0826-18 NY Times Crossword 26 Aug 18, Sunday

Constructed by: Olivia Mitra Framke
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: To the Point

We have a US OPEN-themed puzzle today, complete with some grid art. The black squares in the middle of the grid form a tennis racket, and the circled letters in top left spell out BALL:

  • 59A. Annual sporting event that is this puzzle’s theme : THE US OPEN
  • 13A. One of four on the annual tennis calendar : MAJOR
  • 23A. Follower of deuce : ADVANTAGE
  • 25A. Lot of back and forth? : LONG RALLY
  • 27A. Alternative to grass : HARD COURT
  • 31A. Point of no return? : ACE
  • 43A. Lead-in to line : BASE-
  • 94A. Stadium name near Citi Field : ARTHUR ASHE
  • 96A. Spectators’ area : GRANDSTAND
  • 109A. Location of 59-Across : QUEENS, NEW YORK
  • 121A. Part of U.S.T.A.: Abbr. : ASSN
  • 43D. One way to answer a server? : BACKHAND SHOT
  • 46D. Winning words : GAME, SET, MATCH

Bill’s time: 17m 31s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

6. Underwater workplaces : SEALABS

SEALAB I, II and II were man-made habitats built by the US Navy designed to advance the technology needed for humans to live and work underwater for extended periods. SEALAB I was lowered to a depth of just under 200 feet off the coast of Bermuda in 1964. Four divers (“aquanauts”) stayed in SEALAB for 11 days, before the experiment was halted due to the approach of a tropical storm.

18. Navel formation? : INNIE

The navel is basically a scar left behind when the umbilical cord is removed from a newborn baby. One interesting use of the umbilicus (navel, belly button) is to differentiate between identical twins, especially when they are very young.

21. 1836 siege setting : ALAMO

The famous Alamo in San Antonio, Texas was originally known as Mission San Antonio de Valero. The mission was founded in 1718 and was the first mission established in the city. The Battle of the Alamo took place in 1836, a thirteen-day siege by the Mexican Army led by President General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Only two people defending the Alamo Mission survived the onslaught. One month later, the Texian army got its revenge by attacking and defeating the Mexican Army in the Battle of San Jacinto. During the surprise attack on Santa Anna’s camp, many of the Texian soldiers were heard to cry “Remember the Alamo!”.

22. First name on the high bench : ELENA

Elena Kagan was the Solicitor General of the United States who replaced Justice John Paul Stevens on the US Supreme Court. That made Justice Kagan the first female US Solicitor General and the fourth female US Supreme Court justice. I hear she is a fan of Jane Austen, and used to reread “Pride and Prejudice” once a year. Not a bad thing to do, I’d say …

23. Follower of deuce : ADVANTAGE

In tennis, if the score reaches “deuce” (i.e. when both players have scored three points), then the first player to win two points in a row wins the game. The player who wins the point immediately after deuce is said to have the “advantage”. If the player with the advantage wins the next point then that’s two in a row and that player wins the game. If the person with the advantage loses the next point, then advantage is lost and the players return to deuce and try again. If the one of the players is calling out the score then if he/she has the advantage then that player announces “ad in” or more formally “advantage in”. If the score announcer’s opponent has the advantage, then the announcement is “ad out” or “advantage out”. Follow all of that …?

24. Wordsmith Peter Mark ___ : ROGET

Peter Mark Roget was an English lexicographer. Roget was an avid maker of lists, apparently using the routine of list-making to combat depression, a condition he endured for most of his life. He published his famous thesaurus in 1852, with revisions and expansions being made years later by his son, and then in turn by his grandson.

The first person to use the term “thesaurus” to mean a “collection of words arranged according to sense” was Roget in 1852, when he used it for the title of his most famous work. Up to that point in time, a thesaurus was basically an encyclopedia. Before being used with reference to books, a thesaurus was a storehouse or treasury, coming from the Latin “thesaurus” meaning “treasury, treasure”.

27. Alternative to grass : HARD COURT

There are four different surfaces used for playing tennis competitively:

  • Clay courts (used for the French Open)
  • Hard courts (used for the US Open and the Australian Open)
  • Grass courts (used for Wimbledon)
  • Carpet courts

29. Place for a prize ceremony : DAIS

A dais is a raised platform for a speaker. The term “dais” comes from the Latin “discus” meaning a “disk-shaped object”. I guess that the original daises had such a shape.

