0222-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Feb 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Patrick Berry
THEME: Flip-Flops … a complicated puzzle to explain. Each themed clue is in two parts, the second part [in brackets] describing a hidden word designated by the shaded (circled in my grid) letters in the answer above or below. The hidden answer ends with either UP or DOWN. If the hidden answer ends with DOWN, we write the hidden word in the answer below. If the hidden answer ends with UP, then we write the hidden word in the answer below. We need to FLIP-FLOP these pairs of hidden words in order to reveal the across-answers:

65A. What each group of shaded words in this puzzle does : GOES UP AND DOWN

21A. Turnpike turnoffs [intimidate, in a way] : REST AREAS [STARE down]
23A. Narrator of “Amadeus” [go to bed] : SALIERI [LIE down]
24A. Pet food brand [recover lost ground] : PURINA CAT CHOW [CATCH up]
26A. Compassionate [finally become] : TENDER-HEARTED [END up]
45A. Skateboarder’s safety item [salaam] : ELBOW PAD [BOW down]
51A. Goodbyes [abate] : ADIEUS [DIE down]
53A. Point at the ceiling? [misbehave] : STALACTITE [ACT up]
55A. She’s not light-headed [amass] : BRUNETTE [RUN up]
83A. Activity done in front of a mirror [clearly define] : PRIMPING [PIN down]
85A. Office trash [resign] : WASTEPAPER [STEP down]
89A. Upset stomach [consume] : NAUSEA [USE up]
90A. Loud and harsh [start crowding the crotch] : STRIDENT [RIDE up]
109A. Control of one’s actions [fall in great quantities] : SELF-RESTRAINT [RAIN down]
114A. Granite dome in Georgia [moderate] : STONE MOUNTAIN [TONE down]
117A. Converses à la Tracy and Hepburn [pay in advance] : BANTERS [ANTE up]
119A. Athens landmark [arise] : ACROPOLIS [CROP up]

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 19s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … DOGIES (bogies), BANA (Dana)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Furnishes : AFFORDS
“To afford” can mean to “to supply, furnish”.

8. Bit of body art, for short : TAT
The word “tattoo” (often shortened to “tat”) was first used in English in the writings of the famous English explorer Captain Cook. In his descriptions of the indelible marks adorning the skin of Polynesian natives, Cook anglicized the Tahitian word “tatau” into our “tattoo”.

11. “St. ___ Fire” (Brat Pack film) : ELMO’S
St. Elmo is the patron saint of sailors. He lends his name to the electrostatic weather phenomenon (often seen at sea) known as St. Elmo’s fire. The “fire” is actually a plasma discharge caused by air ionizing at the end of a pointed object (like the mast of a ship), something often observed during electrical storms.

16. Book reviewer? : CPA
Certified public accountant (CPA)

21. Turnpike turnoffs [intimidate, in a way] : REST AREAS [STARE down]
Back in the 15th century a “turnpike” was a defensive barrier across a road. By the 17th century the term was used for a barrier that stopped travellers until a toll was paid. By the 18th century a turnpike (sometimes “pike”) was the name given to a road with a toll.

23. Narrator of “Amadeus” [go to bed] : SALIERI [LIE down]
If you’ve seen the brilliant 1984 movie “Amadeus”, you’ll have seen the composer Salieri portrayed as being very envious and resentful of the gifted Mozart. It is no doubt true that two composers fought against each other, at least on occasion, but the extent of the acrimony between the two has perhaps been exaggerated in the interest of theater. Mozart and his wife had six children, but only two survived infancy. The youngest boy was called Franz Xaver Wolfgang Mozart, born just five months before his father died. Franz was to become a gifted composer, teacher, pianist and conductor, helped along the way by lessons from his father’s supposed rival … Antonio Salieri.

