0130-22 NY Times Crossword 30 Jan 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Watch Your Step!

The grid includes five TRAPs, rebus squares containing the letters T-R-A-P:

  • 122A Secret exits represented five times in this puzzle’s grid : TRAPDOORS
  • 22A Grammy for Kendrick Lamar’s “DAMN.” or Cardi B’s “Invasion of Privacy” : BEST RAP ALBUM
  • 4D Scores for placekickers : EXTRA POINTS
  • 46A Sources of music in musicals : ORCHESTRA PITS
  • 14D Circus apparatus : FLYING TRAPEZE
  • 51A Brewing brothers : TRAPPISTS
  • 39D Four-limbed animals : TETRAPODS
  • 96A Marilyn Monroe wore a fuchsia one while singing “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” : STRAPLESS GOWN
  • 75D Rube Goldberg machines, e.g. : CONTRAPTIONS
  • 102A “The Sound of Music” household : VON TRAPP FAMILY
  • 93D Lacking any adulteration : ULTRAPURE

Bill’s time: 19m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

21 Royal figure of sci-fi : LEIA

Princess Leia is Luke Skywalker’s twin sister in the original “Star Wars” trilogy and was played by Carrie Fisher. Carrie Fisher has stated that she hated the famous “cinnamon bun hairstyle” that she had to wear in the films, as she felt it made her face look too round. She also had to sit for two hours every day just to get her hair styled. Two hours to get your hair done? It takes me just two seconds …

22 Grammy for Kendrick Lamar’s “DAMN.” or Cardi B’s “Invasion of Privacy” : BEST RAP ALBUM

The first Grammy Awards ceremony was held in 1959 and focused on recognizing outstanding achievement in the recording industry. The idea of a Grammy Award came up when recording executives were working on the Hollywood Walk of Fame project in the fifties. These executives concluded that there were many people in the recording industry deserving of accolades but who would probably never make it to the Walk of Fame. As a result, they founded the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. The Academy considered naming the award the “Eddies” after Thomas Edison, but then opted for “Grammy” after Edison’s invention: the gramophone.

27 Moving toward equilibrium, in biology : OSMOSING

Osmosis is the movement of a solvent (often water) across a semipermeable membrane. In the process of osmosis, the solvent tends to flow from an area of less concentration to an area of higher concentration. This sense of absorbing water effortlessly gives rise to the expression “learning by osmosis”.

29 Legerdemain : TRICKS

“Legerdemain” is a term used for “sleight of hand”, the set of techniques used by magicians to manipulate objects such as cards or coins. The term comes from the Middle French “léger de main” that translates as “light of hand”.

31 Horse color : ROAN

A roan horse has an even mixture of white and colored hairs on the body with the head, lower legs, mane and tail having a more solid color.

34 Prepares for a Ms. Olympia competition, say : OILS UP

The Ms. Olympia contest is a women’s bodybuilding competition that was first held in 1980.

41 Insect with distinctive pincers : EARWIG

The insect known as the earwig may have gotten its name from the mistaken belief that it burrowed into the human brain via the ear canal in order to lay its eggs in the brain.

45 Subj. for some future bilinguals : ESL

English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

54 Capital of Japan’s Hyogo Prefecture : KOBE

Kobe is a port city on the island of Honshu in Japan. Here in North America, the city of Kobe is perhaps most famous for its beef. And yes, basketball star Kobe Bryant was named after that very same beef.

59 Second-rate : TWO-BIT

The American quarter is a little unusual in the world of decimal currency, if you think about it. Most currencies have a “20-cent” coin, which is easier to work with mathematically. The US went for the quarter in deference to the practice of dividing Spanish Milled Dollars into eight wedge-shaped “bits”. That’s also why the quarter is sometimes referred to as “two bits”. We’ve been using the adjective “two-bit” to mean “cheap, tawdry” at least since 1929. State quarters were introduced in 1999.

63 Loop trains : ELS

Elevated railroad (El)

The historic commercial center of Chicago is known as the Loop. One theory is that the “loop” got its name from the cable loops in the city’s old cable car system. An alternative theory is that the term only arose with the construction of the elevated railway “loop” that forms the hub of the city’s “L” system.

64 Hornswoggle : ROOK

To rook is to cheat. The earlier use of “rook” as a noun was as a disparaging term describing a swindler or cheat. Somehow, it was insulting to refer to a person as a rook, as in the type of bird.

