1220-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 20 Dec 15, Sunday

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Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

CROSSWORD SETTER: Peter Wentz
THEME: Rebranding … each of today’s themed answers is a well-known advertising slogan, but that slogan has been altered so that it is grammatically correct:

23A. “Corrected” slogan for a tech company? : THINK DIFFERENTLY (from “Think Different”)
33A. “Corrected” slogan for an office supply chain? : YES, WE HAVE THAT (from “Yeah, we’ve got that”)
49A. “Corrected” slogan for a fast-food franchise? : EAT FRESHLY (from “eat fresh”)
66A. “Corrected” slogan for a dessert brand? : EVERYBODY LIKES SARA LEE (from “… nobody doesn’t like Sara Lee”)
83A. “Corrected” slogan for a hairstyling product? : A DAB WILL DO (from “A Little Dab’ll Do Ya!”)
97A. “Corrected” slogan for a frozen breakfast food? : LET GO OF MY EGGO (from “L’eggo my Eggo”)
111A. “Corrected” slogan for a dairy product? : DO YOU HAVE ANY MILK? (from “Got milk?”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 21m 16s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

15. Tennis’s Wawrinka, winner of the 2015 French Open : STAN
Stan Wawrinka is a professional tennis player from Switzerland. Wawrinka has won two Grand Slam singles titles: the Australian Open (2014) and the French Open (2015).

20. Sophomore’s choice : MAJOR
The term “sophomore” has been used for a student in the second year of university since the 1680’s. The original meaning of the word was “arguer”. The term has Greek roots, from two Greek words that have been artificially combined in English. The Greek “sophos” means “wise”, and “moros” means “foolish”.

21. “Language of the unheard,” per Martin Luther King Jr. : RIOT
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said to Mike Wallace in a 1966 interview, while stressing the need for non-violence:

I contend that the cry of “black power” is, at bottom, a reaction to the reluctance of white power to make the kind of changes necessary to make justice a reality for the Negro. I think that we’ve got to see that a riot is the language of the unheard.

22. “Duh, I get it” : AHSO
The slang term “ahso” is used in American English to mean “I see”. The term derives from the Japanese expression “Ah so desu ka” meaning “Oh, that’s how it is”.

23. “Corrected” slogan for a tech company? : THINK DIFFERENTLY (from “Think Different”)
Apple Computer introduced its “Think Different” advertising slogan in 1997. It was a very clear play on the longstanding motto used by IBM, namely “Think”.

26. Matriarch of six of the 12 Tribes of Israel : LEAH
In the Torah, the Israelites are traced back to Jacob, the grandson of Abraham and twin brother of Esau. Jacob had twelve sons, through his concurrent wives Leah and Rachel, and his two concubines Bilhah and Zilpah. The sons became the ancestors of the Twelve Tribes of Israel. The sons were:

– Reuben
– Simeon
– Levi
– Judah
– Dan
– Naphtali
– Gad
– Asher
– Issachar
– Zebulun
– Joseph
– Benjamin

30. Majority of Saudi Arabians : SUNNI
The Islamic sects of Sunni and Shia Muslims differ in the belief of who should have taken over leadership of the Muslim faithful after the death of the Prophet Muhammad. Followers of the Sunni tradition agree with the decision that the Prophet Muhammad’s confidante Abu Bakr was the right choice to become the first Caliph of the Islamic nation. Followers of the Shia tradition believe that leadership should have stayed within the Prophet Muhammad’s own family, and favoured the Prophet’s son-in-law Ali.

33. “Corrected” slogan for an office supply chain? : YES, WE HAVE THAT (from “Yeah, we’ve got that”)
“Yeah, we’ve got that” is a slogan that was used by the office supply chain Staples until 2003, when it was replaced with “That was easy”.

37. Anna Karenina’s lover : ALEXEI
I have to admit to not having read the Tolstoy’s “Anna Karenina”, but I did see the excellent 1977 British television adaptation starring Nicola Pagett. Count Alexei Vronsky is Anna Karenina’s lover.

