0220-22 NY Times Crossword 20 Feb 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Victor Barocas
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Pardon My French

Themed answers are common English phrases with the first word replaced with a similar sounding French word:

  • 22A Positive thinker’s motto? : OUI SHALL OVERCOME (from “We Shall Overcome”)
  • 34A Means of becoming a god? : DIEU PROCESS (from “due process”)
  • 51A Where Rapunzel let down her hair? : BELLE TOWER (from “bell tower”)
  • 65A Holy water? : EAU FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE (from “oh, for heaven’s sake”)
  • 83A Answer to “What is Roquefort or Brie?”? : C’EST CHEESE (from “say ‘cheese’”)
  • 96A Spilled milk? : LAIT TO WASTE (from “lay to waste”)
  • 112A The queen with her pets? : REINE CATS AND DOGS (from “rain cats and dogs”)

Bill’s time: 16m 54s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Graduates of Quantico, informally : FEDS

The FBI Academy is located on a Marine Corps base in Quantico, Virginia. The academy opened for the first trainees in 1972. Included in the training complex is a 10-acre mock city known as Hogan’s Alley.

14 Taller roommate of 15-Down : BERT
(15D Shorter roommate of 14-Across : ERNIE)

For many years, I believed that the “Sesame Street” characters Bert and Ernie were named after two roles played in the Christmas classic “It’s a Wonderful Life”. In the movie, the policeman’s name is Bert and his taxi-driving buddy is named Ernie. However, the “Sesame Street” folks have stated that the use of the same names is just a coincidence. Aww, I don’t wanna believe that’s a coincidence …

18 Showgirl in the 1978 hit “Copacabana” : LOLA

The Copacabana of the 1978 Barry Manilow song is the Copacabana nightclub in New York City (which is also the subject of the Frank Sinatra song “Meet Me at the Copa”). The Copa opened in 1940 and is still going today, although it is struggling. The club had to move due to impending construction and is now “sharing” a location with the Columbus 72 nightclub.

Her name was Lola, she was a showgirl
With yellow feathers in her hair and a dress cut down to there
She would merengue and do the cha-cha
And while she tried to be a star
Tony always tended bar
Across the crowded floor, they worked from 8 ’til 4
They were young and they had each other
Who could ask for more?

19 Boomer’s kid, maybe : GEN XER

The term “Generation X” originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By one definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

A baby boomer is someone who was born in the post-WWII baby boom. The rate of births had been falling fairly steadily in the US at least since 1900, but this trend was sharply reversed in 1946 after WWII. The higher birth rate continued until 1964, when it returned to pre-war levels. Since then the birth rate has continued to decline, although at a slower pace. The period between 1946 and 1964 is often defined as the “baby boom”.

21 Snack item with approximately 53 calories : OREO

For those of us counting calories, Oreo Thins were introduced in 2015. There are only 40 calories in each thin cookie, compared to 53 calories in the real deal.

22 Positive thinker’s motto? : OUI SHALL OVERCOME (from “We Shall Overcome”)

The exact origins of the protest song titled “We Shall Overcome” is a little unclear. Some say that it is based on an early gospel song “I’ll Overcome Someday”, but there doesn’t seem to be much similarity between the two works beyond the titles. Early performers of the song who helped to popularize its use were Pete Seeger and Joan Baez.

26 FireWire alternative : USB

Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

27 Letter between November and Papa in the NATO alphabet : OSCAR

The NATO phonetic alphabet is also called the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) phonetic alphabet. Alfa, Bravo, Charlie … X-ray, Yankee, Zulu.

29 When a prime-time drama might air : AT NINE

In the world of television, prime time is that part of the day when networks and advertisers maximize revenues due to the high number of viewers. Prime time is often defined as 7-10 p.m. Mountain and Central Time, and 8-11 p.m. Pacific and Eastern Time.

31 Reason-based belief in God : DEISM

Deism (from the Latin “deus” meaning god) is the belief that a supreme being created the universe, a belief based on observation and reason and without the need for faith. Further, a deist does not accept divine intervention and rather believes that the supreme being, having created the universe, leaves the world to its own devices.

33 Repeated sound that’s hard to get rid of : HIC

Hiccups is a series of forced intakes of breath, the result of spasms in the muscles of the chest and throat. The most common cause of hiccups is some sort of irritation to the stomach or esophagus, usually taking place while eating. Apparently, we don’t really understand the reason why we hiccup, but a favored suggestion is that it may be something that we inherited from our ancestors of long ago who didn’t stand up quite as straight as we do. Gravity helps us swallow our food, but animals who walk on all fours don’t have that advantage as the food moves horizontally down the throat and into the stomach. Such beasts are in greater need of an involuntary hiccup should some food get stuck. Just a theory …

34 Means of becoming a god? : DIEU PROCESS (from “due process”)

In French, “Dieu” (God) is the foe of “le diable” (the devil).

