0630-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jun 13, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alex Vratsanos & Jeff Chen
THEME: Matching Wits … our theme letters today are MW, which we can see drawn by the black squares at the top- and bottom-center of the grid. Our theme answers are all made up of two words beginning with MW:

64A. Piece longer than its name suggests : MINUTE WALTZ
2D. “Hoochie Coochie Man” singer : MUDDY WATERS
6D. West Point subject : MODERN WARFARE
17D. Bang for one’s buck : MONEY’S WORTH
30D. 1962 movie for which Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke won Oscars, with “The” : MIRACLE WORKER
52D. Euphemism used often on “The Newlywed Game” : MAKING WHOOPEE
58D. Money raised by members of Congress? : MINIMUM WAGE
68D. Dewar’s product : MALT WHISKEY

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 31m 18s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … TANGRAMS (pangrams), CTS (cps)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. Coll. senior’s exam : GMAT
If you want to get into a business school’s graduate program then you might have to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), which will cost you about $250, I believe …

5. Some S.U.V.’s : GMCS
GMC is a division of General Motors (GM) established in 1901 that started out as “GMC Truck”.

9. 1/24 of un jour : HEURE
In French, an hour (heure) is part of a day (jour).

10. ___ Franklin, Grammy-nominated gospel/R&B singer : ERMA
Erma Franklin was an R&B and gospel singer. She was the elder sister of Aretha Franklin. Erma toured with Aretha for a while, and even recorded backup vocals on her sister’s big hit “Respect”.

14. First name in footwear : THOM
Thom McAn footwear was introduced in 1922 by the Melville Corporation (now CVS Caremark). The brand was named after a Scottish golfer called Thomas McCann. The Thom McAn line is epitomized by the comfortable leather casual and dress shoe, so sales have really been hurt in recent decades by the growing popularity of sneakers.

20. Onetime wrestling great ___ the Giant : ANDRE
André the Giant was a professional wrestler from France, whose real name was André René Roussimoff. He suffered from gigantism, over-production of growth hormone, reaching the height of 6 feet 3 inches by the time he was 12-years-old. But, he used his size to develop a very successful career in the ring.

22. Forced return? : REPO
Repossession (repo)

23. Woman in Conan Doyle’s “A Scandal in Bohemia” : ADLER
The character Irene Adler only appeared in one of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In that story, “A Scandal in Bohemia”, Holmes expresses remarkable admiration for Adler as a woman and as a foe. As a result, derivative works in the Holmes genre often feature Adler as something of a romantic interest for Sherlock.

24. Most common elements : MODES
In the world of statistics, the mode of a set of numbers is the value that appears most often.

26. Target of 2006 United Nations sanctions : IRAN
The UN Security Council imposed sanctions on Iran in 2006 because Iran refused to suspend its uranium enrichment program.

27. Euripides play : MEDEA
Euripides was a great playwright of Ancient Greece, renowned for his tragedies. Euripides was one of the three great writers of tragedy of classical Athens, alongside Aeschylus and Sophocles.

29. Heads of a Northwest tribe? : TOTEM POLE
Totem poles are large sculptures that have been carved from trees. Totem poles are part of the culture of Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest of North America.

34. ___ Selassie : HAILE
Emperor Haile Selassie I ruled Ethiopia until he was removed from power in a revolution in 1974. Selassie died in 1975 under suspicious circumstances and it is widely believed that he was assassinated.

37. “Defending liberty, pursuing justice” org. : ABA
The American Bar Association (ABA) was founded back in 1878 and is a voluntary association for lawyers and law students. The ABA focuses on setting academic standards for law schools and setting ethical codes for the profession.

39. Carlo ___ wine : ROSSI
Carlo Rossi is a brand of wine produced by E & J Gallo. The name was chosen in honor of a salesman working for the winery named Charles Rossi, who was also a member of the Gallo family by marriage. Charles Rossi used to appear in TV ads for the wine in seventies.

43. Collaborative Web site : WIKI
A wiki is a website in which users are allowed to create and edit content themselves. The term “wiki” comes from the name of the first such site, introduced in 1994 and called WikiWikiWeb. “Wiki” is a Hawaiian word for “quick”, and is used because comprehensive content is created very quickly a there are so many collaborators contributing to the site.

