0913-20 NY Times Crossword 13 Sep 20, Sunday

Constructed by: MaryEllen Uthlaut
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Final Offer

Themed answers are each common phrases with a FINAL -ER taken OFF:

  • 23A Always glad to be seated in the back of the boat? : HAPPILY EVER AFT (from “happily ever after”)
  • 28A Perfectly placed “Batman” punch? : ABSOLUTE POW (from “absolute power”)
  • 50A Penny going through the wash once again? : RECYCLING CENT (from “recycling center”)
  • 56A Soup served at the church social? : AMEN BROTH (from “Amen, brother”)
  • 77A Afternoon gatherings of Mensa? : BRAIN TEAS (from “brain teaser”)
  • 85A Having no feeling in one’s texting hand? : CELL PHONE NUMB (from “cell phone number”)
  • 103A Ad for heartburn medication? : RELIEF PITCH (from “relief pitcher”)
  • 115A “Quit your snickering, Damon!”? : NO LAUGHING, MATT (from “no laughing matter”)

Bill’s time: 19m 44s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Unit of current : AMP

The unit of electric current is the ampere, which is abbreviated correctly to “A” rather than “amp”. It is named after French physicist André-Marie Ampère, one of the main scientists responsible for the discovery of electromagnetism.

8 Developer of 1982’s E.T., a video game so bad that hundreds of thousands of unsold cartridges were secretly buried in a New Mexico landfill : ATARI

Back in 1983, it was rumored that Atari buried a huge stash of unsold video games in a New Mexico landfill. The game in question was called “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”, widely panned as perhaps the worst video game ever produced. Partly because the burial took place close to the site of the Roswell UFO incident, and also because Atari denied that the event ever occurred, the destruction of the games became somewhat of an urban legend.

20 ___ People’s Democratic Republic : LAO

The official name for the country of Laos is the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. In the Lao language, the country’s name is “Meuang Lao”. The French ruled Laos as part of French Indochina, having united three separate Lao kingdoms. As there was a plural of “Lao” entities united into one, the French added the “S” and so today we tend to use “Laos” instead of “Lao”.

21 Classic actress Sophia : LOREN

Sophia Loren certainly has earned her exalted position in the world of movies. In 1962 Loren won an Oscar for Best Actress for her role in the Italian film “Two Women”, marking the first actress to win an Academy Award for a non-English speaking performance. She received a second nomination for Best Actress for her role in “Marriage Italian-Style”, another Italian-language movie, released in 1964.

22 Lacking freshness : OLD HAT

The use of “old hat” to mean something “out of date, stale” started about 1911. Before that, the term “old hat” meant something very different, and very vulgar. “Old hat” was the name given to a very private part of the female anatomy, the idea being that it was “often felt” (as in a “felt hat”). I just don’t know what to say …

26 Printed cotton fabric : CALICO

In North America, calico is a brightly printed cloth made from cotton material. Over on the other side of the Atlantic, calico is a plain white cotton cloth.

28 Perfectly placed “Batman” punch? : ABSOLUTE POW (from “absolute power”)

The television show “Batman” aired from 1966-1968. Burt Ward played Robin opposite Adam West’s Batman. Supposedly, Burt Ward was offered the part taken by Dustin Hoffman in “The Graduate”, but Ward couldn’t get out of his contract for the “Batman” television series. Holy xxxx, Batman!

40 Part of New York City’s Museum Mile, with “the” : MET

New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art (“the Met”) was founded in 1870 by a group of private citizens. The current museum is huge, with 2 million square feet of floor space.

43 Charlatans : PHONIES

A charlatan is someone who makes false claims of skill or knowledge. “Charlatan” is a word we imported from French, although the original derivation is the Italian “ciarlatano”, a term meaning “quack”.

46 “Catch you later!” : ADIOS!

The term “adiós” is Spanish for “goodbye”. “Adiós” comes from the phrase “a Dios vos acomiendo” meaning “I commend you to God”.

47 Buddhist temple structure : PAGODA

Pagodas are tiered (“storied”) towers found in various parts of Asia that are usually built for religious purposes.

50 Penny going through the wash once again? : RECYCLING CENT (from “recycling center”)

The official name of our smallest denomination coin is “cent”, and our use of the word “penny” is just a colloquialism derived from the British coin of the same name. In the UK, the plural of penny is “pence”, whereas we have “pennies” in our pockets.

