0115-24 NY Times Crossword 15 Jan 24, Monday

Constructed by: Peter A. Collins
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Bound to Happen

Themed answers are common phrases that seem TO HAPPEN with a synonym of “BOUND”:

  • 54A Inevitable … or a hint for 19-, 27- and 48-Across : BOUND TO HAPPEN</li>
  • 19A Start a subway ride : HOP ON THE TRAIN
  • 27A Wash oneself quickly : JUMP IN THE SHOWER
  • 48A Seize an opportunity : LEAP AT THE CHANCE

Bill’s time: 5m 26s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 What Exxon and Shell sell : GAS

The Exxon Corporation was a descendant of John D. Rockefeller’s Standard Oil Company. Exxon merged with Mobil (yet another descendant of Standard Oil) in 1999 to form ExxonMobil.

8 Outdated : PASSE

“Passé” is a French word, meaning “past, faded”. We’ve imported the term into English, and use it in the same sense.

15 Prefix with mural or mingle : INTER-

Intramural sports are conducted within a certain geographic area, as opposed to varsity sports which are played with teams outside that area. The term “intramural” comes from the Latin for “within walls” and first applied to events held between teams based within the walls of a city.

17 Arthur who won Wimbledon in 1975 : ASHE

Arthur Ashe was a professional tennis player from Richmond, Virginia. In his youth, Ashe found himself having to travel great distances to play against Caucasian opponents due to the segregation that still existed in his home state. He was rewarded for his dedication by being selected for the 1963 US Davis Cup team, the first African-American player to be so honored. Ashe continued to run into trouble because of his ethnicity though, and in 1968 was denied entry into South Africa to play in the South African Open. In 1979, Ashe suffered a heart attack and had bypass surgery, with follow-up surgery four years later during which he contracted HIV from blood transfusions. Ashe passed away in 1993 due to complications from AIDS. Shortly afterwards, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

The Wimbledon Championships of tennis are held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club located in Wimbledon, a district of London. The Wimbledon Championships started in 1877, and have been played on grass since day one.

18 ___ Rockne, legendary Notre Dame football coach : KNUTE

Football coach Knute Rockne was born in the city of Voss in Norway. He came to the United States with his family when he was 5-years-old. Years later, Rockne graduated from Notre Dame with a degree in Chemistry, but abandoned that career path when he was offered his first real coaching job.

19 Start a subway ride : HOP ON THE TRAIN

The official name of the London “Underground” rail network is a little deceptive, as over half of the track system-wide is actually “over ground”, with the underground sections reserved for the central areas. It is the oldest subway system in the world, having opened in 1863. It was also the first system to use electric rolling stock, in 1890. “The Tube”, as it is known by Londoners, isn’t the longest subway system in the world though. That honor belongs to the Shanghai Metro. My personal favorite part of the Tube is the Tube map! It is a marvel of design …

23 Ad ___ committee : HOC

The Latin phrase “ad hoc” means “for this purpose”. An ad hoc committee, for example, is formed for a specific purpose and disbanded after making its final report.

33 Turn ___ dime : ON A

The term “dime”, used for a 10-cent coin, comes from the Old French word “disme” meaning “tenth part”.

34 Cover for Claudius : TOGA

I find Claudius to be the most fascinating of all the Roman Emperors. He had a lot going against him, as he walked with a limp and was slightly deaf. Claudius was put in office by the Praetorian Guard (the emperor’s bodyguards) after Caligula was assassinated. Claudius had very little political experience and yet proved to be very forward-thinking and capable.

35 Flickering glow of the northern lights : AURORA

The spectacular aurora phenomenon is seen lighting up the night sky at both poles of the earth (the Aurora Borealis in the north, and the Aurora Australis in the south). The eerie effect is caused by charged particles colliding with atoms at high latitudes.

44 Très stylish : CHIC

“Très chic” is a French term meaning “very stylish”.

47 Bailed-out insurance co. of 2008 : AIG

“AIG” is an initialism used by the American International Group, a giant insurance corporation. After repeated bailouts by American taxpayers starting in 2008, the company made some serious PR blunders by spending large amounts of money on executive entertainment and middle management rewards. These included a $444,000 California retreat, an $86,000 hunting trip in England, and a $343,000 getaway to a luxury resort in Phoenix. Poor judgment, I’d say …

51 Old name for Tokyo : EDO

“Edo” is the former name of the Japanese city of Tokyo. Edo was the seat of the Tokugawa shogunate, a feudal regime that ruled from 1603 until 1868. The shogun lived in the magnificent Edo Castle. Some parts of the original castle remain and today’s Tokyo Imperial Palace, the residence of the Emperor of Japan, was built on its grounds.

52 Quid pro ___ : QUO

“Quid pro quo” is Latin for “something for something”, i.e. a swap.

68 “Republic” philosopher : PLATO

The greatest work of the Greek philosopher Plato is said by most to be his treatise called “The Republic”. The work takes the form of a Socratic dialogue, meaning that it features Plato’s teacher Socrates in dialogue with others discussing the subject matter. Much of the text deals with justice and various forms of government.

