0602-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 2 Jun 13, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Elizabeth C. Gorski
THEME: Stir Crazy … we have a rebus puzzle today, with the colors RED and BLUE stirred together crazily to make THE COLOR PURPLE. I’ve indicated the rebus squares with a dark rectangle in the grid. We use the letters BLUE in those squares to make sense of the across answers, and the letters RED in those squares to make sense of the down answers:

116A. Alice Walker novel … or a hint to 12 squares in this puzzle : THE COLOR PURPLE
22A. Chattered on and on and on : TALKED A (BLUE) STREAK
35A. Extremely exasperated : (BLUE) IN THE FACE
38A. 1990 Steve Martin/Rick Moranis comedy : MY (BLUE) HEAVEN
44A. Aqua : SEA (BLUE)
61A. Final exam handout : (BLUE) BOOK
62A. Formal military attire : DRESS (BLUE)S
65A. Phase associated with Picasso’s “The Old Guitarist” : (BLUE) PERIOD
86A. Brutal castle dweller in folk tales : (BLUE)BEARD
88A. Thomas Gainsborough masterpiece, with “The” : (BLUE) BOY
90A. 1929 Ethel Waters hit whose title is a question : AM I (BLUE)?
102A. One of four items worn by a bride, traditionally : SOMETHING (BLUE)
114A. Navy pilot putting on a show : (BLUE) ANGEL
8D. Flubbed it : ER(RED)
27D. Prepared, as apples for baking : CO(RED)
35D. Exchange for cash : (RED)EEM
37D. Likely to win : FAVO(RED)
45D. Snoopy’s archenemy : (RED) BARON
51D. Tatters : SH(RED)S
65D. Super-popular : (RED) HOT
70D. Matched (up) : PAI(RED)
83D. Nickname for Secretariat : BIG (RED)
84D. Belief system : C(RED)O
86D. Visibly embarrassed : (RED) AS A BEET
98D. Strengthened : SHO(RED) UP

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: Not recorded
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across
1. “You Send Me” singer : SAM COOKE

Sam Cooke was a soul singer from Clarksdale, Mississippi. Cooke is considered by many to have been one of the founders of the soul genre. Cooke’s impressive list of hits includes “You Send Me”, Chain Gang” and “Twistin’ the Night Away”. Cooke was only 33 years old when he died. He was shot after a drunken brawl by a motel manager in what was deemed by the courts to be a justifiable homicide.

9. Adams with the 1991 hit “Get Here” : OLETA
Oleta Adams is an American soul singer from Seattle, Washington. Adams has had most of her success over in the UK, rather than here in the US.

19. Evergreen with aromatic blooms : OLEANDER
The oleander shrub or tree is extremely toxic, especially to humans and dogs. That said, rodents and birds seem to be relatively insensitive to the toxic compounds found in the plant.

21. Tailored sleeve detail : GUSSET
A gusset is a triangular insert in the seam of a garment, for added expansion.

27. Ruler divs. : CMS
Centimeters (cms.)

29. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “The Pearl of ___ Island” : ORR’S
Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote a novel called “The Pearl of Orr’s Island” which is about a young woman trying to establish herself among the inhabitants of Orr’s Island in the Gulf of Maine.

38. 1990 Steve Martin/Rick Moranis comedy : MY (BLUE) HEAVEN
The 1990 film “My Blue Heaven” stars Steve Martin, Rick Moranis and Joan Cusack. The screenplay was written by Nora Ephron, and is based on research that she and her husband Nicholas Pileggi did for Pileggi’s book “Wiseguy”. The movie “Goodfellas” was released just one month after “My Blue Heaven”, and is based on the “Wiseguy” book.

40. Part of a wedding celebration : HORA
The hora (also “horah”) is a circle dance that originated in the Balkans. The hora was brought to Israel by Romanian settlers, and is often performed to traditional Israeli folk songs. The dance is a regular sight at Jewish weddings and at bar and bat mitzvahs. At such events, it is common for the honorees to be raised on chairs during the dance.

43. Its last word is “zyxt”: Abbr. : OED
The “Oxford English Dictionary” (OED) contains over 300,000 “main” entries and 59 million words in total. It is said it would take a single person 120 years to type it out in full. The longest entry for one word in the second edition of the OED is the verb “set”. When the third edition was published in 2007, the longest entry for a single word became the verb “put”. Perhaps not surprisingly, the most-quoted author in the OED is William Shakespeare, with his most quoted work being “Hamlet”. The most-quoted female author is George Eliot (aka Mary Ann Evans).

