0215-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Feb 15, Sunday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: Ellen Leuschner & Jeff Chen
THEME: Split Ends … each of today’s themed answers includes the word OR, giving us a choice. That choice is given to us in the across-direction and the down-direction in the grid:

1A. “Everyone who’s anyone is attending!” : BE THERE or BE SQUARE
2D. – : BE SQUARE

8A. Shoot for the moon : GO BIG or GO HOME
9D. – : GO HOME

13A. Much-anthologized Frank R. Stockton short story : THE LADY or THE TIGER
15D. – : THE TIGER

54A. Proverbial matter of perspective : HALF-FULL or HALF-EMPTY?
57D. – : HALF-EMPTY?

60A. Question asked in classic 1970s ads : IS IT LIVE or IS IT MEMOREX?
61D. – : IS IT MEMOREX?

79A. Stickup line : YOUR MONEY or YOUR LIFE
80D. – : YOUR LIFE

115A. Song by the Clash on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” list : SHOULD I STAY or SHOULD I GO
118D. – : SHOULD I GO?

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 22m 59s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

13. Much-anthologized Frank R. Stockton short story : THE LADY, (or the TIGER)
“The Lady, or the Tiger” is an 1882 fable by American writer Frank R. Stockton, the author’s most famous work. It tells of a man who is being punished for having a romance with a king’s daughter. The man is forced to choose between two doors. Behind one door is a starving tiger, and behind the other a lady. If he choose the tiger, the man dies, and if he chooses the beautiful lady, he must marry her. The man’s true is the princess, who is looking on, and she gives her beau a secret signal, indicating which door to choose. A twist in the tale is that the princess hates the lady awaiting behind one of the doors. Stockton does not tell us which door is chosen, and instead asks us if the princess saved her love, or if she preferred to see him die rather than marry another.

21. Mitchell heroine : O’HARA
As casting proceeded for the movie version of “Gone With the Wind”, Clark Gable was a shoo-in from day one. The role of Scarlett was considered very desirable in the acting community, with Bette Davis on the short list, and Katherine Hepburn demanding an appointment with producer David O. Selznick to discuss the role. Vivien Leigh was an unlikely contender, an English actress for the definitive Southern belle role. Selznick was adamant though, and stuck by his choice despite a lot of protests.

25. Short thing for a diva : ARIETTA
An arietta quite simply is a short aria.

26. Big ___ : SUR
Big Sur is a lovely part of the California Coast, south of Monterey and Carmel. The name “Big Sur” comes from the original Spanish description of the area as “el sur grande” meaning “the big south”.

29. Long John Silver, for one : SEA DOG
Long John Silver is a character in Robert Louis Stevenson’s “Treasure Island”, a pirate with a peg leg.

Robert Louis Stevenson’s most celebrated work I’d say is “Treasure Island”, originally written as a series for a children’s magazine in 1881. I remember “Treasure Island” as the first “real” novel I read as a youngster …

31. Not standard: Abbr. : IRR
Irregular (irr.)

34. Bird that’s also the name of an Irish river : ERNE
The ern (also erne) is also called the white-tailed eagle or sea-eagle.

The River Erne in the north of Ireland is now linked to the River Shannon by the easily navigated Shannon-Erne Waterway. I’ve spent a little time cruising along the River Erne in my time. Happy days …

36. Canon competitor : EPSON
Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

39. Slowing, in music: Abbr. : RIT
Rit. (or sometimes ritard.) is the abbreviation for ritardando, a musical direction to slow down the tempo.

42. Miranda warning receiver, informally : PERP
The Miranda warning is given by US police officers to suspects in order to ensure that any statements made by the suspect can be used at trial. The warning became part of police procedure after a 1966 Supreme Court decision in the case of Miranda v. Arizona. The crux of the court’s decision was that statements made by a suspect during interrogation were only admissible at trial if the defendant was informed of his or her right to consult an attorney, and right to remain silent. The “Miranda” in the case was Ernesto Mirando, who was arrested by the Phoenix PD on suspicion of kidnapping and rape. The Supreme Court decision set aside Miranda’s conviction as his confession was deemed inadmissible. Miranda was rearrested and retried. At the second trial he was convicted without the use of the contested confession.

