0201-22 NY Times Crossword 1 Feb 22, Tuesday

Constructed by: Zhouqin Burnikel
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: New Years

Themed answers are New Year celebrations around the world:

  • 16A Chinese New Year, celebrated on Feb. 1, 2022 : SPRING FESTIVAL
  • 26A Jewish New Year, celebrated on Sept. 25, 2022 : ROSH HASHANAH
  • 55A Thai New Year, celebrated on April 13, 2022 : SONGKRAN
  • 28D Korean New Year, celebrated on Feb. 1, 2022 : SOLLAL
  • 29D Iranian New Year, celebrated on March 21, 2022 : NOWRUZ

Bill’s time: 6m 32s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Smurf with red pants : PAPA

The Smurfs are little blue people created in 1958 by the Belgian cartoonist who went by the pen name Peyo. The Smurfs became famous in the US when Hanna-Barbera used them in a children’s cartoon series. The characters are largely a group of males. The original lineup included just one “Smurfette”, who is wooed by almost all of the boy Smurfs. Later, another female was introduced into the mix called Sassette, and still later along came Granny Smurf.

13 Homecoming guest, informally : ALUM

An alumnus (plural “alumni”) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural “alumnae”). The term comes into English from Latin, in which an alumnus is a foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or alumnus.

14 Algeria has the largest one among African countries : AREA

Algeria is a huge country, the largest in Africa, and the largest country on the Mediterranean. The capital of Algeria is Algiers, and the country takes its name from the city.

15 Capital where natives say “Arrivederci!” : ROMA

“Ciao” is Italian for “‘bye”. “Arrivederci” is more formal, and translates as “goodbye”.

19 Trunk in a studio : TORSO

“Torso” (plural “torsi”) is an Italian word meaning the “trunk of a statue”, and is a term that we imported into English.

26 Jewish New Year, celebrated on Sept. 25, 2022 : ROSH HASHANAH

Rosh Hashanah is loosely referred to as “Jewish New Year”. The literal translation from Hebrew is “head of the year”.

32 Nevada’s third-largest city : RENO

The city of Reno’s economy took off when open gambling was legalized in Nevada in 1931. Within a short time, a syndicate had built the Bank Club in Reno, which was the largest casino in the world at the time.

37 “The Good Place” actress Rudolph : MAYA

Comic actress Maya Rudolph got her break as a regular cast member on “Saturday Night Live”. Rudolph’s mother was singer Minnie Ripperton, who had a big hit in 1975 with the single “Lovin’ You”.

“The Good Place” is a fantasy-comedy TV show about a woman who wakes up in the afterlife. The woman is played by Kristen Bell, and the afterlife is a heaven-like utopia designed by Michael, an immortal architect portrayed by Ted Danson. I haven’t seen this one …

42 Big seller of flat-pack furniture : IKEA

The IKEA furniture chain was founded by Ingvar Kamprad in 1943, when he was just 17-years-old. IKEA is an acronym standing for Ingvar Kamprad Elmtaryd Agunnaryd (don’t forget now!). Elmtaryd was the name of the farm where Ingvar Kamprad grew up, and Agunnaryd is his home parish in Sweden.

43 Blackthorn fruit : SLOE

The sloe is the fruit of the blackthorn bush, and the main flavoring ingredient in sloe gin. A sloe looks like a small plum, but is usually much more tart in taste.

44 Pac-12 team : UTES

The Runnin’ Utes are the basketball team of the University of Utah. The team was given the nickname the Runnin’ Redskins back when Jack Gardner was the head coach from 1953 to 1971. The “Runnin’” part of the name was chosen because Gardner was famous for playing quick offenses. The “Redskins” name was later dropped in favor of the less controversial “Utes”.

45 Haggard of country music : MERLE

Merle Haggard was a country singer and songwriter whose most famous recording has to be “Okie from Muskogee” released in 1969. Haggard would tell you that the song was actually meant as a spoof, but it has become a country “anthem”.

47 Clear sky’s color : AZURE

The term “azure” came into English from Persian via Old French. The French word “l’azur” was taken from the Persian name for a place in northeastern Afghanistan called “Lazhward” which was the main source of the semi-precious stone lapis lazuli. The stone has a vivid blue color, and “azure” has been describing this color since the 14th century.

57 Big toucan feature : BEAK

The toucan is a brightly-marked bird with a large, colorful bill. The name “toucan” comes into English via Portuguese from the Tupi name “tukana”. The Tupi were an indigenous people of Brazil.