46. Bon ___ : MOT
“Bon mot” translates from French as “good word”. We use “bon mot” (and sometimes just “mot”) to mean a quip, a witticism.

53. Actor Roberts : ERIC
Eric Roberts is an actor from Biloxi, Mississippi. Eric is the older brother of actress Julia Roberts.

55. The Superdome, e.g. : ARENA
The New Orleans Superdome was opened in 1975, and is the largest, fixed-dome structure in the world, covering 13 acres. The seating capacity varies depending on the event being staged, but the Rolling Stones attracted a crowd of more than 87,500 people in 1981. The primary purpose of the structure is to host home games for the New Orleans Saints football team. Famously, in 2005, the Superdome became a shelter of last resort for about 30,000 refugees in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

56. Biblical figure whose name means “help” : EZRA
Ezra the Scribe, also called Ezra the Priest, is the central character in the Book of Ezra in the Hebrew Bible.

57. ___ de Pompadour (figure in Fr. history) : MME
Madame de Pompadour was the very official and well catered-to mistress of Louis XV of France. She lives on in popular culture in a number of ways, including the Pompadour hairstyle. At one time she wore her hair swept back from her forehead, but with a wave that made the front of her hair bulge forward. Her name became associated with the style, and so it remains today. The style became fashionable with so-called rockabilly artists in the later fifties, including one Elvis Presley.

59. Many a person behind the Iron Curtain : SLAV
The Slavic peoples are in the majority in communities covering over half of Europe. This large ethnic group is traditionally broken down into three smaller groups:

– the West Slavic (including Czechs and Poles)
– the East Slavic (including Russians and Ukrainians)
– the South Slavic (including Bulgarians and Serbs)

The term “Iron Curtain” was first used in the context of Soviet influence over Eastern Europe in a speech made by Winston Churchill in 1946. He made that address in the US, at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri.

63. Secretary, e.g. : DESK
A secretary is an antique form of desk, one with drawers in a base, a hinged writing surface and a bookcase on top.

64. Piece longer than its name suggests : MINUTE WALTZ
The marvelous “Minute Waltz” is a solo piano piece composed by Frédéric Chopin in 1847. Chopin’s publisher gave the waltz the “minute” nickname, intending to convey that it was a “short” piece. The intention was never to play the whole waltz in one minute, and in fact it typically takes between one and a half and two and a half minutes to play completely.

67. Second of a Latin trio : AMAS
“Amo, amas, amat: … “I love, you love, he/she/it loves”, in Latin.

73. Bird or fruit : KIWI
Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name “Kiwi” for a New Zealander isn’t offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country’s national symbol. “Kiwi” is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply “kiwi”. However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the “s”, and indeed the capital “K”!).

What we call kiwifruit today used to be called a Chinese gooseberry. Marketing folks in the fifties decided to call it a “melonette”, and then New Zealand producers adopted the name “kiwifruit”.

75. Like a sighting of an ivory-billed woodpecker : RARE
The ivory-billed woodpecker is a very large woodpecker. It is 20 inches long and has a wingspan of 30 inches. The ivory-billed woodpecker is native to the American Southwest. Mainly due to the destruction of its habitat and to hunting, the species may actually be extinct.

83. Seat of Dallas County, Ala. : SELMA
The Alabama city of Selma is noted for the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches of 1965.

The Bloody Sunday march took place between Selma and Montgomery, Alabama on 7 March 1965. The 600 marchers involved were protesting the intimidation of African-Americans registering to vote. When the marchers reached Dallas County, Alabama they encountered a line of state troopers reinforced by white males who had been deputized that morning to help keep the peace. Violence broke out with 17 marchers ending up in hospital, one nearly dying. Because the disturbance was widely covered by television cameras, the civil rights movement picked up a lot of support that day.

84. Seven-piece puzzles : TANGRAMS
A tangram is a flat puzzle consisting of seven different shapes that must be arrange to form specific shapes. The game was invented in China, and the name for the puzzle in Chinese translates as “seven boards of skill”. The seven shapes are called “tans” hence the name “tangram” name used in English.

86. Adventurer of Greek myth : ARGONAUT
Jason is a hero from Greek mythology, most noted for leading the quest for the Golden Fleece. The Golden Fleece is the fleece of the gold-haired winged ram. For his quest, Jason assembles a group of heroes who were given the name Argonauts, as they journeyed on the ship called the “Argo”. The vessel was called the “Argo” in honor of the ship’s builder, a man named Argus.