54 Epson product : INK

Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, and one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (with “EP” standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

65 Grape-Nuts maker : POST

C. W. Post decided to get into the cereal business after visiting the Battle Creek Sanitarium operated by John Harvey Kellogg. Post was interested in the chemistry of digestion and was inspired by the dietary products offered by Kellogg at his sanitarium. The first breakfast cereal Post introduced was Grape-Nuts, way back in 1897.

66 Ark groupings : TWOS

Genesis 6:19-20 states that Noah was instructed to take two animals of every kind into the ark. Later, in Genesis 7:2-3 Noah was instructed to take on board “every clean animal by sevens … male and female, to keep offspring alive on the face of all the earth”. Apparently, “extras” (7 rather than 2) were needed for ritual sacrifice.

68 Feudal workers : SERFS

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

77 Afternoon gatherings of Mensa? : BRAIN TEAS (from “brain teaser”)

If you ever learned Latin, “mensa” was probably taught to you in lesson one as it’s the word commonly used as an example of a first declension noun. Mensa means “table”. The Mensa organization, for folks with high IQs, was set up in Oxford, England back in 1946. To become a member, you have to have an IQ that is in the top 2% of the population.

81 Force at sea : ARMADA

The most famous armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England in order to overthrow Queen Elizabeth I in 1588. It failed in its mission, partly due to bad weather encountered en route. Ironically, the English mounted a similar naval attack against Spain the following year, and it failed as well.

83 Monk’s title : FRA

The title “Fra” (brother) is used to address Italian monks.

89 Assumed name : ANONYM

An anonym is a person whose name is not given, one who retains “anonymity”.

90 One of the so-called “Three Crowns of Florence,” along with Petrarch and Boccaccio : DANTE

Dante Alighieri (usually just “Dante”) was an Italian poet of the Middle Ages. Dante’s “Divine Comedy” is widely considered to be the greatest literary work ever written in the Italian language. Dante actually gave his masterpiece the title “Comedy” (“Commedia” in Italian). Written in the early 1300s, none of Dante’s original “Comedy” manuscripts survive. Three copies made by author and poet Giovanni Boccaccio in the 1360s do survive. Boccaccio changed the title to “Divine Comedy” (“Divina Commedia”), and that title persists to this day.

100 Party tray meat : SALAMI

“Salame” (note the letter E at the end) is an Italian sausage that is traditionally associated with the peasant classes. The meat in the sausage is preserved with salt, and it can be hung and stored for as long as ten years. The name “salame” comes from “sale”, the Italian word for salt, and “-ame”, a suffix indicating a collective noun. Our English word “salami” is actually the Italian plural for “salame”.

114 State you’ll never get to : UTOPIA

The word “Utopia” was coined by Sir Thomas More in his book “Utopia” published in 1516 to describe an idyllic fictional island in the Atlantic Ocean. More’s use of the name Utopia comes from the Greek “ou” meaning “not” and “topos” meaning “place”. By calling his perfect island “Not Place”, More was apparently making the point that he didn’t think that the ideal could actually exist.

115 “Quit your snickering, Damon!”? : NO LAUGHING, MATT (from “no laughing matter”)

Matt Damon is an actor and screenwriter from Cambridge, Massachusetts. Damon’s big break came with the 1997 movie “Good Will Hunting”, in which he starred. He co-wrote the screenplay with his childhood friend Ben Affleck.

117 Hitting the floppy disk icon, say : SAVING

I don’t think my kids really know what a floppy disk is. A floppy disk is made up of a thin and flexible magnetic material that can store data, enclosed in a protective case. I’ve used 8-inch floppies in my time, and many 5.25-inch floppy disks. Until fairly recently, I had a desktop that would take 3.5-inch disks, although I think the last 3.5-inch floppy disappeared from the house several years ago …

118 Islamic rulers : EMIRS

An emir is a prince or chieftain, one most notably from the Middle East in Islamic countries. In English, “emir” can also be written variously as “emeer, amir, ameer” (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

119 Hill resident : ANT

Anthills are actually underground nests. The ants in the colony excavate below ground, resulting in a pile of sand or soil above ground.

120 Soup pod : OKRA

The plant known as okra is mainly grown for its edible green pods. The pods are said to resemble “ladies’ fingers”, which is an alternative name for the plant. Okra is known as “ngombo” in Bantu, a name that might give us the word “gumbo”, the name for the name of the southern Louisiana stew that includes okra as a key ingredient.