69 Luxury Hyundai : AZERA

“Azera” was the name used worldwide for the Hyundai model known as the “Grandeur” in its homeland of South Korea. The Azera was produced from 1986 to 1992.

77 One using cloves or garlic : SPICER

Cloves are the flower buds of the tree Syzygium aromaticum. Until a couple of centuries ago, clove trees were only found in the Maluku Islands in Indonesia. Because they were a rich source of cloves, mace and nutmeg, the Moluccas were referred to historically as the Spice Islands.

Our word “garlic” evolved via Old English from “gar” (spear) and “leac” (leek). The use of “spear” is apparently a reference to the shape of a clove.

83 Hairstyle protectors : DO-RAGS

Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags (also “durags”) today, but they have been around for centuries. The etymology of “do-rag” is pretty evident, i.e. a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place.

85 Tabbouleh topping : TAHINI

“Tahini” is the Arabic name for a paste made from ground sesame seeds. Tahini is a major ingredient in hummus, one of my favorite dishes.

Tabbouleh is a Middle Eastern dish made from tomatoes, and chopped parsley, mint, bulgur and onion, along with olive oil, lemon juice and salt. The name “tabbouleh” comes from the Arabic “taabil” meaning “seasoning”. I love tabbouleh …

89 Kind of test : DNA

DNA was first isolated in 1869 by Swiss physician and biologist Friedrich Miescher. The molecular structure of DNA was identified in 1953, by the American and British team of James Watson and Francis Crick.

92 Recipe unit : ONE CUP

The Latin “recipere” means “to take”, and the imperative form “recipe” was written at the top of medical prescriptions as an instruction, i.e. “take (the following)”. This use of “recipe” evolved into the instruction for preparing a dish of food in the mid-1700s.

95 Goddess in a peacock-drawn chariot : HERA

In Greek mythology, Hera was the wife of Zeus and the goddess of women, marriage, family and childbirth. She was noted for her jealous and vengeful nature, particularly against those who vied for the affections of her husband. The equivalent character to Hera in Roman mythology was Juno. Hera was the daughter of Cronus and Rhea.

96 Marilyn Monroe wore a fuchsia one while singing “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” : STRAPLESS GOWN

“Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” is a song from the musical “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”, and the 1953 film of the same name starring Marilyn Monroe. When Monroe sings the song in the film, it is her own voice that we are hearing. Well, almost … the soprano Marni Nixon dubs in some of the high notes for her.

99 Beverage that was a medieval source of nutrition : ALE

So, medieval times weren’t all bad …

101 Literary protagonist raised by wolves : MOWGLI

“The Jungle Book” by Rudyard Kipling was originally published in 1894, and is a collection of adventure stories or fables featuring the animals of the jungle and a young boy named Mowgli. Baloo is a sloth bear that teaches the cubs of a wolf pack the Law of the Jungle. Baloo’s most challenging pupil however is no lupine, but rather the man-cub Mowgli.

102 “The Sound of Music” household : VON TRAPP FAMILY

Baron Georg Johannes von Trapp was an officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy who achieved worldwide fame when his family became the inspiration for the musical “The Sound of Musical”.

105 “Horned” creature : TOAD

Horny toads (also called “horned toads”) aren’t toads at all. “Horny toad” is a familiar name for the desert horned lizard, a species of lizard native to the western US. It does look somewhat like a toad though, as it has a very flat and wide body.

110 Apelike : SIMIAN

“Simian” means “pertaining to monkeys or apes”, from the Latin word “simia” meaning “ape”.

112 University of Montana city : MISSOULA

Missoula, Montana is home to the University of Montana. Missoula was the birthplace of Jeannette Rankin, who became the first woman to hold high government office when she was elected to the US congress in 1916. Mike Mansfield was another famous Missoula resident, the longest-serving Majority Leader in the history of the US Senate.

115 Weasel word? : POP

“Pop! Goes the Weasel” is an English nursery rhyme, and a relatively young one that probably dates back only to the mid-1800s. No one really knows for certain the significance of the “pop” or the “weasel”.

118 ___ Fielding, co-host of “The Great British Bake Off” beginning in 2017 : NOEL

“The Great British Bake Off” is a television baking competition introduced by the BBC in the UK in 2010. The show was a phenomenal and perhaps surprising success almost immediately. “Bake Off” is rebroadcast in the US by PBS as “The Great British Baking Show”. There was great controversy in the UK in 2016 when the BBC couldn’t find the fund to pay the producers for the show, and so it had moved to a new channel, with a new set of hosts. The BBC hosts decided not to move with the show, saying they weren’t interested in the “dough” (their pun!).