89. Big gobbler : TOM
A male turkey is called a “tom”.

91. Eskimo boot : MUKLUK
Mukluks are soft boots worn by Arctic peoples such as the Inuit and Yupik. The boots are made from reindeer skin or sealskin. The term “mukluk” come from the Yupik “maklak”, the word for “bearded seal”.

93. Hollywood legend Davis : BETTE
I must confess that I have a problem watching movies starring Bette Davis. I think I must have seen her play one of her more sinister roles when I was a kid and it gave me nightmares or something. So, I have never seen the 1950 classic “All About Eve”, given that Bette Davis gets top billing. But, the title role of Eve Harrington was played by Anne Baxter, and Ms Baxter’s movies I do enjoy. Coincidentally, on the epic television series “Hotel”, when Bette Davis became ill, it was Anne Baxter who was chosen to take on her role.

97. It has 31 días : ENERO
In Spanish, the month of January (enero) has 31 days (dias).

99. ___ bar (Hershey product) : HEATH
The Heath candy bar is the invention of brothers Bayard and Everett Heath in the 1920s.

101. Some dinero : PESOS
“Dinero” is a Spanish word for money, as well as a slang term for money here in the US.

109. Four Holy Roman emperors : OTTOS
Otto I through Otto IV were all Holy Roman Emperors.

The Holy Roman Empire (HRE) existed from 962 to 1806 AD and was a territory of varying size over the centuries that centered on the Kingdom of Germany. The HRE was a successor to the western half of the Ancient Roman Empire.

110. Certain singers : ALTI
In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word “alto” describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term “contralto” describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male’s voice (not a boy’s) with the same range as an alto is called a “countertenor”.

111. Noted mausoleum site : AGRA
The most famous mausoleum in the world has to be the Taj Mahal in Agra, India. The Taj Mahal was built after the death of the third wife of Shah Jahan, Mumtaz Mahal (hence the name of the mausoleum). The poor woman died in childbirth delivering the couple’s 14th child.

113. Women’s Health competitor : SHAPE
“Shape” and “Women’s Health” are magazines.

115. Baghdad’s ___ City : SADR
Sadr City is a suburb of Iraq, oft in the news these days. Sadr City is named after the deceased Shia leader Mohammad Mohammad Sadeq al-Sadr.

117. You may be shocked by it : TASER
Victor Appleton wrote a novel for young adults called “Tom Swift and His Electric Rifle”. The company that developed the TASER electroshock weapon named its product as a homage to the novel. The acronym TASER stands for “Thomas A. Swift’s Electric Rifle”. Interesting, eh?

118. Baseball’s Slaughter : ENOS
Enos Slaughter has a remarkable playing record in Major League Baseball over a 19-year career. Slaughter’s record is particularly remarkable given that he left baseball for three years to serve in the military during WWII.

121. Word before and after “Tovarich” in a “Doctor Zhivago” number : NYET
“Nyet Tovarich, Nyet” is a song from the soundtrack of the movie “Doctor Zhivago”.

“Doctor Zhivago” is of course the epic novel by Boris Pasternak, first published in 1957. I haven’t tried to read it but the 1965 film version is a must-see, directed by David Lean and starring Omar Sharif in the title role. The story centers on Yuri Zhivago, a doctor and poet, and how he is affected by the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War.

Down
1. Columbus’s home : GENOA
Genoa is a seaport in the very north of Italy, in the region known as Liguria. One of Genoa’s most famous sons was Christopher Columbus.

2. “Hoochie Coochie Man” singer : MUDDY WATERS
Muddy Waters was a musician from Mississippi who was nicknamed the “father of modern Chicago blues”.

8. 1943 penny composition : STEEL
During WWII there was a shortage of copper, so the US Mint switched to zinc-coated steel for production of one-cent coins in 1943. The coins had all sorts of problems in circulation, so the mint had to change again for the 1944-46 production, using a brass/copper alloy. For obvious reasons, the 1943 coin is called a “steelie”, and is the only coin ever issued by the US mint that can be picked up by a magnet.

