0422-19 NY Times Crossword 22 Apr 19, Monday

Constructed by: Bruce Haight
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Idiomatic Tennis

Themed answers are common phrases that have been applied to the game of tennis, in a “punny” sort of way:

  • 17A Tennis with dad? : POP SINGLES
  • 23A Losing tennis player’s prayer? : GIMME A BREAK
  • 37A Dislike for tennis? : CONTEMPT OF COURT
  • 48A “Wow, no wonder you’re playing such great tennis!”? : WHAT A RACKET!
  • 59A Lose every set of a tennis match 6-0? : FALL IN LOVE

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 5m 32s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

14 “Toy Story” studio : PIXAR

Pixar Animation Studios started out as part of Lucasfilm in 1979, George Lucas’s production company. Lucas sold what was to become Pixar to Apple CEO Steve Jobs in 1986. Pixar produced its first feature film in 1995, the fabulous “Toy Story”, and followed up with a string of hits. The company was then sold to Walt Disney in 2006, when valued at $7.4 billion. That transaction resulted in Steve Jobs becoming the biggest shareholder in Walt Disney.

16 Ne, on the periodic table : NEON

Neon was discovered in 1898 by two British chemists Sir William Ramsay and Morris Travers. They chilled a sample of air, turning it into a liquid, and then warmed the liquid and separated out the gases that boiled off. Along with nitrogen, oxygen and argon (already known), the pair of scientists discovered two new gases. The first they called “krypton” and the second “neon”. “Krypton” is Greek for “the hidden one” and “neon” is Greek for “new”.

19 With 8-Down, dessert brand that “nobody doesn’t like” : SARA …
(8D See 19-Across : … LEE)

In 1935, businessman Charles Lubin bought a chain of three bakeries in Chicago called Community Bake Shops, and soon expanded the operation into seven stores. Lubin introduced a cream cheesecake that he named after his daughter who was only 8-years-old at the time, Sara Lee Lubin. The cheesecake was a hit and he renamed the bakeries to Kitchen of Sara Lee. The business was bought out by Consolidated foods in 1956, but the brand name Sara Lee persists to this day, as does Ms. Sara Lee herself who now goes by the name Sara Lee Schupf.

21 Motorists’ org. : AAA

The American Automobile Association (AAA) is a not-for-profit organization focused on lobbying, provision of automobile servicing, and selling of automobile insurance. The AAA was founded in 1902 in Chicago and published the first of its celebrated hotel guides back in 1917.

30 Exam for a future atty. : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

31 Wonderland girl : ALICE

The title character in Lewis Carroll’s 1865 novel “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” is based on a child named Alice Liddell. Lewis Carroll (real name “Charles Lutwidge Dodgson”) met the Liddell family while he was photographing Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford, after which he befriended the Liddells. Carroll told the three Liddell sisters (including Alice) a story about a little girl named Alice and her adventures, in order to entertain the children while on a boating trip on the River Isis in Oxford. He elaborated on the story for the girls on a subsequent boat trip, and agreed to write down the tale as the children loved it so much. Carroll’s writings became a full-fledged manuscript, including the author’s own illustrations. It was first published in 1865, three years after that boat trip.

42 ExxonMobil business : OIL

The Exxon Corporation was a descendant of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company. Exxon merged with Mobil (yet another descendant of Standard Oil) in 1999 to form ExxonMobil.

43 Jargon : LINGO

Lingo is specialized vocabulary. “Journalese” and “legalese” would be good examples.

“Jargon” can mean nonsensical and meaningless talk, or the specialized language of a particular group, trade or profession. The term is Old French, with the more usual meaning of “a chattering”. How apt …

44 Famous ___ (cookie brand) : AMOS

Wally Amos was a talent agent, one who was in the habit of taking home-baked cookies with him as an enticement to get celebrities to see him. He was urged by friends to open a cookie store (the cookies were that delicious, I guess) and this he did in Los Angeles in 1975 using the name “Famous Amos”. The store was a smash hit and he was able build on the success by introducing his cookies into supermarkets. The brand was eventually purchased, making Wally a rich man, and Famous Amos cookies are still flying off the shelf. Wally Amos also became an energetic literacy advocate. He hosted 30 TV programs in 1987 entitled “Learn to Read” that provided reading instruction targeted at adults.

