0217-19 NY Times Crossword 17 Feb 19, Sunday

Constructed by: David Kwong
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Trivial Matters

Today’s puzzle features colors in 6 rebus squares. Those colors are arranged in a circle in the grid, and correspond to the question categories in a game of Trivial Pursuit. Themed answers come in pairs, and are 6 questions and answers in each of those categories:

  • 22A What kind of tree ___? : ALWAYS HAS FOLIAGE
  • 30A Answer to 22-Across [Science & Nature] : EVERGREEN
  • 66A What 1986 ___ romantic comedy got its title from a song by the Psychedelic Furs? : HIGH SCHOOL
  • 85A Answer to 66-Across [Entertainment] : PRETTY IN PINK
  • 68A Who wrote a 2003 best seller about a ___? : SECRET CODE
  • 82A Answer to 68-Across [Art & Literature] : DAN BROWN
  • 113A What ___ comes from a farm bird? : DELAWARE NICKNAME
  • 46A Answer to 113-Across [Geography] : BLUE HEN STATE
  • 13D Where were battleships sunk in an 1894 ___? : JAPANESE VICTORY
  • 48A Answer to 13-Down [History] : YELLOW SEA
  • 39D What annual game have the ___ won more than any other team? : OKLAHOMA SOONERS
  • 104A Answer to 39-Down [Sports & Leisure] : ORANGE BOWL

Bill’s time: 19m 32s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

9 Veal topper, informally : PARM

Parmigiana is a dish from southern Italy. The original parmigiana was made with an aubergine (eggplant) filling, with cheese and tomato layers and then baked. Versions originating outside of Italy have replaced the aubergine with breaded cutlets of chicken or veal.

21 Part of a Latin 101 conjugation : AMAT

“Amo, amas, amat” translates from Latin as “I love, you love, he/she/it loves”.

24 High-grade cotton : PIMA

Pima is a soft cotton that is very durable and absorbent. Pima cotton is named after the Pima Native Americans who first cultivated it in this part of the world.

25 Capital that was home to the world’s tallest building before the Burj Khalifa : TAIPEI

Taipei (officially “Taipei City”) is the capital of Taiwan (officially “the Republic of China”). “Taipei” translates from Chinese as “Northern Taiwan City” and indeed, the capital is situated at the northern tip of Taiwan. The city is nicknamed “City of Azaleas” as flowers are said to bloom better in Taipei than in any other city on the island.

26 Pears and apples : POMES

The Latin word for “fruit” is “pomum”, which gives us the botanical term “pome” that is used for a group of fleshy fruits, including apples and pears.

27 Vladimir Lenin’s real last name : ULYANOV

“Lenin” wasn’t the birth name of the Russian leader. He was born Vladimir Ulyanov, and originally used “Lenin” as a pen name.

29 Nahuatl speaker : AZTEC

Nahuatl is a group of languages spoken mainly in Central Mexico. Historically, Nahuatl was known as “Aztec”.

36 Moving vehicle : VAN

The vehicle we call a “van” takes its name from “caravan”, and is a shortened version of the older term. Back in the 1600s, a caravan was a covered cart. We still used the term “caravan” in Ireland to describe what we call a “mobile home” or “recreational vehicle” here in the US.

38 “Carmen” and “Elektra” : OPERAS

When Georges Bizet wrote his famous opera “Carmen”, he used the melody of what he thought was an old folk song as a theme in the lovely aria “ Habanera”. Not long after he finished “Carmen” he discovered that the folk song was in fact a piece that had been written by another composer, who had died just ten years before “Carmen” was published. Fittingly, Bizet added a note to the score, declaring the original source.

“Elektra” is an opera by Richard Strauss that premiered in 1909. The work is based on Greek mythology, and is centered on Elektra, the daughter of the Greek king Agamemnon.

42 Director Anderson : WES

Film director Wes Anderson’s most famous movie is probably “The Royal Tenenbaums” that was released in 2001, and is not my favorite film by any stretch. However, Anderson’s 2007 release “The Darjeeling Limited”, that I enjoyed.