40. Skaters’ leaps : AXELS
An Axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. It was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

41. Who might say “I’m I. M.” : PEI
I. M. Pei (full name: Ieoh Ming Pei) is an exceptional American architect who was born in China. Of Pei’s many wonderful works, my favorite is the renovation of the Louvre in Paris, especially the Glass Pyramid in the courtyard.

44. Early co-host of “The View” : STAR JONES
Star Jones is a lawyer and television journalist who spent almost a decade as co-host of the talk show “The View”.

49. “Corrected” slogan for a fast-food franchise? : EAT FRESHLY (from “eat fresh”)
“Eat fresh” is an advertising slogan used by the SUBWAY chain of sandwich restaurants.

The SUBWAY chain of fast food restaurants is the largest single-brand restaurant in the world. I’m a big fan of SUBWAY sandwiches, especially the toasted ones …

52. Feudal superiors : LIEGES
A liege was a feudal lord, one to whom service or allegiance was owed under feudal law. “Liege” was also the term used for one who owed allegiance or service to a lord. Very confusing …

53. “The Boy Next Door” star, to fans : J.LO
“The Boy Next Door” is a 2015 thriller movie about a teenage boy who develops an unhealthy obsession about his neighbor and teacher. The teacher is played by Jennifer Lopez.

59. Earnings, so to speak : BACON
Back in the day, a wealthy man would “bring home the bacon” and sit around with guests “chewing the fat”.

66. “Corrected” slogan for a dessert brand? : EVERYBODY LIKES SARA LEE (from “… nobody doesn’t like Sara Lee”)
“Everybody doesn’t like something, but nobody doesn’t like Sara Lee” is an advertising slogan used by Sara Lee.

In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

73. Molly who wrote “Bill of Wrongs” : IVINS
Molly Ivins was a newspaper columnist, journalist and political commentator. One of Ivins’ books is a “Bill of Wrongs: The Executive Branch’s Assault on America’s Fundamental Rights”.

74. Hogwarts delivery system : OWLS
In the “Harry Potter” universe, messages are sent by “owl post”, which uses owls as mail carriers.

In J.K. Rowling’s “Harry Potter” universe, The Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry was founded by the four most brilliant witches and wizards of their time: Godric Gryffindor, Helga Hufflepuff, Rowena Ravenclaw and Salazar Slytherin. Each of the founders lent their name to a House in the school, i.e. Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw and Slytherin.

75. Dweeb : WIENIE
Dweeb is a relatively recent American slang that came out of college life in the late sixties. Dweeb, squarepants, nerd, they’re all not-nice terms that mean the same thing: someone excessively studious and socially inept.

81. Measure of inflation, for short : PSI
Pounds per square inch (PSI) is a measure of pressure.

82. Calligraphers : PENMEN
Calligraphy is the art of fine handwriting, and a term derived from the Greek “kallos” meaning “beauty” and “graphein” meaning “to write”.

83. “Corrected” slogan for a hairstyling product? : A DAB WILL DO (from “A Little Dab’ll Do Ya!”)
The original Brylcreem product was a pomade introduced in England in 1928. When it first appeared in a television advertisement it was touted with a jingle that started out:

Bryl-creem, a little dab’ll do ya,
Use more, only if you dare,
But watch out,
The gals will all pursue ya,–
They’ll love to put their fingers through your hair.

89. Thom ___ shoes : MCAN
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

91. “When in ___, tell the truth”: Mark Twain : DOUBT
Mark Twain is oft-quoted. Here are some gems:

– “Always obey your parents when they are present.”
– “When in doubt, tell the truth.”
– “Man is the only animal that blushes, or needs to.”
– “To eat is human, to digest divine.”
– “The lack of money is the root of all evil.”

97. “Corrected” slogan for a frozen breakfast food? : LET GO OF MY EGGO (from “L’eggo my Eggo”)
Eggo is the brand name of a line of frozen waffles made by Kellogg’s. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name “Eggo” was chosen to promote the “egginess” of the batter. “Eggo” replaced the original name chosen, which was “Froffles”, created by melding “frozen” and “waffles”.

102. Aunt in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” : CHLOE
Aunt Chloe is the title character’s wife in the novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” by Harriet Beecher Stowe.

