0114-24 NY Times Crossword 14 Jan 24, Sunday

Constructed by: John Kugelman
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Er, In Other Words …

Themed answers are common phrases that have been reinterpreted. Words in the format “VERB-ER” become “one who VERBS”:

  • 20A Great ape? : SUPER DUPER (super one who dupes)
  • 22A Erotic artist? : JUNK DRAWER (one who draws junk)
  • 37A Street magician? : WANDER AROUND TOWN (one who wands around town)
  • 60A Farmers? : CHICKEN TENDERS (ones who tend chickens)
  • 71A Switch hitter? : FLICKER OF LIGHT (one who flicks the light)
  • 95A Animal tranquilizer? : NUMBER OF THE BEAST (one who numbs the beast)
  • 113A With 117-Across, the Grim Reaper? : AN OFFER YOU …
  • 117A See 113-Across : … CAN’T REFUSE (one who offs who you can’t refuse)

Bill’s time: 24m 31s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Hurricanes and tornadoes : VORTEXES

Vortex (plural “vortices”) is something resembling a whirlpool. The term “vortex” comes from the Latin verb “vertere” meaning “to turn”.

A severe tropical storm is called a hurricane when it occurs in the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific, a typhoon in the Northwest Pacific, and a cyclone in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean. Tropical storms form over warm water, picking up energy from the evaporation from the ocean surface.

Although a tornado (plural “tornadoes, tornados”) can be encountered in many locations around the world, it is most likely to be experienced in North America, and particularly in “Tornado Alley” in the central US. The Canadian Tornado Alley in southern Canada is where one is second most likely in the world to encounter a tornado.

19 Grape from France’s Côte-d’Or : PINOT NOIR

The pinot noir wine grape variety takes its name from the French for “pine” and “black”. The grapes grow in tight clusters shaped like pine cones, and are very dark in color. The pinot noir grape is most closely associated with Burgundy wines in France, although in recent years the popularity (and price) of California pinot noir wine has soared after it featured so prominently in the wonderful 2004 movie “Sideways”. Grab a bottle of pinot, and go rent the movie …

Côte-d’Or is a department in the east of France, located in the region known as Bourgogne (anglicized as “Burgundy”). The department takes its name from a limestone cliff called the Côte d’Or (“Golden Slope”, literally “Coast of Gold”) that runs north-south through the area.

30 ___ Jam (record label) : DEF

Def Jam is a US record label, one focused on hip hop music.

34 Guinness of “The Ladykillers” : ALEC

Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered (sadly, I think) for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars”. He won his only Best Actor Oscar for playing Colonel Nicholson in the marvelous 1957 WWII movie “The Bridge on the River Kwai”. Guinness did himself serve during the Second World War, in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve. He commanded a landing craft during the Allied invasion of Sicily in 1943.

47 Rock’s ___ Fighters : FOO

Foo Fighters are described as an alternative rock band, one formed in 1994 by the drummer from Nirvana, Dave Grohl. The term “foo fighters” originally applied to unidentified flying objects reported by allied airmen during WWII. Spooky …

48 Toast with a raised stein : PROST!

“Prosit” (also “prost”) is a German toast meaning “may it benefit”.

A stein is a type of beer glass. The term “stein” is German in origin, and is short for “Steinkrug” meaning “stone jug”. “Stein” is German for “stone”.

50 Bad thing to drop in polite company : F-BOMB

“F-bomb” refers to the offensive four-letter word beginning with the letter F. The term “F-bomb” was first used in print in a “Newsday” article in 1988 in a story about baseball catcher Gary Carter.

52 Anthony Hopkins won this with only 16 minutes of screen time : BEST ACTOR

The marvelous actor Anthony Hopkins got his big break in movies playing Richard the Lionheart in the 1968 historical drama “The Lion in Winter”. Hopkins hails from the south coast of Wales, and was encouraged in his early career by fellow Welshman Richard Burton, whom he met when he was a teenager. I’d say that Hopkins’ best-known film role was Hannibal Lecter in “The Silence of the Lambs”.

“The Silence of the Lambs” is a 1991 psychological drama based on a novel of the same name by Thomas Harris. Jodie Foster plays FBI trainee Clarice Starling, and Anthony Hopkins plays the creepy cannibalistic serial killer Hannibal Lecter. “The Silence of the Lambs” swept the Big Five Oscars (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay) for that year, being only the third movie ever to do so. The other two so honored were “It Happened One Night” (1934) and “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975).