121 Dangerous fly : TSETSE

Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name “tsetse” comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as “fly”. Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as “sleeping sickness”. Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

122 Dividing membranes : SEPTA

In the world of anatomy, a septum (plural “septa”) is a dividing wall within a chamber or other structure. For example, the interatrial septum separates the left and right atria of the heart, and the nasal septum separates the nostrils of the nose.

Down

1 Labor-regulating org. : OSHA

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

6 Yucatán natives : MAYAS

The Maya civilization held sway in Central America and Mexico from about 350 AD, until the arrival of the Spanish in the 1500s.

Yucatán is one of Mexico’s 31 states and is located in the east of the country, on the northern tip of the Yucatán peninsula.

9 ___ Bora, area of Afghanistan : TORA

The famous cave that almost certainly housed Osama Bin Laden for a while was in Tora Bora in eastern Pakistan. Tora Bora is not far (~ 30 mi) from what used to be an even more famous spot, the Khyber Pass. “Tora Bora” is a Pashto name which translates to “black dust”.

11 Foul rulers : REFS

Back in the early 17th century, a referee was someone who examined patent applications. We started using the same term for a person presiding over a sporting event in the 1820s. “Referee” is a derivative of the verb “to refer”, and literally describes someone who has the authority to make a decision by “referring to” a book, archive etc.

13 Start of a magician’s phrase : HOCUS …

There appears to be a lot of speculation about the origin of the magician’s phrase “hocus pocus”, but nothing stands out to me as being very definitive.

15 Waited at a red light, say : IDLED

The first traffic lights date back to 1868 when they were installed outside the Houses of Parliament in London. They resembled the signals already in use for trains, with semaphore arms and red and green gas lamps for nighttime use. That first system was operated manually, by a policeman at the base. Sadly, one police officer was killed just one year after the light’s installation, when the gas system exploded.

16 FedEx, maybe : SHIP

FedEx began operations in 1973 as Federal Express, but now operates very successfully under it’s more catchy, abbreviated name. Headquartered in Memphis with its “SuperHub” at Memphis International Airport, FedEx is the world’s largest airline in terms of tons of freight flown. And due to the presence of FedEx, Memphis Airport has the largest-volume cargo operation of any airport worldwide.

25 Sanskrit scripture : VEDA

The Vedas are a body of ancient Indian texts, the oldest Hindu scriptures. The word “véda” is Sanskrit, and means “knowledge, wisdom”.

Sanskrit is an Indo-Aryan language and one of the 22 scheduled languages of India. Sanskrit has a rich tradition and is the language in which many historical and religious texts are written. There aren’t many speakers of the language today although efforts are underway to revive spoken Sanskrit.

31 Get out of Dodge, so to speak : EVACUATE

The phrase “get out of Dodge”, meaning “scram, flee”, is a reference to Dodge City, Kansas. The phrase became a cliché on TV westerns (mainly “Gunsmoke”, I think) and was then popularized by teenagers in the sixties and seventies.

33 Caustic compound : PHENOL

Phenol is also known as carbolic acid. Phenol can be used as an embalming fluid, although more usually bodies are embalmed using formaldehyde. Injections of phenol were used extensively by the Nazis during the WWII particularly in concentration camps, as a means of execution.

37 Latin clarifier : ID EST

“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

38 Easy-to-bend metal : TIN

The Latin word for tin is “stannum”, and so tin’s atomic symbol is “Sn”. One of the ores used as a source of tin is “stannite”.

39 Greek vowel : IOTA

Iota is the ninth letter in the Greek alphabet, and one that gave rise to our letters I and J. We use the word “iota” to portray something very small, as it is the smallest of all Greek letters.

42 Dash gauge : TACH

The tachometer takes its name from the Greek word “tachos” meaning “speed”. A tachometer in a car measures engine revolutions per minute (rpm).

Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a board placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from “dashing” against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hoofs of the horses. Quite interesting …

47 Digital passcodes : PINS

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then “PIN number” is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then “ATM machine” is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

49 ___ snake : GARTER

The garter snake is found right across the continent, It is in fact the most widely distributed genus of reptile in North America, being found anywhere from Southeast Alaska to Central America.