125 “Bus Stop” playwright : INGE

“Bus Stop” is a marvelous play written by William Inge in 1955. The famous 1956 movie of the same name, starring Marilyn Monroe, is only very loosely based on the play.

126 Camping shelter : LEAN-TO

By definition, a lean-to is a building in which the rafters lean against the wall of another building. A lean-to shelter has a similar appearance, although it is free-standing. The shelter has a single-pitched roof and only three walls.

127 Advocates : ESPOUSES

To espouse is to take in marriage. We have used the extended meaning of “to give one’s support to” since the 1600s.

128 Romanov ruler : TSAR

The House of Romanov was the second and last imperial dynasty to rule over Russia, after the Rurik dynasty. The reign of the Romanovs ended when Emperor Nicholas II abdicated following the February Revolution of 1917. Famously, Nicholas II and his immediate family were murdered soon after he stepped down, and other members of the Romanov Dynasty were sent into exile by the Bolsheviks.

Down

1 Twins, e.g., for short : SIBS

A sibling (sib) is a member of a family (fam).

2 Site with tech tutorials : C|NET

c|net is an excellent technology website. c|net started out in 1994 as a television network specializing in technology news. The host of “American Idol”, Ryan Seacrest, started off his career as host of a c|net show.

5 Mental health org. : APA

American Psychiatric Association (APA)

6 They’re thumped at supermarkets : MELONS

Melons are plants with edible, fleshy fruits that are usually sweet. The fruit of a melon is actually a berry.

11 OB/GYNs, e.g. : DRS

Obstetrics and gynecology (Ob-Gyn)

14 Circus apparatus : FLYING TRAPEZE

The circus act known as the “trapeze” is so called because the shape defined by the crossbar, ropes and ceiling of the tent is a “trapezium”.

16 “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” sounds : OINKS

There was an old American version of the English children’s song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” (E-I-E-I-O) that was around in the days of WWI. The first line of the older US version goes “Old MacDougal had a farm, in Ohio-i-o”.

17 N.Y.C. retailer with a famed holiday window display : SAKS

Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide.

19 Rum ___ Tugger (cat in “Cats”) : TUM

Rum Tum Tugger is one of the characters in T. S. Eliot’s “Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats”. Rum Tum Tugger also appears in Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “Cats”, the musical based on Eliot’s book. In the musical, Rum Tum Tugger’s persona was written as a homage to Mick Jagger of the Rolling Stones. So, the character tends to strut around the stage a lot.

28 [someone else’s error] : [SIC]

[Sic] indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

30 Cause chaos : RAISE HAVOC

Havoc is great damage or destruction. The term “havoc” comes from the Anglo-French phrase “crier havok”, which was an order given in the late 1500s to soldiers, instructing them to seize plunder.

37 Only person to win an Oscar, Emmy and Tony in the same year (1973) : FOSSE

Bob Fosse won more Tony Awards for choreography than anyone else, a grand total of eight (and another Tony for direction). Fosse also won an Oscar for Best Director for the 1972 movie “Cabaret”, even beating out the formidable Francis Ford Coppola who was nominated that same year for “The Godfather”.

40 “Raiders of the Lost Ark” biter : ASP

“Raiders of the Lost Ark” is, in my humble opinion, the best of the Indiana Jones franchise of movies. This first Indiana Jones film was released in 1981, produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. Harrison Ford was Spielberg’s first choice to play the lead, but Lucas resisted as he was concerned that he would be too closely associated with the actor (as Ford played Han Solo in “Star Wars”, and also appeared in Lucas’s “American Graffiti”). Tom Selleck was offered the role but he couldn’t get out of his commitments to “Magnum, P.I.” Eventually Spielberg got his way and Ford was hired, a good thing I say …

42 Plato’s P : RHO

Rho is the Greek letter that looks just like our Roman letter “p”, although it is equivalent to the Roman letter R. It is the 17th letter in the Greek alphabet.

43 Halloween decorations that can be made with cotton balls : WEBS

All Saints’ Day is November 1st each year. The day before All Saints’ Day is All Hallows’ Eve, better known by the Scottish term “Halloween”.

