1028-19 NY Times Crossword 28 Oct 19, Monday

Constructed by: Zhouqin Burnikel
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Out of Danger

Themed answers end with a word made OUT OF the letters D-A-N-G-E-R:

  • 59A Safe … or how the last words of 16-, 23- and 49-Across are made? : OUT OF DANGER
  • 16A Look (at) : TAKE A GANDER
  • 23A Singer with the 2018 #1 hit “Thank U, Next” : ARIANA GRANDE
  • 49A Locale for London’s Royal Opera House : COVENT GARDEN

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 4m 03s!!

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Hollywood trophy : OSCAR

Legend has it that actor Emilio Fernández was the model for the Oscar statuette. Cedric Gibbons, art director at MGM, created the design and supposedly convinced a reluctant Fernández to pose nude for “Oscar”.

6 Paleo diet restriction, informally : CARB

The paleolithic (or “paleo, caveman”) diet is a fad diet that became popular in the 2000s. The idea is to eat wild plants and animals that would have been available to humans during the Paleolithic era (roughly the Stone Age). This period precedes the introduction of agriculture and the domestication of animals. As a result, someone on the diet avoids consuming grains, legumes, dairy and processed foods. The diet consists mainly of lean meat (about 45-65% of the total calorie intake), non-starchy vegetables, fruits, berries and nuts.

10 Tiebreaker periods, for short : OTS

Overtime (OT)

13 Pinterest posting : PHOTO

Pinterest is a free website which can be used to save and manage images (called “pins”) and other media. For some reason, the vast majority of Pinterest users are women.

14 Skater Harding : TONYA

Tonya Harding won the US Figure Skating Championships in 1991. Harding’s reputation was greatly tarnished in the run up to the 1994 Olympics, when her former husband and her bodyguard contracted someone to attack Harding’s main competitor, Nancy Kerrigan. During a practice session for the US Championship, a hired thug assaulted Kerrigan with police baton, attempting to break her leg. Kerrigan was forced to withdraw, and Harding won the championship. Both Harding and Kerrigan were selected for the Olympic team, and despite attempts to get Harding removed, both skated at the Games in Lillehammer. Harding finished in eighth place, and Kerrigan won the silver medal. Harding admitted that she helped cover up the attack when she found out about it, and was stripped of her US Championship title.

16 Look (at) : TAKE A GANDER

To take a gander is to take a long look. “Gander” is a term we’ve been using in this sense since the 1880s, coming from the idea that in taking a long look one might be craning one’s neck like a goose (or gander).

18 “As I see things …,” in a text : IMO …

In my opinion (IMO)

20 Facts and figures : DATA

Our word “data” (singular “datum”) comes from the Latin “datum” meaning “given”. The idea is that data are “things given”.

23 Singer with the 2018 #1 hit “Thank U, Next” : ARIANA GRANDE

Ariana Grande is a singer and actress from Boca Raton, Florida. Grande plays the role of Cat Valentine on the sitcom “Victorious” that aired for four season on Nickelodeon. Grande’s singing career took off with the release of the 2011 album “Victorious: Music from the Hit TV Show”.

26 Giant in test prep : KAPLAN

Kaplan Inc. was founded in 1938 by Stanley Kaplan, who started out tutoring students for the New York State Regents Exam in the basement of his parents’ home in Brooklyn. He opened up locations for tuition around the country, and in 1984 sold the company to the Washington Post. Revenue for Kaplan was over 2½ billion dollars in 2009.

30 Sir ___ Newton : ISAAC

Sir Isaac Newton was one of the most influential people in history, and the man who laid the groundwork for all of classical mechanics. The story about an apple falling on his head, inspiring him to formulate his theories about gravity, well that’s not quite true. Newton often told the story about observing an apple falling in his mother’s garden and how this made him acutely aware of the Earth’s gravitational pull. However, he made no mention of the apple hitting him on the head.

33 Chutzpah : GALL

Our word “chutzpah” meaning “nerve, gall, impudence” is derived from the Yiddish “khutspe”, which has the same meaning.

36 Reno’s home: Abbr. : NEV

The official nickname of Nevada is the Silver State, a reference to the importance of silver ore in the state’s growth and economy. An unofficial nickname is the Battle Born State. “Battle Born” is a reference to Nevada being awarded statehood during the American Civil War.

Reno, Nevada was named in honor of Major General Jesse Lee Reno, a Union officer killed in the Civil War. The city has a famous “Reno Arch”, a structure that stands over the main street. The arch was erected in 1926 to promote an exposition planned for the following year. After the expo, the city council decided to keep the arch and held a competition to decide what wording should be displayed, and the winner was “The Biggest Little City in the World”.

