.

58 Actor Patel : DEV

Dev Patel is an actor from Harrow in England. Patel is best known for playing the lead in the hit movie “Slumdog Millionaire”. He also stars in a lovely 2012 film called “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel” alongside an incredible cast that included Judi Dench, Bill Nighy, Maggie Smith and Tom Wilkinson. Patel also had a regular role in the marvelous HBO drama series called “The Newsroom”.

65 Kind of rating : NIELSEN

Arthur Nielsen founded his Nielsen Media Research company to track brand advertising. He quickly moved into market analysis of radio audiences in the thirties, and today the company is famous for tracking television audiences. I remember watching the last episode of the TV series “Becker”, in which Ted Danson played a doctor. Given that the show had been ordered off the air due to declining viewership, there’s a great line in the last episode when Becker asks for the chart of a patient called “Nielsen”. He looks at the lab results and announces “I don’t know what everyone is talking about … these numbers aren’t so bad!” Great stuff …

67 Road crew’s supply : TAR

The terms “tarmac” and “macadam” are short for “tarmacadam”. In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as “macadam”. Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The “tar-penetration macadam” is the basis of what we now call tarmac.

68 House speaker before Pelosi : RYAN

Paul Ryan was a nominee for Vice President in the 2012 election, and was on the Republican ticket with Mitt Romney. Ryan was elected as Speaker of the House of Representatives in 2015 after John Boehner resigned. At 45, Ryan then became the youngest Speaker since 1875.

Nancy Pelosi first became Speaker of the House in 2007, and was the 60th person to hold that position. Ms. Pelosi represents a district not far from here, which covers most of San Francisco. She was the first Californian, the first Italian-American and the first woman to be Speaker of the House. As Speaker of the House is second-in-line to the presidency, after the Vice President, Nancy Pelosi is the highest-ranking female politician in US history.

76 Disintegrate, in a way, as cells in the body : LYSE

Lysosomes are structures found within cells that have the job of breaking up waste material and cellular debris.

79 S O S in Gotham City : BAT-SIGNAL

Batman is an ally of Police Commissioner Gordon of Gotham City. Gordon orders the shining of a searchlight, known as the Bat-Signal, into the sky to summon Batman when he is needed.

82 Simple shelter : TEPEE

A tepee (also written as “tipi” and “teepee”) is a cone-shaped tent traditionally made from animal hides that is used by the Great Plains Native Americans. A wigwam is a completely different structure and is often a misnomer for a tepee. A wigwam is a domed structure built by Native Americans in the West and Southwest, intended to be a more permanent dwelling. The wigwam can also be covered with hides but more often was covered with grass, reeds, brush or cloth.

89 “Marriage Story” co-star, to fans : SCARJO

Scarlett Johansson is a film actress from New York City. Johansson had an acclaimed lead performance in the 1996 movie “Manny & Lo”, when she was just 12 years old. The earliest films I remember her in, two favorites of mine, are “Girl in a Pearl Earring” and “Lost in Translation”, both from 2013. She has become quite the sex symbol, and is the only woman to have been named “Sexiest Woman Alive” twice by “Esquire” magazine. The media sometimes refer to her as “ScarJo”, a moniker that she apparently dislikes intensely.

“Marriage Story” is a 2019 movie starring Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver as a couple going through a messy divorce. The critics loved this one. Me, not so much …

96 Headstrong : ORNERY

Back in the early 1800s, the word “ornery” was an informal contraction for the word “ordinary”, and meant commonplace, but with a sense of “poor quality, coarse, ugly” as opposed to “special”. Towards the end of the century, the usage “ornery” had evolved into describing someone who was mean or cantankerous.

99 Like a wunderkind : GIFTED

A wunderkind is a child prodigy, often one with a musical gift. The term is German in origin and translates literally as “wonder child”.

101 Edie of “The Sopranos” : FALCO

Actress Edie Falco won three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO’s outstanding drama series called “The Sopranos”. Falco also won an Emmy in 2010 for playing the title role in “Nurse Jackie”, an excellent black comedy.

“The Sopranos” is an outstanding television drama made by HBO that is a story about Italian-American mobsters in New Jersey. “The Sopranos” is regularly cited as one of the best TV series of all time. It’s “must see TV” …

106 Exams for some bio majors : MCATS

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT)

113 Director Craven : WES

Wes Craven was a very successful film director and writer specializing in movies of the horror genre, which means that I don’t watch them! He was responsible for “A Nightmare on Elm Street” and the “Scream” films. Craven passed away in August 2015.