45. Govt. construction overseer : GSA
The US Government’s General Services Administration (GSA), as the name suggests, provides general services to other federal agencies. So for example, the GSA manages office space for the other agencies, and transportation.

46. Founded, on city signs : ESTD
Established (estd.)

51. Some fraternity men : NUS
The Latin equivalent of the Greek letter nu is “N”. An uppercase nu looks just like the Latin capital N, however, the lowercase nu looks like our lowercase “v”. Very confusing …

59. John who played Harold in the “Harold & Kumar” films : CHO
John Cho is an actor and musician who was born in Seoul, South Korea but who has lived in the US since he was a young boy. Cho’s break in movies came in playing Harold Lee in the ”Harold & Kumar” films. He is now making a name for himself playing Mr. Sulu in the latest “Star Trek” movies.

60. Question asked in classic 1970s ads : IS IT LIVE (or is it MEMOREX?)
Memorex is now a brand of data storage products owned by Imation. Memorex started out in 1961 in Silicon Valley as a company making computer tapes, eventually adding storage disks and other media to its portfolio of products. A famous advertising campaign featured singer Ella Fitzgerald singing a note that shattered a glass. A recording of that note was then played, which also shattered the glass. The tag line to the ad became very famous: Is it live, or is it Memorex?”

69. Greek goddess of vengeance : NEMESIS
Nemesis was a Greek goddess, the goddess of retribution. Her role was to make pay those individuals who were either haughty or arrogant. In modern parlance, one’s nemesis is one’s sworn enemy, often someone who is the exact opposite in character but someone who still shares some important characteristics. A nemesis is often someone one cannot seem to beat in competition.

70. Like Lake Mead or Lake Powell : MAN-MADE
The Colorado River rises in the Rocky Mountains, flows through the southwestern US and northwest Mexico, and empties into the Gulf of California. Famously, the Colorado flows through the Grand Canyon. The best known dam on the Colorado is the Hoover Dam that forms Lake Mead.

Glen Canyon Dam is the second largest dam on the Colorado River and is located at Page, Arizona. The Dam was built to flood Glen Canyon, creating what we now know as Lake Powell.

71. Strunk and White topic : USAGE
William Strunk, Jr. was co-author of the first editions of “The Elements of Style” back in 1918 (usually referred to as “Strunk & White”). Strunk’s fellow-author was Elwyn Brooks (E. B.) White, the creator of the children’s stories “Charlotte’s Web” and “Stuart Little”.

72. They’re of no concern to cougars : AGE GAPS
“Cougar” is a slang term for a woman who seeks out relations with a much younger man. A classic “cougar” of American filmdom is the character played by Anne Bancroft in 1967’s “The Graduate”, with Dustin Hoffman’s character being the “prey”.

73. “M*A*S*H” role : PIERCE
Hawkeye Pierce is the lead character in the “M*A*S*H” novel, movie and TV series. Hawkeye was originally portrayed by Donald Sutherland in the film, and then by Alan Alda in the television show. Pierce is the only character appearing in all 250 episodes of the groundbreaking TV series.

75. Cry from a damsel in distress : SAVE ME!
A “damsel” is a young woman, often referring to a lady of noble birth. The term came into English from the Old French “dameisele”, which had the same meaning. The modern French term is “demoiselle”, which in turn is related to the term of address “mademoiselle”.

77. Part of I.M.F.: Abbr. : INTL
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) was established at the end of 1945 with 29 major economies supporting and funding an effort to stabilize economies across the globe after WWII. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., today the IMF has 187 member countries.

89. Foe of Mr. Fantastic in the comics : DR DOOM
Doctor Doom is a supervillain created in the Marvel Comics universe, an archenemy of the Fantastic Four.

The Fantastic Four is a team of superheroes in Marvel Comics universe. The team is made up of Mister Fantastic, the Invisible Woman, the Human Torch and the Thing.