52 Overdo, as a stage role : HAM UP

The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

59 Lose every set of a tennis match 6-0? : FALL IN LOVE

In tennis the score of zero is designated as “love”. Some people believe that this usage originates from the French “l’oeuf” (meaning “the egg”). The idea is that the written character “0” looks like an egg.

62 Ship of 1492 : NINA

The ship used by Christopher Columbus that we know as the Niña was actually the nickname of a ship actually called the Santa Clara. The nickname “Niña” probably came from the name of her owner, Juan Niña of Moguer.

66 “Porgy and ___” : BESS

“Porgy and Bess” is an opera with music by George Gershwin, lyrics by Ira Gershwin, and libretto by DuBose Heyward. The storyline of the opera is based on the novel “Porgy” written by DuBose Heyward and and wife Dorothy. “Porgy and Bess” was first performed in 1935, in New York City, but really wasn’t accepted as legitimate opera until 1976 after a landmark production by the Houston Grand Opera. The most famous song from the piece is probably the wonderful aria “Summertime”.

67 Soda in an old blind taste test : PEPSI

The Pepsi-Cola formulation was developed by one Caleb Bradham who made the drink at home and sold it as Brad’s Drink. Bradham’s aim was to provide a drink that was pleasant to taste, that would aid digestion and boost energy. Included in the formula were pepsin (a digestive enzyme) and kola nuts. These two ingredients inspired the brand name we use today: Pepsi-Cola.

Down

2 Relative of a cello : VIOL

The viola da gamba (also called simply “viol”) is a bass instrument in what is known as the viol family, with a tonal range that about matches that of the modern-day cello. It is the second largest of all the viols, so is played resting on the floor between the legs. In fact, “viola da gamba” is Italian translating into “viol for the leg”.

5 First “T” in TNT : TRI-

“TNT” is an abbreviation for “trinitrotoluene”. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

7 Ayatollah’s faith : ISLAM

Over 50% of the world’s population consider themselves to be adherents of the “big three” Abrahamic religions: Christianity (2-2.2 billion), Islam (1.6-1.7 billion) and Judaism (14-18 million).

9 “___ Miz” : LES

The 1980 musical “Les Misérables” is an adaptation of the 1862 novel of the same name by Victor Hugo. The show opened in London in 1985, and is the longest running musical in the history of London’s West End. My wife and I saw “Les Miz” in the Queen’s Theatre in London many years ago, but were only able to get tickets in the very back row. The theater seating is very steep, so the back row of the balcony is extremely high over the stage. One of the big events in the storyline is the building of a street barricade over which the rebels fight. At the height we were seated we could see the stagehands behind the barricade, sitting drinking Coke, even smoking cigarettes. On cue, the stagehands would get up and catch a dropped rifle, or an actor who had been shot. It was pretty comical. I didn’t really enjoy the show that much, to be honest. Some great songs, but the musical version of the storyline just didn’t seem to hang together for me.

10 Arcade game instruction before playing : INSERT COIN

Our word “arcade” comes from the Latin “arcus” meaning “arc”. The first arcades were passages made from a series of arches. This could be an avenue of trees, and eventually any covered avenue. I remember arcades lined with shops and stores when I was growing up on the other side of the Atlantic. Arcades came to be lined with lots of amusements, resulting in amusement arcades and video game arcades.

12 Locale for Pyongyang and Seoul : KOREA

Pyongyang is North Korea’s capital, and the nation’s largest city. During the early 1900s, the city earned the nickname “Jerusalem of the East”, as it was the epicenter of a Protestant revival led by missionaries from the West.