“Uncle Tom’s Cabin” by Harriet Beecher Stowe is an anti-slavery novel published in 1852. “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” outsold every other novel in the 19th century, and is cited as greatly influencing the abolitionist cause and helping lay the groundwork for the Civil War.

103. Reflective writing : ELEGY
An elegy is a mournful poem or funeral song, also known as a dirge. Perhaps the most famous elegy in the English language is that written by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750. His “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is the source of many oft-quoted phrases, including:

– Celestial fire
– Far from the Madding Crowd
– Kindred spirit

104. Certification for eco-friendly buildings, for short : LEED
LEED is a green building certification program. The acronym stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

111. “Corrected” slogan for a dairy product? : DO YOU HAVE ANY MILK? (from “Got milk?”)
The “got milk?” advertising campaign was funded originally by the California Milk Processor Board and later by milk processors and dairy farmers. The “got milk?” ads encourage us to drink cow’s milk, and lots of it.

115. Hot rod’s rod : AXLE
A “hot rod” is an American car that has been modified for speed by installing a larger than normal engine. A “street rod” is generally a more comfortable type of “hot rod”, with the emphasis less on the engine and more on custom paint jobs and interiors. By definition, a street rod must be based on an automobile design that originated prior to 1949.

118. “Duck Dynasty” network : A AND E
“Duck Dynasty” is a reality television show on the A&E cable channel. The show is centered on the Robertson family from Monroe, Louisiana who made a lot of money selling products to duck hunters. Phil Robertson was in the news awhile back for views he expressed on homeosexuality and other subjects in an interview with “GQ” magazine.

119. Action-oriented sorts, supposedly : LEOS
Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 23 to August 22 are Leos.

120. Surfaces, in a way : TARS
“Tarmac” and “macadam” are short for “tarmacadam”. In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as “macadam”. Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The “tar-penetration macadam” is the basis of what we now call Tarmac.

Down
1. “Africa” band, 1982 : TOTO
Toto is an American rock band dating back to 1977. As well as their famous “Rosanna”, they also sang another good tune called “Africa”.

2. First Ironman locale : OAHU
An Ironman Triathlon is a race involving a 2.4 mile swim, a 112 mile bike ride, and a marathon run of just over 26 miles. The idea for the race came out of a debate between some runners in the 1977 Oahu Perimeter Relay. They were questioning whether runners, swimmers or bikers were the most fit athletes. The debaters decided to combine three local events to determine the answer, inviting athletes from all three disciplines. The events that were mimicked to come up with the first triathlon were the Waikiki Roughwater swim (2.4 miles), the Around-Oahu Bike Race (115 miles) and the Honolulu Marathon (26.2 miles). The idea was that whoever finished first would be called “the Iron Man”. The first triathlon was run in 1978, with fifteen starters and only twelve finishers. The race format is used all over the world now, but the Hawaiian Ironman is the event that everyone wants to win.

6. Buggy people? : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a subgroup of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

8. Driver who won the Indy 500, Daytona 500 and Le Mans : AJ FOYT
A. J. Foyt is a retired racing driver. He is the only driver to have won the Indianapolis 500 (four times, in fact), the Daytona 500, the 24 Hours of Daytona as well as the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

9. European deer : ROE
Roe deer are found mainly in Europe. They would be the deer shown on television and in movies when Robin Hood was out hunting in Sherwood Forest.

11. “The Terminator” star, to fans : ARNIE
The body-builder, actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger was born in Graz in Austria, the son of the local police chief. Schwarzenegger’s family name translates into the more prosaic “black plough man”. In his bodybuilding days, he was often referred to as the Austrian Oak. When he was Governor of California he was called “the Governator”, a play on his role in the “The Terminator” series of movies.

The 1984 movie “The Terminator” was directed by James Cameron. It was a relatively low budget production, costing $6.4 million. It has grossed around $80 million to date, so no wonder the Terminator said “I’ll be back”.

13. Oktoberfest dance : POLKA
The polka is a dance from central Europe, one that originated in Bohemia in the mid-1800s. It’s thought that “polka” comes from a Czech word meaning “little half”, reflecting the little half-steps included in the basic dance.