24. Pet food brand [recover lost ground] : PURINA CAT CHOW [CATCH up]
Purina began operations in 1894 as an operation for producing feed for farm animals. A few years later, in 1902, the Ralston name was introduced when Webster Edgerly joined the business. Edgerly was the founder of a controversial social movement called Ralstonism. Central to the movement was personal health, with RALSTON standing for Regime, Activity, Light, Strength, Temperation, Oxygen and Nature.

28. City of Light creator at the 1893 World’s Fair : TESLA
Nikola Tesla was born in Serbia, but later moved to the US. Tesla’s work on mechanical and electrical engineering was crucial to the development of alternating current technology, the same technology that is used by equipment at the backbone of modern power generation and distribution systems.

The 1893 World’s Fair was held in Chicago, and was officially known as the Columbian Exposition. During the evening of the opening day of the fair, President Grover Cleveland had the honor of pressing a button that switched on 100,000 AC-powered incandescent bulbs, which illuminated the neoclassical structures that housed many of the exhibits. The “City of Light” display was a project managed by Nikola Tesla and George Westinghouse.

29. Welles of “The Third Man” : ORSON
“The Third Man” is a great film noir produced in England in 1949, and starring Joseph Cotten, Orson Welles and Trevor Howard. It’s a great film in itself, but is often remembered for the title music, an instrumental piece featuring the zither that was written and performed by Anton Karas. The screenplay for the film was written by Graham Greene.

36. Dealer’s enemy : NARC
“Narc” is a slang term for a law enforcement officer who tracks down criminals associated with illegal drugs.

38. Ridicule : TWIT
“To twit” is to tease someone for making an embarrassing mistake.

41. Country with the longest coastline : CANADA
Measurement of a country’s coastline is no trivial task. The coastline paradox tells us that measurements of a coastline’s length varies with the distance between points on the coastline at which measurements are taken. So, the length of coastline reported for countries around the world varies depending on the source. However, all sources seem to list Canada as the country with the longest coastline.

44. Comic strip dog : ODIE
Odie is Garfield’s best friend and is a slobbery beagle, a character in Jim Davis’s comic strip.

45. Skateboarder’s safety item [salaam] : ELBOW PAD [BOW down]
The word “salaam” is an Anglicized spelling of the Arabic word for “peace”. It can mean an act of deference, in particular a very low bow.

53. Point at the ceiling? [misbehave] : STALACTITE [ACT up]
A stalactite is a mineral deposit that hangs from the roof of a cave, formed by continuous dripping of mineral-rich water. “Stalactite” comes from the Greek word “stalasso” meaning “to drip”.

55. She’s not light-headed [amass] : BRUNETTE [RUN up]
A “brunet” is a dark-haired male, and a “brunette” is a dark-haired female. “Brunet” is an Old French word meaning “brownish, brown-haired”.

59. Cosmic balance? : LIBRA
The constellation of Libra is named for the scales held by the goddess of justice. Libra is the only sign of the zodiac that isn’t named for a living creature.

60. Lit group : SOTS
Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning a fool. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

“Lit” is a slang term meaning “drunk”.

64. Storied voyager : SINBAD
Sinbad is the hero of a set of fictional tales from the Middle East. Sinbad comes from the port city of Basra and had fantastic adventures on voyages throughout the sea east of Africa and south of Asia.

79. Comic actress Catherine : O’HARA
Catherine O’Hara is an actress and comedienne from Toronto, Ontario. One of O’Hara’s more famous film roles is the mother in the Christmas classic “Home Alone”.

80. Four-legged orphans : DOGIES
“Dogie” is cowboy slang for a motherless calf in a herd.

87. Start of many rapper names : LIL’
Lil’ is a short form of the word “little”. There are a whole slew of rappers named Lil’ something, like Lil’ Wayne, Lil’ J, and Lil’ Kim.

91. ___ Tree State (Maine) : PINE
Maine is the least densely populated state located east of the Mississippi, and almost 90% of its land is covered with forests. Perhaps that’s why the state’s nickname is “The Pine Tree State” …

92. Like March Madness teams : SEEDED
March Madness is the name given to (among others) the NCAA Men’s Division 1 Basketball Championship, held in spring each year.