60 Stadium level : TIER

The Greek word “stadion” was a measure of length, about 600 feet. The name “stadion” then came to be used for a running track of that length. That “running track” meaning led to our contemporary term “stadium” (plural “stadia”).

66 Fashion designer Tahari : ELIE

Elie Tahari is an American fashion designer, although he was born in Jerusalem. Tahari immigrated to the US from Israel in 1971 and started work as an electrician in the Garment District in New York City. It was there that he became interested in fashion.

Down

2 Pedigree competitor : ALPO

Alpo is a brand of dog food introduced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

4 “Time’s Arrow” novelist Martin : AMIS

I suppose the successful English novelist Martin Amis must have writing in his blood. He is the son of the respected author Kingsley Amis, a Booker Prize winner. Martin Amis’s best-known novels comprise his so-called “London Trilogy” consisting of “Money” (1984), “London Fields” (1989) and “The Information” (1995).

7 Formerly called : NEE

“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”. The term “née” is mainly used in English when referring to a married woman’s birth name, assuming that she has adopted her husband’s name, e.g. Michelle Obama née Robinson, Melania Trump née Knavs, and Jill Biden née Jacobs.

8 Methane, e.g. : GAS

Methane (CH4) is the main component of natural gas, with ethane (C2H6) being the second largest component.

11 Mogadishu-born model and cosmetics mogul : IMAN

Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid is a supermodel from Somalia who goes simply by the name “Iman” these days. “Iman” is an Arabic word for “faith”. She is a smart cookie. She has a degree in political science and is fluent in five languages: Somali, Arabic, Italian, French and English. Iman was married to English rock star David Bowie from 1992 until his death in 2016.

Mogadishu is a major port city on the east coast of Africa, and is the capital of Somalia. The city is known locally as “Xamar”.

12 Brewing ingredient : MALT

Malt is germinated cereal grains that have been dried. The cereal is germinated by soaking it in water, and then germination is halted by drying the grains with hot air.

17 Quick bite : NOSH

Our word “nosh” has been around since the late fifties, when it was imported from the Yiddish word “nashn” meaning “to nibble”. We use “nosh” as a noun that means “snack”, or as a verb meaning “to eat between meals”.

22 Tourney winners : CHAMPS

“Tourney” is another word for “tournament”. The term comes from the Old French word “tornei” meaning “contest of armed men”, from “tornoier” meaning “to joust, jilt”.

23 Tennis’s Nadal : RAFAEL

Rafael “Rafa” Nadal is a Spanish tennis player. He is noted for his expertise on clay courts, which earned him the nickname “The King of Clay”.

31 President between Calvin and Franklin : HERBERT

President Herbert Hoover was born in West Branch, Iowa, and is the only president to have been born in that state. His birthplace is now a National Landmark, and he and his wife were buried in the grounds of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum in West Branch. President Hoover died at the age of 90 years old in 1964, outliving his nemesis Franklin Delano Roosevelt by almost 20 years.

President Calvin Coolidge, the only US President to have been born on July 4th, was known as a man of few words. It was while he was serving as US Vice President, in the administration of Warren G. Harding, that Coolidge earned the nickname “Silent Cal”. There are a couple of anecdotes about Coolidge that illustrate his renowned reticence. The first involves a lady sitting beside the president at dinner one evening who remarked to him, “Mr. Coolidge, I’ve made a bet against a fellow who said it was impossible to get more than two words out of you.” His famous reply was, “You lose.” A second tale recalls the comment made by poet Dorothy Parker in 1933 when she heard that Coolidge had just died. She inquired archly, and perhaps a little coldly, “How could they tell?”

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) was the only child of Sara Delano and James Roosevelt Sr. The Delano family history in America goes back to the pilgrim Philippe de Lannoy, an immigrant of Flemish descent who arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts in 1621. The family name “de Lannoy” was anglicized here in the US, to “Delano”. Franklin was to marry Eleanor Roosevelt, and apparently the relationship between Sara and her daughter-in-law was very “strained”.

32 Government in power : REGIME

Quite often, the terms “regime” and “regimen” seem to be used interchangeably. In contemporary usage, “regime” is applied more generally, and “regimen” more specifically. A “regimen” is a systematic approach that one might apply to something, to exercise or diet for example. The term “regime” can also be used in such contexts, but can have additional definitions, such as “government in power”. A form of government cannot be described as a “regimen”.

47 Org. on a mouthwash bottle : ADA

American Dental Association (ADA)

56 Peter Parker in “Spider-Man,” for one : NERD

Spider-Man is a creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, and first appeared in comics in 1962. Spider-Man was a somewhat groundbreaking character in that his alter ego was a teenage high school student (Peter Parker), which marked the first time that a young person featured front and center as the superhero.