37 “Address” for Springsteen’s band : E STREET

The E Street Band is the backing group for Bruce Springsteen. The band came together in 1972 but didn’t take a formal name until two years later. The keyboard player in the original line up was David Sancious, and his mother allowed the group to rehearse at her home. That home was on E Street in Belmar, New Jersey, and that’s where the band got their name.

43 Sneaker named for a cat : PUMA

Puma is a German company that sells athletic shoes worldwide. The company is most famous for its line of soccer boots.

44 Like argon or neon : INERT

An inert gas can be different from a noble gas. Both are relatively non-reactive, but a noble gas is an element. An inert gas might be a compound, i.e. made up of more than one element.

The chemical element argon has the symbol Ar. Argon is a noble gas, and so by definition is relatively nonreactive. The name “argon” comes from the Greek word for “lazy, inactive”. There’s a lot of argon around, as it is the third-most abundant gas in our atmosphere.

Neon was discovered in 1898 by two British chemists Sir William Ramsay and Morris Travers. They chilled a sample of air, turning it into a liquid. They then warmed that liquid and separated out the gases that boiled off. Along with nitrogen, oxygen and argon (already known), the pair of scientists discovered two new gases. The first they called “krypton” and the second “neon”. “Krypton” is Greek for “the hidden one” and “neon” is Greek for “new”.

46 The Hunter constellation : ORION

According to Greek mythology, Orion was a giant hunter who was placed in the night sky by Zeus, the king of the gods. Orion is very recognizable as a constellation, especially with the three bright stars known as “Orion’s Belt”. The brightest star in the sky, Sirius, is said to be Orion’s hunting dog, and this star sits at Orion’s “foot”.

48 Evil-repelling charm : AMULET

Amulets are items worn to ward off disease or to protect against harmful magic spells.

49 Locale for London’s Royal Opera House : COVENT GARDEN

Covent Garden in London’s West End is associated with the Royal Opera House that is located in the area, and with the former fruit and vegetable market that used to sit right at the center of the district. The name “Covent Garden” comes from the fact that there once was a walled garden in the area owned by the Benedictine Monks of the Abbey of St. Peter in Westminster. The abbey rented out the walled garden calling it “Convent Garden”, and this morphed into the area’s current name.

54 Roald who created Willy Wonka : DAHL

Willy Wonka is the lead character in the 1964 novel by Roald Dahl called “Charlie & the Chocolate Factory”. Willy Wonka has been portrayed on the big screen twice. Gene Wilder was a fabulous Wonka in the 1971 version titled “Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory”, and Johnny Depp played him in the Tim Burton movie from 2005 called “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”. I’m not too fond of Tim Burton movies, so I haven’t seen that one …

58 Senator Cruz : TED

US Senator Ted Cruz served as Solicitor General for the state of Texas before heading to Washington. Cruz was appointed Solicitor General in 2003 at the age of 32, making him the youngest solicitor general in the country. Famously, Cruz is an opponent of the Affordable Care Act and made a speech in 2013 in the US Senate on the subject that lasted for 21 hours and 19 minutes. It was the fourth longest speech in the history of the Senate.

64 Mind-boggling designs : OP ART

Op art is also known as optical art, and puts optical illusions to great effect.

65 Barnyard honker : GOOSE

A male goose is called a gander, with the female simply being referred to as a goose. Young geese are called goslings.

Down

2 Ousted Iranian ruler : SHAH

The last Shah of Iran was Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, who was overthrown in the revolution led by the Ayatollah Khomeini in 1979. The post-revolution government sought the extradition of the Shah back to Iran while he was in the United States seeking medical care (he had cancer). His prolonged stay in the United States, recovering from surgery, caused some unrest back in Iran and resentment towards the United States. Some say that this resentment precipitated the storming of the US Embassy in Tehran and the resulting hostage crisis.

5 Monaco Grand Prix, e.g. : ROAD RACE

Even though the term is used in many competitions, I think that we most associate “Grand Prix” with the series of Formula One motor races. These Formula One Grand Prix races trace their roots back to organized automobile road races from one French town to the next that date back to 1894. “Grand Prix” translates from French as “grand, big prize.”

The Principality of Monaco is on the Mediterranean coast, and is otherwise surrounded by France, even though it is just under 10 miles from the Italian border. Monaco is the world’s most densely populated country, and the world’s second smallest country (the smallest being Vatican City). The principality has been very prosperous since the late 1800s, with the economy given a tremendous boost with the opening of several gambling casinos.