30. Nellie who wrote “Ten Days in a Mad-House” : BLY

Nellie Bly was a pen name of an American journalist whose real name was Elizabeth Cochran. In 1888, Bly took a trip around the world, emulating the fictional trip of Phileas Fogg in “Around the World in Eighty Days”. She departed from New York and arrived back in San Francisco two days behind schedule, jeopardizing her goal of beating the “eighty days”. The owner of her newspaper chartered a private train for her and she made it back to New York in just over 72 days. Quite a woman …

Journalist Nellie Bly wrote a series of articles for the New York World in the 1880s recounting her undercover investigation of life in the Women’s Lunatic Asylum on Blackwell’s Island in the East River. Bly feigned insanity while lodging at a women’s boarding house so that she was carted off to the asylum. The articles were republished in 1887 in book form as “Ten Days in a Mad-House”, after which there was a grand jury investigation into the horrific conditions described by Bly.

34. Certain corp. takeover : LBO

A leveraged buyout (LBO) is a transaction in which an investor acquires a controlling volume of stock in a company, but buys that stock with borrowed funds (hence “leveraged”). Often the assets of the acquired company are used as collateral for the borrowed money. There is a special form of LBO known as a management buyout (MBO) in which the company’s own management team purchase the controlling interest.

36. NBC hit since ’75 : SNL

NBC first aired a form of “Saturday Night Live” (SNL) in 1975 under the title “NBC’s Saturday Night”. The show was actually created to give Johnny Carson some time off from “The Tonight Show”. Back then “The Tonight Show” had a weekend episode, and Carson convinced NBC to pull the Saturday or Sunday recordings off the air and hold them for subsequent weeknights in which Carson needed a break. NBC turned to Lorne Michaels and asked him to put together a variety show to fill the vacant slot, and he came up with what we now call “Saturday Night Live”.

37. Ingredient in a Dark ‘n’ Stormy : RUM

A Dark ‘n’ Stormy is a classic cocktail made from dark rum and ginger beer, served over ice. The name comes from the ingredients, with the “dark” being the rum, and the “stormy” being the ginger beer.

38. Muslim holy men : IMAMS

An imam is a Muslim leader, and often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

40. Designer inits. : YSL

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL) was an Algerian-born French fashion designer. Saint Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

44. Rod who was the 1977 A.L. M.V.P. : CAREW

Rod Carew is a former Major League Baseball player from Panama. Actually. Carew is a “Zonian”, meaning that he was born in the Panama Canal Zone, a political entity that existed for decades from 1903.

45. “Bridesmaids” co-star : WIIG

Kristen Wiig is a comic actress who appears on “Saturday Night Live”. She also made an appearance on the first season of Spike TV’s quirky “The Joe Schmo Show”, playing “Dr. Pat”. More recently, she co-wrote and starred in the 2011 hit film “Bridesmaids”, and co-starred in the 2016 reboot of “Ghostbusters”.

47. Food with an unfortunate-sounding last two syllables : FALAFEL

Falafel is a ball of ground chickpeas or fava beans that has been deep fried and served in pita bread. I love chickpeas, but falafel is often too dry to me …

55. Sophocles tragedy : ELECTRA

Electra was a princess in Greek mythology, the daughter of Agamemnon. Electra had to mourn the death of her father who was murdered, and then the death of her mother Clytemnestra, who was also murdered.

Sophocles was one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose work has survived. The first of these was Aeschylus, the second Sophocles, and the third Euripides. Sophocles is believed to have written 123 plays, the most famous of which are “Antigone” and “Oedipus the King”.

59. Annual sporting event that is this puzzle’s theme : THE US OPEN

The US Open is one of the oldest tennis championships in the world, having started out as the US National Championship in 1881. Today, the US Open is the last major tournament in the Grand Slam annual series, following the Australian Open, the French Open and Wimbledon.

64. Stingy sort? : BEE

A queen bee has a stinger, just like worker bees. When a worker bee stings, it leaves it stinger in its victim. The worker bee dies after losing its stinger as the loss rips out part of its insides. However, a queen bee can sting with impunity as her stinger’s anatomy is different.