50 First name on a famous plane : ENOLA

The Enola Gay was the B-29 that dropped the first atomic bomb, the bomb that destroyed Hiroshima in August 1945. Enola Gay was the name of the mother of pilot Col. Paul W. Tibbets, Jr.

53 Host for a destructive beetle : ELM

Dutch elm disease is a fungus devastating to all species of elm trees that is transmitted by the elm bark beetle. The disease is thought to have originated in Asia and is now rampant in Europe and North America. Even though there is a hybrid of elm known as the Dutch elm, the disease isn’t named after the tree. Rather, the disease is called “Dutch” as it was identified in 1921 by a phytopathologist (plant pathologist) in the Netherlands.

55 Abbr. on a label of brandy : VSOP

Brandy is a spirit distilled from wine. The term “brandy” ultimately comes from the Dutch “gebrande wijn” meaning “burnt wine”. The length of this aging of the spirit defines the various grades of brandy:

  • VS: Very Special … at least 2 years storage
  • VSOP: Very Special (or Superior) Old Pale … at least 4 years storage
  • XO: Extra Old … at least 6 years
  • VSO: Very Superior Old … 12-17 years

58 Class skippers : TRUANTS

“Truant” is such a lovely word. We have been using it to describe someone who wanders from an appointed place since the mid-1400s. Prior to that, a truant was a beggar or a vagabond.

61 Princess seduced by Zeus : LEDA

In Greek mythology, Leda was the beautiful Queen of Sparta who was seduced by Zeus when he took the form of a swan. Leda produced two eggs from the union. One egg hatched into Clytemnestra and the beautiful Helen of Troy, over whom was fought the Trojan War. The other egg hatched into the twins Castor and Pollux. Castor and Pollux had different fathers according to the myth. Pollux was the son of Zeus and was immortal, while Castor was the son of Leda’s earthly husband, and so he was a mortal. In the world of the arts, William Butler Yeats wrote a famous sonnet called “Leda and the Swan” in 1924, and Peter Paul Rubens made a copy of a now-lost painting called “Leda and the Swan” by Michelangelo.

63 Cartesian conclusion : … I AM

The great French philosopher Rene Descartes made the famous statement in Latin, “Cogito ergo sum”. This translates into French as “Je pense, donc je suis” and into English as “I think, therefore I am”.

Anything pertaining to the philosophy of the great Rene Descartes can described by the adjective “Cartesian”.

68 Who wrote a 2003 best seller about a ___? : SECRET CODE
(82A Answer to 68-Across [Art & Literature] : DAN BROWN)

“The Da Vinci Code” is an excellent yarn (although much panned), written by Dan Brown. Brown’s first book to feature the character Robert Langdon was even better in my opinion, namely “Angels & Demons”.

71 Tres + cinco : OCHO

In Spanish, “tres y cinco” (three plus five) is “ocho” (eight).

75 Asmara is its capital : ERITREA

Eritrea is a country located in the Horn of Africa, and surrounded by Sudan, Ethiopia, Djibouti and the Red Sea. Some scientists believe that the area now known as Eritrea was the departure point for the anatomically modern humans who first left Africa to populate the rest of the world.

91 Amherst campus, for short : UMASS

The University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass) is the largest public university in New England. UMass was founded back in 1863, although it took a while to get the school into service. Construction work was delayed and the college went through two presidents before William S. Clark took charge. He cracked the whip, completed the construction and enrolled the first students in the same year that he took over the reins, in 1867. As a result, although Clark was the third President of UMass, he is regarded by most as the school’s founding father.

92 Cacophonous : NOISY

“Cacophony” is such a lovely word, a word used to describe a harsh or jarring sound. The term arises from the Greek “kakos” (bad) and “phone” (voice).

108 Lens covers : CORNEAS

The cornea is the transparent part of the eye in the front, covering the iris and the pupil. Even though the cornea is not part of the lens it acts as a lens, and in fact does most of the work focusing light coming in through the eye. The cornea is in effect a fixed-focus lens passing on light to the variable-focus lens that is inside the eye.

109 Meerkat in “The Lion King” : TIMON

Timon and Pumbaa are a pair of characters in Disney’s 1994 animated film “The Lion King”. Timon is a meerkat, and was voiced by the great Nathan Lane. Pumbaa is a warthog, and was voiced by Ernie Sabella.

111 Living, to Livy : IN ESSE

Titus Livius (aka “Livy”) was a Roman historian who lived from 59 BC to AD 17. Livy wrote the definitive history of Rome at that time.

113 What ___ comes from a farm bird? : DELAWARE NICKNAME (46 A Answer to 113-Across [Geography] : BLUE HEN STATE)

The Delaware Blue Hen has been the state bird of Delaware since 1939. As a result, the athletic teams of the University of Delaware are known as the Delaware Fightin’ Blue Hens.

118 Song heard at the start of “Saturday Night Fever” : STAYIN’ ALIVE

“Saturday Night Fever” was a phenomenal movie in its day, but to be honest, I don’t think it has aged well. I still love the soundtrack, which is the third-best selling movie soundtrack of all time (number one is “The Bodyguard” and number two is “Purple Rain”, would you believe?). “Saturday Night Fever” was the first film for which the soundtrack was launched before the movie itself, in a cross-marketing exercise designed to hype the movie before its release.

Down

1 Some roadsters : MIATAS

The Mazda MX-5 is sold as the Miata in North America, and as the Roadster in Japan. I’ve always liked the looks of the Mazda Miata, probably because it reminds me so much of old British sports cars. The Miata is built in Hiroshima, Japan. The name “Miata” comes from an Old High German word meaning “reward”.

4 Tour de France stage : ETAPE

“Étape” is the French word for stage, as in a “stage” in the Tour de France. The term is used in English military circles to describe where troops halt overnight, but can also describe the section of the march itself. So, a march can be divided into stages, into étapes.

Back in the late 1800s, long-distance cycle races were used as promotional events, traditionally to help boost sales of newspapers. These races usually took place around tracks, but in 1902 the backers of the struggling sports publication “L’Auto” decided to stage a race that would take the competitors all around France. That first Tour de France took place in 1903, starting in Paris and passing through Lyon, Marseilles, Bordeaux, Nantes and then back to Paris.

6 60 minuti : ORA

In Italian, there are “sessanta minuti” (sixty minutes) in an “ora” (hour).

9 Scorer of 12 World Cup goals : PELE

“Pelé” is the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who has used the name “Pelé” for most of his life. Pelé is now retired, and for my money was the world’s greatest ever player of the game. He is the only person to have been a member of three World Cup winning squads (1958, 1962 and 1970), and is a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames is “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

10 Spanish ouzo flavoring : ANIS

Ouzo is an apéritif from Greece that is colorless and flavored with anise. Ouzo is similar to French pastis and Italian sambuca.

11 Nutritional std. : RDA

Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) were introduced during WWII, and were replaced by Recommended Daily Intakes (RDIs) in 1997.

12 Bump on a slope : MOGUL

Moguls are the series of bumps in the surface of snow that arise naturally as a succession of skiers make turns on a slope.

13 Where were battleships sunk in an 1894 ___? : JAPANESE VICTORY (48A Answer to 13-Down [History] : YELLOW SEA)

The Yellow Sea is the northern part of the East China Sea, and is located between the Korean peninsula and China. The water surface does indeed take on a golden yellow hue at times when it picks up sand particles from sand storms in the Gobi Desert, which lies to the west of the Yellow Sea.

14 Key of Beethoven’s “Für Elise” : A MINOR

“Für Elise” is a beautiful piece of solo piano music by Beethoven that is also known as “Bagatelle in A Minor”. “Für Elise” means simply “For Elise”, but sadly no one knows for sure the identity of the mysterious dedicatee.

15 Quimby of children’s books : RAMONA

Ramona Quimby is a character in a series of “Henry Huggins” children’s novels penned by Beverly Cleary. As she aged, Ramona merited her own set of stories.

16 Lines on sheet music : STAVES

The sets of five horizontal lines and four spaces that are used in musical notation are known as staves. The singular of “staves” is “staff” in American English, but “stave” in British English.

18 CBS debut of 2000 : CSI

The “CSI” franchise of TV shows has been tremendously successful, but has finally wound down. “CSI: Miami” (the “worst” of the franchise, I think) was cancelled in 2012 after ten seasons. “CSI: NY” (the “best” of the franchise) was cancelled in 2013 after nine seasons. The original “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation”, set in Las Vegas, hung in there until 2015 when it ended with a two-hour TV movie. The youngest show in the series was “CSI: Cyber”. It lasted for two seasons, before being canceled in 2016.

19 Comic actor known for his shock humor : TOM GREEN

Canadian comedian and actor Tom Green came to prominence as host of his own talk show that first aired on MTV in 1999. Green was briefly married to Drew Barrymore, from 2001 to 2002.

30 Cole Porter’s “Well, Did You ___?” : EVAH

“Well, Did You Evah!” is a song from the 1939 Cole Porter musical “DuBarry Was a Lady”. A more famous rendition of the song was by Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra in the 1956 movie “High Society”.

39 What annual game have the ___ won more than any other team? : OKLAHOMA SOONERS
(104A Answer to 39-Down [Sports & Leisure] : ORANGE BOWL)

The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game played in Miami Gardens, Florida. The Rose Bowl is the oldest of the bowl games (inaugurated in 1902), but the Sun Bowl, Sugar Bowl and Orange Bowl come in second. The first Orange Bowl was played on New Year’s Day 1935.

41 Condition once called “shell shock,” for short : PTSD

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

44 How chicken teriyaki is usually served : ON RICE

Teriyaki is a Japanese technique of cooking in which the foods are grilled in a sweet soy sauce marinade. The marinade may or may not include ginger.

47 Court plea, in brief : NOLO

“Nolo contendere” (sometimes shortened to “nolo”) is a legal term that translates from Latin as “I do not wish to contend”. It’s the plea of no contest, and is an alternative to guilty and not guilty, meaning that one doesn’t admit guilt but nor does one dispute the charge.

49 Oregon city that was the first permanent U.S. settlement west of the Rockies : ASTORIA

The city of Astoria, Oregon developed around Fort Astoria, which was established in 1810. Fort Astoria was a fur-trading post built by John Jacob Astor’s Pacific Fur Company, hence the “Astoria” name.

56 Like Fenway among all major-league ballparks : OLDEST

The Boston Red Sox is one of the most successful Major League Baseball teams and so commands a large attendance, but only when on the road. The relatively small capacity of Boston’s Fenway Park, the team’s home since 1912, has dictated that every game the Red Sox has played there has been a sell-out since May of 2003. I recently had the pleasure of touring Fenway Park. It’s quite a place …

59 Cinephile’s channel : TCM

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is one of my favorite television channels as it delivers just what its name promises, i.e. classic movies.

62 Natty neckwear : ASCOTS

An Ascot is a horrible-looking (I think!), wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

A natty dresser is one who dresses smartly. The term “natty” may come from the Middle English “net” meaning “fine, elegant”, in which case it shares its etymology with the word “neat”.

64 Locale for Jacques Cousteau : MER

In French, a “mer” (sea) is large body of “eau” (water).

Jacques-Yves Cousteau started off his career in the French Navy, aiming for a working life in aviation. Because of a car accident, Cousteau had to abandon his first career choice and instead went to sea. Famously, he co-invented the Self Contained Underwater Breathing Apparatus (SCUBA), also called the aqua-lung.

67 Crankcase device : OIL PUMP

In most internal combustion engines the pistons that move up and down are arranged in a line, and connected to a crankshaft that runs along the bottom of the engine. The up and down motion of the pistons turns the crankshaft, which turning motion is “transmitted” (via the transmission) to the wheels. The case surrounding the crankshaft is called the crankcase. The crankcase contains a lot of oil that is squirted onto the crankshaft to lubricate it. Excess oil falls to the bottom of the crankcase and into a reservoir called the oil pan.

69 Like a moray : EELY

Morays are a large group of about 200 species of eels found across the world’s oceans. They are carnivorous and look pretty scary but they’re quite shy when confronted and present no threat to humans. One interesting thing about morays is that they will sometimes work in cooperation with the grouper fish found in reefs, the two helping each other hunt for food.

70 Director Burton : TIM

Movie director and producer Tim Burton makes my least favorite type of movie: dark, gothic, horror fantasies. The list of his titles includes “Edward Scissorhands”, “Sleepy Hollow”, “Sweeney Todd”, “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” and “Alice in Wonderland”. Also included in each of these movies is Johnny Depp in a starring role, as Depp and Burton are good friends and frequent collaborators. Another frequent star in Burton movies is English actress Helena Bonham Carter, who has been his domestic partner since 2001.

74 Follower of the Gospels : ACTS

The Acts of the Apostles is the fifth book of the Christian New Testament. It is believed that the author of the Gospel of Luke was the same person who wrote “Acts”.

78 Wry Bombeck : ERMA

Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years. She produced more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns under the title “At Wit’s End”, with all describing her home life in suburbia.

87 Longtime Steelers coach Chuck : NOLL

Chuck Noll was the head coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers from 1969 to 1991. Noll won the Super Bowl four times in all as head coach, which is an NFL record.

88 Small digit : PINKIE

The use of “pinkie” or “pinky” for the little finger or toe comes into English from “pinkje”, the Dutch word for the same digit. Who knew …?

95 Kind of scholar : RHODES

The Rhodes Scholarship is an award that funds postgraduate study at Oxford University. The scholarship dates back to 1902, when it was established by English mining magnate and politician Cecil Rhodes. Several Rhodes Scholars have gone on to head governments including, Bill Clinton (US), John Turner (Canada) and there Australian Prime Ministers (Bob Hawke, Tony Abbott and Malcolm Turnbull). The program is not without controversy. For decades, it was only open to males, and in fact only males who were not black Africans.

98 TV Tarzan player : RON ELY

Ron Ely is most famous for playing the title role in the “Tarzan” TV series in the sixties. Years later, Ely hosted the 1980 and 1981 “Miss America” pageants right after longtime host Bert Parks retired, before the job was taken over by Gary Collins. And Ely is a successful mystery novelist. He wrote “Night Shadows” and “East Beach” in the mid-nineties, both of which featured his private eye Jake Sands.

99 Hot stuff : WASABI

Sometimes called “Japanese horseradish”, wasabi is a root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste of wasabi is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

100 Fate : KISMET

“Kismet” is a Turkish word, meaning “fate, fortune, lot”.

105 Sacha Baron Cohen character : BORAT

The full name of the 2006 “mockumentary” is “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan”. Borat is played by a British comedian, Sacha Baron Cohen. Not my cup of tea …

107 Original edition of this puzzle’s theme : GENUS

Trivial Pursuit was invented in 1979 by two Canadians from Montreal. The pair decided to come up with their own game after they discovered that there were pieces missing from the game of Scrabble that they wanted to play. There was a full blown launch of a commercial version of the game in 1982. In 2008, Hasbro bought the complete rights to Trivial Pursuit, for US$80 million! On a personal note, I met my lovely wife while playing a game of Trivial Pursuit …

109 Actor Diggs : TAYE

Taye Diggs is an actor most associated with the Broadway show “Rent”, in which he played the nasty landlord Benny. He then co-starred on the television show “Private Practice”. Diggs given name is “Scott”, and the nickname “Taye” comes from saying the given name as “Scottay”.

111 Whack : ICE

To ice, to off, to whack, to murder.