51 Japanese city where Lexus is headquartered : NAGOYA

Nagoya is the third-largest city in Japan. It is a port city on the island of Honshu. Nagoya is home to many large manufacturing operations, including Mitsubishi Aircraft Company and the Lexus division of Toyota.

52 Classic muscle cars : GTOS

The initialism “GTO” was used on several touring cars (including a famous Pontiac) and stands for “Gran Turismo Omologato”. Italian car manufacturers started the tradition of calling their luxury performance cars “Gran Turismo”, and calling those cars they approved for racing “Gran Turismo Omologato”. The phrase “gran turismo omologato” translates as “grand touring homologated”, “homologated” being a technical term signifying official approval.

53 Cards with the most pips : TENS

A pip is a dot on a die or a domino, or a mark on a playing card.

57 Bread : MOOLAH

Lettuce, cabbage, kale, dough, bread, scratch, cheddar, simoleons, clams and moola(h) are all slang terms for money.

67 Cowardly sort : WIMP

Our term “wimp”, describing a “timid person”, is probably an alteration of “whimper”, the sound that such an individual might make.

70 Units of distance in physics : FERMIS

A femtometer is 10 to the power of -15 meters, and can also be called a “fermi”, in honor of physicist Enrico Fermi.

75 Drinks usually drunk with straws : MALTS

Walgreens claims to have introduced the malted milkshake, back in 1922.

76 Compos mentis : SANE

“Compos mentis” is a Latin phrase that translates as “in command of one’s mind”. It is a term used in contemporary law.

77 Stark who was crowned king in the “Game of Thrones” finale : BRAN

HBO’s “Game of Thrones” is a fantasy television drama that is adapted from a series of novels by George R. R. Martin called “A Song of Ice and Fire”. “Game of Thrones” is actually filmed in and around Belfast, Northern Ireland. I recently binge-watched the show’s first seven seasons, and enjoyed it. There’s no doubt that the production value of “Game of Thrones” is remarkable, but to be honest, I never became riveted by the storyline …

78 Eight-year member of Clinton’s cabinet : RENO

Janet Reno was Attorney General (AG) of the US from 1993 to 2001, and part of the Clinton administration. Reno was the second-longest holder of the office, and our first female Attorney General. In 2002, Reno ran for Governor of Florida but failed to win the Democratic nomination. Thereafter she retired from public life, and passed away at the end of 2016.

82 Animal for which the Canary Islands are named : DOG

The Canary Islands are located off the northwest coast of Africa. The islands aren’t named for the canary bird and in fact the bird is named for the islands. The name of the Canary Islands comes from the Latin “Canariae Insulae” which translates as “Island of the Dogs”. This was the original name for the third largest island, now called Gran Canaria. In the days of ancient Rome the island was noted as a home to a large number of very large dogs.

90 Practices lexicography : DEFINES

A lexicographer is someone who compiles a dictionary. The term comes into English via French from the Greek “lexikon” meaning “wordbook”, and “graphos” meaning “writer”.

95 Greetings to some mainlanders : ALOHAS

The Hawaiian word “aloha” has many meanings in English: affection, love, peace, compassion and mercy. More recently, “aloha” has come to mean “hello” and “goodbye”, but only since the mid-1800s.

97 Ground-dwelling songbird : PIPIT

Pipits are small birds found almost everywhere on the globe, except the driest of deserts, the wettest of rainforests and Antarctica.

101 Kind of acid : AMINO

Amino acids are essential to life in many ways, not least of which is their use as the building blocks of proteins. Nine amino acids are considered “essential” for humans. These nine must be included in the diet as they cannot be synthesized in the body.

104 Greek vowels : ETAS

Eta is the seventh letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a forerunner of our Latin character “H”. Originally denoting a consonant, eta was used as a long vowel in Ancient Greek.

105 Classic pop art sculpture with a slanted “O” : LOVE

Robert Indiana is the working name used by artist Robert Clark, who was born and raised in Indiana. Indiana’s most famous work is his “LOVE” print, which first appeared in a series of poems written in 1958. The most famous version of the “LOVE” work was created for a 1964 Christmas card used by the Museum of Modern Art. Famously, the print was then used for an 8-cent US postage stamp in 1973.

108 Male deer : HART

A male deer is usually called a buck, and a female is a doe. However, the male red deer is usually referred to as a stag. The males of even larger species of deer are often called bulls, and females cows. In older English, male deer of over 5 years were called harts, and females of over 3 years were called hinds. The young of small species are known as fawns, and of larger species are called calves. All very confusing …

110 Singer/songwriter Lee : AMOS

Amos Lee is a singer-songwriter from Philadelphia who performs in the genres of soul and folk.

