0116-24 NY Times Crossword 16 Jan 24, Tuesday

Constructed by: Marshal Herrmann
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: One L

Each and every answer in today’s grid includes only ONE letter L:

  • 62 First-year law student … or what every answer in this puzzle has exactly : ONE L

Bill’s time: 10m 58s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Publication that usually has only one contributor : BLOG

Many folks who visit this website regard it as just that, a website. That is true, but more specifically it is referred to as a blog, as I make regular posts (actually daily posts) that then occupy the “front page” of the site. The blog entries are in reverse chronological order, and one can just look back day-by-day, reading older and older posts. “Blog” is a contraction of the term “web log”.

14 Slimming surgery, for short : LIPO

Liposuction (lipo) dates back to the 1920s when it was developed by a surgeon in France. However, the procedure quickly lost favor when a French model developed gangrene after surgery. As a result, it wasn’t until the mid-seventies that modern liposuction took off, after being popularized by two Italian-American surgeons in Rome.

15 Writer Zora ___ Hurston : NEALE

Zora Neale Hurston was an American author who was most famous for her 1937 novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God”.

17 Nonstick cookware brand : T-FAL

Tefal (also “T-Fal”) is a French manufacturer of cookware that is famous for its nonstick line. The name “Tefal” is a portmanteau of TEFlon and ALuminum, the key materials used in producing their pots and pans.

20 Gesture involving hitting one’s own hand in celebration : SELF-FIVE

The celebratory gesture that we call a “high five” is said to have been invented by former baseball players Dusty Baker and Glenn Burke when they were both playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers in the late 1970s.

24 Singer Nat King ___ : COLE

Nat King Cole’s real name was Nathaniel Adams Coles. Cole made television history in 1956 when his own show debuted on NBC, a first for an African-American. Cole couldn’t pick up a national sponsor, so in order to save money and possibly save the show, many guest artists worked for no fee at all – the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Harry Belafonte and Peggy Lee. The show survived for a year, but eventually Nat King Cole had to pull the plug on it himself.

28 Material for some jewelry at a surf shop : SEA GLASS

Sea glass is weathered glass found on beaches. The original glass comes from things like broken bottles. The broken glass is rolled and tumbled for years in the sea, resulting in smooth edges and also a frosted appearance.

32 June birthstone : PEARL

Pearls form in oysters because of a reaction that is similar to an immune system response in higher animals. The pearl is formed as the oysters lay down successive layers of calcium carbonate around some microscopic foreign body that has penetrated the shell.

Here is the “official” list of birthstones, by month, that we tend to use today:

  • January: Garnet
  • February: Amethyst
  • March: Bloodstone or Aquamarine
  • April: Diamond
  • May: Emerald
  • June: Pearl or Moonstone
  • July: Ruby
  • August: Sardonyx or Peridot
  • September: Sapphire or Lapis Lazuli
  • October: Opal or Pink Tourmaline
  • November: Topaz or Citrine
  • December: Turquoise or Zircon (also now, Tanzanite)

34 Many a C-Span interviewee, informally : POL

C-SPAN is a privately-funded, nonprofit cable channel that broadcasts continuous coverage of government proceedings.

37 Game with nine rooms : CLUE

Clue is a board game that we knew under a different name growing up in Ireland. Outside of North America, Clue is marketed as “Cluedo”. Cluedo was the original name of the game, introduced in 1949 by the famous British board game manufacturer Waddingtons. There are cute differences between the US and UK versions. For example, the man who is murdered is called Dr. Black (Mr. Boddy in the US), one of the suspects is the Reverend Green (Mr. Green in the US), and the suspect weapons include a dagger (a knife in the US), and a spanner (a wrench in the US). I think it’s a fabulous game, a must during the holidays …

38 Trains that run to O’Hare airport : ELS

O’Hare International was the world’s busiest airport from 1963 to 1998. The original airport was constructed on the site between 1942 and 1943, and was used by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the manufacture of planes during WWII. Before the factory and airport were built, there was a community in the area called Orchard Place, so the airport was called Orchard Place Airport/Douglas Field. This name is the derivation of the airport’s current location identifier: ORD (OR-chard D-ouglas). Orchard Place Airport was renamed to O’Hare International in 1949 in honor of Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare who grew up in Chicago. O’Hare was the US Navy’s first flying ace and a Medal of Honor recipient in WWII.