115 Partner of tuck : NIP

The phrase “nip and tuck” means “closely contested”, as in “it was nip and tuck until the final days of the campaign”. The phrase is also used to describe a skin-tightening cosmetic surgery procedure.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Not rumpled, as a bed : MADE
5 Slice, for example : SODA
9 Veal topper, informally : PARM
13 Cookie containers : JARS
17 “Yeah, right!” : I BET!
18 Certain body of believers : CHRISTENDOM
21 Part of a Latin 101 conjugation : AMAT
22 What kind of tree ___? : ALWAYS HAS FOLIAGE
24 High-grade cotton : PIMA
25 Capital that was home to the world’s tallest building before the Burj Khalifa : TAIPEI
26 Pears and apples : POMES
27 Vladimir Lenin’s real last name : ULYANOV
29 Nahuatl speaker : AZTEC
30 Answer to 22-Across [Science & Nature] : EVERGREEN
32 Multipurpose : ALL-IN-ONE
33 Fixed : SET
34 Polite : CIVIL
36 Moving vehicle : VAN
38 “Carmen” and “Elektra” : OPERAS
39 “Jeez!” : OH MAN!
40 Mimicking : APING
42 Director Anderson : WES
43 Simulated : MOCK
46 Answer to 113-Across [Geography] : BLUE HEN STATE
48 Answer to 13-Down [History] : YELLOW SEA
50 First name on a famous plane : ENOLA
52 Farm females : SOWS
53 Host for a destructive beetle : ELM
55 Abbr. on a label of brandy : VSOP
58 Class skippers : TRUANTS
61 Princess seduced by Zeus : LEDA
63 Cartesian conclusion : … I AM
65 Word said before “do” : IT’LL
66 What 1986 ___ romantic comedy got its title from a song by the Psychedelic Furs? : HIGH SCHOOL
68 Who wrote a 2003 best seller about a ___? : SECRET CODE
71 Tres + cinco : OCHO
72 “Little ol’ me?” : MOI?
73 Fine fabric : LACE
75 Asmara is its capital : ERITREA
76 Regard : DEEM
77 World Cup cry : OLE!
79 Newspaper units: Abbr. : COLS
81 Clammy : MOIST
82 Answer to 68-Across [Art & Literature] : DAN BROWN
85 Answer to 66-Across [Entertainment] : PRETTY IN PINK
89 “Phooey!” : RATS!
90 Have a bawl : SOB
91 Amherst campus, for short : UMASS
92 Cacophonous : NOISY
94 Knight’s wear, in England : ARMOUR
97 Pad : MAT
98 Find a new tenant for : RELET
99 Calendar units: Abbr. : WKS
102 Select, as sides for a game : CHOOSE UP
104 Answer to 39-Down [Sports & Leisure] : ORANGE BOWL
106 “To repeat …” : AGAIN …
108 Lens covers : CORNEAS
109 Meerkat in “The Lion King” : TIMON
111 Living, to Livy : IN ESSE
112 Nose out : EDGE
113 What ___ comes from a farm bird? : DELAWARE NICKNAME
117 Blacken : SEAR
118 Song heard at the start of “Saturday Night Fever” : STAYIN’ ALIVE
119 Ride provider : UBER
120 Some I.R.S. data, for short : SSNS
121 Not hush-hush : OPEN
122 Kind : TYPE
123 What a judge does for much of the day : SITS