“Zyxt” is an obsolete word from the county of Kent in the south of England, and is a form of the verb “to see”.

46. Blazers, e.g., in brief : SUVS
The term SUV, an acronym for Sports Utility Vehicle, was introduced by our marketing friends. Using the term Sports Utility Vehicle was a very clever way to get us to pay a lot of money for what was essentially a station wagon on a truck chassis, or at least it was back then.

48. Young cow : HEIFER
A calf is a young cow of either sex that is not more than a year old. A heifer is a young cow that has not calved, and the term “cow” can be used for a female of the species that has given birth.

53. One of the little things in life? : AMEBA
An ameba (or “amoeba” as we spell it back in Ireland) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

55. Title song of a 1970 Van Morrison album : MOONDANCE
Van Morrison is a singer-songwriter from Belfast in Northern Ireland. Back in Ireland we refer to him as “Van the Man”. Some of his more famous songs are “Brown Eyed Girl”, “Moondance” and “Have I Told You Lately”.

58. K-12, in education : ELHI
“Elhi” is an informal word used to describe anything related to schooling from grades 1 through 12, i.e. elementary through high school.

59. A guitar may be connected to it : AMP
An electric guitar, for example, needs an amplifier (amp) to take the weak signal created by the vibration of the strings and turn it into a signal powerful enough for a loudspeaker.

61. Final exam handout : (BLUE) BOOK
“Blue book exam” is a term used for a test given at many colleges in the US. Blue book exams usually involve the writing of essays. The first blue book exams were administered by Butler University in Indianapolis, and the “blue” was chosen because Butler’s school colors are blue and white. The color blue is still commonly used regardless of which school is giving the test, although other colors can be used.

62. Formal military attire : DRESS (BLUE)S
The Marine Corps Blue Dress uniform is the one that is perhaps most recognizable, and is often used in recruiting posters.

65. Phase associated with Picasso’s “The Old Guitarist” : (BLUE) PERIOD
Picasso’s Blue Period refers to his works completed between 1901 and 1904. All his paintings in the era were basically monochromatic, using different shades of blue. HIs best-known work from the period is “The Old Guitarist”, which you can see at the Art Institute of Chicago.

69. Substitute currency : SCRIP
Scrip isn’t legal tender, but operates just like currency in specific applications. It is in effect a form of credit. Originally the word “scrip” was used for a certificate giving one the right to receive something, often shares of a stock. “Scrip” is probably short for (sub)script(ion) receipt.

73. “You’re ___ one, Mr. Grinch” : A MEAN
The Grinch is the title character in Dr. Seuss’s 1957 children’s book “How the Grinch Stole Christmas! Based on Seuss’s hero, we now use the term “grinch” for someone opposed to Christmas festivities or coarse and greedy in general.

81. Final non-A.D. year : ONE BC
The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

86. Brutal castle dweller in folk tales : (BLUE)BEARD
“Bluebeard” is a folktale from France that tells of a brutal nobleman who routinely murders his wives, and the attempts of one wife to avoid the same fate.

88. Thomas Gainsborough masterpiece, with “The” : (BLUE) BOY
“The Blue Boy” is the most famous painting by English artist Thomas Gainsborough. The masterpiece can be seen in the Huntington Library in San Marino, California. When Henry Huntington purchased “The Blue Boy” in 1921, it fetched $728,800, which was a record price for any painting up till then.

90. 1929 Ethel Waters hit whose title is a question : AM I (BLUE)?
Ethel Waters was a singer and actress. Waters was the second African American to be nominated for an Academy Award (after Hattie McDaniel). She received the nomination as Best Supporting Actress in 1949, for her performance in the film “Pinky” in which she played the title character’s grandmother.

91. Author Santha Rama ___ : RAU
Santha Rama Rau was a travel writer from India who lived much of her life in the US. As well as writing her own books, Rau also adapted for the stage the E. M. Forster novel “A Passage to India”.

92. Brown ermine : STOAT
Ermine is another name for the stoat. The stoat has dark brown fur in the summer, and white fur in the winter. Sometimes the term “ermine” is reserved for the animal during the winter when the fur is white. Ermine skins have long been prized by royalty and are often used for white trim on ceremonial robes.

