1030-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 14, Thursday

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CROSSWORD SETTER: David Woolf
THEME: Chips Ahoy … today’s grid resembles a CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE. The crossword is a rebus puzzle, with the letters CHIP appearing together in some chairs, which I have denoted in my grid with a black disc:

16A. Entertainers with something to get off their chests? : CHIPPENDALES DANCERS
23A. Wise one? : POTATO CHIP
29A. Contribute : CHIP IN
42A. The Bahamas, e.g. : ARCHIPELAGO
56A. Treat represented visually by this puzzle’s answer : CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE
16D. Tribe of the Upper Midwest : CHIPPEWA
26D. Nonhuman singer of a 1958 #1 song : CHIPMUNK
29D. Fast-food chain named after a spice : CHIPOTLE
44D. They may be made with pitching wedges : CHIP SHOTS
59D. Upbeat : CHIPPER

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 24m 55s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

10. Actor Guy of “Memento” : PEARCE
Guy Pearce is an Australian actor (actually born in England) who got his break playing in the Aussie soap opera “Neighbours”. I remember him playing drag queen Felicia Jollygoodfellow in the entertaining Australian film “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” (1994). He also appeared in several hit American movies, such as “L.A. Confidential”, “The Count of Monte Cristo” and “The Time Machine”.

13. They may be blocked in the winter : SINUSES
In anatomical terms a sinus is a cavity in tissue. Sinuses are found all over the body, in the kidney and heart for example, but we most commonly think of the paranasal sinuses that surround the nose.

16. Entertainers with something to get off their chests? : CHIPPENDALES DANCERS
Chippendales is a big touring operation featuring exotic male dancers. The show started out as a nightclub in Los Angeles in the early eighties.

20. ___ Dome (old Colts home) : RCA
The RCA Dome was probably better known as the Hoosier dome, home to the Indianapolis Colts from 1984-2007. It was torn down in 2008, but the inflated roof was put to good use afterwards. The material was re-purposed by local artisans, creating wallets, messenger bags etc. These can still be purchased, with proceeds going to charity.

23. Wise one? : POTATO CHIP
The Wise Potato Chip Company was founded in 1921 by Earl Wise, Sr.

27. Transfer ___ : RNA
Ribonucleic Acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by what is called transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

28. Jokester : WAG
A “wag” or a “card” is a very amusing person, one who is often quite eccentric.

30. Focus of The Source magazine : RAP MUSIC
“The Source” is a monthly magazine that mainly covers the world of rap music, but also some politics and culture. I don’t have a subscription …

32. John McCain, for one : ARIZONIAN
John McCain went into the US Naval Academy in 1958, following a family tradition as his father and grandfather were both four-star admirals. The younger McCain did not achieve the same rank, retiring from the Navy as a captain in 1981, but his career development was interrupted by almost six years spent as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam. John McCain has been a US Senator from Arizona since 1987.

36. Summer abroad : ETE
In French, spring (printemps) is followed by summer (été).

37. French woman’s name meaning “bringer of victory” : VERONIQUE
Veronique is the French form of the female name Veronica. The name ultimately comes from the Greek “phero” meaning “to bring” and “nike” meaning “victory”.

42. The Bahamas, e.g. : ARCHIPELAGO
“Archipelago” is a name often used for a group or chain of islands. “Archipelago” is our spelling of the Italian “arcipelago”, a word that has Greek roots. “Arcipelago” was the proper name for the Aegean Sea in Greek, a word that was eventually used for the Aegean Islands.

The Bahamas is a group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean, lying in the same island chain as Cuba and Hispaniola. The Bahamas was a British colony for many years but became independent in 1973, although it retains membership in the British Commonwealth.

47. Tar Heels’ sch. : UNC
The University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill started enrolling students way back in 1795, making it the oldest public university in the country (the first to enrol students).

Tar Heel is a nickname for anyone living in, or from, the state of North Carolina. As such, it is the nickname also of the athletic teams of the University of North Carolina. No one seems to know for sure where the term “Tar Heel” originated, but it is thought to be related to the historical importance of the tar, pitch and turpentine industries that thrived in the state due to the presence of vast forests of pine trees.