70 Unleash a tirade : RANT

The term “tirade” describes a long and vehement speech, and is a word that came into English from French. “Tirade” can have the same meaning in French, but is also the word for “volley”. So, a tirade is a “volley” of words.

Down

1 Scotland’s Ness or Lomond : LOCH

I would guess that Loch Lomond is one of the two most famous lakes in Scotland. Loch Ness is famous for its “monster”, and Loch Lomond is famous for the lovely song “The Bonnie Banks o’ Loch Lomond”. Oh, ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I’ll tak’ the low road …

2 Anise-flavored Greek liqueur : OUZO

Ouzo is an apéritif from Greece that is colorless and flavored with anise. Ouzo is similar to French pastis and Italian sambuca. All three liqueurs turn cloudy with the addition of water.

4 1960s western sitcom that takes place at Fort Courage : F-TROOP

Relatively few people outside of the US saw the American sitcom “F-Troop”, which was made in the sixties. I remember watching the show as a young lad because it was picked up by the Irish national television service. The only other country outside the US that showed “F-Troop” was Australia.

8 Red-cheeked Pokémon character : PIKACHU

“Pokémon” is the second-biggest video game franchise in the world, second only to the “Mario” franchise. “Pokémon” is a contraction of “Pocket Monsters”.

11 Volleyball action between bump and spike : SET

In volleyball, each team can only touch the ball a maximum of three times before it returns to the other side of the net. The three contacts are often a “bump” (a preliminary pass) and a “set” (setting up the attacking shot) followed by a “spike” (a shot into the opposing court).

21 Civil rights leader Parks : ROSA

Rosa Parks was one of a cadre of brave women in days gone by who refused to give up their seats on a bus to white women. It was the stand taken by Rosa Parks on December 1, 1955 that sparked the Montgomery, Alabama Bus Boycott. President Clinton presented Ms. Parks with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1996. When she died in 2005, Rosa Parks became the first ever woman to have her body lie in honor in the US Capitol Rotunda.

29 White House daughter of 2009-17 : MALIA OBAMA

Malia Obama is the eldest of Barack and Michelle Obama’s two daughters. She graduated from the private Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C., the same school that Chelsea Clinton attended. Malia took a gap year after leaving high school, and spent the 2016 summer as an intern in the US Embassy in Madrid, before heading off to Harvard in 2017.

30 ___ Fridays : TGI

T.G.I. Fridays is an American restaurant chain that was founded in 1965 in New York City. Today there are over a thousand T.G.I. Fridays restaurants in over 50 countries. I think that Fridays has always been particularly successful overseas. I used to visit one a lot with my family when we lived in the Philippines, and I believe the most successful Fridays restaurant anywhere in the world is the one in Haymarket Leicester Square in London in the UK.

31 Concoct, as a plan : HATCH

To decoct is to extract the flavor of a liquid by boiling down and increasing the concentration. A related term is “to concoct”, meaning “to boil together”. We use the verb “to concoct” in a figurative sense to mean to contrive, devise.

39 “___ sells seashells …” : SHE

She sells seashells on the seashore.
The shells she sells are seashells, I’m sure.
For if she sells seashells on the seashore
Then I’m sure she sells seashore shells.

42 Little roll-up in Tex-Mex cuisine : TAQUITO

A “flauta”, also known as a “taquito”, is a rolled tortilla with some kind of filling that has been deep-fried until it is crispy.

45 Pain relief brand with an oxymoronic name : ICY HOT

Icy Hot is a topical heat rub that is used to relieve muscular discomfort and pain from arthritis and rheumatism. The active ingredient doesn’t provide any heat or cold, but it does stimulate nerve receptors in the skin causing the user to experience a cool sensation followed by warmth.

The word “oxymoron” is in itself an oxymoron. It is derived from the Greek words “Oxys” and “moros” meaning “sharp” and “stupid” respectively.

46 ___ Pet : CHIA

Chia is a flowering plant in the mint family. Chia seeds are an excellent food source and are often added to breakfast cereals and energy bars. There is also the famous Chia Pet, an invention of a San Francisco company. Chia Pets are terra-cotta figurines to which moistened chia seeds are applied. The seeds sprout and the seedlings become the “fur” of the Chia Pet.

57 “Free Willy” whale : ORCA

The orca that starred in the 1993 movie “Free Willy” was actually called Keiko, with Willy being his “stage name”. Keiko had a sad life. He was captured near Iceland in 1979 and sold to a local aquarium. Subsequently he was sold on to Marineland in Ontario, and then Six Flags Mexico in 1985. After starring in the movie, his fans raised money with the intent of returning Keiko to the wild. Keiko had become very ill, partly from being confined in a small tank in Mexico, so a lot of money had to be spent returning him to good health. He was purchased by the Oregon Coast Aquarium who undertook the task of treating him and preparing him for the wild. You might recall the dramatic journey he took from Mexico to Oregon in a US Air Force transport plane in 1996. Having regained his health, he was flown to Iceland and there was gradually reintroduced into the wild. Sadly, Keiko did not fare too well back in the ocean. He was never adopted by a pod, so lived a solitary life. He lost weight, would sometimes follow fishing boats and play with any humans who would give him attention. In 2003, Keiko beached himself in Taken Bay in Norway, where he died.