102. One of four items worn by a bride, traditionally : SOMETHING (BLUE)
The tradition of a new bride wearing something old, new, borrowed and blue comes from a traditional English rhyme that dates back to the 1800s:

Something old,
something new,
something borrowed,
something blue,
and a silver sixpence in her shoe.

110. Infection fighter : T CELL
T cells are a group of white blood cells that are essential components of the body’s immune system. T cells are so called because they mature in the thymus, a specialized organ found in the chest.

111. Calls to Bo Peep : BAAS
The lines that are most commonly quoted for the rhyme about “Little Bo Peep” are:

Little Bo-Peep has lost her sheep,
And can’t tell where to find them;
Leave them alone, And they’ll come home,
Wagging their tails behind them.But, there are actually four more verses, including this one:
It happened one day, as Bo-peep did stray
Into a meadow hard by,
There she espied their tails side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.

114. Navy pilot putting on a show : (BLUE) ANGEL
“Blue Angels” is the popular name for the US Navy’s Flight Demonstration Squadron. The group was formed in 1946 and is the oldest of the US military’s flying aerobatic teams. The squadron took its nickname back in ‘46 from the Blue Angel nightclub that was around at that time in New York City.

116. Alice Walker novel … or a hint to 12 squares in this puzzle : THE COLOR PURPLE
Alice Walker is an author and poet. Walker’s best known work is the novel “The Color Purple”, which earned her the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. “The Color Purple” was of course adapted into a very successful film of the same name, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Whoopi Goldberg.

122. Alvar who designed Finlandia Hall : AALTO
Alvar Aalto was a Finnish architect and designer. He did most of his work in the first half of the twentieth century, and earned himself the nickname of “Father of Modernism” in Finland and the rest of the Nordic countries.

Finlandia Hall is a concert hall in Helsinki, Finland that was designed by noted architect Alvar Aalto.

124. Minor, in law : PETIT
In the law, “petit” means “lessor, minor”. The term came into use via Middle Englsh from Old French. “Petit” is still the French word for “small”.

Down
1. One going [hic!] : SOT
Our word “sot” comes from the Old English “sott”, meaning a fool. The word “sot” started to be associated with alcohol and not just foolery in the late 1500s.

2. Kyrgyzstan range : ALAI
The Trans-Alay (also “Trans Alai”) range is in the Pamir Mountains lying between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. The highest point in the range is called Lenin peak.

7. Mauna ___ : KEA
Mauna Kea is a dormant volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii, the peak of which is the highest point in the whole state. Mauna Kea is in effect the tip of a gigantic volcano rising up from the seabed. So, the “real” height of the volcano (ignoring the ocean) is over 33,000 feet, which is significantly “taller” than even Mount Everest, which has an elevation of 29,029 feet above sea level.

9. Seven-foot runner : OSTRICH
The ostrich is a flightless bird that is native to Africa. The ostrich is extensively farmed, mainly for its feathers but also for its skin/leather and meat.

10. Rhine siren : LORELEI
Lorelei is the name of a legendary mermaid who lured fishermen by singing a beautiful song so that they steered their boats onto rocks lurking beneath the water’s surface.

16. “Puzzles of the Black Widowers” author : ASIMOV
Isaac Asimov was a wonderful science fiction writer, and a professor of biochemistry. He was a favorite author as I was growing up and I must admit that some hero worship on my part led me to study and work as a biochemist for a short while early in my career. My favorite of his works is the collection of short stories called “I, Robot”, although Asimov’s most famous work is probably his “Foundation” trilogy of novels.

“Puzzles of the Black Widowers” is a collection of mystery stories by Isaac Asimov. The Black Widowers are a fictional club of mystery solvers who appear in six of Asimov’s books in all.

18. Tyler of rock : STEVEN
Steven Tyler is the lead singer of the rock band Aerosmith, which is based in Boston. Tyler likes to scream a lot on stage and is the known as the “Demon of Screamin’”. Tyler’s daughter is the actress Liv Tyler.

21. Sleuth, in slang : GUMSHOE
Gumshoe is a slang term for a private detective or private investigator (P.I.). Apparently the term “gumshoe” dates back to the early 1900s, and refers to the rubber-soled shoes popular with private detectives at that time.

23. ___ Genesis : SEGA
The Genesis is a video game console sold in the US by the Japanese company Sega. In the rest of the world, the console is sold as the Mega Drive, as Sega couldn’t get the rights to the Mega Drive name in the US.