95. Theater giant? : IMAX
The IMAX Corporation, which is behind the IMAX film format, is a Canadian company. The impetus for developing the system came after Expo ’67 in Montreal. Back then large format screenings were accomplished using multiple projectors with multiple screens, with images basically stitched together. The team behind the IMAX technology set out to simplify things, and developed a single-camera, single-projector system.

104. What sarongs lack : SEAMS
Sarong is the Malay word for “sheath”, and a sarong was originally the garment worn by Malay men and women around their waists. The Malay sarong is actually a tube of fabric, about a yard wide and two-and-a-half yards “long”. Many variations of the sarong are worn all over South Asia and the Pacific Islands. I had occasion to wear one in Hawaii many years ago, and found it very … freeing!

108. Finnish outbuilding : SAUNA
As my Finnish-American wife will tell you, “sauna” is a Finnish word, and is correctly pronounced “sow-nah” (with “sow” as in the female pig).

114. Granite dome in Georgia [moderate] : STONE MOUNTAIN [TONE down]
Stone Mountain is a granite dome in Georgia that has a circumference of over 5 miles in length. Famously, the dome has a massive bas relief structure of the three Confederate leaders of the Civil War: President Jefferson Davis, General Robert E. Lee and General Stonewall Jackson, each mounted on their favorite horse. The carving surface is 3 acres in area, making it the largest bas relief sculpture in the world.

117. Converses à la Tracy and Hepburn [pay in advance] : BANTERS [ANTE up]
Spencer Tracy was a marvelous actor who shares the record for most nominations for the Best Actor Oscar (nine) with Sir Laurence Olivier. Famously, Tracy became estranged from his wife early in their marriage, but never divorced. He had a long-term relationship with fellow actor Katharine Hepburn, a relationship that they worked hard to keep out of the spotlight.

Katharine Hepburn has been nominated for a Best Actress Oscar 12 times, and holds the record for Best Actress wins at four. She won for her roles in:

– “Morning Glory” in 1933
– “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” in 1967
– “The Lion in Winter” in 1968
– “On Golden Pond” in 1981

119. Athens landmark [arise] : ACROPOLIS [CROP up]
The term “Acropolis” translates from Greek as “high city” or “city on the extremity”. In English we use the term “Citadel” to mean the same thing thing. The most famous citadel bearing the name is the Acropolis of Athens. This Acropolis is a large, flat-topped rock in the city of Athens that rises almost 500 feet above sea level. The most recognizable building that stands on the Acropolis is the Parthenon, also known as the Temple of Athena.

124. Stan of Marvel Comics : LEE
Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board. If you like superhero movies based on the characters from Marvel Comics, then you could spend a few hours trying to spot Stan Lee in those films as he has a penchant for making cameo appearances. Lee can be spotted in “X-Men” (2000), “Spider-Man” (2002), “Hulk” (2003), “Fantastic Four” (2005), “Iron Man” (2008) and many other films.

Down
1. Super Bowl highlights, to some : ADS
The Super Bowl is used for high-profile advertising because of the high viewership numbers. For example, Super Bowl XLV (2011) had an average audience of 111 million viewers, making it the most-watched American TV program in history.

4. Luxury hotel chain : OMNI
Omni Hotels & Resorts is headquartered in Irvine, California and has properties in the US, Canada and Mexico.

5. Barrel racing venue : RODEO
“Rodeo” is a Spanish word, which is usually translated as “round up”.

6. Printmaker Albrecht : DURER
Albrecht Dürer was a German artist, noted for his etchings and engravings as well as for his paintings.

8. Appetizer with puréed olives : TAPENADE
The dish known as tapenade is traditionally made from olives, capers, anchovies and olive oil. The name comes from the Provençal word for capers, “tapenas”.