Oktoberfest is a 16-day beer festival in Munich that actually starts in September. About six million people attend every year, making it the largest fair in the world. I’ve been there twice, and it really is a great party …

16. Hurricanes’ grp. : THE NHL
The Carolina Hurricanes are the professional hockey team based in Raleigh, North Carolina. The team was founded as the New England Whalers, when they were located in Boston, and then Hartford, Connecticut. The Whalers moved to Raleigh in 1997, and became the Hurricane.

17. Yoga poses : ASANAS
“Asana” is a Sanskrit word literally meaning “sitting down”. The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called “padmasana”.

18. Like three Cy Young games : NO-HIT
Cy Young was a pitcher in the major leagues from 1890-1911. Young is remembered for pitching the first perfect game of baseball’s modern era. Soon after he died in 1955, the Cy Young Award was created and is presented to the best pitcher in each baseball season.

24. Indirect objects, grammatically speaking : DATIVES
As we recall from English class, a noun is in the dative case when it refers to an object that is given “to” someone.

32. “Acoustic guitar” or “terrestrial radio” : RETRONYM
“Retronym” is a term used to distinguish between the current form of an object and the original form. For example, we tend to call the original guitar an “acoustic guitar” to differentiate it from today’s “electric guitar”. Similarly, we now say “cloth diapers” and “film cameras” when referring to the originals.

35. ___ Pepper : SGT
Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band was the alter-ego of the Beatles and was the title of a famous studio album released in 1967.

36. Hudgens of “High School Musical” : VANESSA
Vanessa Hudgens is an actress who made her name playing Gabriella Montez in the “High School Musical” series of films. More recently, Hudgens played the title role in the musical “Gigi” on Broadway.

39. Pioneering stand-up comedian : SAHL
Mort Sahl is a Canadian-born actor and comedian who moved to the US with his family when he was a child. Sahl became friends with John F. Kennedy. When Kennedy became president, Sahl wrote a lot of jokes for the President’s speeches, although he also told a lot of Kennedy jokes in his acts. After the President was assassinated in 1963, Sahl was intensely interested in finding out who was behind the crime and even got himself deputized as a member of one of the investigating teams. He was very outspoken against the results of the Warren Commission report on the assassination, and soon found himself out of favor with the public. It took a few years for him to make his comeback, but come back he did.

43. El Paso setting: Abbr. : MST
Mountain Standard Time (MST)

Although there have been human settlements in the El Paso area for thousands of years, the first European settlement was founded in 1659 by the Spanish. That first community was on the south bank of the Rio Grande, and was called El Paso del Norte (the North Pass). Most of the urban development under Spanish rule took place on the south side of the river, with El Paso del Norte acting as the center of governance for the Spanish for the territory of New Mexico. The Rio Grande was chosen as the border between Mexico and the US in 1848, so most of the city of El Paso del Norte became part of the Mexican state of Chihuahua (and is now called Ciudad Juarez). The area north of the river developed as a US military post, eventually becoming the modern city of El Paso, Texas.

45. Admission of 1959 : ALASKA
Alaska became the 49th state to join the United States on January 3rd, 1959. Hawaii became the 50th state just a few months later, on August 21st.

50. Nordic wonders : FJORDS
A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

53. “Romeo Must Die” star, 2000 : JET LI
The actor Jet Li’s real name is Li Jian Jie. Jet Li is a martial artist and international film star from Beijing, China. Li played a villain in “Lethal Weapon 4”, and had a leading role in the 2000 movie “Romeo Must Die”.

55. Missouri River natives : OTOES
The Otoe (also Oto) Native American tribe originated in the Great Lakes region as part of the Winnebago or Siouan tribes. The group that would become the Otoe broke away from the Winnebago and migrated southwestwards ending up in the Great Plains. In the plains the Otoe adopted a semi-nomadic lifestyle dependent on the horse, with the American bison becoming central to their diet.

57. It makes a turn at the entrance : STILE
A stile is a structure allowing people to pass over or through a fence, while at the same time preventing livestock from escaping. The derivative term “turnstile” describes a revolving structure in a wall or fence that allows the controlled passage of people.