9. The Three Stooges, e.g. : HAMS
The word “ham”, describing a performer who overacts, is apparently a shortened form of “hamfatter” and dates back to the late 1800s. “Hamfatter” comes from a song in old minstrel shows called “The Ham-Fat Man”. It seems that a poorly performing actor was deemed to have the “acting” qualities of a minstrel made up in blackface.

If you’ve seen a few of the films starring “The Three Stooges” you’ll have noticed that the line up changed over the years. The original trio was made up of Moe and Shemp Howard (two brothers) and Larry Fine (a good friend of the Howards). This line up was usually known as “Moe, Larry and Shemp”. Then Curly Howard replaced his brother when Shemp quit the act, creating the most famous trio, “Moe, Larry And Curly”. Shemp returned when Curly had a debilitating stroke in 1946, and Shemp stayed with the troupe until he died in 1955. Shemp was replaced by Joe Besser, and then “Curly-Joe” DeRita. When Larry Fine had a stroke in 1970, it effectively marked the end of the act.

11. Caramel candy brand : ROLO
Rolo was a hugely popular chocolate candy in Ireland when I was growing up. Rolo was introduced in the thirties in the UK, and is produced under license in the US by Hershey. I was a little disappointed when I had my first taste of the American version as the center is very hard and chewy. The recipe used on the other side of the Atlantic calls for a soft gooey center.

15. Purple Heart recipients, e.g. : HEROES
The Purple Heart is a military decoration awarded by the President to members of the US military forces who have been wounded or killed while serving. Today’s Purple Heart was originally called the Badge of Military Merit, an award that was established by George Washington 1782 while he was commander-in-chief of the Continental Army. The Purple Heart is a heart-shaped medal with a gold border bearing a profile of President Washington, and a purple ribbon.

16. It’s worn by many Libras : OPAL
Here is the “official” list of birthstones by month, that we tend to use today:

January: Garnet
February: Amethyst
March: Bloodstone or Aquamarine
April: Diamond
May: Emerald
June: Pearl or Moonstone
July: Ruby
August: Sardonyx or Peridot
September: Sapphire or Lapis Lazuli
October: Opal or Pink Tourmaline
November: Topaz or Citrine
December: Turquoise or Zircon (also now, Tanzanite)

19. Many S.A. women : SRAS
Many women in South America (S.A.) speak Spanish and are married, so would be addresses as “senora” (sra.).

30. 1962 movie for which Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke won Oscars, with “The” : MIRACLE WORKER
“The Miracle Worker” is a 1962 movie based on the autobiography of Helen Keller called “The Story of My Life”.

Helen Keller became a noted author despite been deaf and blind, largely through the work of her teacher, Anne Sullivan. Keller was left deaf and blind after an illness (possible meningitis or scarlet fever). when she was about 18 months old. She was to become the first deaf and blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The relationship between Sullivan and Keller is immortalized in the play and film called “The Miracle Worker”.

38. Still dripping? : BOOZE
Booze might be dripping from a still.

44. “Toy Story 3” role for Michael Keaton : KEN
I haven’t seen Pixar’s “Toy Story 3”, but I hear it is excellent. “Toy Story 3” is so successful that it is now the highest-grossing animated film of all time and has brought in over a billion dollars worldwide. In the movie, Ken is a smooth-talking doll that falls in love with Barbie. Ken is voiced by actor Michael Keaton.

Michael Keaton is an actor from Coraopolis, Pennsylvania. Keaton is perhaps best remembered for roles he played in Tim Burton films. Keaton had the title role in “Beetlejuice” in 1988, and the title role in “Batman” in 1989 and “Batman Returns” in 1992.

45. Muckraker Tarbell : IDA
Ida Tarbell was a teacher and what we would call today an “investigative journalist”, although back in her day she was known as a “muckraker”. Her most famous work is her 1904 book “The History of the Standard Oil Company”. This exposé is credited with hastening the breakup of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil in 1911.

48. Peruvian volcano El ___ : MISTI
El Misti is a volcano also known as Guaga-Putina that lies in Southern Peru near the city of Arequipa.

50. ___ Schwarz : FAO
FAO Schwarz is perhaps the most famous, and is certainly the oldest toy store in the United States. The FAO Schwarz outlet on Fifth Avenue in New York City has been made very famous by Hollywood. For example, in the New York Store you can see that floor piano that was played by Tom Hanks in the movie “Big”.