57 “Dynamite” K-pop band : BTS

BTS is a boy band from South Korea with seven members. The initialism “BTS” stands for the phrase “Bangtan Sonyeondan”, which translates literally as “Bulletproof Boy Scouts”. BTS is the best-selling musical act in the history of South Korea.

K-pop (Korean pop) is a genre of music from South Korea that emerged in the early nineties.

64 Acrobat’s safeguard : NET

An acrobat is someone who performs gymnastic feats. The term “acrobat“ comes into English via French from the Greek “akrobatos” meaning “going on tip-toe, climbing up high”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Smurf with red pants : PAPA
5 Performed in a choir : SANG
9 Overly proper : PRIM
13 Homecoming guest, informally : ALUM
14 Algeria has the largest one among African countries : AREA
15 Capital where natives say “Arrivederci!” : ROMA
16 Chinese New Year, celebrated on Feb. 1, 2022 : SPRING FESTIVAL
19 Trunk in a studio : TORSO
20 Star’s negotiator : AGENT
21 Lines at a theater? : SCRIPT
26 Jewish New Year, celebrated on Sept. 25, 2022 : ROSH HASHANAH
32 Nevada’s third-largest city : RENO
33 A long way off : AFAR
34 Follow, as orders : OBEY
36 List-ending abbr. : ET AL
37 “The Good Place” actress Rudolph : MAYA
38 Became threadbare : WORE
39 Impudence : GALL
40 Pigs’ hangouts : PENS
41 Barbecue spice mixes : RUBS
42 Big seller of flat-pack furniture : IKEA
43 Blackthorn fruit : SLOE
44 Pac-12 team : UTES
45 Haggard of country music : MERLE
47 Clear sky’s color : AZURE
48 Approximate fig. : EST
49 Came to a halt : CEASED
54 Ave. crossers : STS
55 Thai New Year, celebrated on April 13, 2022 : SONGKRAN
57 Big toucan feature : BEAK
60 Stadium level : TIER
61 Squared up : EVEN
65 Prepare for takeoff : TAXI
66 Fashion designer Tahari : ELIE
67 Tick off : RILE
68 Bit of a dance : STEP
69 Tear to pieces : REND
70 Highly skilled : DEFT

Down

1 Days gone by : PAST
2 Pedigree competitor : ALPO
3 Sound from a contented cat : PURR
4 “Time’s Arrow” novelist Martin : AMIS
5 Old couch’s problem : SAG
6 Sheepdog’s greeting : ARF!
7 Formerly called : NEE
8 Methane, e.g. : GAS
9 Uptight type : PRIG
10 Wander around : ROVE
11 Mogadishu-born model and cosmetics mogul : IMAN
12 Brewing ingredient : MALT
17 Quick bite : NOSH
18 “Bye now!” : TA-TA!
22 Tourney winners : CHAMPS
23 Tennis’s Nadal : RAFAEL
24 “Thumbs down!” : I SAY NO!
25 Sentence segment : PHRASE
26 Movie do-overs : RETAKES
27 Standing guard : ON ALERT
28 Korean New Year, celebrated on Feb. 1, 2022 : SOLLAL
29 Iranian New Year, celebrated on March 21, 2022 : NOWRUZ
30 Explanatory page on a company’s website : ABOUT US
31 President between Calvin and Franklin : HERBERT
32 Government in power : REGIME
35 Affirmatives : YESSES
46 ___-warrior (environmental activist) : ECO
47 Org. on a mouthwash bottle : ADA
50 Go in : ENTER
51 Like ballet dancers : AGILE
52 Unit of yarn : SKEIN
53 Messed up : ERRED
55 Not attend : SKIP
56 Peter Parker in “Spider-Man,” for one : NERD
57 “Dynamite” K-pop band : BTS
58 Dine : EAT
59 Tool on a fire truck : AXE
62 Fight (for) : VIE
63 Pointy-eared toymaker : ELF
64 Acrobat’s safeguard : NET

11 thoughts on “0201-22 NY Times Crossword 1 Feb 22, Tuesday”

  1. 10:02. Couldn’t remember SKEIN so a natick at SKEIN/SONGKRAN. Also had ROMe before ROMA until I realized there was no such thing as a MeLT in the brewing process.

    Interesting theme.

    Best –

    1. Hmmm. Actually, for this one: 7:48, no errors. I apparently got confused and posted my Wednesday results on Tuesday’s blog.

    1. Thank you, Sandra. I’ve fixed that blunder. I appreciate the help.

      Now, to sort out my left from right …

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