9. Fuego extinguisher : AGUA
In Spanish, a fire (fuego) might be extinguished using water (agua).

10. Balustrade location : TERRACE
A balustrade is a decorative railing in which the major components are individual balusters. The term “baluster” is thought to come from the Italian “balaustra” meaning “pomegranate flower”. The name reflects a baluster’s resemblance in shape to that of a half-open pomegranate flower.

11. Physicist Rutherford after whom rutherfordium is named : ERNEST
By some definitions, New Zealand-born physicist and chemist Ernest Rutherford was the first person to “split the atom”. Rutherford bombarded nitrogen with alpha particles and thereby forced neutrons out of the nucleus of the nitrogen atom. The first intentional nuclear “fission” came decades later in the 1930s, with experiments in which larger nuclei were split into smaller nuclei.

12. Radiation shield material : LEAD
Lead is an effective radiation shield due to its high atomic number and high density. It is particularly effective at stopping gamma rays and x-rays.

13. Hosts, for short : MCS
Master or mistress of ceremonies (MC)

14. Muesli tidbit : OAT
“Muesli” is a Swiss-German term describing a breakfast serving of oats, nuts, fruit and milk. “Muesli” is a diminutive of the German word “Mues” meaning “puree”. Delicious …

16. Setting for a castle : CHESS
The corner piece in the game of chess is a called a rook, a word coming from the Persian word “rokh” meaning a “chariot”. The rook has also been called, perhaps incorrectly, the castle, tower, marquess or rector.

17. Painter Uccello : PAOLO
Paolo Uccello was a an Italian painter, as well as a mathematician. As such, Uccello is well noted for his work on visual perspective in the world of art. His paintings had a sense of depth, setting him apart from his contemporaries. Uccello’s most famous work is “The Battle of San Romano”, a work divided into three large panels. Today, you’ve got to travel to see all three panels; one is in London, one in Paris, and one in Florence.

18. City on the Nile : ASWAN
The Egyptian city of Aswan lies in the south of the country, on the River Nile. Aswan is famous for its stone quarries, going back to ancient times. The most celebrated granite rock from the area is called syenite. Stone from Aswan was shipped northwards along the Nile and used in the construction of the pyramids.

25. “___ Late” (Ricky Nelson hit) : IT’S
As most people are well aware here in the US (but not us immigrants!), Ricky Nelson started his career playing himself on the radio in “The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet”, starting in 1949. Soon after he starred in a feature film “Here Come the Nelsons”, and then started recording albums. Ricky Nelson was one of the long list (it seems) of singing stars that died in plane crashes. He owned his own plane, which crashed on the day after Christmas in 1985, just northeast of Dallas. Seven people were killed, including Nelson and his fiancée.

32. Strikers’ replacements : SCABS
We first started calling strikebreakers “scabs” in the early 1800s, and before that a scab was a person who refused to join a trade union (back as early 1777). The word probably comes from the use of “scab” as a skin disease, and so is a term that is meant to insult.

33. “Taxi” character Elaine : NARDO
As an actress, Marilu Henner’s most celebrated role was as Elaine O’Connor Nardo on “Taxi”. Henner has a condition called a Superior Autobiographical Memory. This means that she can recall information and events that took place on every day of her life, starting from a very early age.

34. Greenlandic speaker : INUIT
The Inuit peoples live in the Arctic, in parts of the US, Russia, Greenland and Canada.

43. Team with a mascot named Orbit : ASTROS
Orbit is the mascot of the Houston Astros baseball team. He is an alien creature with two antennae tipped by baseballs. Orbit was introduced by the Astros in 1990, and then retired in 1999 to make way for Junction Jack, the team mascot when the Astros moved to Enron Field. Orbit was resurrected in 2013 when the Astros moved from the National to the American League.

46. Firth of “The King’s Speech” : COLIN
Colin Firth is an English actor who came to prominence playing Mr Darcy in the fabulous television adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Pride and Prejudice” that came out in 1995 (I cannot recommend that six-episode drama enough). More recently, Firth won the Best Actor Oscar for playing King George VI in “The King’s Speech”.

“The King’s Speech” is a wonderful, wonderful 2010 film about King George VI and his efforts to overcome his speech impediment. Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter all do fabulous jobs playing the lead characters. It is an independent film, so was made with a relatively low budget of $15 million, but grossed almost $400 million at box offices worldwide. “The King’s Speech” is the most successful British independent film of all time.

48. Mr. ___ (soft drink) : PIBB
The soft drink on the market today called Pibb Xtra used to be known as Mr Pibb, and before that was called Peppo. Peppo was introduced in 1972 as a direct competitor to Dr Pepper.

49. Gillette brand : ATRA
Fortunately for crossword setters, the Atra razor was introduced by Gillette in 1977. The Atra was sold as the Contour in some markets and its derivative products are still around today.

54. Actress Swinton : TILDA
Tilda Swinton is an English actress, quite famous in her native land. Swinton made a big name for herself outside the UK when she played the “baddie” in the 2007 movie “Michael Clayton”, opposite the “goodie” played by George Clooney.

56. Hanes purchase, informally : TEE
The Hanes brand of apparel was founded in 1901. A related brand was introduced in 1986 called Hanes Her Way.

64. Courters : SWAINS
A swain is a country lad, or a beau. Back in the 12th century a swain was a young man who attended a knight.

66. Brace : PAIR
A brace is a pair, as in a brace of game birds that have been killed for sport.

67. Divided houses : DUPLEXES
A duplex house is a family dwelling divided into two living spaces, with two separate entrances.

68. #4 for the Bruins : ORR
Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking …

70. I.M.’ing session : CHAT
Even though instant messaging (sending IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties.

71. Longship propellers : OARS
The Vikings were a Germanic people from northern Europe who were noted as great seafarers. Key to the success of the Vikings was the design of their famous “longships”. Made from wood, the longship was long and narrow with a shallow hull, It was also light, so that the crew would actually carry it small distances over land and around obstacles. Longships were designed to be propelled both by sail and by oars.

72. Summons, e.g. : WRIT
A writ is an order issued by some formal body (these days, usually a court) with the order being in written form. Warrants and subpoenas are examples of writs.

75. Bamboozles : DUPES
It’s thought that the lovely word “bamboozle” came into English from the Scottish “bombaze” meaning “perplex”. We’ve been using “bamboozle” since the very early 1700s.

77. Fundamental principle : TENET
A tenet is an article of faith, something that is held to be true. “Tenet” is Latin for “he holds”.

80. Writer Richard Henry ___ : DANA
Richard Henry Dana, Jr. is an author whose most famous title is “Two years Before the Mast”, an 1840 book that tells the story of a two-year sea voyage that Dana took starting in 1834. The journey took Dana from Boston around Cape Horn to California, and back again.

84. ___ Jemison, first African-American woman in space : MAE
Mae Jemison was a crew member on the Space Shuttle Endeavour on a 1992 mission. As such, Jemison became the first African American woman to travel in space. Jemison is also a big fan of “Star Trek” and appeared on an episode of “Star Trek: The Next Generation”. That made her the first real astronaut to appear on any of the “Star Trek” shows.

98. Knife brand : X-ACTO
The X-Acto knife was invented in the thirties by a Polish immigrant, although his intention was to come up with a scalpel for surgeons. The knife couldn’t cut it as a scalpel though (pun intended!), because it was difficult to clean. The inventor’s brother-in law suggested it be used as a craft knife, and it is still around today.

99. Iroquoian tribe : HURON
The Native Americans known as the Wyandot people are also called the Huron. The Wyandot people mainly inhabit a reservation in Quebec, Canada.

100. Before long : ANON
“Anon” originally meant “at once” and evolved into today’s meaning of “soon” apparently just because the word was misused over time.

