0411-19 NY Times Crossword 11 Apr 19, Thursday

Constructed by: Brendan Emmett Quigley
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): Add a Schwa

Themed answers sound like common phrases, but with a schwa (an unstressed vowel) added at the beginning:

  • 19A Ornately decorated money? : BAROQUE BREAD (from “broke bread”)
  • 26A March meant to end a drought? : PARADE FOR RAIN (from “prayed for rain”)
  • 41A Bumper version of a cart? : COLLIDE BARROW (from “Clyde Barrow”)
  • 47A What the trees by Walden Pond provided? : THOREAU SHADE (from “throw shade”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 11m 44s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6 Who said “A woman’s perfume tells more about her than her handwriting” : DIOR

Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, drawing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped re-establish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

10 Croque-monsieur ingredient : HAM

The “croque monsieur” is a French dish, a baked or fried ham and cheese sandwich. Before baking, the sandwich is dipped in whipped eggs. The cheese used is traditionally Emmental or Gruyère. If the sandwich is topped with a fried egg, then it referred to as a croque madame.

14 “Dies ___” : IRAE

“Dies Irae” is Latin for “Day of Wrath”. It is the name of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

16 Kind of alcohol : ETHYL

Ethyl alcohol is more usually known as ethanol. Ethanol is the alcohol found in intoxicating beverages, and nowadays is also used as a fuel for cars. It is also found in medical wipes and hand sanitizer, in which it acts as an antiseptic.

17 “The Twits” author : DAHL

Roald Dahl’s name is Norwegian. Dahl’s parents were from Norway, although Dahl himself was Welsh. Dahl became one of the most successful authors of the twentieth century. Two of his most famous titles are “James and the Giant Peach” and “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory”.

18 Nike rival : AVIA

The “Avia” brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

19 Ornately decorated money? : BAROQUE BREAD (from “broke bread”)

Something described as baroque is extremely ornate and convoluted. The term comes from the Baroque Period, in which many of the arts focused on great detail and elaborate design.

30 Oven handle? : AMANA

The Amana Corporation takes its name from the location of its original headquarters, in Middle Amana, Iowa. Today, the Amana name is very much associated with household appliances. The company was founded in 1934 to manufacture commercial walk-in coolers.

31 Adamant refusal : I WON’T!

The words “adamant” and “adamantine” can mean hard like rock or stony, in the literal sense. In the more figurative sense, someone who is adamant or adamantine is stubborn or inflexible, like a mule, mulish.

32 Mistake indicator : [SIC]

[Sic] indicates that a quotation is written as originally found, perhaps including a typo. “Sic” is Latin for “thus, like this”. The term is more completely written as “sic erat scriptum”, which translates as “thus was it written”.

35 Yellow card displayers : REFS

A series of colored penalty cards is used by referees and umpires in several sports, most notably in soccer. The cards were first used in the 1970 FIFA World Cup in Mexico, after language difficulties created confusion during the prior competition in 1966. The main cards used are a yellow card indicating a caution, and a red card indicating expulsion from the game.

37 Building site code? : HTML

The initialism “HTML” stands for HyperText Markup Language. HTML is the language used to write most Internet web pages (including this one).

38 AC/DC single with the lyric “Watch me explode” : TNT

The Heavy Metal band known as AC/DC was formed by two brothers Malcolm and Angus Young in Australia. The group is usually called “Acca Dacca” down under.

39 Israeli president who was the author of 11 books : PERES

Shimon Peres was an Israeli statesman who was born in Poland, in a township that is now part of Belarus. Peres served as President of the State of Israel from 2007 to 2014. Born Szymon Perski, Peres was the oldest head of state in the world while he served as president of Israel. While serving as foreign minister, he represented Israel in the secret negotiations that led to the signing of the Oslo Accords in 1993. For that work, Peres was jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize with Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat.

41 Bumper version of a cart? : COLLIDE BARROW (from “Clyde Barrow”)

Bonnie and Clyde were criminals who robbed and killed their way across the central US during the Great Depression. Clyde Barrow was born a desperately poor young boy just south of Dallas, Texas. He was always in trouble with the law, first getting arrested at the age of 16. He met Bonnie Parker in 1930 at a friend’s house, and the smitten Parker followed Clyde into a life of crime. The pair were killed by a posse of Texas police officers just four years later in Louisiana.