36. “Dies ___” : IRAE
“Dies Irae” is Latin for “Day of Wrath”. It is the name of a famous melody in Gregorian Chant, one that is often used as part of the Roman Catholic Requiem Mass.

39. Smokey the Bear spot, e.g., for short : PSA
Public service announcement (PSA).

Smokey Bear (and not Smokey “the” Bear, as mentioned in the clue) is the mascot of the US Forest Service. Smokey first appeared in 1944, in an advertising campaign directed towards preventing forest fires.

45. Snoopy’s archenemy : (RED) BARON
Snoopy, the famous beagle in the “Peanuts” comic strip, has a number of alter-egos and is sometimes depicted as a World War I flying ace piloting a Sopwith Camel biplane. Snoopy’s arch-enemy in the air is Manfred von Richthofen, the Red Baron, and Snoopy can often be seen shaking his fist and crying out, “Curse you, Red Baron!”

49. A.T.F. agents, e.g. : FEDS
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) is today part of the Department of Justice. The ATF has its roots in the Department of Treasury dating back to 1886 when it was known as the Bureau of Prohibition. “Explosives” was added to the ATF’s name when the bureau was moved under the Department of Justice as part of the reorganization called for in the Homeland Security Act of 2002.

50. “Casablanca” role : ILSA
Ilsa Lund was of course played by Ingrid Bergman in the 1942 movie “Casablanca”. I love the words of one critic describing the chemistry between Bogart and Bergman in this film: “she paints his face with her eyes”. Wow …

54. Forest Whitaker’s Oscar-winning role : AMIN
“The Last King of Scotland” is a 2006 film adaptation of a 1998 novel of the same name by Giles Foden. The story tells of a Scottish doctor (played by James McAvoy) who was employed by Idi Amin (played by Forest Whitaker). The title of the piece comes from the fact that Idi Amin offered his services as King of Scotland, should he ever be needed.

57. Puccini’s “Nessun ___” : DORMA
“Nessun dorma” has to be the tenor aria that most tugs at the heart strings. It is taken from the last act of Puccini’s opera “Turandot”, and translates as “None shall sleep”. Back in my part of the world, “Nessun dorma” became a hit in the popular music charts, with a version by Pavarotti being used as the theme song to the 1990 FIFA World Cup in Italy. No other classical recording has ever done better in the charts.

58. Dalí’s homeland, to Dalí : ESPANA
The famous surrealist painter Salvador Dalí was born in Figueres, Spain. I had the privilege of visiting the Dalí Museum in Figueres some years ago, just north of Barcelona. If you ever get the chance, it’s a “must see” as it really is a quite magnificent building with a fascinating collection.

66. Corn bread : PONE
Pone is another word for corn bread, from the Powhatan word “apan” meaning “something baked”.

67. “The Far Pavilions,” for one : EPIC
“The Far Pavilions” is a novel by M. M. Kaye that tells the story of an English officer during the British Raj. The most famous screen adaptation of the novel is a 3-part TV miniseries from 1984 starring Ben Cross, Amy Irving, Omar Sharif and Christopher Lee.

78. Social division : CASTE
Many creatures organize themselves into a social structure, a phenomenon known as “eusociality”. Examples of such creatures would be ants, bees and wasps, where there are queens, workers and soldiers. The groups within such a hierarchical structure are known as castes. The word “caste” was borrowed from the class divisions in Indian society (although the word “caste” and hierarchical concept was actually introduced by the Portuguese).

79. One-named designer : ERTE
Erté was the pseudonym of French artist (Russian born) Romain de Tirtoff. Erté is the French pronunciation of his initials “R.T.”

83. Nickname for Secretariat : BIG (RED)
The thoroughbred racehorse Secretariat was rated the 35th best athlete in the 20th century by ESPN in 1999!

84. Belief system : C(RED)O
“Credo” is the Latin word for “I believe”.

87. Songbirds in “The Rubáiyát” : BULBULS
Bulbuls are medium-sized songbirds. “Bulbul” comes from the Persian word for “nightingale” even though the bulbul is a completely different type of bird.

Omar Khayyam was a Persian with many talents. He was a poet as well as an important mathematician, astronomer and physician. A selection of his poems were translated by one Edward Fitzgerald in a collection called “Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam”.

89. Jewish males’ org. : YMHA
The Young Men’s Hebrew Association (YMHA) and Young Women’s Hebrew Association (YWHA) provide assistance for Jewish immigrants.

91. Pastrami go-with : RYE
In the US, pastrami was originally called “pastrama”, a dish brought to America by Jewish immigrants from Romania in the second half of the the nineteenth century. The original name may have evolved from the Turkish word “pastirma” meaning “pressed”. “Pastrama” likely morphed into “pastrami”, influenced by the name of the Italian sausage that we call salami.

94. Skating move : TOE LOOP
A toe loop is a relatively simple jump in figure skating (not that I could do one!). In a toe loop, the skater uses the toe pick on the skate to lift off on a backward outside edge, landing on the same backward outside edge.

96. Relentless fighter : PITBULL
Sadly, the pit bull breed of dogs have earned themselves a poor reputation. I just read that pit bulls make up about 2% of the dogs in the US but about 40% of the dog attacks in the country have been attributed to the breed.

99. Herbal brew : TISANE
“Tisane” is another word for herbal tea. “Tisane” comes into English via French from the Greek “ptisane”, the word for crushed barley.

100. Hannah who wrote “Men in Dark Times” : ARENDT
Hannah Arendt was studying and working the field of philosophy when she had to flee her native Germany in the runup to WWII because of her Jewish heritage. She ended up in the US in 1941, and took posts in various schools here. In 1969 she was appointed full professor at Princeton, the first woman to win such a position, and a decade before women students were admitted to the college.

101. Priestly robe : ALB
The alb is the white, neck-to-toe vestment worn by priests, usually with a rope cord around the waist. The term alb comes from “albus”, the Latin word for “white”.

106. Amtrak bullet train : ACELA
The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, getting up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. The brand name “Acela” was created to evoke “acceleration” and “excellence”.

112. Mil. addresses : APOS
Army Post Office (APO)

117. She-bear: Sp. : OSA
In Spanish, “osa” is a female bear, and “oso” is a male.

119. ___ mater : PIA
“Pia mater” is Latin, and means “tender mother”. It is the name given to the mesh-like envelope that surrounds the brain and spinal cord. The pia mater brings blood to some of the exterior parts of the brain, and provides physical support for larger blood vessels passing over the brain’s surface.

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. “You Send Me” singer : SAM COOKE
9. Adams with the 1991 hit “Get Here” : OLETA
14. Hippie’s wear : BEADS
19. Evergreen with aromatic blooms : OLEANDER
20. Jazz club highlights : SOLOS
21. Tailored sleeve detail : GUSSET
22. Chattered on and on and on : TALKED A (BLUE) STREAK
24. One who works at home? : UMPIRE
25. Thought : IDEA
26. Upright : ERECT
27. Ruler divs. : CMS
28. Early second-millennium year : MIV
29. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “The Pearl of ___ Island” : ORR’S
32. Like many thrones : GILT
33. Theme of many a country song : LOST LOVE
35. Extremely exasperated : (BLUE) IN THE FACE
38. 1990 Steve Martin/Rick Moranis comedy : MY (BLUE) HEAVEN
39. According to : PER
40. Part of a wedding celebration : HORA
41. ___ hers : HIS OR
43. Its last word is “zyxt”: Abbr. : OED
44. Aqua : SEA (BLUE)
46. Blazers, e.g., in brief : SUVS
48. Young cow : HEIFER
50. You can believe it : ISM
53. One of the little things in life? : AMEBA
55. Title song of a 1970 Van Morrison album : MOONDANCE
58. K-12, in education : ELHI
59. A guitar may be connected to it : AMP
61. Final exam handout : (BLUE) BOOK
62. Formal military attire : DRESS (BLUE)S
65. Phase associated with Picasso’s “The Old Guitarist” : (BLUE) PERIOD
69. Substitute currency : SCRIP
71. Best : SURPASS
72. Board, as a carousel : HOP ONTO
73. “You’re ___ one, Mr. Grinch” : A MEAN
75. Fluffy neckwear : BOA
76. “What’s going ___ there?” : ON IN
77. Imagined series of events : SCENARIOS
81. Final non-A.D. year : ONE BC
85. Sleuth, in slang : TEC
86. Brutal castle dweller in folk tales : (BLUE)BEARD
88. Thomas Gainsborough masterpiece, with “The” : (BLUE) BOY
90. 1929 Ethel Waters hit whose title is a question : AM I (BLUE)?
91. Author Santha Rama ___ : RAU
92. Brown ermine : STOAT
95. Coal unit : LUMP
97. In the past : AGO
98. Works overtime, say : STAYS LATE
102. One of four items worn by a bride, traditionally : SOMETHING (BLUE)
105. Having the necessary work credentials : HIREABLE
106. “I Got ___” (silly children’s song with the line “Why is everyone laughing at me?”) : A PEA
107. Hardly fancy? : HATE
108. Sugary ending : -OSE
109. Fella : BUB
110. Infection fighter : T-CELL
111. Calls to Bo Peep : BAAS
114. Navy pilot putting on a show : (BLUE) ANGEL
116. Alice Walker novel … or a hint to 12 squares in this puzzle : THE COLOR PURPLE
121. Reverses : UNDOES
122. Alvar who designed Finlandia Hall : AALTO
123. Wind-driven craft : SAILBOAT
124. Minor, in law : PETIT
125. Wrap one’s brain around : GRASP
126. Wall Street workers : ANALYSTS