94. Figure skater Midori : ITO
Midori Ito is a Japanese figure skater. Ito was the first woman to land a triple/triple jump and a triple axel in competition. In fact she landed her first triple jump in training when she was only 8 years old …

97. Mop & ___ : GLO
Mop & Glo is brand of floor cleaner and polish.

104. “Bye for now,” in textspeak : TTYL
Talk to you later (TTYL)

107. No longer hungry : SATED
“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

109. D.C. club : NATS
The Washington Nationals baseball team started out life as the Montreal Expos in 1969. The Expos moved to Washington in 2005 becoming the Nats. There are only two Major Leagues teams that have never played in a World Series, one being the Mariners and the other the Nats.

110. Indian music : RAGA
Raga isn’t really a type of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners).

111. Langston Hughes poem : I, TOO
Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as “jazz poetry”. His poem “I, Too, Sing America” was published in 1925.

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed–

I, too, am America.

112. William ___, British general in the Revolutionary War : HOWE
William Howe, 5th Viscount Howe fought during the American War of Independence, eventually rising to Commander-in-Chief of the British forces. Howe was in charge when the British took New York and Philadelphia, but also when the Saratoga campaign failed and the French entered the war. Howe resigned his post in 1777 and sailed back to England. Despite being censured for his actions in North America, Howe carved out a successful military and political career for himself in later years.

113. Assist, as an outlaw : ABET
The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

114. Colored like ink in “Love’s Labour’s Lost” : EBON
The words “I did encounter that obscene and preposterous event, that draweth from my snow-white pen the ebon-coloured ink” are from Shakespeare’s play “Love’s Labour Lost”.

“Love’s Labour’s Lost” is a comedy by William Shakespeare that was first performed in 1597, in the presence of Queen Elizabeth I.

115. Song by the Clash on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” list : SHOULD I STAY (or should I GO)
The Clash were one of the original punk bands, one that came together in 1976 in London. Despite their popularity, the Clash only ever had one number one single, “Should I Stay or Should I Go”. Even though the song was first released in 1982, it didn’t make it to the top of the charts until 1991 when it was re-released.

120. Part of an Adirondack chair : SLAT
An Adirondack chair is a wooden chair designed for use outdoors. The original Adirondack chair was designed in 1903 by one Thomas Lee, who was vacationing in Westport, New York in the Adirondack Mountains.

121. ___ Conference : TED
The acronym TED stands for Technology Entertainment and Design. TED is a set of conferences held around the world by a non-profit group called the Sapling Foundation. The conference subjects are varied, and the meetings are often led by big names such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Bill Gates and Jane Goodall. The Sapling Foundation then makes recordings of the conferences available for free online with the intent of disseminating the ideas globally. These conferences are known as “TED Talks”.

122. Command to Fido : BEG!
“Fido”, the name for many a dog, is Latin for “I trust”.

126. Parisian possessive : SES
“Ses” is the French word for “his”, “her” or “its”, when referring to a group of items.

127. “Maid in Manhattan” star, informally : J.LO
J.Lo is the nickname of singer and actress Jennifer Lopez. “J.Lo” is also the title of her second studio album, released in 2001.

“Maid in Manhattan” is 2002 romantic comedy starring Jennifer Lopez as a hotel maid and single mother. A senatorial candidate, played by Ralph Fiennes, falls for the maid, and hilarity ensues. Well, not so much …

128. Rx signers : MDS
“Ter” is the Latin word for “three”, commonly used in the medical world on prescriptions as part of the expression “ter in die”. “Ter in die” is Latin for “three times a day”, abbreviated to “TID”. “Bis in die” (BID) would be twice a day, and “quater in die” (QID) would be four times a day.

129. General ___ chicken : TSO’S
General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

Down
3. Cartoonist who wrote the caption “Well, if I called the wrong number, why did you answer the phone?” : THURBER
James Thurber was a cartoonist, author and humorist who was noted for his wit. One of Thurber’s most famous works is the 1939 short story “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”.