47 What the trees by Walden Pond provided? : THOREAU SHADE (from “throw shade”)

Henry David Thoreau is a personal hero of mine. Thoreau is best known for his book called “Walden” published in 1854. The book outlines his philosophy of life and details his experiences living in a cabin near Walden Pond just outside Concord, Massachusetts.

To throw shade is to show disrespect to someone publicly using insults or criticisms.

51 Frequently cosplayed sci-fi character : LEIA

Princess Leia is Luke Skywalker’s twin sister in the original “Star Wars” trilogy and was played by Carrie Fisher. Carrie Fisher has stated that she hated the famous “cinnamon bun hairstyle” that she had to wear in the films, as she felt it made her face look too round. She also had to to sit for two hours every day just to get her hair styled. Two hours to get your hair done? It takes me just two seconds …

53 Yellowish color : OCHER

Ocher is a light, yellowy-brown color, although variations of the pigment are possible such as red ocher and purple ocher. “Ocher” is usually spelled “ochre” on the other side of the pond.

Down

4 Vegan source of protein : SOYBEANS

What are known as soybeans here in the US are called “soya beans” in most other English-speaking countries. So, I drink soy milk here in America, but when I am over in Ireland I drink “soya milk”.

6 Mischievous trick : DIDO

A dido is a mischievous prank. The etymology of the term “dido” is unclear, though it might somehow come from the Carthaginian Queen Dido who appears in the “Aeneid”.

7 Modern locale of ancient Sumer : IRAQ

Iraq is often called the “Cradle of Civilization” as it was home to Sumer, which was the earliest known civilization on the planet. By 5000 BC the Sumerian people were practicing year-round agriculture and had a specialized labor force. For the first time, a whole race were able to settle in one place by storing food, instead of having to migrate in a pattern dictated by crops and grazing land.

8 Home to Interstates H-1, H-2 and H-3 : OAHU

The westernmost and southernmost “interstate” highway in the US is the H-1 on the island of Oahu.

11 Like some elephants : ASIAN

There are only three species of elephant living today, with all others being extinct. These are the African bush elephant, the African forest elephant, and the Asian elephant (or “Indian elephant”). As is well known, the African elephant is distinguished from the Asian/Indian elephant by its much larger ears.

12 George ___, general at the Battle of Chancellorsville : MEADE

George Meade was a career army officer with a depth of experience in civil and military operations even before the onset of the Civil War. During the war he rose to the level of commander of the Army of the Potomac, and is best remembered for leading the Union forces that defeated General Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg in 1863.

The Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville was fought in April/May 1863. The combatants were the Union Army of the Potomac led by Major General Joseph Hooker and the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia led by General Robert E. Lee. Although Lee’s forces were half the size of Hooker’s, the Confederates emerged victorious. One notable outcome of the engagement was the death of Confederate general Stonewall Jackson, a victim of friendly fire.

15 Wrist bones : CARPI

The human wrist is known anatomically as the carpus (plural “carpi”). The carpal bones allow the wrist its remarkable range of motion.

20 Way on Waze: Abbr. : RTE

Waze is a navigation app that is similar to Google Maps and Apple Maps. Waze was developed in Israel, and was acquired by Google in 2013.

21 Sheep’s cry : BLAT

To blat is to cry, especially like a sheep. In other words, to “blat” is to “bleat”. The noun “blat” is often used for an overblown sound on a brass instrument.

23 Noodle soup : RAMEN

Ramen is a noodle dish composed of Chinese-style wheat noodles in a meat or fish broth flavored with soy or miso sauce. Ramen is usually topped with sliced pork and dried seaweed. The term “ramen” is a also used for precooked, instant noodles that come in single-serving, solid blocks.

27 Guy in a restaurant : FIERI

Guy Fieri is a restaurant owner and television personality. Fieri is known as “the face of the Food Network” as his television series on that channel is very popular.

33 “Could you turn on the A.C.?” : I’M HOT

Air conditioner (AC)

34 Weapons for the X-Man Wolverine : CLAWS

In the Marvel Comics universe, Wolverine is a mutant with keen animal-like senses and an ability to regenerate body parts after injury. He usually appears as a member of the X-Men superhero team. On the big screen, Wolverine is regularly played by Australian actor Hugh Jackman.

39 Ballet move : PLIE

The French word for “bent” is “plié”. In the ballet move known as a plié, the knees are bent. A “demi-plié” is a similar move, but with less bending of the knees.

42 She played Mrs. Which in 2018’s “A Wrinkle in Time” : OPRAH

“A Wrinkle in Time” is a book by Madeleine L’Engle. Published in 1962, it is described as a science fantasy. Included in the book’s cast of characters are Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who and Mrs. Which, all of whom turn out to be supernatural beings who transport the antagonists through the universe. “A Wrinkle in Time” was adapted into a 2018 movie of the same name starring Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon and Mindy Kaling as the three “Mrs” characters.

43 What might have a crush on you? : BOA

Boa constrictors are members of the Boidae family of snakes, all of which are non-venomous. Interestingly, the female boa is always larger than the male.

44 America’s first ICBM : ATLAS

Atlas boosters launched the first four US astronauts into space. The Atlas rocket design was originally developed in the late fifties and was deployed for several years as it was intended, as an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM).

An Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) is a ballistic missile with the range necessary to cross between continents. Being ballistic (unlike a cruise missile), an ICBM is guided during the initial launch phase, but later in flight just relies on thrust and gravity to arrive at its target. It is defined as intercontinental as it has a range greater than 3,500 miles. ICBMs are really only used for delivering nuclear warheads. Scary stuff …

45 ___ Khan, tiger in “The Jungle Book” : SHERE

In Rudyard Kipling’s “The Jungle Book”, the author names his regal tiger character “Shere Khan”. Kipling chose this name as he had met an Afghan Prince in his travels named “Sher Shah Suri”, meaning “The Lion or Tiger King”.

“The Jungle Book” by Rudyard Kipling was originally published in 1894, and is a collection of adventure stories or fables featuring the animals of the jungle and a young boy named Mowgli. Baloo is a sloth bear who teaches the cubs of a wolf pack the Law of the Jungle. His most challenging pupil however is no lupine, but rather the man-cub Mowgli.

48 Tucson school, informally : U OF A

The University of Arizona (UA, or “U of A”) was the first university founded in the state, opening its doors for students in Tucson in 1885 (which was actually 27 years before the territory was granted statehood).

55 She was tempted : EVE

In the Christian tradition, the “fall of man” took place in the Garden of Eden when Adam and Eve succumbed to the temptation of eating from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. This went against the bidding of God, and was at the urging of the serpent. As a result, Adam and Eve were banished from Eden to prevent them becoming immortal by eating from the tree of life. The first humans had transitioned from a state of innocent obedience to a state of guilty disobedience.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Demanding : BOSSY
6 Who said “A woman’s perfume tells more about her than her handwriting” : DIOR
10 Croque-monsieur ingredient : HAM
13 ___ View (streaming site) : YAHOO!
14 “Dies ___” : IRAE
15 Beer purchase : CASE
16 Kind of alcohol : ETHYL
17 “The Twits” author : DAHL
18 Nike rival : AVIA
19 Ornately decorated money? : BAROQUE BREAD (from “broke bread”)
22 Perfervid : ARDENT
25 Snowcapped, say : ALPINE
26 March meant to end a drought? : PARADE FOR RAIN (from “prayed for rain”)
30 Oven handle? : AMANA
31 Adamant refusal : I WON’T!
32 Mistake indicator : [SIC]
35 Yellow card displayers : REFS
36 Lists of commands : MENUS
37 Building site code? : HTML
38 AC/DC single with the lyric “Watch me explode” : TNT
39 Israeli president who was the author of 11 books : PERES
40 Commotion : HOO-HA
41 Bumper version of a cart? : COLLIDE BARROW (from “Clyde Barrow”)
44 Fireplace receptacle : ASHPIT
46 Beginnings : ONSETS
47 What the trees by Walden Pond provided? : THOREAU SHADE (from “throw shade”)
51 Frequently cosplayed sci-fi character : LEIA
52 Socially aware, modernly : WOKE
53 Yellowish color : OCHER
57 Bend over backward : ARCH
58 Some : A FEW
59 Member of an early 20th-century French art movement : FAUVE
60 Pick up : SEE
61 [Been there, done that] : [YAWN]
62 Let go : FREED

