0216-20 NY Times Crossword 16 Feb 20, Sunday

Constructed by: Sam Ezersky
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Number Theory

Themed answers include an English word that may be reinterpreted as a number in a foreign language. That number is repeated beside the themed answer, with the appropriate language specified elsewhere in the grid:

  • 90A With 92-Across, alternative title for this puzzle : LOST IN …
  • 92A See 90-Across : … TRANSLATION
  • 24A Relative of marmalade : QUINCE JELLY
  • 26A FIFTEEN : QUINCE
  • 20A What the answer at 26-Across is written in : SPANISH
    • 46A Whom Harry Potter frees from serving Draco Malfoy’s family : DOBBY THE HOUSE ELF
    • 45A ELEVEN : ELF
    • 34A What the answer at 45-Across is written in : GERMAN
    • 59A With 60-Across, take control after a coup : SEIZE …
    • 60A See 59-Across : … POWER
    • 61A SIXTEEN : SEIZE
    • 84A What the answer at 61-Across is written in : FRENCH
    • 71A Because : DUE TO THE FACT THAT
    • 75A TWO : DUE
    • 104A What the answer at 75-Across is written in : ITALIAN

    … a complete list of answers

    Bill’s time: 24m 27s

    Bill’s errors: 0

    Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

    Across

    5 Kind of case in grammar : DATIVE

    As we recall from English class, a noun is in the dative case when it refers to an object that is given “to” someone.

    24 Relative of marmalade : QUINCE JELLY

    The quince is a fruit related to the apple and pear. Some people suggest that the fruit eaten from the Tree of Knowledge by Adam and Eve was in fact a quince.

    28 Oval Office V.I.P. : POTUS

    President of the United States (POTUS)

    Although there have been several “oval” offices used by US presidents in the White House, the current Oval Office was designed and constructed at the bequest of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The room has four doors. One door opens onto the Rose Garden; a second door leads to a small study and dining room; a third opens onto the main corridor running through the West Wing; the fourth door opens to the office of the president’s secretary.

    29 Transition point : CUSP

    The word “cusp” comes from the Latin “cuspis” meaning “spear, point”. In the world of astrology, a cusp is an imaginary line separating two signs of the zodiac. For example, some whose birthday is between April 16 and April 26 is said to have been born “on the cusp” between the signs Aries and Taurus.

    40 Gaping opening : MAW

    “Maw” is a term used to describe the mouth or stomach of a carnivorous animal. “Maw” is also used as slang for the mouth or stomach of a greedy person.

    41 Willem of “John Wick” : DAFOE

    Willem Dafoe is an American actor, one from Wisconsin. He was born just plain “William” Dafoe, but didn’t like being called “Billy”. So, he changed his name to “Willem”, which was the pronunciation of his name by his Scottish babysitter.

    “John Wick” is a 2014 action movie starring Keanu Reeves in the title role. Reeves plays a retired hitman who goes on a killing spree to avenge the murder of his dog. There’s quite the body count …

    46 Whom Harry Potter frees from serving Draco Malfoy’s family : DOBBY THE HOUSE ELF

    In the “Harry Potter” universe, Dobby is a house elf (basically a slave) used by the Malfoy family.

    50 Spicy, crunchy snack tidbit : WASABI PEA

    Wasabi peas are peas that have been fried and then coated with wasabi powder mixed with sugar, salt and oil. They are crunchy snacks, and a favorite of mine …

    53 “Ars Amatoria” writer : OVID

    “Ars amatoria” (“The Art of Love” in English) is a series of poems in three books by the Roman poet Ovid. Book one provides men with instruction on how to find a woman. Book two gives a man guidance on keeping that woman. Ovid turns the tables in book three and gives advice to women on how to find and keep a man.

    54 Area the Chinese call Xizang : TIBET

    Tibet is a plateau region that is part of China, and is located northeast of the Himalayas. Tibet declared its independence from China in 1913, but fell back under Chinese control after the Invasion of Tibet in 1951. The Tibetan leader, the 14th Dalai Lama, fled the country during the 1959 Tibetan Rebellion. Since then, he has led the Tibetan government-in-exile in Dharamsala, India.

    56 Hell : HADES

    In classical mythology, the god of the underworld was named Hades. Over time, “Hades” came to mean the underworld itself and the name for the god became “Pluto”. Pluto’s character was more positive than the god Hades, and he represented a more rewarding afterlife compared to that offered by the darker Hades.

