0308-22 NY Times Crossword 8 Mar 22, Tuesday

Constructed by: Mary Lou Guizzo
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): Nobly Done, Ladies!

Happy International Women’s Day, everyone! Themed answers are female Nobel Prize winners:

  • 17A 1966 Swedish Literature Nobelist who wrote about the struggles of the Jewish people : NELLY SACHS
  • 23A 1988 American Nobelist in Physiology or Medicine who helped develop the first drug used to fight rejection in organ transplants : GERTRUDE ELION
  • 38A 2018 Canadian Physics Nobelist who helped implement chirped pulse amplification : DONNA STRICKLAND
  • 51A 1976 Peace Nobelist from Northern Ireland who co-founded Community of Peace People : BETTY WILLIAMS
  • 60A 1911 Polish/French Chemistry Nobelist who pioneered research in radioactivity : MARIE CURIE

Bill’s time: 5m 14s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Bacall’s partner in a classic Hollywood romance, informally : BOGIE

Humphrey “Bogie” Bogart’s breakthrough movie was “The Petrified Forest” from 1936, but for me nothing beats “Casablanca”. That said, check out the original “Sabrina” from 1954. It’s a real delight. Bogie was nominated three times for a Best Actor Oscar, but only won once: for “The African Queen”.

What a unique actress Lauren Bacall was, with that husky voice and her quiet, suggestive manner. She was born in New York City to Jewish immigrant parents from Europe. Bacall was actually a first cousin of Shimon Peres, the former President and Prime Minister of Israel. Famously, she was married to Humphrey Bogart, from 1945 until his passing in 1957.

6 Apple pick? : IMAC

When Apple chose the letter “I” prefix for the iMac in 1998, that letter “I” stood for “Internet”. Steve Jobs and his marketing team followed up with the message that I also stood for “individual, instruct, inform and inspire”.

14 “Easy on Me” singer, 2021 : ADELE

“Adele” is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. Her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US. “30” followed in 2021.

15 Wine valley in California : NAPA

The first commercial winery in Napa Valley, California was established way back in 1858. However, premium wine production only dates back to the 1960s, with the region really hitting the big time after its success at the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976. The story of that famous blind wine tasting is told in the entertaining 2008 film “Bottle Shock”.

16 Fathom or foot : UNIT

Our word “fathom” comes from the Old English word used to describe the length of the outstretched arms. Today, a fathom is equal to six feet.

17 1966 Swedish Literature Nobelist who wrote about the struggles of the Jewish people : NELLY SACHS

Nelly Sachs was a German poet who voiced the grief felt by the Jewish people after WWII. She herself had escaped on the last flight from Nazi Germany to Sweden in 1940. Sachs had been scheduled to report to a concentration camp one week later. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1966.

23 1988 American Nobelist in Physiology or Medicine who helped develop the first drug used to fight rejection in organ transplants : GERTRUDE ELION

Gertrude Elion was an American biochemist and pharmacologist whose work earned her a Nobel Prize in 1988. She graduated with a masters degree in 1941, and had to go into high-school teaching because she couldn’t get a research post as she was a woman. After the world started to wake up, Elion got an assistant’s post at Burroughs-Wellcome Pharmaceuticals and began to make a name for herself. She invented Purinethol, the first treatment for leukemia, as well as a string of other drugs.

25 Knight’s title : SIR

Kneel, and a monarch might “dub thee a knight” if you’re lucky. “Dub” is a specific term derived from Old English that was used to mean “make a knight”. As the knight was also given a knightly name at the same time, “dub” has come to mean “give someone a name”.

27 Hurricane’s center : EYE

A severe tropical storm is called a hurricane when it occurs in the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific, a typhoon in the Northwest Pacific, and a cyclone in the South Pacific and Indian Ocean. Tropical storms form over warm water, picking up energy from the evaporation from the ocean surface.

28 Old atlas inits. : SSR

The former Soviet Union (officially “Union of Soviet Socialist Republics” or “USSR”) was created in 1922, not long after the Russian Revolution of 1917 that overthrew the tsar. Geographically, the new Soviet Union was roughly equivalent to the old Russian Empire, and comprised fifteen Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs).

29 Tehran’s country : IRAN

Tehran is the capital of Iran and is the largest city in the Middle East, with a population of about 8.5 million. Iran has been around a really long time and Tehran is actually the country’s 31st national capital.

31 Bio class subject : RNA

Ribonucleic acid (RNA) is an essential catalyst in the manufacture of proteins in the body. The genetic code in DNA determines the sequence of amino acids that make up each protein. That sequence is read in DNA by messenger RNA, and amino acids are delivered for protein manufacture in the correct sequence by transfer RNA. The amino acids are then formed into proteins by ribosomal RNA.

33 Bit role : CAMEO

Even in my day, a cameo role was more than just a short appearance in a movie (or other artistic piece). For the appearance to be a cameo, the actor had to play himself or herself, and was instantly recognizable. With this meaning it’s easy to see the etymology of the term, as a cameo brooch is one with the recognizable carving of the silhouette of a person. Nowadays, a cameo is any minor role played by a celebrity or famous actor, regardless of the character played.

38 2018 Canadian Physics Nobelist who helped implement chirped pulse amplification : DONNA STRICKLAND

Donna Strickland is a Canadian physicist known for her pioneering work in the field of pulsed lasers. In 2018, she became just the third woman to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics, after Marie Curie in 1903 and Maria Goepapert Mayer in 1963.

43 Rank below capt. : CDR

Commander (Cdr.)

45 Grp. that welcomed girl Cubs in 2018 : BSA

Boy Scouts of America (BSA)

51 1976 Peace Nobelist from Northern Ireland who co-founded Community of Peace People : BETTY WILLIAMS

Betty Williams and Mairead Corrigan were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1976 for the work they did to promote a peaceful resolution to the conflict in Northern Ireland. Williams and Corrigan founded the Women for Peace, which evolved into the Community of Peace People.

57 Diplomatic envoy : EMISSARY

An emissary is an ambassador, an agent sent on a mission, usually from one government to another. The term derives from the Latin “emissarius” meaning “that is sent out”.

58 Spanish Mrs. : SRA

The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame), in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora) and in Portuguese is also “Sra.” (Senhora).

60 1911 Polish/French Chemistry Nobelist who pioneered research in radioactivity : MARIE CURIE

Marie Curie lived a life of firsts. She was the first female professor at the University of Paris, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and indeed was the first person to win two Nobel prizes (in Physics in 1903, and in Chemistry in 1911). Most of Curie’s work was in the field of radioactivity, and was carried out in the days when the impact of excessive radiation on the human body was not understood. She died from aplastic anemia, caused by high exposure to radiation. To this day, Curie’s personal papers are kept preserved in lead-lined boxes as they are highly radioactive, even her personal cookbook.

66 Strait-laced : PRIM

Our term “strait-laced” is used to describe someone who is “excessively inflexible in matters of conduct”. Note the spelling “strait” (and not “straight”), which in this case means “tight”, and is a reference to the laces of a woman’s corset. A woman with a strait-laced (tightly-laced) corset would have a rigid posture. This usage was extended to the figurative meaning of “rigid in conduct”.

68 Bygone G.M. car : OLDS

Oldsmobile was an automobile brand founded by Ransom E. Olds (REO) in 1897. The brand was finally phased out by General Motors in 2004.

69 Locale spelled out in a Village People song : YMCA

“YMCA” was released in 1978 by Village People and has been adopted as an anthem by the gay community. The song was written by Victor Willis, a straight member of the mostly gay band, and he clarifies that the lyrics are extolling the virtues of the “YMCA” as a source of recreation for black urban youth. I think he might have been winking when he said that …

Village People is a disco group formed in New York City in 1977. From day one, the band’s act and music was aimed at the gay community. The name refers to New York’s Greenwich Village, which at the time had a large gay population. The group’s members dressed up as characters associated with stereotypical gay culture, including a cop, Native American, GI, construction worker and cowboy. The biggest hits for Village People are “Y.M.C.A.” and “In the Navy”.

Down

2 Poet Amanda Gorman’s “___ to Our Ocean” : ODE

Amanda Gorman is a poet and activist who, in 2017, was the first person named as the National Youth Poet Laureate. Famously, Gorman recited her poem “The Hill We Climb” at the inauguration of President Biden in 2021.

When day comes, we step out of the shade aflame and unafraid. The new dawn blooms as we free it. For there is always light. If only we’re brave enough to see it. If only we’re brave enough to be it.

5 Pooh’s down-in-the-dumps friend : EEYORE

Eeyore is the donkey character in A. A. Milne’s “Winnie-the-Pooh”. Eeyore is very lovable, but has a gloomy and pessimistic outlook on life.

7 ___ Picchu, Peru : MACHU

Machu Picchu is known as “The Lost City of the Incas”, and it can be visited on a mountain ridge in Peru, 50 miles northwest of the city of Cuzco in the southeast of the country. The name Machu Picchu means “old peak”. The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu originates about 50 miles from Cusco on the Urubamba River in Peru. It can take travelers about 5 days to trek the full length of the trail, passing through many Incan ruins before reaching the Sun Gate on Machu Picchu mountain. The trail was becoming greatly overused, forcing the Peruvian government to limit the number of people on the trail each day to 500. Book early …

8 Sap-sucking bugs : APHIDS

Aphids are called “greenfly” back in Britain and Ireland where I come from. The most effective way to control aphids, in my experience, is to make sure there are plenty of ladybugs in the garden (called “ladybirds” in Ireland!).

9 Levels of social status in India : CASTES

Although caste systems exist in several societies around the world, we tend to associate the concept with the social stratification that is still found in many parts of India. The term “caste” comes from the Portuguese word “casta” meaning “race, breed”. The Portuguese used the term to describe the hereditary social groups that they found in India when they arrived in the subcontinent in 1498.

11 Mushroom in miso soup : ENOKI

Enokitake (also known as “enoki”) are long and thin white mushrooms often added to soups or salads.

12 YouTube upload : VIDEO

YouTube is a video-sharing website that was launched in 2005 by three ex-PayPal employees. Google bought YouTube in 2006 for $1.65 billion. Yep, $1.65 billion, less than two years after it was founded …

18 Mythical goat-men : SATYRS

The satyrs of Greek mythology came with a very high sex drive. They are the “rude” male subjects drawn on the side of old Greek vases. The nubile maidens known as nymphs were often an object of attention for the satyrs.

22 Big pharma company : MERCK

Merck & Co., Inc. is a US company, once a subsidiary of the German company known today as Merck KGaA. The US subsidiary of the German firm was confiscated in 1917 during WWI, and set up as an independent company that grew into the giant that it is today.

“Big Pharma” is a nickname for the pharmaceutical industry. The monker comes from the acronym for the lobbying group for the industry, the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

25 One of nine on a nonagon : SIDE

The prefix “nona-” is used to denote the number nine or ninth. An example is “nonagon”, a nine-sided polygon.

32 Rainbow shape : ARC

Sunlight reflected by airborne water droplets can produce rainbows. The water droplets act as little prisms, dispersing the white light into its constituent colors. Sometimes we see double rainbows. If we look carefully, we can see that the order of the colors in the first and second arcs is reversed.

34 ___ carte : A LA

On a restaurant menu, items that are “à la carte” are priced and ordered separately. A menu marked “table d’hôte” (also called “prix fixe”) is a fixed-price menu with limited choice. “Table d’hôte” translates from French as “table of the host”.

36 Oklahoma city named for a Camelot woman : ENID

Enid, Oklahoma takes its name from the old railroad station around which the city developed. Back in 1889, that train stop was called Skeleton Station. An official who didn’t like the name changed it to Enid Station, using a character from Alfred Lord Tennyson’s “Idylls of the King”. Maybe if he hadn’t changed the name, the city of Enid would now be called Skeleton, Oklahoma! Enid has the nickname “Queen Wheat City” because it has a huge capacity for storing grain, the third largest grain storage capacity in the world.

“Idylls of the King” is a cycle of twelve poems by Alfred, Lord Tennyson that retells the tale of King Arthur. One of the “idylls” is the story of Geraint and Enid. This story is told in two parts: “The Marriage of Geraint” and “Geraint and Enid”. Tennyson’s Enid gave her name to the city of Enid, Oklahoma.