46 Heavy metal’s “Prince of Darkness” : OSBOURNE

English singer Ozzy Osbourne became famous in the seventies as the lead singer of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. His level of success soared again in the early 2000s when he appeared in an MTV reality show called “The Osbournes”, along with his wife Sharon and two of his three children, Kelly and Jack. Ozzy and Sharon’s eldest child, Aimee, refused to sign up for the show, opting instead for some level of privacy.

47 “Am ___ only one?” : I THE

Nope …

53 A.L. East squad: Abbr. : TOR

The Toronto Blue Jays baseball franchise was founded in 1977. The Blue Jays are the only team based outside the US to have won a World Series, doing so in 1992 and 1993. And since the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, the Blue Jays are the only Major League Baseball team now headquartered outside of the US.

68 Traffic control org. : DEA

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

70 Disco ___ (iconic garment for Lady Gaga) : BRA

“Lady Gaga” is the stage name of Stefani Germanotta. Germanotta is a big fan of the band Queen, and she took her stage name from the marvelous Queen song titled “Radio Ga Ga”.

71 “Chandelier” singer, 2014 : SIA

“Sia” is the stage name of Australian singer Sia Furler from Adelaide. She is a cousin of Australian Christian Rock musician Peter Furler. Sia is a very private person, and even covers her face with a blond wig while performing.

73 Longtime record label : RCA

RCA was founded in 1919 as the Radio Corporation of America, and as a wholly-owned subsidiary of General Electric (GE). GE divested RCA in 1932, and then reacquired the company in 1986. Today, RCA is just a brand name.

75 Rube Goldberg machines, e.g. : CONTRAPTIONS

Rube Goldberg was a cartoonist, engineer and inventor who became famous for designing overly-complicated gadgets to perform the simplest of tasks. Goldberg produced a famous series of cartoons depicting such designs. Such was the success of his work, the Merriam-Webster dictionary accepted the phrase “Rube Goldberg” as an adjective in 1931, an adjective meaning “accomplishing something simple through complex means”.

76 Like some vaccines : ORAL

A vaccine used to be a modified virus administered to an individual to stimulate the immune system into developing immunity, until RNA vaccines were introduced to combat COVID-19. British physician Edward Jenner came up with the first vaccine, injecting people with the cowpox virus in order to prevent smallpox. The term “vaccination” comes from the Latin “vaccinus” meaning “from cows”, with “vacca” translating as “cow”.

78 A, in Berlin : EIN

Berlin is the capital of Germany. It is the nation’s largest city, and is the second-most populous city in the European Union (after London).

81 Expansive work of art, usually : MURAL

A mural is a painting that is applied directly to a wall or a ceiling. The term “mural” comes from the Latin “murus” meaning “wall”.

82 Disreputable : SEAMY

We’ve used “seamy” to mean “the least pleasant, the worst” since the 1600s. The idea comes from the seamed side of a sewn garment being the less attractive.

84 Annual Austin festival, familiarly : SXSW

South by Southwest, also known as “SXSW”, is an annual festival that has been taking place in Austin, Texas since 1987. SXSW is a melded event, combining a music festival, a film festival and an interactive festival.

91 One being coddled, maybe : EGG

The word “coddle” means to boil gently, as in “coddle an egg”. “Coddle” was first used to mean “treat tenderly” by Jane Austen. Austen introduced the extended usage in her masterpiece “Emma”.

98 Small Nintendo console, once : WII MINI

The Wii mini is a smaller version of the incredibly successful Wii gaming console that was released in 2012.

100 Spring month in France : MAI

In French, the month of “mai” (May) is in the season of “printemps” (spring).

102 ___ 1, Yuri Gagarin’s spacecraft : VOSTOK

Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space when his spacecraft Vostok I made a single orbit of the Earth in 1961. Sadly, Gagarin died only seven years later in a plane crash.

106 Sign of resistance : OMEGA

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

108 Some bank deposits : SILTS

Today, we mostly think of silt as a deposit of sediment in a river. Back in the mid-1400s, silt was sediment deposited by seawater. It is thought that the word “silt” is related to “salt”, as found in seawater.

111 Pelicans’ home, informally : NOLA

The New Orleans Hornets joined the NBA in 1988 as an expansion team, originally based in Charlotte, North Carolina. The team was going to be called the Charlotte Spirit, but the name was changed following a “name the team” contest run in the local area. During the Revolutionary War, Lord General Cornwallis had referred to Charlotte as a “veritable nest of hornets” due the city’s resistance to British occupation, which explains the local fans’ fondness for the name “Hornets”. The franchise was moved to New Orleans for the 2002 season, as attendance wasn’t big enough to sustain the team in Charlotte. The team had to play two seasons in Oklahoma City due to damage caused by Hurricane Katrina, and played as the New Orleans/Oklahoma City Hornets. After several years back in New Orleans, the franchise was renamed to the Pelicans, a nod to the Brown Pelican that is the Louisiana state bird.