112 “Suis” is part of its conjugation : ETRE

The French for “to be” is “être”, and for “I am” is “je suis”.

113 Comic book publisher Lee : STAN

Stan Lee did just about everything at Marvel Comics over the years, from writing to being president and chairman of the board. If you like superhero movies based on the characters from Marvel Comics, then you could spend a few hours trying to spot Stan Lee in those films as he had a penchant for making cameo appearances. Lee can be spotted in “X-Men” (2000), “Spider-Man” (2002), “Hulk” (2003), “Fantastic Four” (2005), “Iron Man” (2008) and many other films.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Curse : OATH
5 Unit of current : AMP
8 Developer of 1982’s E.T., a video game so bad that hundreds of thousands of unsold cartridges were secretly buried in a New Mexico landfill : ATARI
13 Stealing attempts on the diamond? : HEISTS
19 Look extremely stylish, slangily : SLAY
20 ___ People’s Democratic Republic : LAO
21 Classic actress Sophia : LOREN
22 Lacking freshness : OLD HAT
23 Always glad to be seated in the back of the boat? : HAPPILY EVER AFT (from “happily ever after”)
26 Printed cotton fabric : CALICO
27 Think of together : ASSOCIATE
28 Perfectly placed “Batman” punch? : ABSOLUTE POW (from “absolute power”)
30 Behind the line of scrimmage : ONSIDE
32 Pried, with “in” : NOSED …
33 Look ahead : PLAN
36 Unfilled spaces : CAVITIES
40 Part of New York City’s Museum Mile, with “the” : MET
43 Charlatans : PHONIES
46 “Catch you later!” : ADIOS!
47 Buddhist temple structure : PAGODA
50 Penny going through the wash once again? : RECYCLING CENT (from “recycling center”)
53 Subject of Walter Lord’s “A Night to Remember” : TITANIC
54 Epson product : INK
55 Facebook profile feature : STATUS
56 Soup served at the church social? : AMEN BROTH (from “Amen, brother”)
58 Persuade by force : COERCE
61 Sheep’s kin : GOATS
63 Commencement : ONSET
64 Church officer : ELDER
65 Grape-Nuts maker : POST
66 Ark groupings : TWOS
68 Feudal workers : SERFS
72 In a lively manner : GAILY
74 What a pointless meeting probably should have been handled by : EMAIL
76 California in San Francisco, e.g. : STREET
77 Afternoon gatherings of Mensa? : BRAIN TEAS (from “brain teaser”)
81 Force at sea : ARMADA
83 Monk’s title : FRA
84 Withdrew : REVOKED
85 Having no feeling in one’s texting hand? : CELL PHONE NUMB (from “cell phone number”)
89 Assumed name : ANONYM
90 One of the so-called “Three Crowns of Florence,” along with Petrarch and Boccaccio : DANTE
91 Source of the idioms “fat of the land” and “fire and brimstone” : GENESIS
92 As we speak : NOW
93 Small anatomical opening, as in a bone : FENESTRA
96 These can go for a lot of bucks : DOES
97 Check for mistakes : PROOF
100 Party tray meat : SALAMI
103 Ad for heartburn medication? : RELIEF PITCH (from “relief pitcher”)
109 Puts forward : NOMINATES
114 State you’ll never get to : UTOPIA
115 “Quit your snickering, Damon!”? : NO LAUGHING, MATT (from “no laughing matter”)
117 Hitting the floppy disk icon, say : SAVING
118 Islamic rulers : EMIRS
119 Hill resident : ANT
120 Soup pod : OKRA
121 Dangerous fly : TSETSE
122 Dividing membranes : SEPTA
123 ___ flour : SOY
124 “No man hath ___ God …” : SEEN