39 Fast-food chain with a cowboy hat logo : ARBY’S

The Arby’s chain of fast food restaurants was founded in 1964 by two brothers, Forrest and Leroy Raffel. The name “Arby’s” is a homonym of “RB’s”, standing for “Raffel Brothers”. There is a rumor out there that the initials “RB” were chosen for “roast beef”, but that’s not true.

40 Pastoral poem : IDYL

An idyll (also “idyl”) is a short poem with a pastoral theme, usually depicting the scene in romantic and idealized terms. The word “idyl” comes from the Greek “eidyllion”, which literally translates to “little picture” but was a word describing a short poem with a rustic theme.

41 Royal Caribbean trip : CRUISE

Royal Caribbean is a cruise line that was founded in Norway in 1968, and now operates out of Miami. Since 1991, Royal Caribbean’s vessels all have names ending with “of the Seas”, e.g. Empress of the Seas, Majesty of the Seas and Grandeur of the Seas.

51 Japanese box lunch : BENTO

A bento is a single-person meal that is eaten quite commonly in Japan. A bento can be purchased as a take-out meal, or it may be packed at home. A bento is usually sold as a “bento box”.

53 Satisfied for now, with “over” : TIDED …

Something is said to tide one over if it (often money) will see one through a rough patch. The idea behind the verb phrase “to tide over” is that a swelling tide can carry one over an obstacle without effort, as perhaps a reserve fund might keep the lenders from one’s door. The use of “tide” in this sense might come from some famous lines spoken by Brutus in the play “Julius Caesar” by William Shakespeare

There is a Tide in the affairs of men,
Which taken at the Flood, leads on to Fortune

54 Bygone Russian rulers : TSARS

The last ruler of Imperial Russia was Tsar Nicholas II (of the House of Romanov). Famously, the Tsar and his family were murdered in 1918 in the basement of a house in Yekaterinburg, Russia by members of the Bolshevik secret police. The Tsar’s youngest daughter was 16-year-old Anastasia and rumors of her escape have persisted for years. The rumors grew with the help of numerous women who claimed to be Anastasia. In 2009, DNA testing finally proved that the remains of all of the Tsar’s immediate family, including Anastasia, have been found and identified.

56 Pale purple : MAUVE

The name given to the light violet color that we know as “mauve” comes via French from the Latin “malva”. The Latin term translates as “mallow”, the common name of several species of plants, many of which have mauve-colored flowers.

61 The Monkees’ “___ Believer” : I’M A

“I’m a Believer” was a big hit for the Monkees in 1966. The band’s recording of “I’m a Believer” is a cover version. The song was written and originally recorded by Neil Diamond.

63 Journalist ___ B. Wells : IDA

Ida B. Wells was an African-American journalist and leader of the civil rights movement. She published a pamphlet in 1892 called “Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases”, which publicized the horrors of lynching of African Americans by white mobs in the South.

64 Sushi fish : EEL

Anyone going to a sushi restaurant can order all types of raw fish (known collectively as “sashimi”). However, eel is always served cooked, and that’s because the blood of eels contains a protein that cramps muscles if eaten. If the heart muscle “cramps”, the result can be death. The protein is easily rendered harmless by applying heat, i.e. by cooking.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Bacall’s partner in a classic Hollywood romance, informally : BOGIE
6 Apple pick? : IMAC
10 Races, as an engine : REVS
14 “Easy on Me” singer, 2021 : ADELE
15 Wine valley in California : NAPA
16 Fathom or foot : UNIT
17 1966 Swedish Literature Nobelist who wrote about the struggles of the Jewish people : NELLY SACHS
19 Was a passenger : RODE
20 Feathery neckwear : BOA
21 Successful singer or producer of popular music : HITMAKER
23 1988 American Nobelist in Physiology or Medicine who helped develop the first drug used to fight rejection in organ transplants : GERTRUDE ELION
25 Knight’s title : SIR
27 Hurricane’s center : EYE
28 Old atlas inits. : SSR
29 Tehran’s country : IRAN
31 Bio class subject : RNA
33 Bit role : CAMEO
38 2018 Canadian Physics Nobelist who helped implement chirped pulse amplification : DONNA STRICKLAND
42 Computer command : ENTER
43 Rank below capt. : CDR
44 In the thick of : AMID
45 Grp. that welcomed girl Cubs in 2018 : BSA
48 Casual affirmative : YUP
50 Commercials : ADS
51 1976 Peace Nobelist from Northern Ireland who co-founded Community of Peace People : BETTY WILLIAMS
57 Diplomatic envoy : EMISSARY
58 Spanish Mrs. : SRA
59 Nothin’ : NADA
60 1911 Polish/French Chemistry Nobelist who pioneered research in radioactivity : MARIE CURIE
65 Level : TIER
66 Strait-laced : PRIM
67 Get around : EVADE
68 Bygone G.M. car : OLDS
69 Locale spelled out in a Village People song : YMCA
70 Allowed by law : LEGAL