    59 With 60-Across, take control after a coup : SEIZE …
    60 See 59-Across : … POWER

    A coup d’état (often just “coup”) is the sudden overthrow of a government, and comes from the French for “stroke of state”. The Swiss-German word “putsch” is sometimes used instead of “coup”, with “Putsch” translating literally as “sudden blow”. We also use the abbreviated “coup” to mean “sudden, brilliant and successful act”.

    77 Miss in the future, maybe : MRS

    “Mr.” is an abbreviation for “mister”, and “Mrs.” is an abbreviation for “mistress”.

    78 Buzz source : KAZOO

    The modern instrument we know today as the kazoo was invented by one Alabama Vest of Macon, Georgia in the 1800s. The kazoo first came to the public’s attention at the Georgia State Fair of 1852, when it was known as the “Down-South Submarine” (because of its shape, I would imagine).

    81 Fictional creature made from slime : ORC

    Orcs are mythical humanoid creatures that appear in the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien. Since Tolkien’s use of orcs, they have also been featured in other fantasy fiction as well as in fantasy video games.

    88 Rainbows, e.g. : ARCS

    Sunlight reflected by airborne water droplets can produce rainbows. The water droplets act as little prisms, dispersing the white light into its constituent colors. Sometimes we see double rainbows. If we look carefully, we can see that the order of the colors in the first and second arcs is reversed.

    101 It’s SW of Erie, Pa. : AKRON, OH

    For much of the 1800s, the Ohio city of Akron was the fastest-growing city in the country, feeding off the industrial boom of that era. The city was founded in 1825 and its location, along the Ohio and Erie canal connecting Lake Erie with the Ohio River, helped to fuel Akron’s growth. Akron sits at the highest point of the canal and the name “Akron” comes from the Greek word meaning “summit”. Indeed, Akron is the county seat of Summit County. The city earned the moniker “Rubber Capital of the World” for most of the 20th century, as it was home to four major tire companies: Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone and General Tire.

    106 With 103-Across, character in Episodes I through IX of “Star Wars” : ARTOO …
    103 See 106-Across : -DETOO

    Artoo’s proper name is R2-D2 (also “Artoo-Detoo”). R2-D2 is the smaller of the two famous droids from the “Star Wars” movies. British actor Kenny Baker, who stood just 3 ft 8 ins tall, was the man inside the R2-D2 droid for the first six of the “Star Wars” movies.

    107 Millennial, informally : GEN-YER

    The Millennial Generation are sometimes referred to as “Generation Y” (Gen-Y). Millennials were born after the “Gen-Xers”, from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

    109 “Butt out!” : MYOB

    Mind your own business (MYOB)

    Down

    1 Title host of radio’s first major quiz show : DR IQ

    “Dr. I.Q.” is a quiz show that aired on the radio from 1939 until 1950, with a television version airing from 1953 until 1954, and again from 1958 until 1959. The show’s format called for assistants to wander through the theater seeking audience members will to participate in the quiz. This led to the show’s catchphrase “I have a lady in the balcony, Doctor!”, which was announced when the assistant found someone for the quizmaster to challenge.

    2 Contact lens care brand : RENU

    ReNu is a brand name of contact lens products sold by Bausch & Lomb.

    3 Broadway opening : ACT I

    New York’s original theater district was located around Union Square, which was called Rialto, after the famous commercial district in Venice, Italy. New York theaters relocated over time to the Broadway area. However, the term “rialto” continues to be used for the city’s theater district, and indeed for a theater district in many towns and cities.

    5 Items that, ironically, contain nickel : DIMES

    The term “dime”, used for a 10-cent coin, comes from the Old French word “disme” meaning “tenth part”.

    6 “Slumdog Millionaire” co-star ___ Kapoor : ANIL

    The brilliant film “Slumdog Millionaire” is a screen adaptation of a 2005 novel by Indian author Vikas Swarup. A low-budget movie, it ended up winning eight Oscars in 2008. I reckon it turned a profit …

    8 Wishy-washy R.S.V.P. : I MAY

    “RSVP” stands for “répondez s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “answer, please”.

    12 Soldier on horseback : LANCER

    Lancers (also “lancemen”) were a special type of cavalry soldier, ones who fought with lances!

    14 Sloan School of Management sch. : MIT

    MIT’s School of Management is named for MIT graduate Alfred P. Sloan, a former chairman of General Motors.

    19 Like some New Orleans cooking : CAJUN

    Cajun cuisine is named for the French-speaking Acadian people who were deported from Acadia in Canada to Louisiana in the 18th century.