7. Eve who wrote “The Vagina Monologues” : ENSLER
Eve Ensler is a playwright whose most famous work is “The Vagina Monologues”. When Ensler was only 23 years of age she adopted a 15 year old boy. We are familiar with that boy on the big screen these days … actor Dylan McDermott.

11. Beginning of an attorney’s ending : I REST …
I rest my case …

12. Like four of the eight planets : GASEOUS
In our solar system, the four planets nearest the sun (Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars) are known as terrestrial planets, and are composed mainly of silicate rocks and metal. The remaining four planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) are referred to as gas planets, as they have no solid rock or metal. The gas planets are do not have a solid surface, although they are sometimes said to have a “rocky center”. This is actually liquid metal or rock formed by the high temperatures and pressures at the centers of the gas planets.

14. Superman, e.g. : HERO
Superman’s comic book creators gave their title character’s alter-ego the name “Clark Kent” by melding the names of Clark Gable and Kent Taylor, two leading men of the cinema at the time Superman was created. However, they modeled Clark’s character more on the silent film actor Harold Lloyd.

16. Rough position? : LIE
The fairway is bounded by the rough, on a golf course.

18. Historic filer for bankruptcy in 2013 : DETROIT
The city of Detroit’s economic strength declined at the beginning of the 21st century, resulting in a 25% drop in population between 2000 and 2010. Detroit filed for the country’s largest municipal bankruptcy in history in 2013, facing a debt of $18.8 billion. The city exited bankruptcy at the end of 2014.

28. Blather : DRIVEL
Our term “blather” meaning “nonsensical talk” probably came to us via Scottish, and ultimately perhaps from an Old Norse word for “mutter”.

30. ___ Exchange : ARMANI
Armani Exchange is an Armani brand that has been around since 1991. Armani Exchange uses the logo A|X, and is regarded as the accessible Armani brand, which I guess means it’s cheaper.

37. April second? : PEE
The second letter in the word “April” is the letter P (pee).

44. Center of activity : LOCUS
“Locus” (plural “loci”) is Latin for “place”.

45. Physicist Ohm : GEORG
The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

47. Virgil, for Dante : GUIDE
In Dante’s epic poem “The Divine Comedy”, the poet journeys through the three realms of the dead. The Roman poet Virgil guides Dante through Hell and Purgatory, and Dante’s ideal of womanhood Beatrice, she guides him through Heaven.

48. Queen of mystery : ELLERY
The Ellery Queen series of detective novels was somewhat unique in that Ellery Queen was the hero of the tales, and was also the pen name of the author. Actually, the “author” was a pair of writers; two cousins from Brooklyn, New York.

50. Flightless bird : RHEA
The rhea is a flightless bird native to South America. The rhea takes its name from the Greek titan Rhea, an apt name for a flightless bird as “rhea” comes from the Greek word meaning “ground”.

52. Org. with the motto “Not for self but for country” : US NAVY
The motto of the US Navy is “Non sibi sed patriae”, which translates from Latin as “Not for self but for country”.

53. Battle of the Alamo, e.g. : SIEGE
Our word “siege” comes from a 13th century word for a “seat”. The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force “sitting down” outside a fortress until it falls.

The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna’s camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry “Remember the Alamo!”.

54. “For ___” (store sign around Father’s Day) : HIM
Father’s Day was added as an official holiday in 1972, although bills to create the holiday had been with Congress since 1913. By rights, the holiday should be called “Fathers’ Day” (note the punctuation), but the Bill that was introduced in 1913 used the “Father’s Day” spelling, and that’s the one that has stuck.

55. California’s Santa ___ River : ANA
The Santa Ana River rises in the San Bernardino Mountains and empties into the Pacific Ocean 96 miles downstream. The Santa Ana is the largest river in Southern California.

56. I.C.U. worker : LPN
A licensed practical nurse (LPN) might work in an intensive care unit (ICU).

63. “Life ___ Highway” : IS A
“Life is a Highway” is a hit by Tom Cochrane from his 1991 album “Mad Mad World”.

78. Female with a beard : NANNY GOAT
Males goats are called “bucks” or “billies”, although castrated males are known as “wethers”. Female goats are called “does” or “nannies”, and young goats are referred to as “kids”.

81. Stone who co-created “South Park” : MATT
Matt Stone and Trey Parker are the co-creators of “South Park”, an animated television sitcom that I really can’t bear to watch. Before “South Park”, Stone and Parker came up with some well received holiday short subject films called “Jesus vs. Frosty” and “Jesus vs. Santa”, neither of which I’ll be watching. Stone and Parker also wrote the hit musical “The Book of Mormon” with Robert Lopez.

82. Cousins of clarinets : OBOES
The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name “oboe” comes from the French “hautbois” which means “high wood”. When you hear an orchestra tuning before a performance you’ll note (pun intended!) that the oboe starts off the process by playing an “A”. The rest of the musicians in turn tune to that oboe’s “A”.

85. Indie band whose name means, literally, “I have it” : YO LA TENGO
Yo La Tengo is an indie rock band from Hoboken, New Jersey that formed in 1984 as the husband/wife duo Ira Kaplan and Georgia Hubley. The band’s name translates from Spanish as “I have it”, and was chosen with reference to baseball anecdote. Elio Chacon was a baseball player from Venezuela, the seventh person to play in the Majors from that country. There’s a story that Mets center fielder Richie Ashburn was always running into Elio Chacon in the outfield, because he would call for the ball in English, and Chacon only understood Spanish. Ashburn started to call for the ball in Spanish “Yo la tengo!” (I’ve got it!), at which point he’d be run down by left fielder Frank Thomas who only understood English …

87. Anaïs Nin and Franz Kafka, notably : DIARISTS
Anaïs Nin was a French author, famous for her journals that she wrote for over sixty years from the age of 11 right up to her death. Nin also wrote highly-regarded erotica and cited D. H. Lawrence as someone from whom she drew inspiration. Nin was married to banker and artist Hugh Parker Guiler in 1923. Decades later in 1955, Nin married former actor Rupert Pole, even though she was still married to Guiler. Nin and Pole had their marriage annulled in 1966, but just for legal reasons, and they continued to live together as husband and wife until Nin passed away in 1977.

Franz Kafka was born in 1883 in Prague, then part of Bohemia and today the capital of the Czech Republic. Kafka is known as one of the greatest novelists who worked in the German language, and even has an adjective named after him. Something that is “kafkaesque” is senseless, disorienting and may have menacing complexity. As it was for many great artists, Kafka’s fame came after his death when much of his work was published.

93. Please, to a Puritan : PRITHEE
“Prithee” is a quaint way of saying “please”, and comes from the phrase “pray thee”.

“Puritan” was originally a pejorative term used in the 1560s to describe a Protestant extremist who was not satisfied with the extent of the reformation of the Church of England. The Puritans advocated further reforms, believing that the Church of England still harbored a lot of corruption. Facing staunch resistance to their ideals in Britain, many of the Puritans emigrated, the first wave to the Netherlands, with later emigrants moving to New England.

96. Sommelier : STEWARD
“Sommelier” is the French word for a wine steward.

100. Baseball family name : ALOU
Felipe Alou is a former professional baseball player and manager. Alou managed the Montreal Expos from 1992 to 2001, and the San Francisco Giants from 2003 to 2006. Alou was born and raised in the Dominican Republic and came to the US to play for the Giants in 1955. Felipe’s brothers Matty and Jesús followed him to the US, and into Major League baseball.

101. Pompom wielder’s cries : RAHS
The French call a ball made of tufted wool a “pompon”, a word that we imported into English directly as “pompon”. We use “pompon” to describe perhaps bobbles on some hats, or the tufted balls that are shaken by cheerleaders at sports events. Over time, the spelling “pompom” has become common in English, probably due to mishearing. To confuse matters a little, we also use the word “pom-pom”, which is a nickname for a British autocannon used mainly as an anti-aircraft weapon, particularly during WWII.

103. Sulking : IN A PET
A “pet” is a fit of sulking or bad mood.

106. Things found in a pyramid : FOODS
The first food guide pyramid was issued in 1974, in Sweden. The food pyramid that we’re most familiar with in this country is the one published by the USDA in 1992, which was replaced in 2011. Instead of a pyramid, we now have a guide called MyPlate. MyPlate urges us to eat about 30% grains, 30% vegetables, 20% fruits, 20% proteins on our plates, accompanied by a small serving of dairy.

108. Sacred symbol : TOTEM
Totem is the name given to any entity that watches over a group of people. As such, totems are usually the subjects of worship. Totem poles are really misnamed, as they are not intended to represent figures to be worshiped, but rather are heraldic in nature often celebrating the legends or notable events in the history of a tribe.

116. ___ Library (Austin, Tex., attraction) : LBJ
The three presidential libraries in Texas are:

– The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, in Austin
– The George H. W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, in College Station
– The George W. Bush Presidential Center in Dallas

117. Atl. Coast state : DEL
The state of Delaware takes its name from Virginia’s first colonial governor, Englishman Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. Delaware is known as “The First State” as it was the first to ratify the US Constitution, in 1787. It is also the second smallest state in the union, after Rhode Island. Delaware is the state with the fewest counties (3), followed by Hawaii and Rhode Island (5).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “Everyone who’s anyone is attending!” : BE THERE (or be SQUARE)
8. Shoot for the moon : GO BIG (or go HOME)
13. Much-anthologized Frank R. Stockton short story : THE LADY (or the TIGER)
20. Herald, as a new year : USHER IN
21. Mitchell heroine : O’HARA
22. One calling it quits : RETIREE
23. Is a rat : SQUEALS
24. Chimes, e.g. : TONES
25. Short thing for a diva : ARIETTA
26. Big ___ : SUR
27. Rarely : SELDOM
29. Long John Silver, for one : SEA DOG
31. Not standard: Abbr. : IRR
32. Word with coffee or water : TABLE
34. Bird that’s also the name of an Irish river : ERNE
35. Sped : TORE
36. Canon competitor : EPSON
38. Cookies with a “Golden” variety : OREOS
39. Slowing, in music: Abbr. : RIT
40. Audible pauses : UMS
41. Knot again : RETIE
42. Miranda warning receiver, informally : PERP
43. Remote button with “+” and “-” : VOL
45. Govt. construction overseer : GSA
46. Founded, on city signs : ESTD
47. Word before “I didn’t know that!” : GEE!
49. Heavy metal band? : ORE
51. Some fraternity men : NUS
54. Proverbial matter of perspective : HALF-FULL (or half-EMPTY?)
59. John who played Harold in the “Harold & Kumar” films : CHO
60. Question asked in classic 1970s ads : IS IT LIVE (or is it MEMOREX?)
66. Jeopardized : IN PERIL
67. Ask : QUERY
69. Greek goddess of vengeance : NEMESIS
70. Like Lake Mead or Lake Powell : MAN-MADE
71. Strunk and White topic : USAGE
72. They’re of no concern to cougars : AGE GAPS
73. “M*A*S*H” role : PIERCE
75. Cry from a damsel in distress : SAVE ME!
77. Part of I.M.F.: Abbr. : INTL
79. Stickup line : YOUR MONEY (or your LIFE)
83. Just : ONLY
86. Laughed harshly : BRAYED
88. Overstress : BELABOR
89. Foe of Mr. Fantastic in the comics : DR DOOM
91. Reception vessel : URN
92. Some samples : SIPS
94. Figure skater Midori : ITO
95. “Now it makes sense!” : I SEE!
97. Mop & ___ : GLO
98. Frontier sheriff’s badge : TIN STAR
100. In the style of : AFTER
102. Whistleblower’s target? : TAXICAB
104. “Bye for now,” in textspeak : TTYL
105. Rummage (through) : RIFLE
107. No longer hungry : SATED
109. D.C. club : NATS
110. Indian music : RAGA
111. Langston Hughes poem : I, TOO
112. William ___, British general in the Revolutionary War : HOWE
113. Assist, as an outlaw : ABET
114. Colored like ink in “Love’s Labour’s Lost” : EBON
115. Song by the Clash on Rolling Stone’s “500 Greatest Songs of All Time” list : SHOULD I STAY (or should I GO)
119. Material for many a ski lodge : PINE
120. Part of an Adirondack chair : SLAT
121. ___ Conference : TED
122. Command to Fido : BEG
123. Before : ERE
124. Tech grad: Abbr. : ENGR
125. Gets fixed : SETS
126. Parisian possessive : SES
127. “Maid in Manhattan” star, informally : J.LO
128. Rx signers : MDS
129. General ___ chicken : TSO’S

