0805-22 NY Times Crossword 5 Aug 22, Friday

Constructed by: Erik Agard & Brooke Husic
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 15m 19s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

14 Traditional application for a Hindu wedding : HENNA

Henna has been used for centuries as a dye, for leather and wool as well as hair and skin. In modern days, henna is often used for temporary tattoos.

15 “The Kitchen God’s Wife” novelist, 1991 : TAN

“The Kitchen God’s Wife” is a 1991 novel by Amy Tan. It was Tan’s second book, and followed the remarkable success of her 1989 story “The Joy Luck Club”.

17 Musical group : ALTOS

In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word “alto” describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term “contralto” describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male’s voice (not a boy’s) with the same range as an alto is called a “countertenor”.

18 ___ polymerase : RNA

Polymerase is an enzyme found in the body, It is tasked with making new RNA and DNA.

23 “Parasite” co-star ___ Jung-eun : LEE

“Parasite” is a 2019 comedy thriller movie from South Korea that became the nation’s highest-grossing film of all time. It was also the first movie not filmed in English to win the Oscar for Best Picture. I haven’t seen “Paradise” yet, but I hear great things from friends and family who have …

26 Settle up : PAY THE TAB

When we run a “tab” at a bar, we are running a “tabulation”, a listing of what we owe. Such a use of “tab” is American slang that originated in the 1880s.

28 Name that anagrams to something you might smoke : CRAIG

“Cigar” is an anagram of “Craig”.

36 Some leporids : HARES

Hares belong to the genus Lepus. Young hares under one-year-old are called leverets.

38 Vicar in “Emma” : ELTON

Here is the opening paragraph of the novel “Emma”, by Jane Austen:

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.

42 A bird, food or person : KIWI

The kiwi is an unusual bird in that it has a highly developed sense of smell and is the only one of our feathered friends with nostrils located at the tip of its long beak.

What we call kiwifruit today (and sometimes just “kiwi”) used to be called a Chinese gooseberry. Marketing folks in the fifties decided to call it a “melonette”, and then New Zealand producers adopted the name “kiwifruit”.

Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name “Kiwi” for a New Zealander isn’t offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country’s national symbol. “Kiwi” is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply “kiwi”. However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the “s”, and indeed the capital “K”!).

43 Female swan : PEN

An adult male swan is a cob and an adult female is a pen. Young swans are swanlings or cygnets.

44 Office binder? : RED TAPE

Back in the days of yore in England, official documents were bound in bundles with red ribbon. So, getting through all the paperwork required “cutting through the red tape”.

55 Wheel, so to speak : HELM

In its broadest sense, the term “helm” describes the whole of a ship’s steering mechanism, including the rudder and tiller. In a more specific sense, the helm is the handle, tiller or wheel that is used to control the steering gear.

56 Little bits : IOTAS

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, and one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

63 Cloud often seen in the summer : GNATS

Gnats are attracted to the smell of rotting food, and vinegar. Simple homemade traps that use vinegar are often constructed to attract and kill gnats.

Down

2 Fracas : MELEE

Our term “melee” comes from the French “mêlée”, and in both languages the word means “confused fight”.

“Fracas”, meaning “noisy quarrel”, is a French word that we absorbed into English. In turn, the French usage evolved from the Italian “fracasso” meaning “uproar, crash”.

4 Make out, in Manchester : SNOG

“Snogging” is British slang of unknown origin that dates back to the end of WWII. The term is used for “kissing and cuddling”, what we call “making out” over here in the US.

Manchester is the second-most populous city in the UK, and is located in the northwest of England. Manchester grew in size dramatically during the Industrial Revolution. Home to a thriving textile industry, Manchester is often referred to as the world’s first industrialized city.

5 Pounds on keyboards? : HASHTAGS

The # symbol is usually referred to as the “number sign”, but here in the US the name “pound sign” is very common as well, as is “hash mark”.