39 Swindles : BILKS

The verb “to bilk”, meaning “to defraud”, comes from the card game of cribbage. “To bilk” in cribbage is to spoil someone’s score.

41 Criminal records? : BOOTLEGS

Illegal copies of records, perhaps.

To bootleg is to make or smuggle alcoholic drinks illegally. The term arose in the late 1800s as slang for the practice of concealing a flask of liquor down the leg of a high boot. The term has been extended to mean the illegal production and sale of just about anything.

43 Puts the kibosh on : HALTS

A kibosh is something that constrains or checks. “Kibosh” looks like a Yiddish word but it isn’t, and is more likely English slang from the early 1800s.

44 A “golden” one is an especially good thing to follow : RULE

The Golden Rule is also known as the ethic of reciprocity, and is a basis for the concept of human rights. A version of the rule used in the Christian tradition is attributed to Jesus:

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

A derivative phrase often heard today is “Love thy neighbor (as thyself)”.

45 Ohm’s law unit : VOLT

The volt is a unit of electric potential, or voltage. I always think of electrical voltage as something like water pressure. The higher the pressure of water (voltage), the faster the water flows (the higher the electric current that flows).

53 Movie theater eponym : LOEW

Loews Theatres was a chain of movie theaters founded in 1904 by Marcus Loew and Brantford Schwartz. The chain merged with AMC Theaters in 2006.

56 About 5,280 ft., for Denver : ELEV

Denver, Colorado is nicknamed “Mile-High City” because its official elevation is listed as exactly one mile. Denver City was founded in 1858 as a mining town. The name was chosen in honor of the Kansas Territorial Governor at the time, James W. Denver.

62 First-year law student … or what every answer in this puzzle has exactly : ONE L

“One L” is a name used in general for first-year law students, especially those attending Harvard.

Down

2 Classic photo magazine : LIFE

“Life” magazine was founded way back in 1883, and was originally structured as a humorous publication. It changed hands in 1936, when it was repurposed as a magazine with an emphasis on photojournalism. I am a big fan of the latter format, and have quite a few favorite issues in my private collection …

5 Blacksmiths’ blocks : ANVILS

A blacksmith is someone who forges and shapes iron, perhaps to make horseshoes. A farrier is someone who fits horseshoes onto the hooves of horses. The term “blacksmith” is sometimes used for one who shoes horses, especially as many blacksmiths make horseshoes and fit them as well.

7 One of 24 in a Chaucer book : TALE

“The Canterbury Tales” is a collection of stories penned by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. Written in MIddle English, the tales are presented as a storytelling contest held by a group of pilgrims as they travel from London to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral. “The Canterbury Tales” is often cited as a landmark piece of English literature as it popularized the use of vernacular English, as opposed to the French or Latin works that were commonly published up to that time.

8 Athlete who boasted “I’m young; I’m handsome; I’m fast; I’m pretty and can’t possibly be beat” : ALI

Boxer Muhammad Ali was born Cassius Mercellus Clay Jr. in Louisville, Kentucky in 1942. Clay joined the Nation of Islam in the early sixties, at which point he changed his name to Muhammad Ali. The name he chose translates into “one who is worthy of praise” (Muhammad) and “most high” (Ali).

12 Writer Wiesel : ELIE

Elie Wiesel was a holocaust survivor, and is best known for his book “Night” that tells of his experiences in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986. He was also the first recipient of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum Award, which was later renamed the Elie Wiesel Award in his honor.

23 Higher-priced seating section : LOGE

In most theaters and stadiums today, “loge” is the name given to the front rows of a mezzanine level. Loge can also be used for box seating.

25 Tennis great Monica : SELES

Monica Seles has a Hungarian name as she was born to Hungarian parents in former Yugoslavia. Seles was the World No. 1 professional tennis player in 1991 and 1992 before being forced from the sport when she was stabbed by a spectator at a match in 1993. She did return to the game two years later, but never achieved the same level of success.

26 Singer Green : CEELO

“CeeLo Green” is the stage name of rapper Thomas DeCarlo Callaway. Green was one of the coaches for the contestants on the singing TV show “The Voice” for four seasons.

30 All ___ Day (November 2) : SOULS’

All Souls’ Day is a religious holiday mainly in the Roman Catholic tradition. All Souls’ Day is observed on November 2nd annually, and is a commemoration of the “faithful departed”.

31 Luge, e.g. : SLED

A luge is a small sled used by one or two people, on which one lies face up and feet first. The luge can be compared to the skeleton, a sled for only one person and on which the rider lies face down and goes down the hill head-first. Yikes!

32 Ordinary person, informally : PLEB

In ancient Rome, the patricians were the members of the families in the ruling classes. Those Romans who were not patricians by birth were known as plebs.

33 Ship’s wastewater : BILGE

The bilge is the lowest internal part of a ship. The water that collects in there is called bilge water. The term “bilge” is also used as slang for nonsense talk.

40 Latvian or Lithuanian : BALT

The natives of modern day Latvia, Lithuania and Estonia are sometimes referred to as Balts, a reference to the Baltic Sea on which the three countries lie. The term “Balt” is also used for someone who speaks one of the Baltic languages, a group of languages spoken by people mainly residing within the borders of Latvia and Lithuania, as well as in some immigrant communities around the world.

46 German chancellor Scholz : OLAF

Olaf Scholz succeeded Angela Merkel as the chancellor of Germany in 2021. Prior to leading the country, Scholz had served as Merkel’s vice chancellor for almost four years. Scholz is the first Chancellor of Germany not to belong to a church, but was the second to take the oath of office without reference to God (after Gerhard Schröder in 1998).

48 First pope in a line of 13 : LEO I

The first pope named Leo is now known as Pope Saint Leo the Great. Leo I is famous for meeting with the feared Attila the Hun and persuading him to turn back his invading force that was threatening to overrun Western Europe.

50 Actress Lena or actor Ken : OLIN

Lena Olin is a Swedish actress, and someone who has acting in her blood. Her mother was the actress Britta Holmberg and her father the actor and director Stig Olin. Olin had a very successful career in Sweden, often working with the great Ingmar Bergman. Olin’s breakthrough international and English-speaking role was playing opposite Daniel Day-Lewis in “The Unbearable Lightness of Being” released in 1988. Way back in 1974, Miss Olin was crowned Miss Scandinavia in a beauty pageant for Nordic women held in Helsinki, Finland. Olin’s most famous performance was in “Chocolat” released in 2000, and then she won an Emmy in 2003 for Best Supporting Actress in the TV show “Alias”.

Ken Olin was one of the stars on the hit television series “thirtysomething”, playing Michael Steadman. After “thirtysomething”, Olin moved behind the camera and is now a producer and director.

51 One-named “King of Football” : PELE

“Pelé” was the nickname of Edson de Nascimento, a soccer player who used the name “Pelé” for most of his life. For my money, Pelé was the world’s greatest ever player of the game. He was the only person to have been a member of three World Cup winning squads (1958, 1962 and 1970), and was a national treasure in his native Brazil. One of Pele’s nicknames was “O Rei do Futebol” (the King of Football).

52 Daredevil Knievel : EVEL

Daredevil Evel Knievel contracted hepatitis C from the many blood transfusions that he needed after injuries incurred during stunts. He had to have a liver transplant as a result, but his health declined after that. Knievel eventually passed away in 2007.

55 “Xanadu” band, for short : ELO

The title song of the 1980 movie “Xanadu” was performed by the Electric Light Orchestra (ELO) and Olivia Newton-John (who starred in the film). Despite the popularity of ELO around the world, the song “Xanadu” was the band’s only number-one hit back in their homeland of the UK.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Publication that usually has only one contributor : BLOG
5 Locale for a wedding : ALTAR
10 Whole bunch : SLEW
14 Slimming surgery, for short : LIPO
15 Writer Zora ___ Hurston : NEALE
16 Bit of equipment for a skier or trekker : POLE
17 Nonstick cookware brand : T-FAL
18 Logical, as a syllogism : VALID
19 Stir up : ROIL
20 Gesture involving hitting one’s own hand in celebration : SELF-FIVE
22 Was a no-show, say : FLAKED
24 Singer Nat King ___ : COLE
25 Not fast : SLOW
26 Things that scratch a scratching post : CLAWS
28 Material for some jewelry at a surf shop : SEA GLASS
32 June birthstone : PEARL
33 Protrusion : BULGE
34 Many a C-Span interviewee, informally : POL
35 For fear that : LEST
36 Records and documents : FILES
37 Game with nine rooms : CLUE
38 Trains that run to O’Hare airport : ELS
39 Swindles : BILKS
40 Physique : BUILD
41 Criminal records? : BOOTLEGS
43 Puts the kibosh on : HALTS
44 A “golden” one is an especially good thing to follow : RULE
45 Ohm’s law unit : VOLT
46 “Heavens!” : OH LORD!
49 If this is exhausted, all is lost : LAST HOPE
53 Movie theater eponym : LOEW
54 Like cards at a card table : DEALT
56 About 5,280 ft., for Denver : ELEV
57 ___ vera : ALOE
58 Still in the running, so to speak : ALIVE
59 Tick off : RILE
60 Don’t pass : FAIL
61 Alpine call : YODEL
62 First-year law student … or what every answer in this puzzle has exactly : ONE L

Down

1 Sandwiches with an easy-to-remember list of ingredients : BLTS
2 Classic photo magazine : LIFE
3 October birthstone : OPAL
4 Green vehicle? : GOLF CART
5 Blacksmiths’ blocks : ANVILS
6 Depart : LEAVE
7 One of 24 in a Chaucer book : TALE
8 Athlete who boasted “I’m young; I’m handsome; I’m fast; I’m pretty and can’t possibly be beat” : ALI
9 Things to keep an eye out for on a first date : RED FLAGS
10 Disorderly expansion : SPRAWL
11 Rival magazine of 2-Down : LOOK
12 Writer Wiesel : ELIE
13 Fuse, as metal : WELD
21 Birds that sound like they’d taste bad? : FOWL
23 Higher-priced seating section : LOGE
25 Tennis great Monica : SELES
26 Singer Green : CEELO
27 Cowboy’s rope : LASSO
28 Is a sore loser : SULKS
29 Accelerated H.S. class with a long reading list : AP LIT
30 All ___ Day (November 2) : SOULS
31 Luge, e.g. : SLED
32 Ordinary person, informally : PLEB
33 Ship’s wastewater : BILGE
36 Sports-filled school event : FIELD DAY
37 Person held on a pedestal by a small group : CULT HERO
39 Make less sharp : BLUR
40 Latvian or Lithuanian : BALT
42 Small digging tool : TROWEL
43 Low-priced lodging : HOSTEL
45 Device on a duct : VALVE
46 German chancellor Scholz : OLAF
47 Word often said before “Cómo estás?” : HOLA
48 First pope in a line of 13 : LEO I
49 Set (down) : LAID
50 Actress Lena or actor Ken : OLIN
51 One-named “King of Football” : PELE
52 Daredevil Knievel : EVEL
55 “Xanadu” band, for short : ELO

6 thoughts on “0116-24 NY Times Crossword 16 Jan 24, Tuesday”

  1. 9:31, no errors. Didn’t notice all the L’s until I got to the revealer. An interesting challenge for the constructor, no doubt … 🙂. (And I’m intrigued by the fact that it was possible to succeed in the task …🤨.)

  2. 12:48, no errors. Wow. Every answer had an “L” in it. Must have been a bugger to construct. I loved the juxtaposition of BILGE and BULGE for some reason. Also, this seemed harder than it should have been for me.

    1. A lot of constructors use computer programs have auto-fill functions based on a supplied word list from a text file. Basically, it suggests words that will fill or you can let the program fill it itself. From there, write a little program or script to write a new text file with words only with L in them. Load that. Task done.

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