51. Slimming technique, briefly : LIPO
Liposuction dates back to the 1920s when it was developed by a surgeon in France. However, the procedure quickly lost favor when a French model developed gangrene after surgery. As a result it wasn’t until the mid-seventies that modern liposuction took off, after being popularized by two Italian-American surgeons in Rome.

54. Burns with a camera : KEN
Ken Burns directs and produces epic documentary films that usually make inventive use of archive footage. Recent works are the sensational “The War” (about the US in WWII) and the magnificent “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea”. Burns’ latest offering is 2014’s “The Roosevelts”.

55. O.C.’s home : SOCAL
“The O.C.” is a teen drama that aired for four seasons on Fox finishing up in 2007. I never watched it, but I understand that it is set in Newport Beach in Southern California.

63. Good Samaritan, e.g. : SAINT
“The Good Samaritan” is a parable told by Jesus that can be read in the Gospel of Luke. According to the story, a Jewish traveler is robbed, beaten and left for dead at the side of the road. A priest happens by and sees the poor man, but does not stop to help. A fellow Jew also passes and refuses to help. A third man stops and gives aid. This kind person is a Samaritan, a native of Samaria. Back then Jewish and Samaritan people were said to generally despise each other, and yet here a detested creature gives aid. Jesus told the story to a self-righteous lawyer, the intent being (I assume) to shake up his self-righteousness.

65. Development on the north side? : MOSS
There is a traditionally-held belief that in the northern hemisphere there is a heavier growth of moss on the north-facing side of trees. The assumption is that the sun creates a drier environment on the south side of the tree, an environment that is less conducive to the growth of moss.

66. Mountain nymph : OREAD
The Oreads were the nymphs that accompanied the goddess Artemis on her hunting expeditions.

Down
1. Anise relative : FENNEL
Fennel is a hardy perennial plant species in the celery family that is used as a herb. Personally, I can’t stand fennel …

3. Major figure in space? : URSA
The constellation called Ursa Major (Latin for “Larger Bear”) is often just called the Big Dipper because of its resemblance to a ladle or dipper. Ursa Major also resembles a plow, and that’s what we usually call the same constellation back in Ireland: the “plough”.

4. NATO member with the smallest population: Abbr. : ICEL
Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in the whole of Europe, with two-thirds of the nation’s population residing in and around the capital city of Reykjavik. Iceland was settled by the Norse people in AD 874, and was ruled for centuries by Norway and then Denmark. Iceland became independent in 1918, and has been republic since 1944.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was founded not long after WWII in 1949 and is headquartered in Brussels, Belgium. The first NATO Secretary General was Lord Ismay, Winston Churchill’s chief military assistant during WWII. Famously, Lord Ismay said the goal of NATO was “to keep the Russians out, the Americans in, and the Germans down.”

7. Lab safety org. : OSHA
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1970 during the Nixon administration. OSHA regulates workplaces in the private sector and regulates just one government agency, namely the US Postal Service.

10. Popular Polish dish : PIEROGI
Pierogi are stuffed dumplings made using unleavened dough, and a traditional dish from Poland.

12. Mideast chieftains: Var. : EMEERS
In English, emir can also be written as emeer, amir and ameer (watch out for those spellings in crosswords!).

13. Aston Martin DB5, for 007 : SPY CAR
Aston Martin is a British car manufacturer, founded in 1913 by Lionel Martin. The Aston part of the company name comes from Aston Hill, a famous site for hill-climbing cars that is nearby the original factory. Aston Martin cars are much loved by the British entertainment industry. Of course James Bond was given one in “Goldfinger”, and Michael Caine drove one in the 1969 version of “The Italian Job”. Roger Moore’s character drove a yellow Aston Martin in the seventies television show “The Persuaders!”.

15. Qom resident, e.g. : IRANI
Qom (also Qum) is a city in Iran located about 100 miles southwest of Tehran. Qom is a holy city in the Shi’a Islam tradition, and a pilgrimage destination.

16. Tribe of the Upper Midwest : CHIPPEWA
The Ojibwe (also “Ojibwa”) are the second-largest of the First Nations, surpassed only by the Cree. The name “Ojibwa” is more common in Canada, whereas the alternative anglicization “Chippewa” is more common in the US.