Down
1. Dot on a transit map : BUS STOP
2. – : BE SQUARE
3. Cartoonist who wrote the caption “Well, if I called the wrong number, why did you answer the phone?” : THURBER
4. Titter sound : HEE
5. Backspaces, say : ERASES
6. Incense : RILE
7. Eve who wrote “The Vagina Monologues” : ENSLER
8. Mounted : GOT ONTO
9. – : GO HOME
10. Test ___ : BAN
11. Beginning of an attorney’s ending : I REST …
12. Like four of the eight planets : GASEOUS
13. Subjects of apprenticeships : TRADES
14. Superman, e.g. : HERO
15. – : THE TIGER
16. Rough position? : LIE
17. Ones in the oil field? : ARTISTS
18. Historic filer for bankruptcy in 2013 : DETROIT
19. Was lovesick, say : YEARNED
28. Blather : DRIVEL
30. ___ Exchange : ARMANI
33. Cut (off) : LOP
37. April second? : PEE
44. Center of activity : LOCUS
45. Physicist Ohm : GEORG
47. Virgil, for Dante : GUIDE
48. Queen of mystery : ELLERY
50. Flightless bird : RHEA
52. Org. with the motto “Not for self but for country” : US NAVY
53. Battle of the Alamo, e.g. : SIEGE
54. “For ___” (store sign around Father’s Day) : HIM
55. California’s Santa ___ River : ANA
56. I.C.U. worker : LPN
57. – : HALF-EMPTY?
58. Most feeble : FRAILEST
61. – : IS IT MEMOREX?
62. Map part : LEGEND
63. “Life ___ Highway” : IS A
64. One given the velvet rope treatment, for short : VIP
65. Sigmoid shape : ESS
67. Get in line : QUEUE
68. Kind of question : YES/NO
74. Kernel keepers : COBS
76. Prefix with -form : AERI-
77. Crabby : IRRITABLE
78. Female with a beard : NANNY GOAT
80. – : YOUR LIFE
81. Stone who co-created “South Park” : MATT
82. Cousins of clarinets : OBOES
84. Little houses on the prairie : LOG CABINS
85. Indie band whose name means, literally, “I have it” : YO LA TENGO
86. Brace : BUTTRESS
87. Anaïs Nin and Franz Kafka, notably : DIARISTS
89. Straight shooters? : DEADEYES
90. Family members : MOBSTERS
93. Please, to a Puritan : PRITHEE
96. Sommelier : STEWARD
99. Angles : SLANTS
100. Baseball family name : ALOU
101. Pompom wielder’s cries : RAHS
103. Sulking : IN A PET
106. Things found in a pyramid : FOODS
108. Sacred symbol : TOTEM
116. ___ Library (Austin, Tex., attraction) : LBJ
117. Atl. Coast state : DEL
118. – : SHOULD I GO?

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5 thoughts on “0215-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 15 Feb 15, Sunday”

  1. Regarding the Father's Day clue: Fathers could also be interpreted as an attributive noun, which means that it behaves like an adjective even though it's a noun.

    We use attributive nouns all the time without realizing it. For example, if you said, “Last week I went to the Cowboys game,” it is not grammatically imperative to include an apostrophe at the end of Cowboys because Cowboys acts as an attributive noun. Another example would be Veterans Admininstration, not Veterans' Administration.

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