52. Euphemism used often on “The Newlywed Game” : MAKING WHOOPEE
“The Newlywed Game” is a television game show in which newly wed couples are tested in their knowledge of each other. The show first appeared in 1966, and was the last network show to premiere in black and white.

54. Frank Sinatra’s second : AVA
Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of “Mogambo” (1953), “On the Beach” (1959), “The Night of the Iguana” (1964) and “Earthquake” (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra. After her marriages had failed (and perhaps before!) she had long term relationships with Howard Hughes and bullfighter Luis Miguel Dominguin whom she met through her friend Ernest Hemingway.

Frank Sinatra was the only child of Italian immigrants living in Hoboken, New Jersey. Like so many of our heroes, Sinatra had a rough upbringing. His mother was arrested several times and convicted of running an illegal abortion business in the family home. Sinatra never finished high school, being expelled for rowdy conduct, and he was arrested on a morals charge as a youth for carrying on with a married woman, which was an offence back then. But he straightened himself out by the time he was twenty, and started singing professionally.

62. 72 in a six-pack, often: Abbr. : OZS
A six-pack of a beverage might contain six 12-ounce containers.

65. Don Ho’s instrument, informally : UKE
The ukulele originated in the 1800s and mimicked a small guitar brought to the Hawaiian Islands by Portuguese immigrants.

Don Ho apparently had a pretty liberal arrangement with his wife. When Ho was touring with his two backing singers, Pattie Swallie and Elizabeth Gevara, all three of them shared a room together. He had two children with each of his roommates, giving a total of ten kids including the six he had with his wife. The arrangement was quite open, it seems, with all ten kids visiting each other regularly. To each his own …

66. Sierra ___ : LEONE
The Republic of Sierra Leone is a country in West Africa, lying on the Atlantic Coast. The capital city of Freetown was originally set up as a colony to house the “Black Poor” of London, England. These people were mainly freed British slaves of Caribbean descent who were living a miserable life in the run-down parts of London. Perhaps to help the impoverished souls, perhaps to rid the streets of “a problem”, three ships were chartered in 1787 to transport a group of blacks, with some whites, to a piece of land purchased in Sierra Leone. Those who made the voyage were guaranteed British citizenship and protection. The descendants of these immigrants, and others who made the journey over the next 60 years, make up the ethnic group that’s today called the Sierra Leone Creole.

68. Dewar’s product : MALT WHISKEY
Dewar’s is a blended Scotch whisky introduced in 1846 by John Dewar. Dewar’s White Label is the company’s most popular Scotch, first created in 1899, with a taste that is described as “heather and honey”. Dewar’s also make some single malts, under the labels Aberfeldy 12 and Aberfeldy 21. Today, Dewar’s is owned by Bacardi.

76. They’re beside the point: Abbr. : CTS
I think the reference is to cents (cts.), which come beside a decimal point in sums expressed in dollars and cents.

82. Racing vehicle : TOBOGGAN
“Toboggan” came into English from the French Canadian “tabagane”, the name for a long sled with a flat bottom. The French Canadian word is probably from the Algonquian word for a sled, “tobakun”,

85. Mornings, for short : AMS
The 12-hour clock has been around a long time, and was even used in sundial format in Ancient Egypt. Our use of AM and PM dates back to Roman times, with AM standing for Ante Meridiem (before noon) and PM standing for Post Meridiem (after noon). However, the Romans originally used the AM concept a little differently, by counting backwards from noon. So, 2AM to the Romans would be two hours before noon, or 10AM as we would call it today.

88. Beehive State native : UTE
The Ute is a group of Native American tribes that now resides in Utah and Colorado. The Ute were not a unified people as such, but rather a loose association of nomadic groups.

When Mormon pioneers were settling what is today the state of Utah, they referred to the area as Deseret, a word that means “beehive” according to the Book of Mormon. Today Utah is known as the Beehive State and there is a beehive symbol on the Utah state flag.