Seoul is the capital city of South Korea. The Seoul National Capital Area is home to over 25 million people and is the second largest metropolitan area in the world, second only to Tokyo, Japan.

13 Snide remarks : SNARK

“Snark” is a term that was coined by Lewis Carroll in his fabulous 1876 nonsense poem “The Hunting of the Snark”. Somehow, the term “snarky” came to mean “irritable, short-tempered” in the early 1900s, and from there “snark” became “sarcastic rhetoric” at the beginning of the 21st century.

22 Org. for the Suns and the Heat : NBA

The Phoenix Suns NBA team are in the Pacific Division, and are the only team in that division not based in California.

The Miami Heat basketball team debuted in the NBA in the 1988-89 season. The franchise name was chosen in a competitive survey, with “Miami Heat” beating out “Miami Vice”.

24 Ticklish Muppet : ELMO

The Tickle Me Elmo toy was a sensational fad in the late nineties, with stores raising prices dramatically above the recommended retail price to take advantage of demand. Reportedly, prices as high as $1500 were paid at the height of the craze. The toy’s manufacturer, Tyco, originally planned to market the “tickle” toy as Tickle Me Tasmanian Devil (after the “Looney Tunes” character), but then went with “Elmo” after they bought the rights to use “Sesame Street” names.

26 With 28-Down, part of a golf course : BACK …
(28D See 26-Down : … NINE)

There’s an urban myth that the standard number of holes on a golf course is 18 because it takes 18 shots to polish off a fifth of scotch whisky. However, the truth is that the standard number of holes in the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland happened to settle down over time at 18, and that standard was adopted all around the world.

27 ___ vera : ALOE

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that grows in relatively dry climates. The plants leaves are full of biologically-active compounds that have been studied extensively. Aloe vera has been used for centuries in herbal medicine, mainly for topical treatment of wounds.

32 Home to the world’s busiest airport: Abbr. : ATL

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is the world’s busiest airport, as measured by passenger traffic. Atlanta has had that distinction since 1998, and was the world’s busiest in terms of take-offs and landings from 2005 until 2013. Over 50% of Atlanta’s traffic comes from Delta Air Lines.

36 Sporty Pontiacs introduced in the ’60s : GTOS

The initialism “GTO” was used on several touring cars (including a famous Pontiac) and stands for “Gran Turismo Omologato”. Italian car manufacturers started the tradition of calling their luxury performance cars “Gran Turismo”, and calling those cars they approved for racing “Gran Turismo Omologato”. The phrase “gran turismo omologato” translates as “grand touring homologated”, with “homologated” being a technical term signifying official approval.

39 Italian city you might be “leaning” toward visiting? : PISA

The city of Pisa sits right on the Italian coast, at the mouth of the River Arno. The city is perhaps most famous for its Leaning Tower. The tower is actually the campanile (bell tower) of the city’s cathedral, and it has been leaning since it was completed in 1173. Just shows you how important good foundations are …

46 Listings on a résumé : SKILLS

A résumé is a summary of a person’s job experience and education and is used as a tool by a job seeker. In many countries, a résumé is equivalent to a curriculum vitae. “Résumé” is the French word for “summary”.

47 Mani-___ (spa offering) : PEDI

Manicure & pedicure (mani-pedi)

50 Kitchen appliance brand : AMANA

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

51 “Let” and “Fault,” from a chair umpire : CALLS

That would be tennis.

54 Quaint, as a shoppe : OLDE

The word “olde” wasn’t actually used much earlier than the 1920s. “Olde” was introduced to give a quaint antique feel to brand names, shop names etc. as in “Ye Olde Shoppe”.