114 Girl in a tartan : LASS

“Tartan” is sometimes called “plaid” over here in the US, and is a word not used in the same sense outside of this country. In Scotland, a plaid is a blanket or a tartan cloth slung over the shoulder.

120 March Madness “trophy” : NET

“March Madness” is the name given to the NCAA Men’s Division 1 Basketball Championship (among others), that is held in the spring each year. Another name is “the Big Dance”.

121 Road goo : TAR

The terms “tarmac” and “macadam” are short for “tarmacadam”. In the 1800s, Scotsman John Loudon McAdam developed a style of road known as “macadam”. Macadam had a top-layer of crushed stone and gravel laid over larger stones. The macadam also had a convex cross-section so that water tended to drain to the sides. In 1901, a significant improvement was made by English engineer Edgar Purnell Hooley who introduced tar into the macadam, improving the resistance to water damage and practically eliminating dust. The “tar-penetration macadam” is the basis of what we now call “tarmac”.

123 Maliciously reveal personal info about online : DOX

Doxing (also “doxxing”) is the publishing of private information about someone on the Internet with the intention of doing harm or causing embarrassment. The term “doxing” is slang, and comes from “dox”, an accepted abbreviation for “documents”.

124 “Mais ___!” : OUI

“Mais oui!” translates from French as “But yes!”

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Rock subgenre named for its vocal aesthetic : SCREAMO
8 Like some space-saving beds : FOLD-UP
14 Styles that are picked, informally : ‘FROS
18 Amateur : INEXPERT
20 Disinclined (to) : AVERSE
21 Royal figure of sci-fi : LEIA
22 Grammy for Kendrick Lamar’s “DAMN.” or Cardi B’s “Invasion of Privacy” : BEST RAP ALBUM
24 Shuts down : CEASES
25 American, abroad : YANK
26 Apt name for a worrier : STU
27 Moving toward equilibrium, in biology : OSMOSING
29 Legerdemain : TRICKS
31 Horse color : ROAN
34 Prepares for a Ms. Olympia competition, say : OILS UP
36 Tiny foragers : ANTS
37 “Here’s an example …” : FOR INSTANCE …
41 Insect with distinctive pincers : EARWIG
44 Without stop : ON END
45 Subj. for some future bilinguals : ESL
46 Sources of music in musicals : ORCHESTRA PITS
50 Splinter group : SECT
51 Brewing brothers : TRAPPISTS
54 Capital of Japan’s Hyogo Prefecture : KOBE
55 It might be broken in overtime : TIE
56 Waits to publish, as an article : SITS ON
59 Second-rate : TWO-BIT
61 Pronoun pairing : SHE/HER
63 Loop trains : ELS
64 Hornswoggle : ROOK
67 De-creased : IRONED
69 Luxury Hyundai : AZERA
70 “Still da ___” (Trina title track of 2008) : BADDEST
72 Fluster : UNNERVE
74 Kind of squash : ACORN
77 One using cloves or garlic : SPICER
79 What gets filled at a shell station? : TACO
80 Monthly condition, for short : PMS
83 Hairstyle protectors : DO-RAGS
85 Tabbouleh topping : TAHINI
87 Build, as interest : ACCRUE
89 Kind of test : DNA
90 Board figure, informally : EXEC
92 Recipe unit : ONE CUP
95 Goddess in a peacock-drawn chariot : HERA
96 Marilyn Monroe wore a fuchsia one while singing “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” : STRAPLESS GOWN
99 Beverage that was a medieval source of nutrition : ALE
100 ___ President : MADAM
101 Literary protagonist raised by wolves : MOWGLI
102 “The Sound of Music” household : VON TRAPP FAMILY
105 “Horned” creature : TOAD
107 Turn one’s back on : DISOWN
109 Laces (into) : RIPS
110 Apelike : SIMIAN
112 University of Montana city : MISSOULA
115 Weasel word? : POP
118 ___ Fielding, co-host of “The Great British Bake Off” beginning in 2017 : NOEL
119 Suffering from a losing streak, in poker slang : ON TILT
122 Secret exits represented five times in this puzzle’s grid : TRAPDOORS
125 “Bus Stop” playwright : INGE
126 Camping shelter : LEAN-TO
127 Advocates : ESPOUSES
128 Romanov ruler : TSAR
129 Vulnerable : AT RISK
130 Most likely to inspire “thirst” : SEXIEST