17. Writer John who was an authority on cards : SCARNE
John Scarne was an American magician who was known in particular for his card tricks. He also wrote a number of books on card games and gambling. Perhaps even more impressive is that he invented the shoe used in a casino for dealing cards. The dealing device is so called because early versions resembled a woman’s high-heel shoe.

18. Abbr. on a music score : STAC
Staccato is a musical direction signifying that notes should be played in a disconnected form. The opposite of staccato would be legato, long and continuous notes played very smoothly.

23. Kind of gland : PINEAL
The pineal gland is a small gland located in the epithalamus, near the center of the brain. The gland gets its name from its shape, like a tiny pine cone. The pineal gland produces melatonin, a hormone that helps maintain our circadian rhythm, so varying levels of melatonin control our sleep-wake cycle.

24. Covert maritime org. : ONI
The Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) is the oldest of the US intelligence services. The ONI was set up in 1882 to determine the state of advancement of foreign naval forces.

26. Nonhuman singer of a 1958 #1 song : CHIPMUNK
Alvin and the Chipmunks is a cartoon musical group that was created for the recording of a novelty song in 1958 called “The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don’t Be Late)”. The three Chipmunks (Alvin, Simon and Theodore) were all voiced by singer Ross Bagdasarian, Sr. but with a speedy playback to create high-pitched voices.

29. Fast-food chain named after a spice : CHIPOTLE
A chipotle is a smoke-dried jalapeño.

31. News inits. : UPI
Founded in 1958, United Press International (UPI) was one of the biggest news agencies in the world, sending out news by wire to the major newspapers. UPI ran into trouble with the change in media formats at the end of the twentieth century and lost many of its clients as the afternoon newspapers shut down due to the advent of television news. UPI, which once employed thousands, still exists today but with just a handful of employees.

33. Last thing learned in kindergarten? : ZEE
The letter named “zed” has been around since about 1400, and derives from the Greek letter zeta. The spelling and pronunciation of “zee” used in America today first popped up in the 1670s.

“Kindergarten” is a German term, literally meaning “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

34. Long-billed wader : AVOCET
The avocet is found in warm climates, usually in saline wetlands where it uses its upcurved bill to sweep from side-to-side in water searching for aquatic insects on which it feeds. Avocets, and other similar species, may go by the common name of “stilts”, a moniker applied to them because of their long legs.

39. Like liquor, in an Ogden Nash verse : QUICKER
Ogden Nash the poet was well known for his light and humorous verse, such as:

Candy
Is dandy
But liquor
Is quicker

41. Place for un instituteur : ECOLE
In French, one might find a teacher (instituteur) in a school (école).

43. Nouveau ___ : RICHE
The “nouveau riche” are people who have achieved their wealth themselves, not from an inheritance. “Nouveau riche” is French for “new rich”.

50. Group associated with many tourist destinations : UNESCO
The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization is better known by the acronym “UNESCO”. UNESCO’s mission is help build peace in the world using programs focused on education, the sciences, culture, communication and information. The organization’s work is aimed in particular at Africa, and gender equalization. UNESCO also administers a World Heritage Site program that designates and helps conserve sites of outstanding cultural or natural importance to humanity across the world.

53. Philosopher William of ___ : OCCAM
Ockham’s Razor (also Occam’s Razor) is a principle in philosophy and science that basically states that the simplest explanation is usually the correct one. This explanation is a corollary to the more exact statement of the principle, that one shouldn’t needlessly use assumptions in explaining something. The principle was developed by 14th-century logician and Franciscan Friar William of Ockham (or “Occam” in Latin). The principle is dubbed a “razor” as it is used as a philosophical tool used to cut out absurd and spurious reasoning in an argument.

57. Lima’s place : OHIO
Lima is a city located in northwestern Ohio, about 70 miles north of Dayton. The city is home to the Lima Army Tank Plant, where the M1 Abrams battle tank is produced. Lima is also home to the fictional William McKinley High School that is the setting for the TV series “Glee”.