57 Muscat resident : OMANI

Muscat is the capital of Oman. The city lies on the northeast coast of the state on the Gulf of Oman, a branch of the Persian Gulf.

67 ___ of Orleans, moniker for Joan of Arc : MAID

Joan of Arc (also “Jeanne d’Arc”, her birth name) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. In fact, after the fire died down, the executioner raked the coals to display the charred body, proving Joan had died, and then burned the corpse again, twice, so that relics could not be collected. The remaining ashes were then cast into the Seine River. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

71 Switch hitter? : FLICKER OF LIGHT (one who flicks light)

Not only did I have to learn new spellings of words when I moved here from Ireland (here I go, whining again!) but I had to learn that down is the “off” position for a switch most times, and up is the “on” position. It’s exactly the opposite on the other side of the pond. Aaargh …!

78 Zeno of ___, paradoxical thinker : ELEA

Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his paradoxes, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as “Achilles and the Tortoise”, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

79 Fastest train in the U.S. : ACELA

The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, as it gets up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. Introduced in 2000, the brand name “Acela” was created to evoke “acceleration” and “excellence”.

82 Plans of study : CURRICULA

A curriculum (plural “curricula”) is a set of courses offered by a teaching establishment. “Curriculum” is Latin for “running, course”, and comes from “currere” meaning “to run”.

85 Time’s 2023 Athlete of the Year : MESSI

Lionel “Leo” Messi is a soccer player from Argentina. Messi has been awarded FIFA’s Ballon d’Or (Golden Ball) award more times than any other player. The Ballon d’Or is presented to the player who is considered the best in the world in the prior year.

92 Gunpowder ingredient : NITER

The chemical name for saltpeter (also “saltpetre, niter, nitre”) is potassium nitrate. The exact origin of the name “saltpeter” isn’t clear, but it may have come from the Latin “sal petrae” meaning “stone salt”. The main use for potassium nitrate is as a fertilizer, a source of potassium and nitrogen. As it is a powerful oxidizing agent, it is also used in amateur rocket propellants. Anyone who has ignited one of those “engines” would have noticed the lilac-colored flame, indicating the presence of potassium.

Gunpowder is the earliest-known explosive chemical. Also called “black powder”, it is a mixture of sulfur, charcoal and saltpeter (i.e. potassium nitrate). The saltpeter is a powerful oxidizing agent, providing the oxygen to burn the sulfur and charcoal, which acts as the fuel in the mixture. Gunpowder was invented by the Chinese in the 8th century.

95 Animal tranquilizer? : NUMBER OF THE BEAST (one who numbs the beast)

666 is the number of the beast that is linked to Satan or the Antichrist, according to the Book of Revelation in the Bible. The fear of the number 666 has been given a name, i.e. hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia. Don’t forget that …

99 Pan handle? : PETER

J.M. Barrie’s stage play “Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up” premiered in London in 1904. Barrie adapted the play into a 1911 novel titled “Peter and Wendy”. The character Peter Pan actually predated the play, having been introduced by Barrie as a baby in his 1902 adult novel called “The Little White Bird”.

100 Communication with one’s hands, for short : ASL

American Sign Language (ASL)

101 Target of Y.A. fiction : TEEN

Young adult (YA)

105 Big Apple figure : TIM COOK

Tim Cook was appointed as Apple’s CEO in 2011, when he succeeded Steve Jobs. Cook had joined the company back in 1998 as senior vice president in charge of worldwide operations. He came out as gay in October of 2014, making Cook the first openly gay CEO of a company on the Fortune 500 list.

109 “Boy Wonder” of comics : ROBIN

Batman is sometimes referred to as the Caped Crusader, Robin as the Boy Wonder, and the pair as the Dynamic Duo.

113 With 117-Across, the Grim Reaper? : AN OFFER YOU …

117 See 113-Across : … CAN’T REFUSE (one who offs that you can’t refuse)

To off someone is to take them out, to kill them.

Down

1 V on the N.Y.S.E. : VISA

VISA doesn’t actually issue any credit or debit cards. The company just sells the electronic systems and infrastructure to banks which then put the VISA logo on their own cards. Seeing the logo, both customer and merchant know to use the VISA system when making a transaction.

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) can give some quite descriptive ticker symbols to companies, for example:

  • Anheuser-Busch (BUD, for “Budweiser”)
  • Molson Coors Brewing Company (TAP, as in “beer tap”)
  • Steinway Musical Instruments (LVB, for “Ludwig van Beethoven”)
  • Sotheby’s (BID, for the auction house)

2 Albatross, metaphorically : ONUS

An albatross is sometimes a metaphor for a psychological burden. This usage comes from the poem “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. In the story, an albatross is following a ship, a sign of good fortune. Then the “ancient mariner” shoots the albatross with a crossbow, an act that will bring a curse on the ship. The other sailors punish the mariner by forcing him to wear the dead albatross around his neck.

5 “The Jetsons” boy : ELROY
23A 5-Down’s pet : ASTRO

“The Jetsons” is an animated show from Hanna-Barbera that had its first run in 1962-1963, and then was recreated in 1985-1987. When it debuted in 1963 on ABC, “The Jetsons” was the network’s first ever color broadcast. “The Jetsons” is like a space-age version of “The Flintstones”. The four Jetson family members are George and Jane, the parents, and children Judy and Elroy. Residing with the family in Orbit City are their household robot Rosie and pet dog Astro.

12 Nexus: Abbr. : CTR

A nexus is a means of connection, or a center where many connections come together. “Nexus” is a Latin word meaning “that which ties or binds together”. The Latin “nexus” is the past participle of the verb “nectere” meaning “to bind”.

14 Indigo Girls song with the chorus “Adding up the total of a love that’s true / Multiply life by the …” : POWER OF TWO

Indigo Girls are a folk rock music duo made up of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. Ray and Saliers are considered icons in the LGBT community as both identified themselves as lesbians a long time ago, although they have never been a couple.

19 Wrinkle-faced dog : PUG

The pug is a dog breed of Chinese origin. Our current family pet is a boxer/pug cross, and is a good-looking mutt!

22 Disney villain who’s the grand vizier of Agrabah : JAFAR

Jafar is the bad guy in the animated film “Aladdin”. He was important enough to get his name front and center in the sequel called “Aladdin 2”, which is usually referred to as “The Return of Jafar”.

29 Stoolie : RAT FINK

Stoolies, also called “canaries”, will “sing” to the cops given the right incentive. “Stoolie” is short for “stool pigeon”. A stool pigeon was a decoy bird tied to a stool so as to lure other pigeons. Originally a stoolie was a decoy for the police, rather than an informer, hence the name.

31 Somewhat : QUASI

“Quasi” is a Latin word meaning “as if, as though”. We use the term in English to mean “having a likeness to something”.

32 Section of a syllabus : UNIT

“Syllabus” (plural “syllabi”) is the Latin word for “list”.

34 Meat jelly : ASPIC

Aspic is a dish in which the main ingredients are served in a gelatin made from meat stock. “Aspic” is a French word meaning “jelly”.

35 Butler on “The Addams Family” : LURCH

Charles Addams was a cartoonist who signed his work “Chas Addams”. He didn’t draw a cartoon strip but rather individual cartoons, although many of his cartoons did feature regular characters. The most famous of these were the members of the Addams Family, who were published in single-panel cartoons between 1938 and 1988 in “The New Yorker”. The Addams Family moved onto the small and big screens starting in 1964.

They’re creepy and they’re kooky,
Mysterious and spooky,
They’re altogether ooky,
The Addams Family.

36 Japanese mushroom : ENOKI

Enokitake (also known as “enoki”) are long and thin white mushrooms often added to soups or salads.

40 Concrete support : REBAR

A steel bar or mesh used to reinforce concrete is called “rebar”, which is short for “reinforcing bar”.

49 Actor George who wrote the 1994 autobiography “To the Stars” : TAKEI

Mr. Hikaru Sulu was played by George Takei in the original “Star Trek” series. Takei has played lots of roles over the years, and is still very active in television. Did you know that he appeared in the 1963 film, “Pt-109”? He played the helmsman steering the Japanese destroyer that ran down John F. Kennedy’s motor torpedo boat. From destroyer helmsman to starship helmsman …

53 Rapper ___ B : CARDI

“Cardi B” is the stage name of rap artist Belcalis Almánzar from the Bronx in New York City. The name “Cardi B” comes from the brand name “Bacardi”.

62 Author Gaiman : NEIL

Neil Gaiman is an English author whose works include novels, comic books and graphic novels. He has a very noteworthy friendship with musician Tori Amos. Amos has included “Neil” in the lyrics of several of her songs. In turn, Gaiman included her as a character in his comic book “The Sandman”, and Amos penned the introduction to the comic “Death: The HIgh Cost of Living”, and features on the cover.

68 Praline ingredient : PECAN

A praline is a candy made out of nuts and sugar syrup. The first pralines were made in France in the 17th century for an industrialist named Marshal du Plessis-Praslin, who gave his name to the confection.

71 Bass symbol : F-CLEF

“Clef” is the French word for “key”. In music, a clef is used to indicate the pitch of the notes written on a stave. The bass clef is also known as the F-clef, the alto clef is the C-clef, and the treble clef is the G-clef.

73 Actress Fisher of “Eighth Grade” : ELSIE

Elsie Fisher is an actress whose best-known roles are possibly her voice acting. For example, she voiced Agnes in “Despicable Me” (2010) and “Despicable Me 2” (2013), and Parker Needle in “The Addams Family” (2019).

“Eighth Grade” is a 2018 comedy drama movie starring Elsie Fisher as a middle-schooler struggling with anxiety. Comedian Bo Burnham wrote and directed the film, and the storyline reflects his own anxiety as a performer, and his frequent panic attacks. I haven’t seen this one, but I hear really good things …

74 Worshiper of Jah, informally : RASTA

“Jah” is a shortened form of “Jehovah”, and is a name often associated with the Rastafari movement.

75 Insurance giant : GEICO

GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

83 Longtime actor on “Law & Order: SVU” : ICE-T

Rapper Ice-T must be tired of having his name come up as an answer in crossword puzzles (I know I am!). Born Tracy Marrow, Ice-T has been interested in acting for decades and made his film debut in the 1984 movie about breakdancing called “Breakin’”. He has also played Detective Fin Tutuola in the TV show “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” since the year 2000.

88 Emulate Jack Sprat : EAT NO FAT

“Jack Sprat” is a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:

Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.

Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:

Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

91 Old SeaWorld mascot : SHAMU

“Shamu” was the name of the third orca (aka “killer whale”) ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the “stage name” of orca shows in different SeaWorld parks. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

SeaWorld was started in San Diego in 1964. The original plan was to build an underwater restaurant with a marine life show. Eventually the founders dropped the idea of the eating establishment and just went with a theme park. SeaWorld has been mired in controversy since the 2013 release of the documentary “Blackfish”, which tells of the involvement of a particular orca (killer whale) in the death of two SeaWorld employees and one SeaWorld visitor.

93 Parkway or expressway: Abbr. : RTE

The original parkways were scenic highways or roadways in or connecting parks. Sadly, many parkways are a lot less scenic these days, as buildings have sprouted up along the highway’s edges.

105 Some carry a spare one in a boot : TYRE

The British spelling of “tyre”, for what we call a “tire” here in North America, was indeed the original spelling. The English started to use “tire” spelling in the 17th century, and then shifted back to the current “tyre” in the 19th century.

In North America we use the word “trunk” for the storage space in the back of a vehicle as that space is reminiscent of the large traveling chest called a “trunk”. Such trunks used to be lashed onto the back of automobiles before storage was integrated. On the other side of the Atlantic, a trunk is known as a “boot”. The original boot was a built-in storage compartment on a horse-drawn carriage on which a coachman would sit.

110 Zodiac symbol : BULL

Taurus (Latin for “bull”) is a large constellation seen in the winter sky in the northern hemisphere. The brightest star in Taurus is the red giant Aldebaran. NASA space probe Pioneer 10, launched in 1972, is heading towards Aldebaran after having completed its primary mission close to Jupiter. The probe should get to Aldebaran about two million years from now. Watch this space …

111 Sicily or Sardinia : ISLE

In the Italian Peninsula in Southern Europe, the “boot” is the mainland of Italy, and the “ball” being kicked by the boot is the island of Sicily.

Sardinia is an autonomous region of Italy, an island in the Mediterranean off the west coast of the country. It lies to the south of the French island of Corsica. Sardinia is the second largest island in the whole of the Mediterranean Sea (Sicily is the largest).

115 “The Dark Side of the Moon” studio : EMI

EMI was a British music company, with the initialism standing for Electric and Musical Industries.

Pink Floyd was an English rock band founded in 1965. The band’s most famous albums are probably “The Dark Side of the Moon” and “The Wall”.

118 Texter’s “Truthfully …” : TBH …

To be honest (TBH)

119 French chess piece : ROI

In French, the “roi” (king) is the most important piece in the game of “échecs” (chess).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Hurricanes and tornadoes : VORTEXES
9 One of 12, biblically : DISCIPLE
17 “Way to go, me!” : I NAILED IT!
19 Grape from France’s Côte-d’Or : PINOT NOIR
20 Great ape? : SUPER DUPER (super one who dupes)
22 Erotic artist? : JUNK DRAWER (one who draws junk)
23 5-Down’s pet : ASTRO
24 Ooze : SEEPAGE
26 Authors : PENS
27 Yesterday, in Spanish : AYER
30 ___ Jam (record label) : DEF
31 “Let me be perfectly ___” (Pride slogan) : QUEER
34 Guinness of “The Ladykillers” : ALEC
37 Street magician? : WANDER AROUND TOWN (one who wands around town)
44 Made, as a putt : SUNK
45 Stockpile : STORE
46 Linger : REMAIN
47 Rock’s ___ Fighters : FOO
48 Toast with a raised stein : PROST!
50 Bad thing to drop in polite company : F-BOMB
52 Anthony Hopkins won this with only 16 minutes of screen time : BEST ACTOR
54 Reply of disgust : ICK!
55 One hitting the space bar? : ALIEN
57 Muscat resident : OMANI
59 Leaves slack-jawed : AWES
60 Farmers? : CHICKEN TENDERS (ones who tend chickens)
63 Took big steps : STRODE
65 Unplanned preview, perhaps : LEAK
66 See here! : EYE
67 ___ of Orleans, moniker for Joan of Arc : MAID
68 Supply, as elevator music : PIPE IN
71 Switch hitter? : FLICKER OF LIGHT (one who flicks light)
78 Zeno of ___, paradoxical thinker : ELEA
79 Fastest train in the U.S. : ACELA
80 Spot for a microphone : LAPEL
81 What might be drawn with a “C” in cartoons : EAR
82 Plans of study : CURRICULA
85 Time’s 2023 Athlete of the Year : MESSI
87 Appropriate : SEIZE
89 Hail, to Caesar : AVE
90 Warm touch : CARESS
92 Gunpowder ingredient : NITER
94 Top pair : ACES
95 Animal tranquilizer? : NUMBER OF THE BEAST (one who numbs the beast)
98 Trash : TOSS
99 Pan handle? : PETER
100 Communication with one’s hands, for short : ASL
101 Target of Y.A. fiction : TEEN
103 Word with straw or swing : … VOTE
105 Big Apple figure : TIM COOK
109 “Boy Wonder” of comics : ROBIN
113 With 117-Across, the Grim Reaper? : AN OFFER YOU …
117 See 113-Across : … CAN’T REFUSE (one who offs that you can’t refuse)
120 Live content creators : STREAMERS
121 They might be flagged as “Potential Spam” : ROBOCALLS
122 Seasonal charity event : TOY DRIVE
123 Cuts down to size : WHITTLES

Down

1 V on the N.Y.S.E. : VISA
2 Albatross, metaphorically : ONUS
3 Hypnotized, say : RAPT
4 Some closet organizers : TIE RACKS
5 “The Jetsons” boy : ELROY
6 Crossed (out) : XED
7 Online school closing? : EDU
8 Nurses : SIPS
9 Dash’s partner : DINE
10 Ancient Romans made it from soot : INK
11 Purchase for a golf course : SOD
12 Nexus: Abbr. : CTR
13 Peeved : IN A PET
14 Indigo Girls song with the chorus “Adding up the total of a love that’s true / Multiply life by the …” : POWER OF TWO
15 Creditor’s security : LIEN
16 Makes a misstep : ERRS
18 Ready, with “up” : TEE …
19 Wrinkle-faced dog : PUG
21 Cash in : REDEEM
22 Disney villain who’s the grand vizier of Agrabah : JAFAR
25 / : PER
28 Replies of disgust : EWS
29 Stoolie : RAT FINK
31 Somewhat : QUASI
32 Section of a syllabus : UNIT
33 ___ Griffin, civil rights pioneer : EDNA
34 Meat jelly : ASPIC
35 Butler on “The Addams Family” : LURCH
36 Japanese mushroom : ENOKI
38 “Pass,” in a casino : NO BET
39 Quadcopter, e.g. : DRONE
40 Concrete support : REBAR
41 Straws in the wind : OMENS
42 Sweet-talked : WOOED
43 Origin of the words “cake” and “egg” : NORSE
49 Actor George who wrote the 1994 autobiography “To the Stars” : TAKEI
51 Police accountability tool : BODYCAM
53 Rapper ___ B : CARDI
56 List : LEAN
58 Demure : MEEK
61 E.R. shout : CLEAR!
62 Author Gaiman : NEIL
63 What a crackerjack cracker jacks : SAFE
64 Does some field work : TILLS
67 Superlatively sullen : MOPIEST
68 Praline ingredient : PECAN
69 Valentine candy message : I LUV U
70 Not open to appeal, as a court decision : PEREMPTORY
71 Bass symbol : F-CLEF
72 Tiniest bit : LEAST
73 Actress Fisher of “Eighth Grade” : ELSIE
74 Worshiper of Jah, informally : RASTA
75 Insurance giant : GEICO
76 Mental fogs : HAZES
77 Lock : TRESS
79 Law enforcer in the Harry Potter universe : AUROR
83 Longtime actor on “Law & Order: SVU” : ICE-T
84 Give a darn : CARE
86 All together : EN BLOC
88 Emulate Jack Sprat : EAT NO FAT
91 Old SeaWorld mascot : SHAMU
93 Parkway or expressway: Abbr. : RTE
96 Complained : BEEFED
97 Keyboard corner key : ESC
102 Straight up : ERECT
103 Like the open sea : VAST
104 Not fooled by : ONTO
105 Some carry a spare one in a boot : TYRE
106 Smartphone platform : IOS
107 Bit of decoration at a beach house : OAR
108 Not just think : KNOW
110 Zodiac symbol : BULL
111 Sicily or Sardinia : ISLE
112 Ending with late or great : -NESS
114 “___ out!” : FAR
115 “The Dark Side of the Moon” studio : EMI
116 Fire (up) : REV
118 Texter’s “Truthfully …” : TBH …
119 French chess piece : ROI

6 thoughts on “0114-24 NY Times Crossword 14 Jan 24, Sunday”

  1. 25:17 after fixing a glitch that I’d been concerned about early on and then forgotten about (until I failed to get the “success” message at the end).

    (Yesterday, I woke up at 3 o’clock in the morning to find below-zero temperatures outside and a furnace on the fritz inside, so spent most of the day getting the situation under control and wasn’t exactly at my best when I tackled the puzzle in the evening.)

  2. 1:00:33 had “eck” instead of “ick” and since I was not familiar with “aspic” I finally relented and let the app show me my error. I am now familiar with “aspic”. :- )

  3. 33:43. One error. I just sort of sensed the theme and was able to use it. I would have had to take some time to verbalize it the way Bill did.

    Loved the movie “Sideways” even though I’m not much of a movie person.

    I grew up in St. Louis, part of tornado alley, and still remember the tornado sirens going off in the middle of the night (seemed it was ALWAYS in the middle of the night!!) as a kid. They used the old air raid sirens from WWII, and they were unbelievably loud and terrifying to a 3-year old kid. I feared those sirens more than I ever feared tornados….well I was only a kid.

    Right off the bat, I was crossed up by putting VORTices for 1A which is the plural I’m used to hearing from studying aerodynamics among other things. I guess VORTEXES is also correct.

    Btw – The wind vortices that come off of the wingtips of those big jets (e.g. a 787) are so strong that airports usually wait 2-3 minutes after a heavy aircraft like that takes off before they allow another flight to take off behind it.

    Fun one today.

    Best –

  4. Usual time….

    But really messed up on PEREMPTORY….
    Had PURIMSTORY????

    Didn’t get the PETER thing either so that didn’t help.

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