59. Some jazz : BEBOP
The jazz term “bebop” probably came from “Arriba! Arriba!”, words of encouragement from Latin American bandleaders to their musicians.

61. Ma uses them : CELLI
The word “cello” (plural “celli” or “cellos”) is an abbreviation for “violoncello”, an Italian word for “little violone”, referring to a group of stringed instruments that were popular up to the end of the 17th century. The name violoncello persisted for the instrument that we know today, although the abbreviation ‘cello was often used. Nowadays we just drop the apostrophe.

Yo-Yo Ma is a marvelous American cellist, born in Paris to Chinese parents. Ma started studying the violin when he was very young, working his way up (in size) to the viola and finally to the cello. He has said that he wanted to play the double bass, but it was just too big for his relatively small frame.

63. Like ibexes : ALPINE
Ibex is a common name for various species of mountain goat. “Ibex” is a Latin name that was used for wild goats found in the Alps and Apennines in Europe.

65. Cover’s opposite : ORIGINAL
An original of a song is opposite to a cover version.

68. Like shepherds’ charges : OVINE
The Latin word for “sheep” is “ovis”, giving us the adjective “ovine”, meaning “like a sheep”.

78. Subject for one studying onomastics : NAME
Onomastics is the study of proper names and their origins. One branch of onomastics is toponomastics, the study of place names.

79. Ottawa-based media inits. : CBC
“CBC” stands for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Canada’s national public radio and television broadcaster. In terms of financing and structure, CBC is akin to the BBC in Britain. But as commercial advertising is permitted, it perhaps more akin to RTE, the national broadcasting company in my homeland of Ireland.

82. Submarine near the Gulf Coast : PO’ BOY
A po’ boy is a submarine sandwich from Louisiana. There are a lot of theories about where the name came from, and none sound too convincing to me. A po’ boy differs from a regular submarine sandwich in that it uses Louisiana French bread, which is soft in the middle and crusty on the outside.

83. TV character with the catchphrase “Booyakasha!” : ALI G
Ali G is a fictional character created by British comedian Sacha Baron Cohen. Baron Cohen achieved international fame playing another of his personae, Borat, the protagonist in the 2006 movie “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan”.

86. Start of the Lord’s Prayer : OUR
“Our Father …” are the opening words of the Lord’s Prayer (“Pater Noster” in Latin), which is probably the best-known prayer in the Christian tradition.

87. Band with the first video on MTV, with “the” : BUGGLES
The first video played at the launch of MTV the Buggles’ “Video Killed the Radio Star” (I love that song), followed by Pat Benatar singing “You Better Run”.

92. Singer of the aria “Ora e per sempre addio” : OTELLO
The title of the aria “Ora e per sempre addio” from Verdi’s opera “Otello” translates as “Forever Farewell”.

Giuseppe Verdi’s opera “Otello” was first performed in 1887 at La Scala Theater in Milan. The opera is based on Shakespeare’s play “Othello” and is considered by many to be Verdi’s greatest work.

94. Let, e.g. : DO-OVER
An umpire might call “let!” in a game of tennis, leading to a do-over.

98. Plants : FLORA
The fauna is the animal life of a particular region, and the flora is that region’s plant life. The term “fauna” comes from the Roman goddess of earth and fertility who was called Fauna. Flora was the Roman goddess of plants, flowers and fertility.

99. Stephenie who wrote “Twilight” : MEYER
The author Stephen Meyer is best-known for her “Twilight” series of vampire romance novels. The “Twilight” books are aimed at young adults. Meyer also wrote a 2008 adult sci-fi novel called “The Host”, which went straight to the top of the New York Times Best Seller list.

101. URL ender : EDU
The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

– .com (commercial enterprise)
– .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
– .mil (US military)
– .org (not-for-profit organization)
– .gov (US federal government entity)
– .edu (college-level educational institution)

Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

102. I.M. sessions : CHATS
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

106. “Fiddlesticks!” : HECK!
We’ve been using “fiddlesticks” to mean “nonsense” since the early 17th century. Prior to that time, “fiddlestick” referred to the bow of a fiddle.

108. Photographer/writer Arlene : ALDA
Arlene Alda is a photographer and writer from the Bronx, New York. Born Arlene Weiss, she is the wife of actor Alan Alda.