56 Some postseason awardees, for short : MVPS

MVP (most valuable player)

57 Hairy Himalayan humanoid : YETI

The yeti, also known as “the abominable snowman”, is a beast of legend. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology, and a cryptid is a creature or plant that isn’t recognized by the scientific community, but the existence of which has been suggested.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Turn away, as one’s gaze : AVERT
6 Bird’s beak : BILL
10 Varieties : ILKS
14 “Toy Story” studio : PIXAR
15 “Point taken” : I SEE
16 Ne, on the periodic table : NEON
17 Tennis with dad? : POP SINGLES
19 With 8-Down, dessert brand that “nobody doesn’t like” : SARA …
20 Messy meal for pigs : SLOP
21 Motorists’ org. : AAA
22 “Not in a million years!” : NEVER
23 Losing tennis player’s prayer? : GIMME A BREAK
26 In a trite way : BANALLY
30 Exam for a future atty. : LSAT
31 Wonderland girl : ALICE
32 “___ making myself clear?” : AM I
33 Guzzle down : CHUG
37 Dislike for tennis? : CONTEMPT OF COURT
41 Sharp as a tack : KEEN
42 ExxonMobil business : OIL
43 Jargon : LINGO
44 Famous ___ (cookie brand) : AMOS
46 Things for cleaning dishes : SPONGES
48 “Wow, no wonder you’re playing such great tennis!”? : WHAT A RACKET!
52 Overdo, as a stage role : HAM UP
53 Assistance : AID
54 “Good heavens!” : OH MY!
58 Letter-shaped beam : I-BAR
59 Lose every set of a tennis match 6-0? : FALL IN LOVE
62 Ship of 1492 : NINA
63 “___ be over soon” : IT’LL
64 Take home from the shelter, say : ADOPT
65 And others: Abbr. : ET AL
66 “Porgy and ___” : BESS
67 Soda in an old blind taste test : PEPSI

Down

1 Smartphone downloads : APPS
2 Relative of a cello : VIOL
3 Big fair : EXPO
4 Speak with a gravelly voice : RASP
5 First “T” in TNT : TRI-
6 Problem with more than one marriage? : BIGAMY
7 Ayatollah’s faith : ISLAM
8 See 19-Across : … LEE
9 “___ Miz” : LES
10 Arcade game instruction before playing : INSERT COIN
11 Depart : LEAVE
12 Locale for Pyongyang and Seoul : KOREA
13 Snide remarks : SNARK
18 Hammer’s target : NAIL
22 Org. for the Suns and the Heat : NBA
23 Tickled-pink feeling : GLEE
24 Ticklish Muppet : ELMO
25 “You wish!” : AS IF!
26 With 28-Down, part of a golf course : BACK …
27 ___ vera : ALOE
28 See 26-Down : … NINE
29 “Pretend nothing just happened” : ACT NATURAL
32 Home to the world’s busiest airport: Abbr. : ATL
34 Like Christmas decorations and some juries : HUNG
35 Egg on : URGE
36 Sporty Pontiacs introduced in the ’60s : GTOS
38 Boggy wasteland : MOOR
39 Italian city you might be “leaning” toward visiting? : PISA
40 Congeal, as blood : CLOT
45 Something with a “You are here” arrow : MAP
46 Listings on a résumé : SKILLS
47 Mani-___ (spa offering) : PEDI
48 Complain annoyingly : WHINE
49 Nun’s wear : HABIT
50 Kitchen appliance brand : AMANA
51 “Let” and “Fault,” from a chair umpire : CALLS
54 Quaint, as a shoppe : OLDE
55 Circular kind of earring : HOOP
56 Some postseason awardees, for short : MVPS
57 Hairy Himalayan humanoid : YETI
59 Little lie : FIB
60 Gobbled up : ATE
61 Catch a few Z’s : NAP

2 thoughts on “0422-19 NY Times Crossword 22 Apr 19, Monday”

  1. 8:50. Easy Monday. Didn’t know if it was going to be INSERT COIN or “bill”. I don’t know how expensive those games are these days.

    Best –

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