116 Thurman of “Pulp Fiction” : UMA

Uma Thurman started her working career as a fashion model, at the age of 15. She appeared in her first movies at 17, with her most acclaimed early role being Cécile de Volanges in 1988’s “Dangerous Liaisons”. Thurman’s career really took off when she played the gangster’s moll Mia in Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” in 1994. My favorite of all Thurman’s movies is “The Truth About Cats & Dogs”, a less acclaimed romcom released in 1996. She took a few years off from acting from 1998 until 2002 following the birth of her first child. It was Tarantino who relaunched her career, giving her the lead in the “Kill Bill” films.

I’m not a big fan of director Quentin Tarantino. His movies are too violent for me, and the size of his ego just turns me right off. Having said that, I think “Pulp Fiction” is a remarkable film. If you can look past the violence, it’s really well written. And what a legacy it has. John Travolta’s career was on the rocks and he did the film for practically no money, and it turned out to be a re-launch for him. Uma Thurman became a top celebrity overnight from her role. Even Bruce Willis got some good out of it, putting an end to a string of poorly-received performances.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Big inits. in news : NPR
4 Place to visit in a suit : APIARY
10 Sign of winter’s end : PISCES
16 Purchase that often costs 99¢ : APP
19 Something picked at with a pickax : ORE
20 Comic Jones formerly of “S.N.L.” : LESLIE
21 Fleet : ARMADA
22 Low-___ : CAL
23 Duffer’s approach shots that barely go anywhere? : MICROCHIPS
25 Like kids, but not mom or dad? : PLURAL
26 Gaza grp. : PLO
27 Bad position for a server : AD OUT
28 Pick up : SENSE
30 CD follower : -ROM
31 Flair : ELAN
32 Post-Mao Chinese leader : DENG
33 Duffer’s putt that just misses? : A STROKE OF BAD LUCK
37 Goes on a tweetstorm : RANTS
39 ___ Reader : UTNE
40 Tiny insects in a swarm : MIDGES
41 Founder of WikiLeaks : ASSANGE
44 Common skirt feature : PLEAT
45 Preparatory time : EVE
46 Nickname for a duffer who can’t hit straight? : CAPTAIN HOOK
49 “___ on!” : IT’S
51 Yapped like a dog : ARFED
55 Make (out) : EKE
56 Pauses : LETUPS
57 King Midas’s downfall : GREED
59 Sport : WEAR
60 Showing signs of neglect : SEEDY
62 Orphan girl in Byron’s “Don Juan” : LEILA
64 Lodgers : TENANTS
66 Result of spectators heckling a duffer? : DISTRACTED DRIVING
71 Rope holding down a bowsprit : BOBSTAY
73 Course that’s free of obstacles? : EASY A
74 It was “a no-go” in Billy Joel’s “We Didn’t Start the Fire” : EDSEL
77 “Such is life!” : ALAS
78 Foaming at the mouth : RABID
81 Certain insurance coverage : DENTAL
84 Line on a map: Abbr. : HWY
85 Protection : AEGIS
87 Rapper Lil ___ X : NAS
88 Duffer’s problems with an angled club? : WEDGE ISSUES
90 Scale starter, per “The Sound of Music” : DOE
92 Attach to the end of : TAG ON
94 On the button : PRECISE
95 “I’m listening” : DO TELL
98 Physician Jonas : SALK
99 Actress Davis : GEENA
100 Duffer’s reasons to choose a wood? : IRON DEFICIENCIES
104 Turntable rates, in brief : RPMS
108 Letter-shaped fastener : T-NUT
109 ___ order : GAG
110 Wolf (down) : SNARF
111 Button on a DVD player : EJECT
112 Cool, in an uncool way : HEP
113 Something consumed with a cracker? : WALNUT
115 Like the duffer in this puzzle? : NOT UP TO PAR
118 Palindrome in poetry : ERE
119 Box up : ENCASE
120 Cause of fatigue : ANEMIA
121 VW predecessors? : STU
122 New York city on Long Island Sound : RYE
123 Like the “Mona Lisa” in 1911 : STOLEN
124 Civics and Accords : SEDANS
125 School of thought : ISM