36 “Call the Midwife” network : PBS

“Call the Midwife” is a BBC drama about midwives working in the East End of London in the late fifties and early sixties. I must admit, one of the reasons I am intrigued by this show is that I can well remember the midwife coming to our house in the East End of London in 1959 for the delivery of my younger brother. I am sure the attending nurse was a wonderful person, but I remember being scared every time she pulled up outside our flat on her bicycle!

40 Nonsense : TRIPE

“Tripe” is an informal term meaning “rubbish, of little value”. Tripe is actually the rubbery stomach lining of an animal such as a cow. Tripe is a traditional dish in British cuisine that is prepared by poaching it with onions in milk.

45 Ernst and Young, e.g.: Abbr. : SENS

Joni Ernst was elected as a US Senator for Iowa in 2014. Ernst is a Republican who had previously served as a lieutenant colonel in the Iowa National Guard. She is the first female veteran in the US Senate, and the first woman to represent Iowa in the US Congress.

Todd Young was elected as a US senator for Indiana in 2017. Young, a Republican, succeeded Republican Dan Coats by defeating Democratic candidate and former Indiana Governor Evan Bayh.

51 Where Rapunzel let down her hair? : BELLE TOWER (from “bell tower”)

A beau (plural “beaux”) is the boyfriend of a belle, a young lady. “Beau” and “belle” are the masculine and feminine forms of the French word for “handsome, beautiful”.

“Rapunzel” is a fairy tale in the collection of the Brothers Grimm. Rapunzel was a maiden who was locked in a tower by an enchantress. The inevitable prince turns up, and he climbs up to Rapunzel using her long, fair hair as a climbing rope.

54 It matures quickly, in brief : T-BILL

A Treasury note (T-note) is a government debt that matures in 1-10 years. A T-note has a coupon (interest) payment made every six months. The T-note is purchased at a discount to face value, and at the date of maturity can be redeemed at that face value. A Treasury bill (T-bill) is a similar financial vehicle, but it matures in one year or less, and a T-bond matures in 20-30 years.

55 Angled to get attention: Abbr. : ITAL

Italic type leans to the right, and is often used to provide emphasis in text. The style is known as “italic” because the stylized calligraphic form of writing originated in Italy, probably in the Vatican.

62 Doc. to ensure secrecy : NDA

Non-disclosure agreement (NDA)

63 It surrounds a pupil : IRIS

The iris is the colored part of the eye. It has an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

The pupil of the eye is the hole located in the center of the iris through which light enters the retina. The term “pupil” came into English via French from the latin “pupilla”, which is the diminutive form of “pupa” meaning “girl, doll”. The term came about due to the tiny doll-like image that one can see of oneself when looking into the center of another’s eyes.

64 United group, e.g. : AIRCREW

United Airlines (UAL) has a complicated history, but can trace its roots back to Aviation Enterprises, founded in 1944 and later called Texas International. The first use of the “United” name in the company’s history was when airplane pioneer William Boeing merged his Boeing Air Transport with Pratt & Whitney to form the United Aircraft and Transport Corporation (UATC) in 1929. The Air Mail Act of 1934 required that UATC be broken up into United Aircraft (which became United Technologies), the Boeing Aircraft Company and United Air Lines.

65 Holy water? : EAU FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE (from “oh, for heaven’s sake”)

In French, Perrier “par exemple” (for example) is a bottled “eau” (water).

72 “Salus populi suprema lex ___” (motto of Missouri) : ESTO

Missouri’s State Motto is “Salus populi suprema lex esto”, which can be translated as “The welfare of the people shall be the supreme law”. It is a quotation from the “De Legibus” (“On the Laws”) written by Cicero during the last years of the Roman Republic.

74 One of 17 in Monopoly: Abbr. : AVE

The street names in the original US version of the board game Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

79 Dish that’s cooked underground : POI

I am a big fan of starch (being an Irishman I love potatoes). That said, I think that poi tastes horrible! Poi is made from the bulbous tubers (corm) of the taro plant by cooking the corm in water and mashing it until the desired consistency is achieved.

80 Feb. 14 : V-DAY

Saint Valentine’s Day was introduced by Pope Gelasius I in 496 AD to honor various martyrs with the name Valentine. However, the saint’s day was dropped by the Roman Catholic church in 1969, by Pope Paul VI. Try telling that to Hallmark though …

81 673 parts of the Louvre Pyramid : PANES

When I. M. Pei became the first foreign architect to work on the Louvre in Paris, he not only designed the famous glass and steel pyramid, but also worked on renovations throughout the museum. His design was very controversial, causing a lot of ill feelings among the public. Eventually, when the work was complete, public opinion became more favorable. Personally, I think it is magnificent, both inside and out.