65. Many a presidential hopeful: Abbr. : SEN

Senator (sen.)

68. Ostracize : SHUN

The practice of ostracism, freezing out or exclusion, dates back to Ancient Greece. Back then citizens could write the names of men they thought were exceptionally dangerous on tiles that were publicly posted, resulting in a banishment of ten years. “Ostracize” derives from the Greek “ostrakon”, the word for a “tile”.

70. Standard info on stationery nowadays : URLS

An Internet address (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) is more correctly called a Uniform Resource Locators (URL).

72. U. of Md. player : TERP

The sports teams of the University of Maryland are called the Maryland Terrapins, or “the Terps” for short. The name dates back to 1932 when it was coined by the the university’s president at the time, Curley Byrd. He took the name from the diamondback terrapins that are native to the Chesapeake Bay.

74. Conjunction in the Postal Service creed : NOR

There is no official creed or motto for the US Postal Service. However, there is the oft-quoted inscription that is posted (pun!) over the entrance to the James Farley Post Office in New York City:

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

76. The Eagles, on scoreboards : PHI

The Philadelphia Eagles were established in 1933 and joined the National Football League as a replacement for the bankrupt Frankford Yellow Jackets, also from Philadelphia. The “Eagle” name was inspired by the Blue Eagle insignia that was used by companies who were in compliance with the National Industrial Recovery Act that was central to President Roosevelt’s New Deal Program.

78. Pérignon, for one : DOM

Dom Pérignon is the name given to the prestige label of champagne from Moët et Chandon, the French winery. The label’s name honors the Benedictine monk, Dom Pérignon, who helped to improve the quality and production of champagne in the early 18th century. Although Dom Pérignon made major contributions to champagne production, many of the stories in which he figures are just myths. He did not “invent” champagne, nor sparkling wine in general. Nor did he say the famous words, “Come quickly, I am drinking the stars!”. That lovely line first appeared in a print advertisement in the late 1800s!

79. “Nature is the ___ of God”: Dante : ART

Dante Alighieri (usually just “Dante”) was an Italian poet of the Middle Ages. Dante’s “Divine Comedy” is widely considered to be the greatest literary work ever written in the Italian language.

83. Chaney of silents : LON

Lon Chaney, Sr. played a lot of crazed-looking characters in the days of silent movies. He did much of his own make-up work, developing the grotesque appearances that became his trademark, and earning himself the nickname “the man of a thousand faces”. Most famous were his portrayals of the title characters in the films “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” (1923) and “The Phantom of the Opera” (1925).

89. Things found in clogs : FEET

Clogs are shoes made from wood, at least in part. The clog originated as a protective item of footwear for use by farm, factory and mine workers.

90. Bourbon Street’s locale, informally : NOLA

When New Orleans was founded by the French, the House of Bourbon was ruling France. Bourbon Street was named in its honor.

94. Stadium name near Citi Field : ARTHUR ASHE

The Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, New York opened in 1997 and for years was the largest outdoor, tennis-only venue in the world. The stadium was often criticized for not having a retractable dome to protect the playing surface from inclement weather. Well, that changed in 2016 when the stadium debuted its new retractable roof, a $150 million investment in the facility.

98. “Harlequin’s Carnival” painter : MIRO

Joan Miró was a Spanish artist. Miro immersed himself in Surrealism, so much so that Andre Breton, the founder of the movement, said that Miro was “the most Surrealist of us all”.

99. James ___, Belgian painter in the movement Les XX : ENSOR

James Ensor was a Belgian painter active in the first half of the twentieth century. He lived in Ostend for almost all of his life, and in terms of travel, he only made three brief trips abroad, to Paris, London and Holland.

101. Saskatchewan native : CREE

The Cree are one of the largest groups of Native Americans on the continent. In the US most of the Cree nation live in Montana on a reservation shared with the Ojibwe people. In Canada most of the Cree live in Manitoba.

The Canadian province of Saskatchewan (Sask.) takes its name from the Saskatchewan River. The river in turn takes its name from the Cree name, which translates as “swift flowing river”. The capital of Saskatchewan is Regina, although the biggest city in the province is Saskatoon.