109. Short timetable? : SKED
Schedule (sked.)

111. Chemical used to fight malaria : DDT
DDT is dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (don’t forget now!). DDT was used with great success to control disease-carrying insects during WWII, and when made available for use after the war it became by far the most popular pesticide. And then Rachel Carson published her famous book “Silent Spring”, suggesting there was a link between DDT and diminishing populations of certain wildlife. It was the public outcry sparked by the book, and reports of links between DDT and cancer, that led to the ban on the use of the chemical in 1972. That ban is touted as the main reason that the bald eagle was rescued from near extinction.

113. Like : A LA
The phrase “in the style of” can be translated in “alla” in Italian and “à la” in French.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Chipped beef go-with : TOAST
6. Plugged in : AWARE
11. Subjects of frequent updates : APPS
15. Tennis’s Wawrinka, winner of the 2015 French Open : STAN
19. Wet spot : OASIS
20. Sophomore’s choice : MAJOR
21. “Language of the unheard,” per Martin Luther King Jr. : RIOT
22. “Duh, I get it” : AHSO
23. “Corrected” slogan for a tech company? : THINK DIFFERENTLY (from “Think Different”)
26. Matriarch of six of the 12 Tribes of Israel : LEAH
27. Bounce : OUST
28. Regarding : AS TO
29. Keeper of the flame? : WICK
30. Majority of Saudi Arabians : SUNNI
31. Kind of tone : EARTH
33. “Corrected” slogan for an office supply chain? : YES, WE HAVE THAT (from “Yeah, we’ve got that”)
37. Anna Karenina’s lover : ALEXEI
39. Deer hunter’s prize : STAG
40. Skaters’ leaps : AXELS
41. Who might say “I’m I. M.” : PEI
42. Rating for many HBO shows : TV-MA
44. Early co-host of “The View” : STAR JONES
49. “Corrected” slogan for a fast-food franchise? : EAT FRESHLY (from “eat fresh”)
52. Feudal superiors : LIEGES
53. “The Boy Next Door” star, to fans : J.LO
56. Elbow : JOSTLE
57. Sources of some rattling : SABERS
58. Milkmaid’s handful : TEAT
59. Earnings, so to speak : BACON
62. Tubs : VATS
64. Fall back on, as in desperation : RESORT TO
66. “Corrected” slogan for a dessert brand? : EVERYBODY LIKES SARA LEE (from “… nobody doesn’t like Sara Lee”)
71. Gambit : BOLD MOVE
72. Gambit : PLAY
73. Molly who wrote “Bill of Wrongs” : IVINS
74. Hogwarts delivery system : OWLS
75. Dweeb : WIENIE
77. Confine : ENCAGE
81. Measure of inflation, for short : PSI
82. Calligraphers : PENMEN
83. “Corrected” slogan for a hairstyling product? : A DAB WILL DO (from “A Little Dab’ll Do Ya!”)
87. Shows promise : BODES WELL
89. Thom ___ shoes : MCAN
90. Short note? : IOU
91. “When in ___, tell the truth”: Mark Twain : DOUBT
93. Second : AIDE
95. Took, as a test : SAT FOR
97. “Corrected” slogan for a frozen breakfast food? : LET GO OF MY EGGO (from “L’eggo my Eggo”)
102. Aunt in “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” : CHLOE
103. Reflective writing : ELEGY
104. Certification for eco-friendly buildings, for short : LEED
105. “Funny bumping into you here” : OH HI
107. “Unfortunately …” : ALAS …
110. Seaside scavenger : GULL
111. “Corrected” slogan for a dairy product? : DO YOU HAVE ANY MILK? (from “Got milk?”)
115. Hot rod’s rod : AXLE
116. Took a card : DREW
117. President-___ : ELECT
118. “Duck Dynasty” network : A AND E
119. Action-oriented sorts, supposedly : LEOS
120. Surfaces, in a way : TARS
121. Targets of cons : MARKS
122. Work with the hands : KNEAD

Down
1. “Africa” band, 1982 : TOTO
2. First Ironman locale : OAHU
3. “From my perspective …” : AS I SEE IT …
4. Possible black market cause : SIN TAX
5. “Naughty!” : TSK!
6. Buggy people? : AMISH
7. Drift : WAFT
8. Driver who won the Indy 500, Daytona 500 and Le Mans : AJ FOYT
9. European deer : ROE
10. Get things wrong : ERR
11. “The Terminator” star, to fans : ARNIE
12. Bit of marketing : PITCH
13. Oktoberfest dance : POLKA
14. It’s a mess : STY
15. Signs of respect : SALUTES
16. Hurricanes’ grp. : THE NHL
17. Yoga poses : ASANAS
18. Like three Cy Young games : NO-HIT
24. Indirect objects, grammatically speaking : DATIVES
25. “Oh, gross!” : EWW!
30. Sides in a classic battle : SEXES
32. “Acoustic guitar” or “terrestrial radio” : RETRONYM
34. “Hey, relax!” : EASY!
35. ___ Pepper : SGT
36. Hudgens of “High School Musical” : VANESSA
37. Big lug : APE
38. Shepherd’s workplace : LEA
39. Pioneering stand-up comedian : SAHL
43. El Paso setting: Abbr. : MST
45. Admission of 1959 : ALASKA
46. Josh : RIB
47. Gibes : JEERS
48. Figures in bedtime stories : OGRES
50. Nordic wonders : FJORDS
51. Charge : LEVY
53. “Romeo Must Die” star, 2000 : JET LI
54. Approach evening : LATEN
55. Missouri River natives : OTOES
57. It makes a turn at the entrance : STILE
58. Globetrot : TRAVEL
59. Some jazz : BEBOP
60. Promises : AVOWS
61. Ma uses them : CELLI
63. Like ibexes : ALPINE
65. Cover’s opposite : ORIGINAL
67. Greeted with respect : BOWED TO
68. Like shepherds’ charges : OVINE
69. Holds to be : DEEMS
70. Scrutinized : EYED
76. Mint : NEW
78. Subject for one studying onomastics : NAME
79. Ottawa-based media inits. : CBC
80. Flooded with : AWASH IN
82. Submarine near the Gulf Coast : PO’ BOY
83. TV character with the catchphrase “Booyakasha!” : ALI G
84. Rope from a ship, say : LIFELINE
85. “Whoop-de-___” : DOO
86. Start of the Lord’s Prayer : OUR
87. Band with the first video on MTV, with “the” : BUGGLES
88. Connectivity issue : LAG
91. Having all the add-ons, say : DELUXE
92. Singer of the aria “Ora e per sempre addio” : OTELLO
94. Let, e.g. : DO-OVER
96. Barring no one : TO A MAN
97. Corporate department : LEGAL
98. Plants : FLORA
99. Stephenie who wrote “Twilight” : MEYER
100. Cartoonish shrieks : YEOWS
101. URL ender : EDU
102. I.M. sessions : CHATS
106. “Fiddlesticks!” : HECK!
108. Photographer/writer Arlene : ALDA
109. Short timetable? : SKED
111. Chemical used to fight malaria : DDT
112. Border line? : HEM
113. Like : A LA
114. Talk up a storm : YAK

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4 thoughts on “1220-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 20 Dec 15, Sunday”

  1. Had "weeney" at 75A, so that whole section didn't come out well, otherwise ok. I'm not much on corporate slogans. I recall there was a short interview with the ad exec who came up with BMW's "Ultimate driving machine" slogan after an episode of Mad Men, but that's about it.

  2. Not a fun puzzle for me today. Quit after 56 mins. Insisted on putting ESSAY into 103A instead of ELEGY, so bottom left corner was all wrong. Rest of the puzzle finished with no errors.

  3. 37:51, no errors. I try to ignore advertising in general and silly company slogans in particular, but I guess some of them have sunk in to some extent – enough so that I was able to construct grammatical versions of them, anyway. Some words/names that were new to me: Buggles (!), Wawrinka, Star Jones, LEED, Toto (as the name of a band, rather than a little dog), "dative" (as a noun), and Vanessa Hudgens. Daughter and grandkids are on their way back to LA, so life can return to "normal" (a mixed blessing … 🙂

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