Down

1 Labor-regulating org. : OSHA
2 “Such a pity!” : ALAS!
3 Bugs : TAPS
4 Doc’s needle : HYPO
5 Without reserve : ALL IN
6 Yucatán natives : MAYAS
7 Fancifully worded : POETIC
8 Drink rarely drunk with a straw : ALE
9 ___ Bora, area of Afghanistan : TORA
10 ___ American Heritage Month (April) : ARAB
11 Foul rulers : REFS
12 Says without feeling : INTONES
13 Start of a magician’s phrase : HOCUS …
14 Send over the moon : ELATE
15 Waited at a red light, say : IDLED
16 FedEx, maybe : SHIP
17 Order by the border : TACO
18 “Please ___ your tray tables” (plane request) : STOW
24 World-renowned : ICONIC
25 Sanskrit scripture : VEDA
29 Part of many California place names : LOS
31 Get out of Dodge, so to speak : EVACUATE
33 Caustic compound : PHENOL
34 Needing a passcode, maybe : LOCKED
35 Even one : ANY
37 Latin clarifier : ID EST
38 Easy-to-bend metal : TIN
39 Greek vowel : IOTA
40 Lead-in to rail : MONO-
41 Computer menu with Undo and Redo : EDIT
42 Dash gauge : TACH
43 Word with freeze or fixing : … PRICE
44 Choice word : ELSE
45 “Don’t just ___ there!” : SIT
47 Digital passcodes : PINS
48 Viewed optimistically : AT BEST
49 ___ snake : GARTER
51 Japanese city where Lexus is headquartered : NAGOYA
52 Classic muscle cars : GTOS
53 Cards with the most pips : TENS
57 Bread : MOOLAH
59 Map section : REGION
60 Irascible : CRANKY
62 Some Hollywood up-and-comers : STARLETS
65 Responded in court : PLED
67 Cowardly sort : WIMP
69 Turn down : REFUSE
70 Units of distance in physics : FERMIS
71 Sticks a fork in : STABS
73 Piece of news : ITEM
75 Drinks usually drunk with straws : MALTS
76 Compos mentis : SANE
77 Stark who was crowned king in the “Game of Thrones” finale : BRAN
78 Eight-year member of Clinton’s cabinet : RENO
79 State : AVOW
80 Glance at, as headlines : SCAN
82 Animal for which the Canary Islands are named : DOG
86 Opposite of WSW : ENE
87 -s or -ed : ENDING
88 Modern prefix : NEO-
90 Practices lexicography : DEFINES
93 One vain about his looks : FOP
94 “You ___?” : RANG
95 Greetings to some mainlanders : ALOHAS
97 Ground-dwelling songbird : PIPIT
98 Bit attachments : REINS
99 Old enough : OF AGE
101 Kind of acid : AMINO
102 Like most mouthwashes : MINTY
103 Brownish shade : RUST
104 Greek vowels : ETAS
105 Classic pop art sculpture with a slanted “O” : LOVE
106 “Personally …” : TO ME …
107 Cut out : CLIP
108 Male deer : HART
110 Singer/songwriter Lee : AMOS
111 Appropriate : TAKE
112 “Suis” is part of its conjugation : ETRE
113 Comic book publisher Lee : STAN
116 Where to find MA and PA : USA

14 thoughts on “0913-20 NY Times Crossword 13 Sep 20, Sunday”

  1. 27:03, no errors. Like yesterday, I’m not quite sure why I’m up ( but perhaps I’ll be able to sleep a bit more later). Not much to say about the puzzle, except that I got hung up for a bit on a silly misstep. Venus and the Moon are putting on quite a show this morning.

  2. 45:51. About normal for a sleepy Sunday morning for me. Brain was idling a lot, then stuck in low gear. Grandkids complaining loudly added to my lack of attention.

  3. Thanks Bill, I always find your commentary educational.

    Today it looks like your 25D explication for Sanskrit may have spilled over into 29D, just a typo . . .

  4. 35:34. Went quickly once I got the theme and leaned on it heavily.

    No idea of the origin of the Canary Island name….nor of the bird named Canary itself. Interesting info. Something I’ll throw in someone’s face in a snobby manner as though I’ve known that my whole life.

    Best –

  5. Hmmm. Googling the above text gets you to a bizarre (but possibly interesting) story, but I don’t think I’d recommend clicking on the link in the text … 😳

  6. 1:34:27 no errors but it seemed like 4 hours or more…the setter seems to be well read and doesn’t mind proving it…didn’t like this one👎👎
    Stay safe and go Ravens .

  7. 43:16, no errors. Got hung up in a lot of sections. Last section to drop was the one containing BRAIN TEAS. I started with SMART instead of BRAIN, took a long time unravelling. Was only able to get FENESTRA by remembering my Junior High French. ‘Fenêtre’ is French for ‘window’.

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