7 One might offer a sweet message : CANDY HEART

The forerunner to Sweethearts candy was introduced in 1866, with the famous sayings written on the candy tailored for use at weddings. One of the original expressions was, “Married in pink, he will take a drink”. The original candy was a lot bigger, to fit all those words! The smaller, heart-shaped candy hit the shelves in 1901. We’ve been able to buy Sweethearts with the words “Text me” since 2010.

8 One way to be tried : IN ABSENTIA

“In absentia” is Latin for “while absent”. For example, a person might be given an award in absentia, or perhaps be convicted of a crime in absentia.

11 Round holiday fare : LATKE

A latke is a delicious potato pancake (I’m Irish, so anything made with potatoes is delicious, to be fair).

21 “‘Tis but ___ name that is my enemy”: Juliet : THY

William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” is all about the love between the two title characters, which is forbidden as the pair come from two families who are sworn enemies. Early in the play, Romeo (a Montague) sneaks into a masquerade ball being held by the Capulets in the hope of meeting a Capulet girl named Rosaline. Instead, he meets and falls for Juliet, also a Capulet. Tragedy ensues …

‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy.
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet.

22 Alaska has the highest one in the U.S.: Abbr. : LAT

The most southerly state in the US is Hawaii, and the most northerly is Alaska. Alaska is also the most westerly state, and believe it or not, it is also the most easterly state. That’s because Alaska’s Aleutian Islands stretch across the 180-degree of longitude into the Eastern Hemisphere.

27 Hesitate (at) : BALK

To balk is to stop and refuse to go on. It’s not just a baseball term …

28 Some cowboy wear : CHAPS

Chaps are leather leggings that are worn when riding a horse. The purpose of the garment is to provide protection for the legs when riding through bushy terrain, perhaps a heavy thicket. The name “chaps” comes from the Spanish name for the leggings, which is “chaparejos” or “chaparreras”. The Spanish term comes from chaparro, a Spanish word that can be used for a low-growing thicket.

29 Make a lead balloon? : RACE AHEAD

Make a lead balloon, grow bigger.

30 Realm in “Frozen” : ARENDELLE

“Frozen” is a 2013 animated feature from Walt Disney Studios that is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Snow Queen”. The film is all about the exploits of Princess Anna, the younger sister of Elsa, Snow Queen of Arendelle. Spoiler alert: Prince Hans of the Southern Isles seems to be a good guy for most of the film, but turns out to be a baddie in the end. And, a snowman named Olaf provides some comic relief.

33 Style points? : STILETTOS

The stiletto knife was developed in Italy, and is a knife intended for thrusting and stabbing as opposed to slashing and cutting. The term “stiletto” comes from the Latin “stilus”, which was a thin pointed writing instrument used in ancient Rome to engrave wax or clay tablets. And, there are also stiletto heels on some women’s shoes, heels that are long and thin.

44 Church address, for short : REV

Reverend (Rev.)

48 Some nobility : DAMES

The title “Dame” in the British system of honors is the female equivalent to “Sir”, as used to address a knight. In days of old, the wife of a knight was given the title of Dame. Since the 17th century, the wife of a knight has been called “Lady”. So now, anyone with the title of Dame has earned the honor in her own right and not through marriage.

50 Subject of the 2021 historical film “Spencer” : DIANA

Charles, Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer in 1981 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. The wedding was a huge television event, with about 750 million people tuning in worldwide. Although the event was billed as the start of a fairytale marriage, the couple separated in 1992 and divorced in 1996. Lady Diana died in a car crash in Paris the following year.