Down

1 Forbid : BAN
2 Poet Amanda Gorman’s “___ to Our Ocean” : ODE
3 Toothpaste type : GEL
4 “Imagine that!” : I’LL BE!
5 Pooh’s down-in-the-dumps friend : EEYORE
6 One ___ million : IN A
7 ___ Picchu, Peru : MACHU
8 Sap-sucking bugs : APHIDS
9 Levels of social status in India : CASTES
10 Like farm country : RURAL
11 Mushroom in miso soup : ENOKI
12 YouTube upload : VIDEO
13 Back of a ship : STERN
18 Mythical goat-men : SATYRS
22 Big pharma company : MERCK
23 Research money : GRANT
24 Lease (out) : RENT
25 One of nine on a nonagon : SIDE
26 A hot one makes a good impression : IRON
30 Opposite of SSW : NNE
32 Rainbow shape : ARC
34 ___ carte : A LA
35 Some fiercely protective “bears” : MAMAS
36 Oklahoma city named for a Camelot woman : ENID
37 Bettor’s chances : ODDS
39 Fast-food chain with a cowboy hat logo : ARBY’S
40 Pastoral poem : IDYL
41 Royal Caribbean trip : CRUISE
46 Like marshes : SWAMPY
47 Military aviation wing : AIR ARM
49 Package : PARCEL
51 Japanese box lunch : BENTO
52 Message sent with a click : EMAIL
53 Satisfied for now, with “over” : TIDED …
54 Bygone Russian rulers : TSARS
55 Line of a song : LYRIC
56 Pale purple : MAUVE
61 The Monkees’ “___ Believer” : I’M A
62 Cleaning cloth : RAG
63 Journalist ___ B. Wells : IDA
64 Sushi fish : EEL

8 thoughts on “0308-22 NY Times Crossword 8 Mar 22, Tuesday”

  1. 7:06, no errors. I’m tempted to make a smart-alecky comment about the probity of turning SATYRS loose in a puzzle of this nature, but I shall refrain … 😜.

  2. 11:15 – error on NELLiSACHS/EEiore

    The only name I knew was MADAMCURIE. Got the easy crosses on the others. Must lead a sheltered life …

    Be Well.

  3. 5:49. I also knew only one of the Nobel winners and I thought to myself, how telling is it that I knew only one woman Nobel laureate. And then I thought further about how many Nobel winners can I bring to mind overall? A couple for Peace Prizes – tho I’d have only a vague notion of the year – and maybe a couple for Medicine and Economics and that’s it. OK – let’s Add Bob Dylan to the list.

    Not sure what that tells me, other than being thankful for crossing clues when doing X-word puzzles.

  4. 7:26. Another good theme. So many Nobel’s these days are awarded for political reasons. The ones in this puzzle, however, were well earned.

    DONNA STRICKLAND is an amazing optical physicist, but the best story of this bunch is that of GERTRUDE ELION. That one merits a “wow”.

    I wonder how much longer SSR will be on OLD initial…

    Nice Monkees reference in today’s puzzle as it’s Mickey Dolenz’ 77th birthday today. He is the last surviving member of the band.

    I know this as it also is my mother’s 82nd birthday today.

    Best –

  5. Went too fast. Entered ANA for 31A thinking it was Anatomy. Never came back to it. When I got to NELY (who I didn’t know) I had NELLY _ ACHS.
    So when I looked at 18D, I had _ATYAS. ? goat man? I went with BATYAS because GERTRUDE BACHS sounded better. That left me with BATYAS for goat men. Hmmm.

    Really messed up.

    Agree with @jeff, Gertrudes story sounds remarkable.

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