Down

1 Wanderer : NOMAD
2 ___ Parade, annual June celebration : PRIDE
3 Intel producer : RECON
4 Scads : A LOT
5 Part of the upper bod : PEC
6 “Or so” : -ISH
7 V.I.P. rosters : A LISTS
8 More yellow, but not yet brown, say : RIPER
9 Like a question for which “maybe” is not an option : YES/NO
10 Capital of French Polynesia : PAPEETE
11 Off the internet, to internet users : IRL
12 Blue toon in a white dress : SMURFETTE
13 Chocolate substitute : CAROB
14 Japanese soybean appetizer : EDAMAME
15 Nickname that can be either masculine or feminine : SAL
16 Standard outlet connection : AC PLUG
17 Grand dwelling : PALACE
18 Carelessly drops : PLONKS
24 Ankle-biter : RUG RAT
29 Move stealthily : SKULK
31 Weapon sought by Voldemort : ELDER WAND
33 Woman with a well-known internet “list” : ANGIE
34 Cardiologist’s tool : STENT
35 Like some personalities : ON-AIR
36 Go full ___ (throw a world-class hissy fit) : DIVA
38 Certain employee at ESPN or JPMorgan Chase : ANALYST
41 Vanquishers of kings? : ACES
42 Drink in a little cup : SAKE
43 Piece of training equipment in boxing : SPEED BAG
44 Put forth, as a theory : POSITED
47 Dance that men often do shirtless : HULA
48 Europe-based grp. with no European members : OPEC
50 Org. that employs radio telescopes : SETI
52 Principle of harmonious design : FENG SHUI
53 Absorb, as a loss : EAT
54 Ones practicing: Abbr. : DRS
57 ___ Purchase, 1853 land deal with Mexico : GADSDEN
58 Actor Patel : DEV
61 Thorn in a dictator’s side : DISSIDENT
63 Grassy field : LEA
65 Kind of rating : NIELSEN
67 Road crew’s supply : TAR
68 House speaker before Pelosi : RYAN
69 Went green, perhaps? : DYED
70 Called up : RANG
71 Call to a shepherd : BAA!
72 Stadium cry : OLE!
75 Milk sources : EWES
76 Disintegrate, in a way, as cells in the body : LYSE
79 S O S in Gotham City : BAT-SIGNAL
80 Biblical figure with a tomb in the Cave of the Patriarchs : ISAAC
82 Simple shelter : TEPEE
83 Spanish winds : AIRES
86 Convinced : SOLD
88 No longer sleeping : WOKEN
89 “Marriage Story” co-star, to fans : SCARJO
91 Simple and ingenious : ELEGANT
93 Sparkle : GLISTEN
95 Have trouble deciding : DITHER
96 Headstrong : ORNERY
97 Spot coverage? : TOUPEE
99 Like a wunderkind : GIFTED
101 Edie of “The Sopranos” : FALCO
102 Spoilers, of a sort : NANAS
103 Witch : CRONE
105 “Catch That ___ Spirit” (old ad slogan) : PEPSI
106 Exams for some bio majors : MCATS
107 Pull some strings? : STRUM
111 Guesses by GPSes : ETAS
113 Director Craven : WES
114 Play with : USE
116 Thurman of “Pulp Fiction” : UMA
117 Word with rolling or bowling : … PIN

11 thoughts on “0419-20 NY Times Crossword 19 Apr 20, Sunday”

  1. 48:30. Both the cluing and subject matter got me on this one. PAPEETE, BOBSTAY and FENG SHUI I had to get via crosses. Jeff Chen’s cluing is always good for making you turn sideways a few times. The guy is good at this.

    I didn’t know the Mona Lisa was stolen in 1911. Apparently it wasn’t a particularly famous piece until then. I stared at it once for about 2 minutes at the Louvre in 1999. It struck me how small it was.

    Best –

  2. I should have guessed it was a Jeff Chen puzzle! Spent forever searching for one wrong letter. Grrr. Oh, 48:37 with one cheat.

  3. And coming in fourth? Me with 49:10. Amused that I knew “feng shui” from a running joke we have about the disaster that is my den. Never encountered “IRL” in internet “speak” only in Indy Racing League, which I long ago lost interest in

  4. I spent over 2 hours to finish this one with no errors…anytime I see a Jeff Chen puzzle I know I’m in for a long stay…Does he ever do one by himself?
    What does 88A mean?…I just stopped to watch the Blue Angles and the Air Force fly over to honor the health care workers…very emotional.

    1. A “wedge issue” can be defined as “a divisive political issue” but, in this puzzle, it is humorously defined as a duffer’s problem with a golf club of a certain kind, called a “wedge”.

  5. …and the various wedge clubs are angled anywhere from 47 to 62 degrees. “Angled club” in the clue is meant to be the “wedge” hint.

  6. 32:48, no errors. Learned A LOT from today’s puzzle. LYSE sent me to an article on osteogenesis, fascinating stuff. BOBSTAY is something that I might recall in the future, but will never use.

  7. Took longer than expected.. Like others here, I saw Chen and winced.. 2 lookups and still 2 errors.. After an hour I have to speed things up. Couple of places that I got stuck,.. PAPEETE and GADSDEN.. I should have worked around them but I was too headstrong.. Still fun.

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