52 Vague response for an E.T.A. : SOON

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

55 “A Black Lady Sketch Show” network : HBO

Home Box Office (HBO) is the oldest continuously-operating pay TV service in the US, having launched in 1972. HBO is a favorite of mine as I really like many of the HBO made-for-television movies and original series. Among the list of original series from HBO are “Mildred Pierce”, “The Pacific”, “John Adams”, “Big Love”, “Extras”, “The Wire”, “Sex and the City”, “From the Earth to the Moon”, “The Sopranos” and “Band of Brothers”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Compress hard : SMUSH
6 Comp. ___ (univ. major) : SCI
9 They’re often paired with nuts : BOLTS
14 Traditional application for a Hindu wedding : HENNA
15 “The Kitchen God’s Wife” novelist, 1991 : TAN
16 Benefit : AVAIL
17 Musical group : ALTOS
18 ___ polymerase : RNA
19 Free : LET GO
20 Sleep aid said to reduce anxiety : WEIGHTED BLANKET
23 “Parasite” co-star ___ Jung-eun : LEE
24 “Word is …” : THEY SAY …
25 Sounds of some pauses : ERS
26 Settle up : PAY THE TAB
28 Name that anagrams to something you might smoke : CRAIG
31 Frequently flooded area : FEN
32 Staggered breathing? : GASPS
36 Some leporids : HARES
37 Item in a husk : OAT
38 Vicar in “Emma” : ELTON
39 Top-notch : ACES
40 ___ Burke, sportscaster and N.B.A. analyst : DORIS
42 A bird, food or person : KIWI
43 Female swan : PEN
44 Office binder? : RED TAPE
46 Ending with play or plate : -LET
47 Get down : SADDEN
49 They might be standing or marching : ORDERS
51 More cover than usual … or what a 20-Across might offer? : HEAVY SECURITY
55 Wheel, so to speak : HELM
56 Little bits : IOTAS
57 What’s the matter? : ATOM
59 Farm unit : BALE
60 French word that becomes its own opposite by changing the first letter to V : NOTRE
61 Canceled : NO-GO
62 Compilation for admiration : ODES
63 Cloud often seen in the summer : GNATS
64 ___ Mob, hip-hop collective from N.Y.C. : ASAP

Down

1 Item often wrapped after it’s purchased : SHAWL
2 Fracas : MELEE
3 Free, in a way : UNTIE
4 Make out, in Manchester : SNOG
5 Pounds on keyboards? : HASHTAGS
6 Eats outside, perhaps : STREET FOOD
7 One might offer a sweet message : CANDY HEART
8 One way to be tried : IN ABSENTIA
9 Hair highlighting technique : BALAYAGE
10 ___-ready : OVEN
11 Round holiday fare : LATKE
12 Fierce, hard-to-control sort : TIGER
13 Coin collectors? : SLOTS
21 “‘Tis but ___ name that is my enemy”: Juliet : THY
22 Alaska has the highest one in the U.S.: Abbr. : LAT
26 Round holiday fare : PIES
27 Hesitate (at) : BALK
28 Some cowboy wear : CHAPS
29 Make a lead balloon? : RACE AHEAD
30 Realm in “Frozen” : ARENDELLE
33 Style points? : STILETTOS
34 Activity with intense, fast-paced posing : POWER YOGA
35 Tempers : SNITS
40 Not admitting : DENYING
41 Mates : SPOUSES
44 Church address, for short : REV
45 Goof : ERR
48 Some nobility : DAMES
50 Subject of the 2021 historical film “Spencer” : DIANA
52 Vague response for an E.T.A. : SOON
53 Blues guitarist Baker : ETTA
54 One in a line outside a store : CART
55 “A Black Lady Sketch Show” network : HBO
58 Unruly head of hair : MOP

5 thoughts on “0805-22 NY Times Crossword 5 Aug 22, Friday”

  1. 20:31. Slow slow slow. I was stymied in both the middle-right and the SW. I’ve never seen Frozen, and didn’t know what a leporid was, so the R in HARES was an educated guess, and the N in PEN was a matter of filling in random letters until I got the jingle, which in the days of pen and paper would have been a one box DNF.

  2. 27:56. Not sure I’ve ever finished a puzzle where I knew less than I did for this one. Long answers saved me – even more than usual.

    Tough one with tough cluing. Tomorrow’s puzzle should be interesting.

    Best –

  3. 33:39 after correcting a one-square error: I had guessed ALTON instead of ELTON, giving me BALA YAGA instead of BALAYAGE. Tough puzzle … 😳.

  4. 35:10
    What’s the matter? ATOM …hilarious.

    From Neil deGrasse Tyson, et al:
    “There’s just no way around this one: YOU MATTER, unless you multiply yourself by the speed of light squared, then YOU ENERGY.”

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