58 One of three bears in a fairy tale : PAPA

The story of “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” was first recorded in 1837 in England, although the narrative was around before it was actually written down. The original fairy tale was rather gruesome, but successive versions became more family-oriented. The character that eventually became Goldilocks was originally an elderly woman, and the three “nameless” bears became Papa Bear, Mama Bear and Baby Bear.

60 Barber’s shout : NEXT!

Our term “barber” comes to us via Anglo-French from the Latin “barba” meaning “beard”. Barbers originally offered a wide range of services, including surgery. Henry VIII restricted barbers to just haircutting … and dentistry!

62 The “S” of R.S.V.P. : S’IL

“RSVP” stands for “répondez s’il vous plaît”, which is French for “answer, please”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Lounge about idly : LOAF
5 What Exxon and Shell sell : GAS
8 Outdated : PASSE
13 Forcibly remove from power : OUST
14 Shoestring : LACE
15 Prefix with mural or mingle : INTER-
16 Bygone Russian emperor : CZAR
17 Arthur who won Wimbledon in 1975 : ASHE
18 ___ Rockne, legendary Notre Dame football coach : KNUTE
19 Start a subway ride : HOP ON THE TRAIN
22 Yes, to Yves : OUI
23 Ad ___ committee : HOC
24 However, informally : THO’
27 Wash oneself quickly : JUMP IN THE SHOWER
33 Turn ___ dime : ON A
34 Cover for Claudius : TOGA
35 Flickering glow of the northern lights : AURORA
36 “50% off” store event : SALE
38 The “I” in 30-Down : IT’S
40 “Let’s get going!” : C’MON!
41 Plot surprises : TWISTS
44 Très stylish : CHIC
47 Bailed-out insurance co. of 2008 : AIG
48 Seize an opportunity : LEAP AT THE CHANCE
51 Old name for Tokyo : EDO
52 Quid pro ___ : QUO
53 Small dog’s bark : YIP!
54 Inevitable … or a hint for 19-, 27- and 48-Across : BOUND TO HAPPEN
61 “Me too” : AS AM I
63 Prefix in aviation : AERO-
64 Roof part : EAVE
65 Put a cap on : LIMIT
66 Diplomat’s skill : TACT
67 Summit : APEX
68 “Republic” philosopher : PLATO
69 Historical time span : ERA
70 Unleash a tirade : RANT

Down

1 Scotland’s Ness or Lomond : LOCH
2 Anise-flavored Greek liqueur : OUZO
3 “… and make it snappy!” : … ASAP!
4 1960s western sitcom that takes place at Fort Courage : F TROOP
5 Large cut : GASH
6 Post-workout woe : ACHE
7 Be hot under the collar : SEETHE
8 Red-cheeked Pokémon character : PIKACHU
9 Years, in Latin : ANNI
10 Daring body double, like Debbie Evans in “The Fast and the Furious” : STUNTWOMAN
11 Volleyball action between bump and spike : SET
12 Before, in poetry : ERE
14 Mexican American, e.g. : LATINO
20 Night, in Paris : NUIT
21 Civil rights leader Parks : ROSA
25 Brave enough to come to the rescue : HEROIC
26 Citrus shade : ORANGE
27 Disturb with a nudge : JOSTLE
28 Not at all “whelmed” : UNAWED
29 White House daughter of 2009-17 : MALIA OBAMA
30 ___ Fridays : TGI
31 Concoct, as a plan : HATCH
32 Warlike creature of Middle-earth : ORC
37 Mind reader’s skill, in brief : ESP
39 “___ sells seashells …” : SHE
42 Little roll-up in Tex-Mex cuisine : TAQUITO
43 Render speechless : STUN
45 Pain relief brand with an oxymoronic name : ICY HOT
46 ___ Pet : CHIA
49 As yet : TO DATE
50 Seem : APPEAR
55 Leave out : OMIT
56 Eye drop : TEAR
57 “Free Willy” whale : ORCA
58 One of three bears in a fairy tale : PAPA
59 Divisible by two : EVEN
60 Barber’s shout : NEXT!
61 Swiss mountain : ALP
62 The “S” of R.S.V.P. : S’IL

6 thoughts on “0115-24 NY Times Crossword 15 Jan 24, Monday”

  1. 8:10. As usual for a Monday I paid no attention to the theme.

    So when I go to the barber and he refuses to do surgery on me, I have Henry VIII to thank for that? Henry VIII…the voice of reason?

    Best –

  2. Bill,

    Thanks for the write-up. I always learn things about my own puzzles when I stop by.

    – Pete Collins

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *