0331-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 31 Mar 13, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
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CROSSWORD SETTER: Caleb Madison
THEME: Special Features … today’s themed answers are movie titles, but with an extra letter dropped in to suit the clue. The theme reflects the practice of dropping little inside jokes into media, called “Easter eggs”. Happy Easter, everyone:

23A. Movie about … an intense blinking contest? : STARE WARS (from “Star Wars”)
28A. … a housecleaner? : NEAT WORK (from “Network”)
30A. … a sled racer? : SNOW VOYAGER (from “Now, Voyager”)
44A. … a bee during a downpour? : STINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (from “Singin’ in the Rain”)
56A. … actor Jason’s fan club? : BATEMAN FOREVER (from “Batman Forever”)
80A. … Jerry Garcia’s band’s portraits? : DRAWN OF THE DEAD (from “Dawn of the Dead”)
88A. … a parent’s edicts? : TEEN COMMANDMENTS (from “(The) Ten Commandments”)
100A. … a king’s brilliance? : REGAL GENIUS (from “Real Genius”)
108A. … a harvester? : GRAIN MAN (from “Rain Man”)

COMPLETION TIME: 33m 53s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … YUP (yep), UNIVAC (ENIVAC!!!)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

6. Justice Dept. branch : ATF
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is today part of the Department of Justice. The ATF has its roots in the Department of Treasury dating back to 1886 when it was known as the Bureau of Prohibition. “Explosives” was added to the ATF’s name when the bureau was moved under the Department of Justice as part of the reorganization called for in the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

9. Gyllenhaal of “Brokeback Mountain” : JAKE
Jake Gyllenhaal’s most famous role has to be as co-star with Heath Ledger in “Brokeback Mountain”, but he has also had lead roles in big movies like “The Day After Tomorrow”, “Jarhead” and “Rendition”.

“Brokeback Mountain” is a 2005 movie about the romantic and sexual relationship between two cowboys, played by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal. Matt Damon was asked to play one of the leads but declined. Damon gave the excuse, “I did a gay movie (The Talented Mr. Ripley), then a cowboy movie (All the Pretty Horses). I can’t follow it up with a gay-cowboy movie!”

13. 1983 film debut of Bill Maher : DC CAB
“D.C. Cab” is a comedy movie released in 1983 starring Mr. T. I don’t hear many good things about the film, although there is a special appearance by Irene Cara of “Fame” fame …

Bill Maher is a stand-up comedian and political commentator. Maher has an HBO television show called “Real Time with Bill Maher” which is essentially a follow-on from the very successful “Politically Incorrect” that started out on Comedy Central.

18. Documentarian Morris : ERROL
Errol Morris is a film director, best known for his excellent 2003 documentary “The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara”.

19. It’s found in la mer : SEL
In French, there is salt (sel) found the sea (la mer).

20. Cerberus guards its gates, in myth : HADES
Cerberus is a dog with three heads that appears in both Greek and Roman mythology. Cerberus had the job of guarding the gates of Hades and preventing those who had crossed the River Styx from ever escaping. A sop is a piece of food that has been dipped in some liquid, as one might sop a piece of bread in soup. There is an idiomatic expression, “to give a sop to Cerberus”, which means to give someone a bribe, or pay someone off. The idea is that if one could bribe Cerberus, give him a sop to eat, then he would let you pass and escape from Hades.

23. Movie about … an intense blinking contest? : STARE WARS (from “Star Wars”)
“Stars Wars” fans will be delighted to hear that George Lucas has announced that he will be making “Star Wars Episode VII”, scheduled for release in 2015.

27. Atoms in some light bulbs : ARGONS
A plasma lamp is a light source that generates light by exciting a plasma inside a a glass container, using radio waves to create the plasma of ionized particles. One of the original gases used for such plasmas was argon.

28. … a housecleaner? : NEAT WORK (from “Network”)
The movie “Network” was released in 1976. It was directed by Sidney Lumet and stars Peter Finch in his final role, for which he won a posthumous Academy Award. That Oscar for Peter Finch was remarkable in that it was the first time the Best Actor award had been won after the actor passed away, and it was also the first time it had been won by an Australian.

30. … a sled racer? : SNOW VOYAGER (from “Now, Voyager”)
The 1942 movie “Now, Voyager” stars Bette Davis, Paul Henreid and Claude Rains. The film is based on a novel of the same name by Olive Higgins Prouty. Prouty got the title of her book from the Walt Whitman poem “The Untold Want”:

The untold want by life and land ne’er granted,
Now, voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.

32. Children’s author Silverstein : SHEL
Author Shel Silverstein had a varied career and did a lot more than write books. Silverstein was a poet, composer, cartoonist and screenwriter among other things. One of his successful children’s books is “The Giving Tree”, which was first published in 1964. “The Giving Tree” tells of a young boy who has a special relationship with a tree in a forest. The message of the book seems to be that the tree provides the little boy with everything he needs.

37. Year “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” came out : MCM
L. Frank Baum (the “L” is for Lyman) is of course famous for writing “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz”. Writing early in the 20th century, Baum actually described in his books things that had yet to be invented, like television, laptop computers and wireless telephones.

38. China’s Chiang ___-shek : KAI
Chiang Kai-Shek was the leader of the Nationalist Movement in China right through to the end of WWII. The Nationalists lost out in a Civil War to the Communists backed by the Soviet Union after war, and Chiang Kai-Shek and his government were forced to flee to Taiwan. Chiang Kai-shek claimed rule over China from Taiwan until his death in 1975.

44. … a bee during a downpour? : STINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (from “Singin’ in the Rain”)
In the movie “Singin’ in the Rain”, the wonderful, wonderful dance sequence to the title song was filmed over 2-3 days. Gene Kelly was splashing through puddles and getting rained on while all the time he was sick, with a fever of 103F.

53. Part of E.M.S.: Abbr. : EMER
Emergency Medical Services (EMS).

54. Wall St. Journal listings : IPOS
An Initial Public Offering (IPO) is the very first offer of stock for sale by a company on the open market. In other words, an IPO marks the first time that a company is traded on a public exchange. Companies have an IPO to raise capital to expand (usually).

56. … actor Jason’s fan club? : BATEMAN FOREVER (from “Batman Forever”)
“Batman Forever” is a 1995 superhero film, one in a string of movies featuring the comic book hero Batman. This one has Val Kilmer in the title role, with the two main villains played by Jim Carrey (the Riddler) and Tommy Lee Jones (Two-Face).

Jason Bateman is an actor from Rye, New York who is most associated with the role of Michael Bluth on TV’s “Arrested Development”. Jason’s older sister is Justine Bateman, who played Mallory Keaton on the show “Family Ties”.

64. One might have a ball : DEB
Deb is short for “debutante”, which translates from French as “female beginner”.

66. Public health agcy. : CDC
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days …

72. Device Professor X wears over his head in “X-Men” : CEREBRO
In the “X-Men” universe, Cerebro is a device that can amplify the brainwaves of a user with telepathic capabilities. Cerebro is routinely used to distinguish between mutants and humans.

74. Pop singer Bedingfield : NATASHA
Natasha Bedingfield is a pop singer from England.

80. … Jerry Garcia’s band’s portraits? : DRAWN OF THE DEAD (from “Dawn of the Dead”)
Jerry Garcia was one of the founding members of the rock band, the Grateful Dead. Garcia struggled with cocaine and heroin addiction during most of his life, and died of a heart attack in 1995 in a California drug rehabilitation center.

“Dawn of the Dead” is a 1978 horror movie all about zombies going after some folks barricaded into a shopping mall. I really don’t do zombies nor horror films …

85. Air : MIEN
One’s mien is one’s bearing or manner. “Mien” shares the same etymological root as our word “demeanor”.

86. It’s west of the International Date Line : ASIA
The International Date Line (IDL) is an imaginary line that runs north-south along the 180-degree line of latitude (with a few deviations). The IDL is located on the opposite side of the Earth to the Prime Meridian, which runs through Greenwich, England. A person flying non-stop around the world from east to west loses one hour each time he or she crosses a time zone. When that person arrives back at his or her starting point, she would have lost 24 hours in total, a full day. So, the traveller has to compensate by moving the calendar forward 24 hours, by adding a day. By convention, this date change is made when crossing the IDL.

87. High clouds : CIRRI
Cirrus clouds are those lovely wispy white strands that are often called “mare’s tail”.

88. … a parent’s edicts? : TEEN COMMANDMENTS (from “(The) Ten Commandments”)
“The Ten Commandments” is an epic movie directed by Cecil B. DeMille, and released in 1956. The cast is as epic as the film, with Charlton Heston playing the starring role of Moses.

92. ___ Zone : ESPN
ESPN Zone is a chain of restaurants, albeit a small chain as there are only two of them. The original location was in Baltimore, Maryland but it’s closed now. There is one ESPN Zone in the entertainment complex in Downtown Los Angeles called L.A. Live, and there is another not too far away (that I’ve visited) in Downtown Disney in Anaheim.

95. One-named R&B singer : MYA
Mya is an R&B singer-songwriter. I don’t know her music, but I did see her get to the runner-up spot on the ninth series of “Dancing with the Stars”, beaten out of first place by Donny Osmond (don’t ask!).

100. … a king’s brilliance? : REGAL GENIUS (from “Real Genius”)
“Real Genius” is a comedy movie released in 1985, starring Val Kilmer. It’s one of those clever-kid-on-a-college-campus films. The final scene is perhaps notable. As the movie closes, the students destroy a professor’s house using laser-popped popcorn. The cast of the TV show “Mythbusters” delved into the movie premise, and showed that even though popcorn could indeed be popped by lasers, the popped corn wasn’t hard enough to break window-glass, never mind bring a house down.

108. … a harvester? : GRAIN MAN (from “Rain Man”)
“Rain Man” is an entertaining and thought-provoking film released in 1988 starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. It’s all about a self-possessed yuppie (Cruise, appropriate casting!) who discovers he has a brother who is an autistic savant (Hoffman). Hoffman won the Best Actor Oscar for his performance, and “Rain Man” won the Best Picture award.

113. Kind of bean : PINTO
Pinto beans are so-called because their skins have a mottled (“pinto”) appearance.

114. Who wrote “Wherever Law ends, Tyranny begins” : LOCKE
John Locke was the English philosopher who postulated that the mind is a blank slate (or “tabula rasa”) when we are born, and that we fill that slate with our experiences and observations.

115. Hidden DVD feature … which can be found, literally, in the answers to the italicized clues : EASTER EGG
In a film, book, computer program (or even a crossword!), an “Easter egg” is a hidden message or inside joke that is left intentionally during production. The term “Easter egg” is used for such a device as it evokes the idea of an Easter egg hunt. You can check out thousands of such Easter eggs at www.eeggs.com.

117. City south of Brigham City : OGDEN
Ogden, Utah was the first permanent settlement by people of European descent in what is now the state of Utah.

118. Peptic ___ : ULCER
Until fairly recently, a peptic ulcer was believed to be caused by undue amounts of stress in one’s life. It is now known that 70-90% of all peptic ulcers are in fact associated with a particular bacterium.

120. Lucy of “Kill Bill” : LIU
Lucy Liu is an Asian-American actress from Queens, New York. Liu’s big break came when she was chosen to play the Ling Woo character in “Ally McBeal”. I liked her in the 2000 film “Charlie’s Angels” but as I am no fan of Quentin Tarantino, I did not enjoy the movie “Kill Bill”. I am having fun watching one of Liu’s latest projects, in which she plays one of the two leads in the TV crime drama “Elementary”.

123. Part of N.B. : NOTA
“Nota bene” is the Latin for “note well”

125. Laurel and Lee : STANS
Stan Laurel was an English comic actor (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson), who made a great career for himself in Hollywood. Laurel ended up at the Hal Roach studio directing films, intent on pursuing a career in writing and directing. However, he was a sometime actor and was asked to step in when another comic actor, Oliver Hardy, was injured and couldn’t perform. Laurel and Hardy started to share a stage together during that time and when it was clear they worked so well together, their partnership was born. Oh, and the oft-quoted story that Clint Eastwood is the son of Stan Laurel … that’s just an urban myth.

Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board.

Down
3. Mythological figure often depicted holding a kithara : ERATO
In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of Lyric Poetry.

A kithara was a lyre-like instrument in Ancient Greece. The modern Greek word “kithara” translates as “guitar”.

4. 1945 Best Picture winner, with “The” : LOST WEEKEND
“The Lost Weekend” is an excellent 1945 film starring Ray Milland as an alcoholic writer on a drinking binge for a whole weekend.

8. Recurring Stephen King antagonist Randall ___ : FLAGG
Randall Flagg appears in several of Stephen King’s novels. Flagg is sometimes the main antagonist, but at other times he just makes a cameo appearance. I’m not a fan of the horror genre, so I’ve never bumped into the gentleman …

10. ___ Lovelace, computer pioneer : ADA
Ada Lovelace’s real name was Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace. She was the only legitimate child of Lord Byron, the poet. Lovelace was fascinated by mathematics and wrote about the work done by Charles Babbage in building his groundbreaking mechanical computer. In some of her notes, she proposed an algorithm for Babbage’s machine to compute Bernoulli numbers. This algorithm is recognized by many as the world’s first computer program and so Lovelace is sometimes called the first “computer programmer”.

11. “The Way You Look Tonight” composer : KERN
“The Way You Look Tonight” is a song sung by Fred Astaire to Ginger Rogers in the 1936 movie “Swing Time”. “Swing Time” was composed by Jerome Kern with lyrics by Dorothy Fields, and it won the Best Original Song Oscar.

12. De bene ___ (legal phrase) : ESSE
“De bene esse” is a legal term used to mean “conditionally, provisionally”. The literal translation from Latin is “of well being”.

13. Music genre of Possessed and Deicide : DEATH METAL
Death metal is a subgenre of heavy metal music. Let me check for some death metal titles on my iPod here … nope … none …

14. Hollywood’s Russell : CROWE
Russell Crowe is a highly successful actor from New Zealand. Understandably, he doesn’t like people to call him “Australian”, even though it was in Australia that he launched his acting career. Not too long before the 9/11 attacks, the FBI contacted Crowe to inform him that al-Qaeda was plotting to kidnap him as part of a general attack on high-profile “American” icons. For a few months the New Zealander was guarded by Secret Service agents.

15. Two-time Emmy-winning actress for “Taxi” : CAROL KANE
The actress Carol Kane played Andy Kaufman’s wife Simka Gravis, on the iconic sitcom “Taxi”.

16. Observatory subj. : ASTR
Astronomy (Astr.).

20. English king who was a son of William the Conqueror : HENRY I
Henry I of England was a son of William the Conqueror. According to legend, Henry died from eating “a surfeit of lampreys”, or more likely food poisoning. Lampreys look like a cross between a fish and an eel.

24. Smelt ___ : ROE
Smelt is the name given to several types of small fish.

29. Noted American writer in Yiddish : ASCH
Sholem Asch was a Polish-born American novelist and dramatist who published his work in Yiddish. One of his plays was “God of Vengeance”, a highly-regarded work performed all over Europe and translated into many languages. It opened on Broadway in 1923, but the adult themes (it was set in a brothel, and featured a lesbian relationship) led to the entire cast being arrested and convicted on obscenity charges.

35. Computer used to predict the 1952 presidential election : UNIVAC
UNIVAC I was the first commercial computer made in the US. It was designed by the inventors of ENIAC, the first electronic computer built for the US government. The first UNIVAC sold went to the US Census Bureau in 1951. UNIVAC was used in 1951 to predict the outcome of the US presidential election scheduled for the following year. The traditional pollsters were predicting a win for Adlai Stevenson, but UNIVAC forecast a landslide win for Eisenhower. UNIVAC proved to be correct.