    20 Sloppy : SLIPSHOD

    Someone of something described as slipshod is slovenly in appearance or sloppy. The term “slipshod” probably comes from the idea of someone appearing in one’s slippers, someone who hasn’t made an effort in their dress.

    25 Letter in the classical spelling of “Athena” : ETA

    Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

    The Greek goddess Athena (sometimes “Athene”) is often associated with wisdom, among other attributes. In many representations. Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today’s perception of the owl as being “wise”. Athena’s Roman counterpart was Minerva.

    29 Some battery ends : CATHODES

    A battery is a device that converts chemical energy into electric energy. A simple battery is made up of three parts: a cathode, an anode and a liquid electrolyte. Ions from the electrolyte react chemically with the material in the anode producing a compound and releasing electrons. At the same time, the electrolyte reacts with the material in the cathode, absorbing electrons and producing a different chemical compound. In this way, there is a buildup of electrons at the anode and a deficit of electrons at the cathode. When a connection (wire, say) is made between the cathode and anode, electrons flow through the resulting circuit from the anode to cathode in an attempt to rectify the electron imbalance.

    31 Amorphous creatures : AMOEBAE

    An ameba (also “amoeba”) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

    32 Dreaded musician of the 1960s-’70s : MARLEY

    Bob Marley is the most widely-known reggae performer, with big hits such as “I Shot the Sheriff”, “No Woman, No Cry” and “One Love”. A little sadly perhaps, Marley’s best selling album was released three years after he died. That album would be the “legendary” album called “Legend”.

    Dreadlocks are matted coils of hair that are usually formed intentionally, although if one lets hair grow out without grooming then it naturally forms twisted and matted dreadlocks. The hairstyle is associated with the Rastafarian movement in which “dread” is a very positive term meaning “fear of the Lord”.

    36 1974 Eurovision winner that went on to international stardom : ABBA

    I am an unapologetic fan of ABBA’s music. ABBA was the Swedish group who topped the charts in the seventies and eighties. The name ABBA is an acronym formed from the first letters of the given names of each of the band members: Agnetha, Benny, Bjorn and Anni-Frid. Early in their careers, the four fell in love and formed two married couples: Agnetha and Bjorn, and Benny and Anni-Frid. However, at the height of their success, the relationships became strained and both couples divorced.

    We have a big event across Europe every year called the Eurovision Song Contest. Each nation enters one song in competition with each other, and then voters across the whole continent decide on the winner. That’s how ABBA got their big break when they won in 1974 with “Waterloo”. In 1973, Spain’s entry was “Eres tú” (“It’s You”, literally “You Are”) sung by the band Mocedades. “Eres tú” came second in the competition, but should have won in my humble opinion.

    38 Immature stage of a salamander : EFT

    Salamanders are lizard-like amphibians found all across the northern hemisphere. They are the only vertebrate animals that can regenerate lost limbs.

    39 Letters of credit? : IOU

    I owe you (IOU)

    44 Where Wagner was born and Bach died : LEIPZIG

    Leipzig is a city in Germany located just under 100 miles south of Berlin. The name “Leipzig” comes from the Slavic word ”Lipsk” which means “settlement where the linden trees stand”. Linden trees are also called lime trees and basswood trees.

    Johann Sebastian Bach died when he was 65-years-old, in 1750. He was buried in Old St. John’s Cemetery in Leipzig, and his grave went unmarked until 1894. At that time his coffin was located, removed and buried in a vault within the church. The church was destroyed in an Allied bombing raid during WWII, and so after the war the remains had to be recovered and taken to the Church of St. Thomas in Leipzig.

    Richard Wagner was born in the Jewish quarter of Leipzig in 1813. Decades later, Wagner became known not only for writing magnificent music, but also for his anti-semitic views and writings.

    49 Oktoberfest vessels : STEINS

    Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve attended twice, and it really is a remarkable party …

    60 High hairstyle : POUF

    The pouf is an updo hairstyle that was popularized in 18th-century France by Marie Antoinette. The French queen first sported the pouf at the coronation of her husband, Louis XVI. Ladies of the day would often wear many ornaments and decorations in their hair set in a pouf, such as pearls, feathers and even ships.

    61 Club ___ : SODA

    We call carbonated water “club soda”, because Club Soda used to be a brand name. The Club brand of drinks is actually Irish, and is owned by a company now known as C&C. As kids, we grew up on Club Orange and Club Lemon. Club Soda, not so much …

    62 Egypt’s “king of the gods” : AMUN-RA

    Amun-Ra (also “Amon, Amen”) was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word “ammonia”. This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, “sal ammoniacus” (salt of Amun).