101. Boutonniere’s place : LAPEL
A boutonnière is a flower worn by men in the lapel of a jacket, in the buttonhole. In fact, sometimes a boutonnière is referred to as a “buttonhole”, which is the translation from French.

106. “West Side Story” heroine : MARIA
Leonard Bernstein’s musical “West Side Story” is of course based on William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”. The musical is set in New York City and features two rival gangs: the Sharks from Puerto Rico and the Jets with working-class, Caucasian roots. Tony from the Jets falls in love with Maria from the Sharks. All this parallels Romeo from the House of Montague falling for Juliet from the House of Capulet in the Italian city of Verona.

115. Brother of Shemp : MOE
If you’ve seen a few of the films starring “The Three Stooges” you’ll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as “Moe, Larry and Shemp”. Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, “Moe, Larry And Curly”. Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then “Curly-Joe” DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Furnishes : AFFORDS
8. Bit of body art, for short : TAT
11. “St. ___ Fire” (Brat Pack film) : ELMO’S
16. Book reviewer? : CPA
19. Expel, as from a club : DRUM OUT
20. Historical chapter : AGE
21. Turnpike turnoffs [intimidate, in a way] : REST AREAS [STARE down]
23. Narrator of “Amadeus” [go to bed] : SALIERI [LIE down]
24. Pet food brand [recover lost ground] : PURINA CAT CHOW [CATCH up]
26. Compassionate [finally become] : TENDER-HEARTED [END up]
28. City of Light creator at the 1893 World’s Fair : TESLA
29. Welles of “The Third Man” : ORSON
30. Dunderhead : ASS
31. Attaches, in a way : SEWS ON
32. Barbershop sound : SNIP
36. Dealer’s enemy : NARC
38. Ridicule : TWIT
41. Country with the longest coastline : CANADA
44. Comic strip dog : ODIE
45. Skateboarder’s safety item [salaam] : ELBOW PAD [BOW down]
51. Goodbyes [abate] : ADIEUS [DIE down]
52. Flagman? : REF
53. Point at the ceiling? [misbehave] : STALACTITE [ACT up]
55. She’s not light-headed [amass] : BRUNETTE [RUN up]
57. Embarrassing putts to miss : TAP-INS
59. Cosmic balance? : LIBRA
60. Lit group : SOTS
61. Film library unit : REEL
63. Guy’s partner : GAL
64. Storied voyager : SINBAD
65. What each group of shaded words in this puzzle does : GOES UP AND DOWN
69. Dark looks : SCOWLS
73. Get some Z’s : NAP
74. Subtle emanation : AURA
75. Concert poster info : DATE
79. Comic actress Catherine : O’HARA
80. Four-legged orphans : DOGIES
83. Activity done in front of a mirror [clearly define] : PRIMPING [PIN down]
85. Office trash [resign] : WASTEPAPER [STEP down]
87. Start of many rapper names : LIL’
89. Upset stomach [consume] : NAUSEA [USE up]
90. Loud and harsh [start crowding the crotch] : STRIDENT [RIDE up]
91. ___ Tree State (Maine) : PINE
92. Like March Madness teams : SEEDED
93. Contentment : EASE
95. Theater giant? : IMAX
96. Establishes : SETS
97. Release tension, possibly : EXHALE
102. Big tank : VAT
104. What sarongs lack : SEAMS
108. Finnish outbuilding : SAUNA
109. Control of one’s actions [fall in great quantities] : SELF-RESTRAINT [RAIN down]
114. Granite dome in Georgia [moderate] : STONE MOUNTAIN [TONE down]
117. Converses à la Tracy and Hepburn [pay in advance] : BANTERS [ANTE up]
119. Athens landmark [arise] : ACROPOLIS [CROP up]
120. Retro music collection : LPS
121. Do without a radiator : AIR-COOL
122. Over there : YON
123. Brought on : LED TO
124. Stan of Marvel Comics : LEE
125. Lectures : TALKS TO