Down

1 Twins, e.g., for short : SIBS
2 Site with tech tutorials : C|NET
3 Gets out of a grave situation? : RESURRECTS
4 Scores for placekickers : EXTRA POINTS
5 Mental health org. : APA
6 They’re thumped at supermarkets : MELONS
7 Balls : ORBS
8 Overly simplistic : FACILE
9 Bake-off equipment : OVENS
10 Major-___ (pro ballplayer) : LEAGUER
11 OB/GYNs, e.g. : DRS
12 Application : USE
13 Royal pain : PEST
14 Circus apparatus : FLYING TRAPEZE
15 Laugh or cry, say : REACT
16 “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” sounds : OINKS
17 N.Y.C. retailer with a famed holiday window display : SAKS
19 Rum ___ Tugger (cat in “Cats”) : TUM
23 Like a romantic evening stroll, perhaps : MOONLIT
28 [someone else’s error] : [SIC]
30 Cause chaos : RAISE HAVOC
33 “That’s it?” : AND?
35 Camping shelter : PACK TENT
37 Only person to win an Oscar, Emmy and Tony in the same year (1973) : FOSSE
38 Kitty ___, stunt performer once known as the “fastest woman in the world” : O’NEIL
39 Four-limbed animals : TETRAPODS
40 “Raiders of the Lost Ark” biter : ASP
42 Plato’s P : RHO
43 Halloween decorations that can be made with cotton balls : WEBS
46 Heavy metal’s “Prince of Darkness” : OSBOURNE
47 “Am ___ only one?” : I THE
48 Level : TIER
49 Some skin-care products : SERA
52 Power up : SWITCH ON
53 A.L. East squad: Abbr. : TOR
57 Slice, for one : ORANGE SODA
58 Give the ___ : NOD
60 Stopover : INN
66 Put on ice : KEPT COLD
68 Traffic control org. : DEA
70 Disco ___ (iconic garment for Lady Gaga) : BRA
71 “Chandelier” singer, 2014 : SIA
73 Longtime record label : RCA
74 Annexes : ADDS
75 Rube Goldberg machines, e.g. : CONTRAPTIONS
76 Like some vaccines : ORAL
78 A, in Berlin : EIN
80 Incline : PREDISPOSE
81 Expansive work of art, usually : MURAL
82 Disreputable : SEAMY
84 Annual Austin festival, familiarly : SXSW
86 “This is too much” : I CANNOT
88 One to be dethroned : CHAMP
91 One being coddled, maybe : EGG
93 Lacking any adulteration : ULTRAPURE
94 Zing : PEP
97 One who may have attachment issues? : EMAILER
98 Small Nintendo console, once : WII MINI
100 Spring month in France : MAI
102 ___ 1, Yuri Gagarin’s spacecraft : VOSTOK
103 Cries in a tattoo parlor : OWS
104 Frothy coffee invented in Greece : FRAPPE
106 Sign of resistance : OMEGA
108 Some bank deposits : SILTS
110 Foul mood : SNIT
111 Pelicans’ home, informally : NOLA
114 Girl in a tartan : LASS
116 Miner discoveries : ORES
117 Relative of “Hey!” : PSST!
120 March Madness “trophy” : NET
121 Road goo : TAR
123 Maliciously reveal personal info about online : DOX
124 “Mais ___!” : OUI

10 thoughts on “0130-22 NY Times Crossword 30 Jan 22, Sunday”

  1. 36:47. Early on I had TRAPP family, not thinking a Sunday would have a rebus. What do I know?? Placekickers have FGS – and that’s what stayed in 4D for a long time. Finally realizing a rebus make it then go more smoothly. Kind of surprised at the clue for 80A

  2. 32:28, no errors. Enjoyable challenge for me. Just enough crosses to bridge the gaps in my knowledge base.
    22A: love the oxymoron!

    1. The dash answers complete the clue above when combined with “trap”. For 32 down, it completes the answer to clue 4 down, “Ex(trap)oints – extra points.

  3. Finally got to this.
    No errors.. long slog.

    PACK TENT? never heard it used as a “SHELTER”. Hmmm

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