    63 Excellent conductors : MAESTRI

    “Maestro” is often used to address a musical conductor. “Maestro” (plural “maestri”) is the Italian word for “master, teacher”. The plural in English is usually “maestros”.

    64 N.Y.C. neighborhood near NoLIta : SOHO

    The Manhattan neighborhood known today as SoHo was very fashionable in the early 1900s, but as the well-heeled started to move uptown the area became very run down and poorly maintained. Noted for the number of fires that erupted in derelict buildings, SoHo earned the nickname “Hell’s Hundred Acres”. The area was then zoned for manufacturing and became home to many sweatshops. In the mid-1900s artists started to move into open loft spaces and renovating old buildings as the lofts were ideal locations in which an artist could both live and work. In 1968, artists and others organized themselves so that they could legalize their residential use of an area zoned for manufacturing. The group they formed took its name from the name given to the area by the city’s Planning Commission i.e “South of Houston”. This was shortened from So-uth of Ho-uston to SoHo as in the SoHo Artists Association, and the name stuck.

    NoLIta is a neighborhood in Manhattan in New York City. The name “NoLIta” is derived from “North of Little Italy”. One of NoLIta’s most famous sons is the director Martin Scorsese.

    65 “Ciao” : ADIOS

    The term “adiós” is Spanish for “goodbye”. “Adiós” comes from the phrase “a Dios vos acomiendo” meaning “I commend you to God”.

    67 Muscle cars of the ’60s : GTOS

    The initialism “GTO” was used on several touring cars (including a famous Pontiac) and stands for “Gran Turismo Omologato”. Italian car manufacturers started the tradition of calling their luxury performance cars “Gran Turismo”, and calling those cars they approved for racing “Gran Turismo Omologato”. The phrase “gran turismo omologato” translates as “grand touring homologated”, “homologated” being a technical term signifying official approval.

    70 “E.T.” actress Wallace : DEE

    Actress Dee Wallace is best known for playing young Elliot’s mother in the Steven Spielberg 1982 masterpiece “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”.

    72 “Ugh, stop talking already!” : TMI

    Too much information (TMI)

    74 Sun ___, “The Art of War” philosopher : TZU

    “The Art of War(fare)” is an ancient military text that is attributed to a high-ranking Chinese general called Sun Tzu. I’ve even seen the principles in Sun Tzu’s book applied to modern business.

    80 Like the presidency of John Adams : ONE-TERM

    John Adams was the second President of the United States. I must admit that I learned much of what I know about President Adams in the excellent, excellent HBO series “John Adams”, which is based on David McCullough’s 2001 biography of the same name. Having said that, I have also visited the Adams home in Quincy, Massachusetts several times. He was clearly a great man with a great intellect …

    83 Longtime Eagles QB Donovan : MCNABB

    Donovan McNabb played as quarterback with Syracuse University before joining the Philadelphia Eagles, Washington Redskins and then the Minnesota Vikings.

    89 Kisses, in Cambridge : SNOGS

    “Snogging” is British slang of unknown origin that dates back to the end of WWII. The term is used for “kissing and cuddling”, what we call “making out” over here in the US.

    93 Candy wrapped in a tube : ROLO

    Rolo was a hugely popular chocolate candy in Ireland when I was growing up. Rolo was introduced in the thirties in the UK, and is produced under license in the US by Hershey. I was a little disappointed when I had my first taste of the American version as the center is very hard and chewy. The recipe used on the other side of the Atlantic calls for a soft gooey center.

    94 “I’ll come to you ___”: Macbeth : ANON

    There is a superstition in the theatrical world that uttering the name “Macbeth” in a theater will bring disaster of some sort. To avoid this, the euphemism “the Scottish Play” is used instead.

    96 New pedometer reading : OOOO

    A pedometer is an instrument worn by a runner or walker that measures the number of steps taken. The name of the device comes from “pes”, the Latin for “foot”.

    97 Beginner, in modern lingo : NOOB

    “Noob” is a not-so-nice slang term for a “newbie”, and often refers to someone who is new to an online community.

    100 ___ Salvador : SAN

    San Salvador is the capital of El Salvador. The city was founded by the Spanish 1525, although it was moved on two occasions early on, in 1528 and 1545. The name “San Salvador” translates as “Holy Savior”.

    102 What will happily sell its Soul? : KIA

    The Kia Soul is a compact car produced in South Korea, although it was designed by Kia here in the US, in Irvine, California. Yep, the Kia Soul is made in Seoul …

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    Complete List of Clues/Answers

    Across

    1 “Consarn it!” : DRAT!
    5 Kind of case in grammar : DATIVE
    11 Shed some pounds : SLIM UP
    17 Edited, in a way : RECUT
    19 Sister channel of HBO : CINEMAX
    20 What the answer at 26-Across is written in : SPANISH
    21 Low-level, as a class : INTRO
    22 Question that might be asked when hurrying into a meeting : AM I LATE?
    23 Duty for a property owner : LAND TAX
    24 Relative of marmalade : QUINCE JELLY
    26 FIFTEEN : QUINCE
    28 Oval Office V.I.P. : POTUS
    29 Transition point : CUSP
    30 Period preceding a school break : EXAMS
    34 What the answer at 45-Across is written in : GERMAN
    36 “Yes, captain” : AYE AYE, SIR
    40 Gaping opening : MAW
    41 Willem of “John Wick” : DAFOE
    42 Toward the stern : ABAFT
    43 Howe’er : THO’
    44 Chicago mayor Lightfoot : LORI
    45 ELEVEN : ELF
    46 Whom Harry Potter frees from serving Draco Malfoy’s family : DOBBY THE HOUSE ELF
    50 Spicy, crunchy snack tidbit : WASABI PEA
    53 “Ars Amatoria” writer : OVID
    54 Area the Chinese call Xizang : TIBET
    55 “Make sense?” : GET IT?
    56 Hell : HADES
    58 Square up with : REPAY
    59 With 60-Across, take control after a coup : SEIZE …
    60 See 59-Across : … POWER
    61 SIXTEEN : SEIZE
    62 “Just ___ boy, born and raised in South Detroit” (lyric from “Don’t Stop Believin'”) : A CITY
    63 Specks : MOTES
    64 Sleep: Prefix : SOMNI-
    65 Not quite right : AMISS
    66 Full of tension : TAUT
    67 “Hallelujah, praise the Lord!” : GOD IS GOOD!
    71 Because : DUE TO THE FACT THAT
    75 TWO : DUE
    76 Cozy spots to stop : INNS
    77 Miss in the future, maybe : MRS
    78 Buzz source : KAZOO
    79 Cocktail specification : NO ICE
    81 Fictional creature made from slime : ORC
    82 Restaurant handouts for calorie counters : DIET MENUS
    84 What the answer at 61-Across is written in : FRENCH
    86 Final authority : SAY-SO
    88 Rainbows, e.g. : ARCS
    89 Flour filter : SIEVE
    90 With 92-Across, alternative title for this puzzle : LOST IN …
    92 See 90-Across : … TRANSLATION
    98 On-the-go sort : BUSY BEE
    101 It’s SW of Erie, Pa. : AKRON, OH
    103 See 106-Across : -DETOO
    104 What the answer at 75-Across is written in : ITALIAN
    105 Life lessons? : BIOLOGY
    106 With 103-Across, character in Episodes I through IX of “Star Wars” : ARTOO …
    107 Millennial, informally : GEN-YER
    108 Things passed between the legs? : BATONS
    109 “Butt out!” : MYOB!