Down
1. Super Bowl highlights, to some : ADS
2. House on campus : FRAT
3. Precamping purchase : FUEL
4. Luxury hotel chain : OMNI
5. Barrel racing venue : RODEO
6. Printmaker Albrecht : DURER
7. Mixes up : STIRS
8. Appetizer with puréed olives : TAPENADE
9. Fuego extinguisher : AGUA
10. Balustrade location : TERRACE
11. Physicist Rutherford after whom rutherfordium is named : ERNEST
12. Radiation shield material : LEAD
13. Hosts, for short : MCS
14. Muesli tidbit : OAT
15. Electoral map division : STATE
16. Setting for a castle : CHESS
17. Painter Uccello : PAOLO
18. City on the Nile : ASWAN
22. They’re all in the same boat : CREW
25. “___ Late” (Ricky Nelson hit) : IT’S
27. Banquet V.I.P.’s : HONOREES
31. Wild guess : STAB
32. Strikers’ replacements : SCABS
33. “Taxi” character Elaine : NARDO
34. Greenlandic speaker : INUIT
35. Glazier’s supply : PANES
37. Estrangement : RIFT
39. Detach (from) : WEAN
40. Misfortunes : ILLS
42. Fitting : DUE
43. Team with a mascot named Orbit : ASTROS
46. Firth of “The King’s Speech” : COLIN
47. Mattress size : TWIN
48. Mr. ___ (soft drink) : PIBB
49. Gillette brand : ATRA
50. Like a dull party : DEAD
53. Go across : SPAN
54. Actress Swinton : TILDA
56. Hanes purchase, informally : TEE
58. Slack-jawed : AGAPE
62. Big leap forward : LUNGE
64. Courters : SWAINS
65. Woodsy picnic spot : GLADE
66. Brace : PAIR
67. Divided houses : DUPLEXES
68. #4 for the Bruins : ORR
69. Plants in a field : SOWS
70. I.M.’ing session : CHAT
71. Longship propellers : OARS
72. Summons, e.g. : WRIT
75. Bamboozles : DUPES
76. Brief digression : ASIDE
77. Fundamental principle : TENET
78. Quaint oath : EGADS!
80. Writer Richard Henry ___ : DANA
81. Goes (for) : OPTS
82. Nickname for a lanky cowboy : SLIM
84. ___ Jemison, first African-American woman in space : MAE
86. Sport with double touches : EPEE
88. To one way of thinking : IN A SENSE
91. Unseen danger : PITFALL
94. Nevertheless : EVEN SO
97. English assignment : ESSAY
98. Knife brand : X-ACTO
99. Iroquoian tribe : HURON
100. Before long : ANON
101. Boutonniere’s place : LAPEL
103. Keyboard abbr. : ALT
105. Swinging occasion? : AT-BAT
106. “West Side Story” heroine : MARIA
107. Unfriendly dog sound : SNARL
109. One of a bridge foursome : SUIT
110. Smelly : RIPE
111. Check mark : TICK
112. Book of Mormon prophet : ENOS
113. Brisk pace : TROT
115. Brother of Shemp : MOE
116. Getting on : OLD
118. ___-pitch : SLO

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5 thoughts on “0222-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 22 Feb 15, Sunday”

  1. While I admire the clever construction of the theme, I still can't get totally on board with intentionally misspelled words. Something about that concept rubs me the wrong way. Once you figured out the theme, the down answers in the theme were fairly easy fills, which helped in the overall finish. I'm conflicted.

  2. Did not enjoy this puzzle. I look forward to relaxing Sunday morning with this puzzle but today's only annoyed me! Not clever, annoying.

  3. I'll be even more succinct: this puzzle was B***S***. I actually ended up completing it, and with no errors, but was truly amazed, since there are so many intentional misspellings all through it. Both Patrick Berry *and* Will Shortz should be out of jobs for this kind of utter crap.

  4. This puzzle was so incredibly disappointing. I can forgive spelling errors to a degree, this was so atrocious! It's not clever, it's simply annoying!

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