Down

1 A word before you go : BYE
2 ___ milk : OAT
3 “I’m trying to work here” : SHH!
4 Vegan source of protein : SOYBEANS
5 Four-time Grammy-winning gospel singer Adams : YOLANDA
6 Mischievous trick : DIDO
7 Modern locale of ancient Sumer : IRAQ
8 Home to Interstates H-1, H-2 and H-3 : OAHU
9 Takes a refresher course in : RELEARNS
10 Plan (for) : HAVE IN STORE
11 Like some elephants : ASIAN
12 George ___, general at the Battle of Chancellorsville : MEADE
15 Wrist bones : CARPI
20 Way on Waze: Abbr. : RTE
21 Sheep’s cry : BLAT
22 Not with the group : APART
23 Noodle soup : RAMEN
24 New addition to the team : DRAFT CHOICE
27 Guy in a restaurant : FIERI
28 Didn’t just rent : OWNED
29 Galvanize : ROUSE
33 “Could you turn on the A.C.?” : I’M HOT
34 Weapons for the X-Man Wolverine : CLAWS
36 Dissolve : MELT AWAY
37 It was once drawn on the street : HORSECAR
39 Ballet move : PLIE
40 Quarterback’s option : HANDOFF
42 She played Mrs. Which in 2018’s “A Wrinkle in Time” : OPRAH
43 What might have a crush on you? : BOA
44 America’s first ICBM : ATLAS
45 ___ Khan, tiger in “The Jungle Book” : SHERE
48 Tucson school, informally : U OF A
49 Twist : SKEW
50 Cut : HEWN
54 Strawberry or peach : HUE
55 She was tempted : EVE
56 Visibly ashamed : RED

13 thoughts on “0411-19 NY Times Crossword 11 Apr 19, Thursday”

  1. 27:07. Got the theme, but I didn’t know the term “throw shade” although I did know ..THOREAU. Didn’t know DIDO or FIERI; had to get those via crosses.

    The descriptions of the croque-monsieur and croque madam made me hungry…

    Best –

  2. 51:45 no errors thanks to several references to “my notes”.
    I could have stared at this puzzle forever and not gotten the theme…. Typical B.E.Q. Puzzle

  3. I work in pen and had quite a mess by the time I finished with no errors. Cluing was cryptic but fair. Wasn’t crazy about HORSECAR
    though. And hasn’t Guy Fieri used up more than his fifteen minutes of fame. Maybe I’m just a bit cynical this morning.

  4. 28:37, no errors. Definitely challenged by todays puzzle. So many unknowns and so many options which seemed to work. A lot of erasures today. 5D, for example, was a complete unknown. Malinda was my first attempt, then Miranda, before YAHOO and BOSSY dawned on me.

  5. Got it all right, but for some reason, didn’t really like this puzzle. Maybe it was what seemed to be forced or strained cleverness with the gimmick and its elusive, unrevealed theme. Several proper nouns got in the way, too. [Sigh]

  6. Finished in OT with no errors. I thought it was a clever puzzle with themed answers having the extra vowel syllable. Clue and answer for 41 across = REACHING!!!

  7. It figures that the guy with probably the most pretentious-sounding name in all puzzledom also has the most pretentious grids. Full of self-consciously clever, manufactured difficulty that makes them almost unbearable to solve … but you don’t want to let him beat you, so you soldier on.

    This time I managed to finish, and error free, on a Tricky Thursday. Think of this post as my way to “Thoreau some shade” at the enfant terrible.

  8. 19:40, no errors. Some writing separation, so we’ll call it that. Didn’t remember this puzzle all that much from the first time – but 5 weeks will do that.

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