    Down

    1 Title host of radio’s first major quiz show : DR IQ
    2 Contact lens care brand : RENU
    3 Broadway opening : ACT I
    4 Declare for the draft, say : TURN PRO
    5 Items that, ironically, contain nickel : DIMES
    6 “Slumdog Millionaire” co-star ___ Kapoor : ANIL
    7 Be a snitch : TELL
    8 Wishy-washy R.S.V.P. : I MAY
    9 Plant holder? : VAT
    10 Funeral ceremony : EXEQUY
    11 Go across : SPAN
    12 Soldier on horseback : LANCER
    13 Word before card or fund : INDEX …
    14 Sloan School of Management sch. : MIT
    15 Team ___ : USA
    16 Major Southwest hub, for short : PHX
    18 In store : TO COME
    19 Like some New Orleans cooking : CAJUN
    20 Sloppy : SLIPSHOD
    25 Letter in the classical spelling of “Athena” : ETA
    27 “Here’s something that’ll help” : USE THIS
    29 Some battery ends : CATHODES
    31 Amorphous creatures : AMOEBAE
    32 Dreaded musician of the 1960s-’70s : MARLEY
    33 Brisk : SWIFT
    34 Luxurious affair : GALA
    35 Symbols of failure : EFFS
    36 1974 Eurovision winner that went on to international stardom : ABBA
    37 “Wahoo!” : YAY!
    38 Immature stage of a salamander : EFT
    39 Letters of credit? : IOU
    41 Drops on the ground? : DEW
    42 “Not on ___!” : A BET
    44 Where Wagner was born and Bach died : LEIPZIG
    46 Scatterbrained : DITZY
    47 Man’s name that sounds like two consecutive letters of the alphabet : OPIE
    48 At any time : EVER
    49 Oktoberfest vessels : STEINS
    51 Some unfair hiring managers : AGEISTS
    52 “Go ahead,” in Shakespeare : BE IT SO
    56 Openly controversial opinions : HOT TAKES
    57 Knock out : AWE
    58 Invoice directive : REMIT
    59 Like most medical journal articles : SCIENCY
    60 High hairstyle : POUF
    61 Club ___ : SODA
    62 Egypt’s “king of the gods” : AMUN-RA
    63 Excellent conductors : MAESTRI
    64 N.Y.C. neighborhood near NoLIta : SOHO
    65 “Ciao” : ADIOS
    66 Put in jeopardy : THREATEN
    67 Muscle cars of the ’60s : GTOS
    68 Lyrical, as poetry : ODIC
    69 Facetious response to a verbal jab : OUCH
    70 “E.T.” actress Wallace : DEE
    72 “Ugh, stop talking already!” : TMI
    73 Sack : CAN
    74 Sun ___, “The Art of War” philosopher : TZU
    79 Where most of America’s gold is mined : NEVADA
    80 Like the presidency of John Adams : ONE-TERM
    82 Joint : DOOBIE
    83 Longtime Eagles QB Donovan : MCNABB
    84 Suspect : FISHY
    85 Bible study: Abbr. : REL
    87 With a wink : SLYLY
    89 Kisses, in Cambridge : SNOGS
    91 Brown : SEAR
    92 Bring (out) for display : TROT
    93 Candy wrapped in a tube : ROLO
    94 “I’ll come to you ___”: Macbeth : ANON
    95 Eensy-weensy : ITTY
    96 New pedometer reading : OOOO
    97 Beginner, in modern lingo : NOOB
    98 Mammoth : BIG
    99 Western tribe : UTE
    100 ___ Salvador : SAN
    102 What will happily sell its Soul? : KIA

    10 thoughts on “0216-20 NY Times Crossword 16 Feb 20, Sunday”

    1. 46:22 – Challenging for sure. I consider getting DOBBY THE HOUSE ELF and WASABIPEA all via crosses to be my finest moment. I actually tried WASABItes first, but I had to back out of that.

      Love the sound of BE IT SO. Why can’t we talk good like that no more??

      DR IQ sounds like a better show than any reality show on current tv. Let’s bring it back.

      Best –

    2. *
      This puzzle, “Number Theory” (by Sam Ezersky) was one of the best Sunday puzzles of all time. I have worked all of the Sunday puzzles for about the last 20 or 25 years. This one takes the cake! As a mathematician/engineer, I expected a more mathematical challenge rather than the linguistic one! Great puzzle: Kazoo! God is good, MYOB, Wasabipea, and others. There was one ‘J’, 2 ‘Qs’, 3 ‘Xs” and 3 “Zs”! Excellent work! An A+++ in my rating.

    3. Fortunately it is Tuesday, so no one will see my typically pathetic time of 57:03 and my admission that when I saw repeat words in the across answers I thought “ that can’t be right…” 🙂

      Sigh….

    4. Despite the numerous foreign words, the abbr. that were not noted as such and the Shakespeare quotes I somehow managed to get through this in 1:20:47 with no errors….not being a math engineer or even a college graduate I was happy with my results.

    5. 41:49, 5 errors: (R)AZO(R)/HOT TA(R)ES/SOH(R); DU(O)/D(O)E. Stubborn insistence that 78A should be RAZOR didn’t help.

    6. DOBBIETHEHOUSEELF was actually my starting “gimme” point, and I wouldn’t have thought I was all that much of a Rowling fan.

      A fun puzzle, even though I blew the last two or three lines in center-bottom, through not knowing MCNABB for crosses.

    7. Er, that should have been DOBBYTHEHOUSEELF. Which just proves that, as I said, I’m not a hardcore Rowling fan.

    8. Picked away at this during the day and finished Sunday night. No errors, but found it to be quite a handful tho doable. Overcame the solvers’ bane of foreign words and got a couple of the unknowns via crosses. Excellent puzzle except for SCIENCY which sticks out like a sore thumb.

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