100. Bimetallic Canadian coin : TOONIE
“Toonie” is the familiar name for a two-dollar coin in Canada. A kind blog reader pointed out that the one-dollar bill was replaced with the “loonie” coin, a nickname that comes from the “loon” bird that is on one side of the coin. The “toonie” nickname for the two-dollar coin is imitative of the term “loonie”, and I suppose might be spelled “two-nie”. The toonie replaced the two-dollar bill in 1996. The paper bill cost 6 cents to print and lasted about a year in circulation, whereas the toonie costs 16 cents to mint and should last 20 years. Good move …

101. Writing on the Wall? : POST
I think the reference is to writing on the Facebook Wall, maybe. I don’t do Facebook …

102. A Coen brother : ETHAN
I think it’s great to see two brothers working together and being so successful. Joel and Ethan Coen are two movie producers and directors who both live in New York City. The Coen brothers do love the movie-making business and they even married industry “insiders”. Ethan’s wife is film editor Tricia Cooke, and Joel is married to one of my favorite actresses, the lovely Frances McDormand.

104. Joie de vivre : ELAN
Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours i.e “style” or “flair”.

“Joie de vivre” means “joy of living” in French. We use the phrase to mean the happy, carefree enjoyment of life, like when we finish our crossword puzzles …

105. Language of Lahore : URDU
Urdu is one of the two official languages of Pakistan (the other being English), and is one of 22 scheduled languages in India. Urdu partly developed from Persian and is written from right to left.

Lahore is a large city in Pakistan, second in size only to Karachi. It is known as the Garden of the Mughals (or in English, Moguls) because of its association with the Mughal Empire. The Mughals ruled much of India from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries.

108. Feds : T-MEN
A T-man is a law-enforcement agent of the US Treasury (T is for Treasury).

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Coll. senior’s exam : GMAT
5. Some S.U.V.’s : GMCS
9. 1/24 of un jour : HEURE
10. ___ Franklin, Grammy-nominated gospel/R&B singer : ERMA
14. First name in footwear : THOM
18. Robs : LOOTS
20. Onetime wrestling great ___ the Giant : ANDRE
21. Shade of black : SOOT
22. Forced return? : REPO
23. Woman in Conan Doyle’s “A Scandal in Bohemia” : ADLER
24. Most common elements : MODES
25. Asset : PLUS
26. Target of 2006 United Nations sanctions : IRAN
27. Euripides play : MEDEA
28. Opening words? : SAY ‘AH’
29. Heads of a Northwest tribe? : TOTEM POLE
31. Endings of some courses : ORALS
32. Compose : WRITE
34. ___ Selassie : HAILE
35. What whalers may bring back : YARNS
37. “Defending liberty, pursuing justice” org. : ABA
39. Carlo ___ wine : ROSSI
41. Go kicking and screaming : RESIST
43. Collaborative Web site : WIKI
46. Bon ___ : MOT
47. Fully : TO THE MAX
49. Duplicitous : TWO-FACED
51. They may be epic : POEMS
53. Actor Roberts : ERIC
54. Trouble : ADO
55. The Superdome, e.g. : ARENA
56. Biblical figure whose name means “help” : EZRA
57. ___ de Pompadour (figure in Fr. history) : MME
59. Many a person behind the Iron Curtain : SLAV
61. Dome, e.g. : ROOF
63. Secretary, e.g. : DESK
64. Piece longer than its name suggests : MINUTE WALTZ
67. Second of a Latin trio : AMAS
71. Gang member’s “O.K.” before a job : I’M IN
73. Bird or fruit : KIWI
74. Canadian interjections : EHS
75. Like a sighting of an ivory-billed woodpecker : RARE
76. Where 84-Across were invented : CHINA
79. Suffix with favor : -ITE
81. Catching ___ : ONTO
83. Seat of Dallas County, Ala. : SELMA
84. Seven-piece puzzles : TANGRAMS
86. Adventurer of Greek myth : ARGONAUT
89. Big gobbler : TOM
90. Dish that may be ladled : STEW
91. Eskimo boot : MUKLUK
93. Hollywood legend Davis : BETTE
94. Crooked : WRY
95. Bridge spot : CHASM
97. It has 31 días : ENERO
99. ___ bar (Hershey product) : HEATH
101. Some dinero : PESOS
103. Disobeyed orders, say : WENT ROGUE
106. Dewy : MOIST
109. Four Holy Roman emperors : OTTOS
110. Certain singers : ALTI
111. Noted mausoleum site : AGRA
112. ___ buddy : BOSOM
113. Women’s Health competitor : SHAPE
114. Terminal information : GATE
115. Baghdad’s ___ City : SADR
116. ___-length : ANKLE
117. You may be shocked by it : TASER
118. Baseball’s Slaughter : ENOS
119. Carpentry fastener : T-NUT
120. Affix, in a way : TIE ON
121. Word before and after “Tovarich” in a “Doctor Zhivago” number : NYET
122. Informal greetings : HEYS