Down
1. One going [hic!] : SOT
2. Kyrgyzstan range : ALAI
3. Blend : MELD
4. Encrust, as mud might : CAKE ON
5. Terrestrial : ON EARTH
6. Quirky : ODD
7. Mauna ___ : KEA
8. Flubbed it : ER(RED)
9. Seven-foot runner : OSTRICH
10. Rhine siren : LORELEI
11. Opt : ELECT
12. Just so : TO A T
13. “Shoot” : ASK
14. Crummy advice : BUM STEER
15. Medium ability, for short : ESP
16. “Puzzles of the Black Widowers” author : ASIMOV
17. Draw (from) : DERIVE
18. Tyler of rock : STEVEN
21. Sleuth, in slang : GUMSHOE
23. ___ Genesis : SEGA
27. Prepared, as apples for baking : CO(RED)
30. Fraternity letters : RHOS
31. Lab fluid : SERUM
33. Kind of poetry : LYRIC
34. Knickers wearer : LAD
35. Exchange for cash : (RED)EEM
36. “Dies ___” : IRAE
37. Likely to win : FAVO(RED)
38. Faucet brand : MOEN
39. Smokey the Bear spot, e.g., for short : PSA
42. More iffy : SHAKIER
45. Snoopy’s archenemy : (RED) BARON
47. Cries a river : SOBS
49. A.T.F. agents, e.g. : FEDS
50. “Casablanca” role : ILSA
51. Tatters : SH(RED)S
52. Pageant title : MISS
54. Forest Whitaker’s Oscar-winning role : AMIN
56. “Fuggedaboutit!” : NO CAN DO!
57. Puccini’s “Nessun ___” : DORMA
58. Dalí’s homeland, to Dalí : ESPANA
60. Amount at stake : POT
63. Barbecue application : RUB
64. Suffix with smack : -EROO
65. Super-popular : (RED) HOT
66. Corn bread : PONE
67. “The Far Pavilions,” for one : EPIC
68. One tablet, maybe : DOSE
70. Matched (up) : PAI(RED)
74. Magnanimous : NOBLE
78. Social division : CASTE
79. One-named designer : ERTE
80. Go ___ (deteriorate) : SOUTH
82. Web periodical : EMAG
83. Nickname for Secretariat : BIG (RED)
84. Belief system : C(RED)O
86. Visibly embarrassed : (RED) AS A BEET
87. Songbirds in “The Rubáiyát” : BULBULS
89. Jewish males’ org. : YMHA
91. Pastrami go-with : RYE
93. Features : ASPECTS
94. Skating move : TOE LOOP
96. Relentless fighter : PITBULL
98. Strengthened : SHO(RED) UP
99. Herbal brew : TISANE
100. Hannah who wrote “Men in Dark Times” : ARENDT
101. Priestly robe : ALB
103. Promenade : MALL
104. Close : NEARBY
106. Amtrak bullet train : ACELA
110. “There’s gold in them ___ hills!” : THAR
112. Mil. addresses : APOS
113. Chair piece : SLAT
115. “… the grace of God ___” : GO I
116. There may be a high price on it : TAG
117. She-bear: Sp. : OSA
118. Oversaw : RAN
119. ___ mater : PIA
120. U.F.O. crew : ETS


Return to top of page

The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections
Amazon.com Widgets

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.