60. Eye part : CONE
The retina is the tissue that lines the inside of the eye, the tissue that is light-sensitive. There are (mainly) two types of cell in the retina that are sensitive to light, called rods and cones. Rods are cells that best function in very dim light and only provide black-and-white vision. Cones on the other hand function in brighter light and can perceive color.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Moving : FLUID
6. Wizard’s wear : ROBE
10. Actor Guy of “Memento” : PEARCE
11. Indivisibly : AS ONE
13. They may be blocked in the winter : SINUSES
14. Last line of many a riddle : WHO AM I?
16. Entertainers with something to get off their chests? : CHIPPENDALES DANCERS
19. Funeral masses : PYRES
20. ___ Dome (old Colts home) : RCA
21. Milk source : TEAT
22. Green sci. : ECOL
23. Wise one? : POTATO CHIP
27. Transfer ___ : RNA
28. Jokester : WAG
29. Contribute : CHIP IN
30. Focus of The Source magazine : RAP MUSIC
32. John McCain, for one : ARIZONIAN
35. Baby seal : PUP
36. Summer abroad : ETE
37. French woman’s name meaning “bringer of victory” : VERONIQUE
42. The Bahamas, e.g. : ARCHIPELAGO
46. Word before an advice columnist’s name : ASK
47. Tar Heels’ sch. : UNC
48. A tot may have a big one : SIS
49. Engage in oratory : ELOCUTE
51. Slimming technique, briefly : LIPO
52. What a well may produce : ECHO
54. Burns with a camera : KEN
55. O.C.’s home : SOCAL
56. Treat represented visually by this puzzle’s answer : CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIE
61. One using acid, say : ETCHER
62. Wore : SPORTED
63. Good Samaritan, e.g. : SAINT
64. Arena, maybe : CENTER
65. Development on the north side? : MOSS
66. Mountain nymph : OREAD

Down
1. Anise relative : FENNEL
2. Hails : LAUDS
3. Major figure in space? : URSA
4. NATO member with the smallest population: Abbr. : ICEL
5. Hot spot : DESERT
6. Spreadsheet input : RAW DATA
7. Lab safety org. : OSHA
8. Benefit : BOON
9. Pass : ENACT
10. Popular Polish dish : PIEROGI
12. Mideast chieftains: Var. : EMEERS
13. Aston Martin DB5, for 007 : SPY CAR
15. Qom resident, e.g. : IRANI
16. Tribe of the Upper Midwest : CHIPPEWA
17. Writer John who was an authority on cards : SCARNE
18. Abbr. on a music score : STAC
23. Kind of gland : PINEAL
24. Covert maritime org. : ONI
25. Fight against : OPPOSE
26. Nonhuman singer of a 1958 #1 song : CHIPMUNK
29. Fast-food chain named after a spice : CHIPOTLE
31. News inits. : UPI
33. Last thing learned in kindergarten? : ZEE
34. Long-billed wader : AVOCET
38. Teller? : RAT
39. Like liquor, in an Ogden Nash verse : QUICKER
40. Like volunteer work : UNPAID
41. Place for un instituteur : ECOLE
42. “Wait ___!” : A SEC
43. Nouveau ___ : RICHE
44. They may be made with pitching wedges : CHIP SHOTS
45. Vehicles that often have unlicensed drivers : GO KARTS
50. Group associated with many tourist destinations : UNESCO
51. Took stock? : LOOTED
53. Philosopher William of ___ : OCCAM
55. “… ish” : SORTA
57. Lima’s place : OHIO
58. Eye part : LENS
59. Upbeat : CHIPPER
60. Eye part : CONE

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4 thoughts on “1030-14 New York Times Crossword Answers 30 Oct 14, Thursday”

  1. @Bill

    Thanks for explaining 23 Across. I'd never heard of the Wise Potato Chip company. I'll have to check the shelves in my local King Soopers and see if they're there, next to the Lay's.

  2. BOOOOOOO…. rebus trick puzzles are the worst. Besides the trickery, the vague, slippery editing made this one unsolveable. BOOOOOOO… time for Shortz to retire.

  3. The origins of Veronique are debatable. I have read that that it means "true image" as associated with St. Veronica.

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