Down

1 Some roadsters : MIATAS
2 Brightly lit : ABLAZE
3 Clinton who once ran for president : DEWITT
4 Tour de France stage : ETAPE
5 “Pipe down!” : SHH!
6 60 minuti : ORA
7 Get rid of : DISPEL
8 “When it comes to …” : AS FOR …
9 Scorer of 12 World Cup goals : PELE
10 Spanish ouzo flavoring : ANIS
11 Nutritional std. : RDA
12 Bump on a slope : MOGUL
13 Where were battleships sunk in an 1894 ___? : JAPANESE VICTORY
14 Key of Beethoven’s “Für Elise” : A MINOR
15 Quimby of children’s books : RAMONA
16 Lines on sheet music : STAVES
18 CBS debut of 2000 : CSI
19 Comic actor known for his shock humor : TOM GREEN
20 1966 Donovan hit with a rhyming title : MELLOW YELLOW
23 “That tastes bleah!” : YECCH!
28 “Holy cow!” : YIPES!
30 Cole Porter’s “Well, Did You ___?” : EVAH
31 Jungle tangle : VINES
32 Sweet and kind : ANGELIC
35 1962 hit for the Ikettes : I’M BLUE
36 Part of an itinerary : VIA
37 Cost to get a hand : ANTE
39 What annual game have the ___ won more than any other team? : OKLAHOMA SOONERS
40 Too : AS WELL
41 Condition once called “shell shock,” for short : PTSD
43 Process : METHOD
44 How chicken teriyaki is usually served : ON RICE
45 Gave reluctantly, with “up” : COUGHED
47 Court plea, in brief : NOLO
49 Oregon city that was the first permanent U.S. settlement west of the Rockies : ASTORIA
51 A, B, C or D, in multiple choice: Abbr. : ANS
54 Foal’s mother : MARE
56 Like Fenway among all major-league ballparks : OLDEST
57 Folds : PLEATS
59 Cinephile’s channel : TCM
60 “Buzz off!” : SHOO!
62 Natty neckwear : ASCOTS
64 Locale for Jacques Cousteau : MER
67 Crankcase device : OIL PUMP
69 Like a moray : EELY
70 Director Burton : TIM
74 Follower of the Gospels : ACTS
78 Wry Bombeck : ERMA
80 Resilience : SINEW
83 “It’s a waste of time” : NO USE
84 Loaves from whole-grain flour : BROWN BREADS
86 Put away, in a way : EAT
87 Longtime Steelers coach Chuck : NOLL
88 Small digit : PINKIE
93 Reeked : STANK
94 Gain entry to : ACCESS
95 Kind of scholar : RHODES
96 Freeman of “Now You See Me” : MORGAN
98 TV Tarzan player : RON ELY
99 Hot stuff : WASABI
100 Fate : KISMET
101 Unwelcome looks : SNEERS
103 Be of ___ (aid) : USE TO
104 Syracuse player, once : ORANGEMAN
105 Sacha Baron Cohen character : BORAT
107 Original edition of this puzzle’s theme : GENUS
109 Actor Diggs : TAYE
110 Words of triumph : I WIN
111 Whack : ICE
114 Length of a pool and back : LAP
115 Partner of tuck : NIP
116 Suffix with elect : -IVE

19 thoughts on “0217-19 NY Times Crossword 17 Feb 19, Sunday”

  1. Glad this is back up and running. Thanks Bill!!! Sorry you have so much on your mind right now, but we miss you when things go wrong. Good work. Hope you get back to normal soon.

  2. 46:12. I really enjoyed this one and thought was an A+ theme.

    According to Monty Python, the quote is “I drink therefore I am” 🙂

    @Duncan –
    The Syracuse athletic teams were known as the Orangemen until 2004 (I had to look up the year). They then changed the name to the Orange for reasons I never really understood (were orange people offended or something??). Regardless, that’s why Orangemen is in the past tense.

    Best –

    1. What I could gather from Wiki is that the game Trivial Pursuit has had several subject editions, with differing subject matter, such as Kids, Entertainment, etc. The original card set for the game was called ‘Genus’, and was built around general knowledge.

  3. 38:05, no errors. Seemed like an awful lot was going on here; always impressed when the setter is able make the theme symmetrical.

  4. Not too difficult for a Sunday, but did require a bit of mental gymnastics. No errors, but never did catch the Trivial Pursuit angle until it was explained. My compliments to the constructor.

  5. Tough, tough, tough! I never did pick up on the trivial pursuit theme. I got them all right except for “I’m red“ and “red hen“ never heard of a blue hen.
    I have missed Bill, the site and all of you tremendously.
    SO glad we are back!!!

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