6 Late-night host O’Brien : CONAN

Before Conan O’Brien came to fame as a late night talk show host, he was a writer. He wrote for both “Saturday Night Live” and “The Simpsons”. While attending Harvard, O’Brien was president of “The Harvard Lampoon”.

8 Bread for a Reuben sandwich : RYE

There are conflicting stories about the origin of the Reuben sandwich. One such story is that it was invented around 1914 by Arnold Reuben, an immigrant from Germany who owned Reuben’s Deli in New York.

9 10-time Grammy winner Streisand : BARBRA

Barbra Streisand has recorded 31 top-ten albums since 1963, more than any other female recording artist. In fact, she has had an album in the top ten for the last five decades, a rare achievement in itself.

10 Alternative to a bialy : ONION BAGEL

“Bialy” is a Yiddish name for a small onion roll, which takes its name from Bialystok, a city in Poland.

23 Pie ___ mode : A LA

In French, “à la mode” simply means “fashionable”. In America, the term has also come to describe a way of serving pie. Pie served à la mode includes a dollop of cream or ice cream, or as I recall from my time living in Upstate New York, with a wedge of cheddar cheese.

24 Sleeper’s breathing problem : APNEA

Sleep apnea (“apnoea” in British English) can be caused by an obstruction in the airways, possibly due to obesity or enlarged tonsils.

26 Checker after reaching the other side of the board : KING

In the game of checkers, when a “man” reaches the other side of the board, it is promoted to “king”. The king is designated by placing a second piece on top of the first.

28 Salivating animal in a classic conditioning study : PAVLOV’S DOG

Ivan Pavlov was studying gastric function in dogs in the 1890s when he observed that his subject dogs started to salivate before he even presented food to them. This “psychic secretion”, as he called it, interested him so much that he changed the direction of his research and studied the reactions of dogs to various stimuli that were associated with the presentation of food. Famously, he discovered that a dog could be conditioned to respond as though he was about to be fed, just by sensing some stimulus that he had come to associate with food. This might be a bell ringing, an electric shock (poor dog!) or perhaps the waving of a hand. Nowadays we might describe someone as “Pavlov’s Dog” if that person responds just the way he/she has been conditioned to respond, rather than applying critical thinking.

31 Attacked by hornets : STUNG

A hornet is a large type of wasp, with some species reaching over two inches in length.

35 Trent ___, former Senate majority leader : LOTT

Trent Lott is a political figure who first went to Washington to work as an administrative assistant to Representative William M. Colmer, from Mississippi. After four years working for Colmer, Lott ran for the House seat that Colmer was to leave vacant on his retirement. Colmer endorsed Lott in that election, even though Colmer was a Democrat and Lott ran as a Republican. Lott won the race very handily, launching a 35-year career representing his home state of Mississippi in both the House and the Senate. Lott eventually ran into trouble for remarks he made that were interpreted as being racially motivated, and ended up resigning in 2007.

38 Feature of a cheetah’s coat : SPOT

The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal, achieving speeds of 70-75 mph. The name “cheetah” comes from Sanskrit via Hindi, from the word for “variegated”. Something that is variegated has different colored zones, like the mottled hide of the cheetah.

39 Problems with glitchy livestreams : TIME LAGS

In Internet terms, lag is a delay in response caused by network latency. We might notice lag when streaming a video, for example.

45 Mother Teresa, for one : NUN

Mother Teresa was born in 1910 in the city that is now called Skopje, the capital of Macedonia. At birth she was given the names Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu (“Gonxha” means “little flower” in Albanian). She left home at the age of 18 and joined the Sisters of Loreto, and headed to Loreto Abbey in Rathfarnham in Dublin, Ireland in order to learn English. Her goal was to teach in India, and English was the language used there for instruction by the nuns. After Mother Teresa passed away in 1997 she was beatified by Pope John Paul II. She was canonized by Pope Francis in 2016, and is now known as Saint Teresa of Calcutta.

47 Opposite of alfresco : INDOOR

Our word “alfresco” means outdoors, in the fresh air. The term came into English from Italian.

48 Condition treated with Ritalin, in brief : ADHD

The “official” name for the condition we sometimes still refer to as “attention deficit disorder” (ADD) is “attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder” (ADHD).

Ritalin is a trade name for the drug methylphenidate that is used for treatment of ADHD and narcolepsy. Methylphenidate has a similar structure and similar properties to the drug cocaine, although it is less potent.

50 Luxury Swiss watch : OMEGA

Omega is a manufacturer of high-end watches based in Switzerland. An Omega watch was the first portable timepiece to make it to the moon, Perhaps even more impressive is the fact that James Bond has been wearing an Omega watch in the movies since 1995.