102. It represents you : AVATAR

The Sanskrit word “avatar” describes the concept of a deity descending into earthly life and taking on a persona. It’s easy to see how in the world of “online presences” one might use the word avatar to describe one’s online identity.

109. Location of 59-Across : QUEENS, NEW YORK
(59A. Annual sporting event that is this puzzle’s theme : THE US OPEN)

Queens is the largest borough in New York City, and is an amazingly diverse location in terms of ethnicity. There is a population of over 2 million people, with almost 50% of that population being foreign-born. Apparently there are over 130 native languages spoken in the area. Queens was named for Catherine of Braganza (from Portugal), the Queen consort of King Charles II of England.

115. Canapé topper : ROE

A canapé is a finger food, something small enough to eat in just one bite. In French, “canapé” is actually the word for a couch or a sofa. The name was given to the snack as the original canapés were savories served on toasted or stale bread that supposedly resembled a tiny couch.

117. Time to vote: Abbr. : TUE

Election Day was chosen by Congress back in 1845. The month of November was selected as it suited an agricultural society, following the fall harvest and yet not too far into winter, which could make travel difficult. Tuesday was chosen so that people had time to travel to polling stations. Monday elections might have meant that some would have to start out on Sunday, and that could interfere with Christian services.

118. Italian car, informally : ALFA

The “Alfa” in Alfa Romeo is actually an acronym, one standing for Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili (“Lombard Automobile Factory, Public Company”). ALFA was an enterprise founded in 1909 and which was taken over by Nicola Romeo in 1915. In 1920 the company name was changed to Alfa Romeo.

121. Part of U.S.T.A.: Abbr. : ASSN

The United States Tennis Association (USTA) is the national organization governing the sport of tennis in the US. The USTA was founded way back in 1881 as the United States National Lawn Tennis Association.

124. Lion or tiger : CAT

The four “big cats” are the tiger, lion, jaguar and leopard. The largest of the big cats is the tiger, and the smallest is the leopard.

Down

7. One of a well-known septet : ENVY

The cardinal sins of Christian ethics are also known as the seven deadly sins. The seven deadly sins are:

  • Wrath
  • Greed
  • Sloth
  • Pride
  • Lust
  • Envy
  • Gluttony

8. Inits. in 2010 news : ACA

The correct name for what has been dubbed “Obamacare” is the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act” (ACA).

9. Broadway’s Cariou : LEN

Len Cariou is a Canadian actor who is famous for his Broadway portrayal of “Sweeney Todd”. I most recognize Cariou from supporting roles in “Flags of Our Fathers” and “Thirteen Days”, two great movies.

10. Computer key : ALT

The Alt (alternate) key is found on either side of the space bar on US PC keyboards. The Alt key evolved from what was called a Meta key on old MIT keyboards, although the function has changed somewhat over the years. Alt is equivalent in many ways to the Option key on a Mac keyboard, and indeed the letters “Alt” have been printed on most Mac keyboards starting in the nineties.

12. Oscar-nominated George of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” : SEGAL

The actor George Segal was one of my favorite Hollywood stars when I was growing up. I most remember him from the dramatic role he played in 1966’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” alongside Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor, and the comedic role he played in 1973’s “A Touch of Class” opposite Glenda Jackson. Segal has made a successful transition to television in recent years, playing lead roles on the sitcoms “Just Shoot Me!” and “The Goldbergs”.

“Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” is an Edward Albee play that premiered on Broadway in 1962. The play won a Tony in 1963, and was adapted in a successful film in 1966 starring Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor, George Segal and Sandy Dennis. The stage version is a lengthy production, lasting over three hours.

13. Designer Jacobs : MARC

Marc Jacobs is an American fashion designer from New York City with his own line of clothing. He is also the creative director for the French design house, Louis Vuitton.

14. Emotionally detached : ALOOF

I suppose one might guess from the “feel” of the word “aloof” that is has nautical roots. Originally “aloof” meant “to windward” and was the opposite of “alee”. A helmsman might be instructed to stay aloof, to steer the boat into the weather to keep a distance from a lee-shore. It is from this sense of maintaining a distance that aloof came to mean “distant” in terms of personality. Interesting, huh …?