Down
1. Columbus’s home : GENOA
2. “Hoochie Coochie Man” singer : MUDDY WATERS
3. In ___ (late, in law) : ARREAR
4. They may be shot at basketball games : TEE SHIRTS
5. Star quality : GLAMOR
6. West Point subject : MODERN WARFARE
7. Frigid : COLD AS ICE
8. 1943 penny composition : STEEL
9. The Three Stooges, e.g. : HAMS
10. Clairvoyant’s hurdle : ESP TEST
11. Caramel candy brand : ROLO
12. Shooting off more : MOUTHIER
13. Flummoxed : AT SEA
14. Like porn films : TRIPLE X
15. Purple Heart recipients, e.g. : HEROES
16. It’s worn by many Libras : OPAL
17. Bang for one’s buck : MONEY’S WORTH
19. Many S.A. women : SRAS
30. 1962 movie for which Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke won Oscars, with “The” : MIRACLE WORKER
33. Likewise : TOO
36. ___ Z : A TO
37. Jazzed : AMPED
38. Still dripping? : BOOZE
40. Gloss : SHEEN
42. “___ be a real shame …” : IT’D
44. “Toy Story 3” role for Michael Keaton : KEN
45. Muckraker Tarbell : IDA
48. Peruvian volcano El ___ : MISTI
50. ___ Schwarz : FAO
52. Euphemism used often on “The Newlywed Game” : MAKING WHOOPEE
54. Frank Sinatra’s second : AVA
57. Year the iPod came out : MMI
58. Money raised by members of Congress? : MINIMUM WAGE
60. Stupefying : AWING
62. 72 in a six-pack, often: Abbr. : OZS
65. Don Ho’s instrument, informally : UKE
66. Sierra ___ : LEONE
68. Dewar’s product : MALT WHISKEY
69. Medieval museum exhibit : ARMOR
70. Lowdown : SEAMY
72. Nick, maybe : MAR
76. They’re beside the point: Abbr. : CTS
77. Magician’s prop : HAT
78. Blissed out : IN ECSTASY
80. Tut’s relative : TSK
82. Racing vehicle : TOBOGGAN
83. Where one might be in the hot seat? : STEAMBATH
85. Mornings, for short : AMS
86. Some baby sitters : AUNTIES
87. Fundamentally : AT HEART
88. Beehive State native : UTE
92. Gave for a time : LENT TO
96. Posit : ASSERT
98. Where one might be in the hot seat? : ROAST
100. Bimetallic Canadian coin : TOONIE
101. Writing on the Wall? : POST
102. A Coen brother : ETHAN
104. Joie de vivre : ELAN
105. Language of Lahore : URDU
107. They’re always done by one : SOLOS
108. Feds : T-MEN

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4 thoughts on “0630-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Jun 13, Sunday”

  1. Trivia: 100 down: Loonie. How it got it's name. The first paper bill to be converted in Canada was the dollar. It has a picture of the beautiful bird, the Loon, hence it was called a 'Loonie'. It followed that when the 2 dollar bill became a coin a few years later, it was called a Toonie. Or I suppose a 'Two-nie' if one wants to be perfectly correct.

  2. Helen Keller became deaf and blind due to an illness at the age of 2 or so. She was not born blind or deaf.

  3. Hi there, Phylis.

    That "loonie toonie" trivia is right up my alley! I'll add it to my comment above, and hopefully remember to use it the next time TOONIE comes up in a crossword 🙂

    Thanks!

  4. Hi there, Sylvia.

    Thanks for pointing out my error re Helen Keller and her afflictions. I'll change that in the comment I made above.

    I had the privilege of visiting Helen Keller's birthplace in Tuscumbia, Alabama many moons ago. The exhibition in the family home is quite inspiring, as I recall.

    Tanks again for the help, Sylvia.

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