36. Chemical dropper : PIPET
A pipette (also “pipet”) is tool used in a lab to transport an accurately measured volume of liquid. Back in my day, we would suck up the liquid into the pipette by applying our mouths to the top of the instrument. This could be quite dangerous, as one ended up with a mouthful of something unsavory if one lifted the top of pipette out of the liquid too soon. Nowadays, things are much safer.

40. M.I.T. part: Abbr. : INST
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) moved into its magnificent mile-long campus on the Cambridge side of the Charles River in 1906. The campus was built largely with funds donated by George Eastman, the founder of the Eastman Kodak Company.

46. World banking org. : IMF
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) was established at the end of 1945 with 29 major economies supporting and funding an effort to stabilize economies across the globe after WWII. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., today the IMF has 187 member countries.

47. Prefix with noir : NEO-
A neo-noir film is a contemporary film that incorporates elements of the film noir style of the forties and fifties.

50. Gridiron figure : REF
We never used the word “gridiron” when I was growing up in Ireland (meaning a grill used for cooking food over an open fire). So, maybe I am excused for finding out relatively recently that a football field gridiron is so called because the layout of yard lines over the field looks like a gridiron used in cooking!

52. Music related to punk rock : EMO
The musical genre of “emo” originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from “emotional hardcore”. Not my cup of tea …

57. Aconcagua setting : ANDES
The Andes is the longest continuous chain of mountains in the world, running right down the length of the west coast of South America for about 4,300 miles. The highest peak in the range is Mt. Aconcagua, at an elevation of 22,841 feet. Interestingly, the peak of Mt. Chimborazo in Ecuador is the furthest point on the Earth’s surface from the center of the planet. That’s because of the equatorial “bulge” around the Earth’s “waist”.

62. Vituperate : RANT AT
Vituperation is sustained, abusive language.

70. Exactly : SHARP
10pm exactly, 10pm sharp!

75. Sam Spade, e.g., for short : TEC
Private detective Sam Spade is the main character in Dashiell Hammett’s novel “The Maltese Falcon”. Famously, Spade was played by Humphrey Bogart in the 1941 film adaptation directed by John Huston.

76. Île de la ___ : CITE
There are two famous islands in the middle of the River Seine in Paris, one being the Île de la Cité, and the other Île Saint-Louis. Île de la Cité is the most renowned of the two, as it is home to the cathedral of Notre Dame.

78. Solo companion : CHEWBACCA
Wookiees are a biped race featured in “Star Wars”, the most notable being Chewbacca, the loyal friend and associate of Han Solo.

81. Subject of the Pentagon Papers, informally : NAM
Daniel Ellsberg is a former military analyst, who famously became very disillusioned with the Vietnam War. While still working as an analyst, he made copies of classified documents related to the Johnson administration’s conduct of the war. The documents, known as the Pentagon Papers, demonstrated that the administration knew early on that the Vietnam War was essentially “unwinnable” and that continued fighting would lead to higher numbers of casualties than was being projected in the public arena. Ellsberg ended up in court charged with espionage, but all charges were dropped when it was revealed that the Nixon administration had used illegal methods to bolster its case against the defendant.

82. Sugar suffix : -OSE
The sugar we consume as “table sugar” is mainly sucrose that is extracted from sugar cane and sugar beet. We also consume lactose, naturally occurring in milk, and fructose, naturally occurring in fruit. But most of the sugar we eat or drink tends to be prepared commercially, the most famous being high-fructose corn syrup, which is glucose that is industrially processed into a glucose/fructose mix. Don’t get me started on the politics of food …

83. Word at the end of many French films : FIN
“Fin” is the French word for “end”.

85. Fr. title : MME
Madame (Mme.)

89. City SSE of 117-Across : OREM
Orem, Utah was originally known as “Sharon” (a Biblical name), then “Provo Bench”, and in 1914 it was given the family name of a local railroad operator called “Orem”. Orem gave itself the nickname “Family City USA” and sure enough in 2010, “Forbes” rated Orem the 5th best place in the country to raise a family.

99. Poet Conrad : AIKEN
Conrad Aiken was a novelist and poet. Aiken was named Poet Laureate of the United States in 1950.

102. Ones who wrote in the Ogham alphabet : GAELS
Ogham is an old Irish alphabet that is found on a few hundred surviving monuments located around the country and in parts of western Britain. The oldest of these inscriptions has been dated back to the 4th century.

105. World powerhouse in cricket : INDIA
Cricket is the national game of England. The term “cricket” apparently comes from the Old French word “criquet” meaning “goalpost, stick”.

106. Knoxville sch. : UTENN
The Tennessee Volunteers (the Vols) is the name given to the men’s sports teams at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. The women’s teams are called the Lady Volunteers.

Tennessee uses the nickname “Volunteer State” as during the War of 1812 volunteer soldiers from Tennessee fought with particular valor, especially during the Battle of New Orleans.

107. Fake-book material : SONGS
A performer can sometimes use what’s called a musical lead sheet to quickly learn a new song. The lead sheet contains just the melody line, basic chords and lyrics. A collection of lead sheets is called a ‘fake book”, a book that allows a singer to “fake” familiarity with a song.

110. Many ages : AEON
Aeon is a variant spelling of “eon”. In astronomical terms, an aeon is defined as one thousand million years.

111. iPod ___ : NANO
The iPod Nano is the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There have been five versions of the Nano to date and the current Nano as well as playing tunes is an FM player, records voice memos, and even has a pedometer!

112. Home of Typhon, in myth : ETNA
Typhon was known as the “father of all monsters” in Greek mythology, and he was married to the “mother of all monster”, Echidna. Typhon had a huge human torso with a hundred dragon heads. His lower body was made up of gigantic viper coils. Although all the gods feared Typhon, Zeus finally defeated him and trapped him underneath Mount Etna.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. One-on-ones : DUELS
6. Justice Dept. branch : ATF
9. Gyllenhaal of “Brokeback Mountain” : JAKE
13. 1983 film debut of Bill Maher : DC CAB
18. Documentarian Morris : ERROL
19. It’s found in la mer : SEL
20. Cerberus guards its gates, in myth : HADES
21. Wipe out : ERASE
22. Lower : ABASE
23. Movie about … an intense blinking contest? : STARE WARS (from “Star Wars”)
25. It comes from the heart : AORTA
26. Steaming beverage : LATTE
27. Atoms in some light bulbs : ARGONS
28. … a housecleaner? : NEAT WORK (from “Network”)
30. … a sled racer? : SNOW VOYAGER (from “Now, Voyager”)
32. Children’s author Silverstein : SHEL
33. “Yikes!” : EEK!
34. “You betcha” : YUP
37. Year “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” came out : MCM
38. China’s Chiang ___-shek : KAI
41. Part of a pound : CAGE
44. … a bee during a downpour? : STINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (from “Singin’ in the Rain”)
51. Up : AWAKE
53. Part of E.M.S.: Abbr. : EMER
54. Wall St. Journal listings : IPOS
55. Handles : TENDS
56. … actor Jason’s fan club? : BATEMAN FOREVER (from “Batman Forever”)
59. Least volatile, perhaps : SAFEST
60. Some patches : IRON-ONS
61. Expert despite little training : NATURAL
63. Brainy person, and proud of it : NERD
64. One might have a ball : DEB
66. Public health agcy. : CDC
67. Senate vote : NAY
68. Verdant : LUSH
72. Device Professor X wears over his head in “X-Men” : CEREBRO
74. Pop singer Bedingfield : NATASHA
76. Low-maintenance potted plant : CACTUS
80. … Jerry Garcia’s band’s portraits? : DRAWN OF THE DEAD (from “Dawn of the Dead”)
84. ___ water : IN HOT
85. Air : MIEN
86. It’s west of the International Date Line : ASIA
87. High clouds : CIRRI
88. … a parent’s edicts? : TEEN COMMANDMENTS (from “(The) Ten Commandments”)
92. ___ Zone : ESPN
93. “Gag me!” : EWW!
94. Certain extraction : ORE
95. One-named R&B singer : MYA
96. Pitches : ADS
98. Stripped : BARE
100. … a king’s brilliance? : REGAL GENIUS (from “Real Genius”)
108. … a harvester? : GRAIN MAN (from “Rain Man”)
112. Get hot : ENRAGE
113. Kind of bean : PINTO
114. Who wrote “Wherever Law ends, Tyranny begins” : LOCKE
115. Hidden DVD feature … which can be found, literally, in the answers to the italicized clues : EASTER EGG
117. City south of Brigham City : OGDEN
118. Peptic ___ : ULCER
119. Nonstop : ON END
120. Lucy of “Kill Bill” : LIU
121. Object : THING
122. Wherewithal : MEANS
123. Part of N.B. : NOTA
124. Back-to-school mo. : SEP
125. Laurel and Lee : STANS

Down
1. Starts of some games : DEALS
2. ___ Outfitters, clothing retailer : URBAN
3. Mythological figure often depicted holding a kithara : ERATO
4. 1945 Best Picture winner, with “The” : LOST WEEKEND
5. Album holder : SLEEVE
6. Evaluate : ASSAY
7. Prefix with fluoride : TETRA-
8. Recurring Stephen King antagonist Randall ___ : FLAGG
9. Vise parts : JAWS
10. ___ Lovelace, computer pioneer : ADA
11. “The Way You Look Tonight” composer : KERN
12. De bene ___ (legal phrase) : ESSE
13. Music genre of Possessed and Deicide : DEATH METAL
14. Hollywood’s Russell : CROWE
15. Two-time Emmy-winning actress for “Taxi” : CAROL KANE
16. Observatory subj. : ASTR
17. Bill : BEAK
20. English king who was a son of William the Conqueror : HENRY I
24. Smelt ___ : ROE
29. Noted American writer in Yiddish : ASCH
31. Signs off on : OKS
35. Computer used to predict the 1952 presidential election : UNIVAC
36. Chemical dropper : PIPET
37. The 57-Down, e.g. : MTS
39. Supports : AIDS
40. M.I.T. part: Abbr. : INST
41. Airplane area : CABIN
42. Sentient : AWARE
43. Big snapper? : GATOR
45. More wound up : TENSER
46. World banking org. : IMF
47. Prefix with noir : NEO-
48. [I’m not happy about this …] : GRR
49. Like some stockings and baseball games : NO-RUN
50. Gridiron figure : REF
52. Music related to punk rock : EMO
57. Aconcagua setting : ANDES
58. Fund : ENDOW
59. Just what the doctor ordered? : SAY AH
62. Vituperate : RANT AT
65. Darken : BEDIM
66. Nook : CRANNY
68. Weekly bar promotion, maybe : LADIES NIGHT
69. ___ manual : USER’S
70. Exactly : SHARP
71. Allowed to enter : HAD IN
72. Wasn’t exacting : CUT CORNERS
73. Pond fish : BREAM
75. Sam Spade, e.g., for short : TEC
76. Île de la ___ : CITE
77. Once again : ANEW
78. Solo companion : CHEWBACCA
79. Slew : TON
81. Subject of the Pentagon Papers, informally : NAM
82. Sugar suffix : -OSE
83. Word at the end of many French films : FIN
85. Fr. title : MME
89. City SSE of 117-Across : OREM
90. Son-of-a-gun : DARNED
91. Yield to weariness : SAG
97. Stations : DEPOTS
99. Poet Conrad : AIKEN
101. Mess up : ERR
102. Ones who wrote in the Ogham alphabet : GAELS
103. New Mexico State athlete : AGGIE
104. Helping hand, paradoxically : LEG UP
105. World powerhouse in cricket : INDIA
106. Knoxville sch. : UTENN
107. Fake-book material : SONGS
108. Down : GLUM
109. Part of a play : ROLE
110. Many ages : AEON
111. iPod ___ : NANO
112. Home of Typhon, in myth : ETNA
116. ___ for life : SET


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