16. Code you don’t want to break : OMERTA

“Omertà” is a code of honor in southern Italian society. The term has been adopted by the Mafia to mean a code of silence designed to prevent a Mafioso from becoming an informer. For example, the famous Joe Valachi was someone who broke the code of silence in 1963, informing on the New York Mafia. Valachi’s story was told in the movie “The Valachi Papers”, with Charles Bronson playing the lead.

20. Louisville standout : DERBY WINNER

The first Kentucky Derby took place in 1875, and is a race modeled on the Epsom Derby in England and the Grand Prix de Paris (now called the “Prix de l‘Arc de Triomphe”). As such, the Kentucky Derby was run over 1½ miles, although in 1896 this was shortened to 1¼ miles. The winning horse is presented with a very elaborate blanket made of red roses, and so the Derby is nicknamed “Run for the Roses”. The race is held on the first Saturday in May each year, and is limited to 3-year-old horses.

28. Square dance maneuver : DO-SI-DO

The term “do-si-do” is actually a corruption of a French phrase “dos-à-dos”, meaning back-to-back. And parenthetically, this is just the opposite to the familiar French term “vis-à-vis”, meaning face-to-face. In the do-si-do dance move, the partners start facing each other and then advance past each other’s right shoulder, and then move to the right without turning so that they are now facing away from each other (back-to-back). They complete the move facing in the same direction, passing each other’s left shoulders by moving backwards until they return to the starting position. Did you get that …?

31. Oscar-winning film of 1984 : AMADEUS

The magnificent 1984 film “Amadeus” is an adaptation of Peter Shaffer’s 1979 stage play of the same name. Tom Hulce played Mozart, and F. Murray Abraham played Mozart’s rival, Antonio Salieri. Both Hulce and Abraham were nominated for that season’s Best Actor Oscar, with the award going to the latter. There hasn’t been a movie since “Amadeus” that garnered two Best Actor nominations.

33. College in Boston : EMERSON

Emerson College, located in Boston’s Washington Street Theater District, offers degree programs focused on Arts and Communication. The school was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as the Boston Conservatory of Elocution, Oratory and Dramatic Art.

41. Security agreement : LIEN

A lien is the right that one has to retain or secure someone’s property until a debt is paid. When an individual takes out a car loan, for example, the lending bank is usually a lien holder. The bank releases the lien on the car when the loan is paid in full.

48. Dweller along the Bering Sea : ALEUT

The Aleuts live on the Aleutian Islands of the North Pacific, and on the Commander Islands at the western end of the same island chain. The Aleutian Islands are part of the United States, and the Commander Islands are in Russia.

The Bering Sea in the very north of the Pacific Ocean is named for the Danish navigator Vitus Bering who was the first European to systematically explore the area in 1728. Many believe that the first humans arrived in the Americas from Asia when the waters of the Bering Sea were lower during the last ice age, over what is known as the Bering land bridge.

49. The “L” of L.C.D. : LEAST

The lowest/least common denominator (LCD) of a set of fractions is the least common multiple of the denominators of those fractions. For example, the LCD of ⅓ and ¼ is 12 as both ⅓ and ¼ can be expressed in multiples of 1/12 (⅓ is 4/12 and ¼ is 3/12).

In a fraction, the number above the line is the numerator, and the number below the line is the denominator. A common numerator is the number one, as in ½, ¼, ⅓ etc.

52. Genius Bar employees : TECHS

The technical support desk found in Apple Retail Stores is rather inventively called the Genius Bar. The certified support technicians are known as “Geniuses”. The trainees are called GYOs: Grow-Your-Own-Geniuses.

61. Paradigm : EXEMPLAR

We tend to use “paradigm” to mean the set of assumptions and practices that define some aspect of life. It can also simply mean something that serves as a model, pattern or example. “Paradigm” ultimately comes from the Greek word for “show side by side”.

75. Locale for Charlie Chan : OAHU

Charlie Chan is the main character in a series of novels by Earl Derr Biggers. Chan is a Chinese-American detective working with the Honolulu police department. There have been almost 50 movies made featuring the Charlie Chan character.

78. Denims : DUNGAREES

“Dungarees” is an alternative name for overalls. Dungaree was a cheap and poorly woven fabric used by the lower classes. Dungaree originated in the port city of Dongri near Mumbai, India, hence the name.

86. How the Quran is written : IN ARABIC

The Koran is also known as the Qur’an in English, a transliteration of the Arabic name for the holy text of the Muslim faith. The literal translation of “Koran” is “the recitation”.

88. City in Iraq’s Sunni Triangle : SAMARRA

Samarra is a city north of Baghdad in Iraq. We are perhaps familiar with the city name from John O’Hara’s 1934 novel “Appointment in Samarra”.

107. Three-person card game : SKAT

When I was a teenager in Ireland, I had a friend with a German father. The father taught us the game of Skat, and what a great game it is. Skat originated in Germany in the 1800s and is to this day the most popular card game in the country. I haven’t played it in decades, but would love to play it again …

110. Vox V.I.P.s : EDS

“Vox” is a news and opinion website that was founded by former “Washington Post” journalist Ezra Klein in 2014. “Vox” is Latin for “voice”.

112. Red Sox Hall-of-Famer, to fans : YAZ

Carl Yastrzemski, who played his whole career with the Boston Red Sox, goes by the nickname “Yaz”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Lightheaded : WOOZY
6. Underwater workplaces : SEALABS
13. One of four on the annual tennis calendar : MAJOR
18. Navel formation? : INNIE
19. Not renewed : CANCELLED
21. 1836 siege setting : ALAMO
22. First name on the high bench : ELENA
23. Follower of deuce : ADVANTAGE
24. Wordsmith Peter Mark ___ : ROGET
25. Lot of back and forth? : LONG RALLY
27. Alternative to grass : HARD COURT
29. Place for a prize ceremony : DAIS
30. Nellie who wrote “Ten Days in a Mad-House” : BLY
31. Point of no return? : ACE
34. Certain corp. takeover : LBO
35. It’s meant to be : FATE
36. NBC hit since ’75 : SNL
37. Ingredient in a Dark ‘n’ Stormy : RUM
38. Muslim holy men : IMAMS
40. Designer inits. : YSL
42. “Awesome!” : RAD!
43. Lead-in to line : BASE-
44. Rod who was the 1977 A.L. M.V.P. : CAREW
45. “Bridesmaids” co-star : WIIG
47. Food with an unfortunate-sounding last two syllables : FALAFEL
50. Really fancy : ADORE
51. Dreams up : IDEATES
55. Sophocles tragedy : ELECTRA
56. Get further mileage from : RE-USE
57. Vegetable or pasta, e.g. : NON-MEAT
58. Drip, drip, drip : LEAK
59. Annual sporting event that is this puzzle’s theme : THE US OPEN
62. Outside: Prefix : ECTO-
63. Really green : LUSH
64. Stingy sort? : BEE
65. Many a presidential hopeful: Abbr. : SEN
66. Treasure map markers : XES
68. Ostracize : SHUN
69. Lead-in to boy or girl : ATTA …
70. Standard info on stationery nowadays : URLS
72. U. of Md. player : TERP
73. Spot : ESPY
74. Conjunction in the Postal Service creed : NOR
76. The Eagles, on scoreboards : PHI
78. Pérignon, for one : DOM
79. “Nature is the ___ of God”: Dante : ART
81. Something to live for : TODAY
83. Chaney of silents : LON
84. One at home, informally : UMP
85. Ape : MIMIC
88. “Zip it!” : SHUSH!
89. Things found in clogs : FEET
90. Bourbon Street’s locale, informally : NOLA
92. Frenzy : MANIA
94. Stadium name near Citi Field : ARTHUR ASHE
96. Spectators’ area : GRANDSTAND
98. “Harlequin’s Carnival” painter : MIRO
99. James ___, Belgian painter in the movement Les XX : ENSOR
100. Flowchart symbol : ARROW
101. Saskatchewan native : CREE
102. It represents you : AVATAR
104. Old-timey : RETRO
106. First and last black key on a standard piano : A-SHARP
108. Gas type: Abbr. : REG
109. Location of 59-Across : QUEENS, NEW YORK
114. Fly-by-night? : BAT
115. Canapé topper : ROE
116. Computer command : UNDO
117. Time to vote: Abbr. : TUE
118. Italian car, informally : ALFA
119. Lead-in to “Man,” “Woman” or “Fool” in Top 40 hits : I’M A …
120. Further : AND
121. Part of U.S.T.A.: Abbr. : ASSN
122. City grid: Abbr. : STS
123. Enthusiasm : ZEST
124. Lion or tiger : CAT

Down

1. Employs : WIELDS
2. Not for keeps : ON LOAN
3. Low soccer score : ONE-NIL
4. Wittily insults : ZINGS
5. Number on a trophy : YEAR
6. “Alas …” : SADLY …
7. One of a well-known septet : ENVY
8. Inits. in 2010 news : ACA
9. Broadway’s Cariou : LEN
10. Computer key : ALT
11. Utterly uninspiring : BLAH
12. Oscar-nominated George of “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” : SEGAL
13. Designer Jacobs : MARC
14. Emotionally detached : ALOOF
15. Jungle predator : JAGUAR
16. Code you don’t want to break : OMERTA
17. Returned to earth? : ROTTED
19. “I can’t talk now” : CALL ME LATER
20. Louisville standout : DERBY WINNER
26. Candidate for rehab : ABUSER
28. Square dance maneuver : DO-SI-DO
31. Oscar-winning film of 1984 : AMADEUS
32. Revel : CAROUSE
33. College in Boston : EMERSON
37. Whole host : RAFT
38. “Why should ___?” : I CARE
39. Win every game : SWEEP
41. Security agreement : LIEN
43. One way to answer a server? : BACKHAND SHOT
46. Winning words : GAME, SET, MATCH
47. Guy : FELLA
48. Dweller along the Bering Sea : ALEUT
49. The “L” of L.C.D. : LEAST
52. Genius Bar employees : TECHS
53. Relish : EAT UP
54. Rugged, as a landscape : STONY
60. Impotent : HELPLESS
61. Paradigm : EXEMPLAR
64. Submerge : BURY
67. Cybertrash : SPAM
71. Force (into) : SHOEHORN
72. When the diet starts, perhaps : TOMORROW
75. Locale for Charlie Chan : OAHU
77. Dating profile section : INTERESTS
78. Denims : DUNGAREES
80. Purchases at tire shops : RIMS
81. Do well with : THRIVE ON
82. Fit to be tied : OUTRAGED
86. How the Quran is written : IN ARABIC
87. Film-related anagram of AMERICAN : CINERAMA
88. City in Iraq’s Sunni Triangle : SAMARRA
89. Clear the air? : FAN
91. “I’ll take that as ___” : A NO
93. Proficient in : ADEPT AT
95. Much TV fare during the wee hours : RERUNS
97. Towers over : DWARFS
103. Blue hue : AQUA
105. Metal fastener : T-NUT
107. Three-person card game : SKAT
110. Vox V.I.P.s : EDS
111. Forever and a day : EON
112. Red Sox Hall-of-Famer, to fans : YAZ
113. “Bravo!” : OLE!

11 thoughts on “0826-18 NY Times Crossword 26 Aug 18, Sunday”

  1. 42:42. Did this one on the plane last night coming back from a week’s vacation. Glad it was a relatively easy one. I’m not sure I had the mental energy for a more challenging one.

    Never heard of Nellie BLY. Intersting woman, indeed.

    Best –

  2. Thanks for having a woman design the puzzle. Please include more female puzzle makers, as we who are women often find their clues more accessible.

  3. 75 min. and no errors.
    Spent a lot of time in the upper right corner.
    Tues is a day to vote and not a time. Hey pal what time is it? Why according to my watch it’s Tues ? I think that would be the time to get a new watch.

  4. 51. Dreams up : IDEATES had to look it up. Just did not look right after we filled it in.

    Another new word for us and so it goes.

    Nice puzzle See you next week.

  5. 32 mins 15 sec, and 2 errors: SA(M)ARRA/(M)IRO. Not up on my painters or my Iraqi geography…. not an easy one, especially if you’re not a hardcore tennis fan. Didn’t see the racket in the center, nor did BALL come quickly to mind. Oh well, at least it didn’t get in the way of solving.

  6. 36:17, no errors. Similar to @Allen Dickerson, I had to guess at the cross between SAMARRA/MIRO, just happened to guess correctly. Also got thrown by IDEATES, although I have heard the expression before, initially entered CREATES.

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