55 Composer Stravinsky : IGOR

Composer Igor Stravinsky’s most famous works were completed relatively early in his career, when he was quite young. His three ballets “The Firebird”, “Petrushka” and “The Rite of Spring” were published in 1910-1913, when Stravinsky was in his early thirties.

56 Flat-topped hill : MESA

“What’s the difference between a butte and a mesa?” Both are hills with flat tops, but a mesa has a top that is wider than it is tall. A butte is a much narrower formation, and taller than it is wide.

57 Gazelles, for cheetahs : PREY

When running at a sustained speed, gazelles can move along at 30 miles per hour. If needed, they can accelerate for bursts up to 60 miles per hour.

The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal, achieving speeds of 70-75 mph. The name “cheetah” comes into English from Sanskrit via Hindi, from the word for “variegated”. Something that is variegated has different colored zones, like the mottled hide of the cheetah.

60 News inits. since 1958 : UPI

Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) used to be one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a fraction of that workforce.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Hollywood trophy : OSCAR
6 Paleo diet restriction, informally : CARB
10 Tiebreaker periods, for short : OTS
13 Pinterest posting : PHOTO
14 Skater Harding : TONYA
15 Minor criticism : NIT
16 Look (at) : TAKE A GANDER
18 “As I see things …,” in a text : IMO …
19 Pronoun for a yacht : SHE
20 Facts and figures : DATA
21 Cook under a hot flame : BROIL
23 Singer with the 2018 #1 hit “Thank U, Next” : ARIANA GRANDE
26 Giant in test prep : KAPLAN
29 Fallback option : PLAN B
30 Sir ___ Newton : ISAAC
31 All there mentally : SANE
33 Chutzpah : GALL
36 Reno’s home: Abbr. : NEV
37 “Address” for Springsteen’s band : E STREET
40 Viscous substance : GOO
41 Black-tie affair : GALA
43 Sneaker named for a cat : PUMA
44 Like argon or neon : INERT
46 The Hunter constellation : ORION
48 Evil-repelling charm : AMULET
49 Locale for London’s Royal Opera House : COVENT GARDEN
53 What a crying emoji means : I’M SAD
54 Roald who created Willy Wonka : DAHL
55 Little mischief-maker : IMP
58 Senator Cruz : TED
59 Safe … or how the last words of 16-, 23- and 49-Across are made? : OUT OF DANGER
63 Swellhead’s problem : EGO
64 Mind-boggling designs : OP ART
65 Barnyard honker : GOOSE
66 Droop, as an old couch : SAG
67 Ready for picking : RIPE
68 Wander off : STRAY

Down

1 Chooses, with “for” : OPTS
2 Ousted Iranian ruler : SHAH
3 Soft drink in a red can : COKE
4 Snacked on : ATE
5 Monaco Grand Prix, e.g. : ROAD RACE
6 Late-night host O’Brien : CONAN
7 In addition : AND
8 Bread for a Reuben sandwich : RYE
9 10-time Grammy winner Streisand : BARBRA
10 Alternative to a bialy : ONION BAGEL
11 Lacking courage : TIMID
12 Didn’t ask before taking : STOLE
14 “See ya!,” for a Brit : TA-TA!
17 Pick up, as yards in football : GAIN
22 Tolled, as bells : RANG
23 Pie ___ mode : A LA
24 Sleeper’s breathing problem : APNEA
25 Sheer delight : GLEE
26 Checker after reaching the other side of the board : KING
27 On the ocean : ASEA
28 Salivating animal in a classic conditioning study : PAVLOV’S DOG
31 Attacked by hornets : STUNG
32 Elbow’s place : ARM
34 Folk tales : LORE
35 Trent ___, former Senate majority leader : LOTT
38 Feature of a cheetah’s coat : SPOT
39 Problems with glitchy livestreams : TIME LAGS
42 Carpet measurement : AREA
45 Mother Teresa, for one : NUN
47 Opposite of alfresco : INDOOR
48 Condition treated with Ritalin, in brief : ADHD
49 References, as prior court decisions : CITES
50 Luxury Swiss watch : OMEGA
51 Love to death : ADORE
52 Vessel in which to shoot the rapids : RAFT
55 Composer Stravinsky : IGOR
56 Flat-topped hill : MESA
57 Gazelles, for cheetahs : PREY
60 News inits. since 1958 : UPI
61 Light touch : TAP
62 “What’s ___ to like?” : NOT

8 thoughts on “1028-19 NY Times Crossword 28 Oct 19, Monday”

  1. I’ve always wondered how neon (and argon, for that matter) could be called an INERT gas. We see neon mysteriously glowing at us from millions of signs all over everywhere, How could something with an ability like that be considered “inert”?

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