83 Answer to “What is Roquefort or Brie?”? : C’EST CHEESE (from “say ‘cheese’”)

Photographers often instruct us to say “cheese” to elicit a smile-like expression. Even Japanese photographers use the word “cheese” to achieve the same effect. Bulgarians use the word “zele” meaning “cabbage”. The Chinese say “eggplant”, the Danish “orange”, the Iranians “apple” and many Latin Americans say “whiskey”.

Roquefort is a cheese made from sheep milk. It comes from the commune of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon in the South of France.

Brie is a soft cheese that is named for the French region in which it originated. Brie is similar to the equally famous (and delicious) Camembert. Brie is often served baked in puff pastry with fig jam.

91 Announcement on National Coming Out Day : I’M GAY

LGBT History Month has been celebrated annually since 1994. The month of October was chosen so that it coincided with the already-existing National Coming Out Day, which is observed annually on October 11th.

96 Spilled milk? : LAIT TO WASTE (from “lay to waste”)

In French, “une vache” (a cow) produces “lait” (milk).

102 Ubiquitous advertiser with an acronymic name : GEICO

GEICO was founded in 1936 with a very specific mission, to provide auto insurance for employees of the federal government and their families, hence the name Government Employees Insurance Company (GEICO). GEICO is a private company, despite the word “government” in its name. The founders’ idea was to focus on government employees as they believed such a group represented a lower risk profile than the rest of the population. Nowadays any qualifying person can take out a policy with GEICO.

107 Weight of an empty container : TARE

Tare is the weight of a container that is deducted from the gross weight to determine the net weight, the weight of the container’s contents.

108 What’s clothed in summer and naked in winter, per an old riddle : A TREE

Here are a few riddles:

  1. Imagine you are in a dark room. How do you get out?
  2. What can travel around the world while staying in a corner?
  3. There is a word and six letters it contains. Take one away and twelve is what remains. What word is it?
  4. Two girls were born to the same mother, on the same day, at the same time, in the same month and year and yet they’re not twins. How can this be?
  5. What is so delicate that even saying its name will break it?
  6. What word in the English Language is always spelled incorrectly?

And the answers:

  1. Stop imagining.
  2. A stamp
  3. Dozens
  4. They’re in a set of triplets
  5. Silence
  6. Incorrectly

110 China’s largest ethnic group : HAN

The Han Chinese people are the largest ethnic group in the world, and comprise 18% of the planet’s population. The 1.3 billion Han also make up 92% of China’s population. The group takes its name from the Han dynasty that ruled much of modern day China from roughly 200 BCE to 220 CE.

111 What BankAmericard became in 1976 : VISA

VISA doesn’t actually issue any credit or debit cards. VISA just sells the electronic systems and infrastructure to banks who then put the VISA logo on their own cards. Seeing the logo, both customer and merchant know to use the VISA system when making a transaction.

112 The queen with her pets? : REINE CATS AND DOGS (from “rain cats and dogs”)

“La reine” (the queen) is the wife of “le roi” (the king), in French.

It has been “raining cats and dogs” at least since the 1700s, but no one seems to know the origin of the expression.

116 School where some of “Shakespeare in Love” was filmed : ETON

Eton College near Windsor in the south of England was founded way back in 1440 by King Henry VI. Originally known as “The King’s College of Our Lady of Eton besides Wyndsor”, the school was intended to provide free education to poor boys. Free education today at Eton? Not so much …

I found the 1998 movie “Shakespeare in Love” to be an entertaining romantic comedy. It is a fictional account of Shakespeare having a love affair while in the middle of writing his famous “Romeo and Juliet”. The great cast includes Gwyneth Paltrow, Colin Firth and Judi Dench, with Joseph Fiennes in the title role.

117 Annual Memorial Day race, informally : INDY

The Indianapolis 500 race is held annually at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana. The race is run around a 2.5 mile oval, hence requiring 200 laps for completion. The first Indy 500 race was held on Memorial Day in 1911. The winner that day was one Ray Harroun. Harroun had seen someone using a rear view mirror on a horse-drawn vehicle, and decided to fit one on his Marmon “Wasp” motor car. Supposedly, that was the first ever use of a rear-view mirror on a motor vehicle.

118 Red Sox’ div. : AL EAST

The Boston Red Sox are one of the most successful Major League Baseball teams and so command a large attendance, but only when on the road. The relatively small capacity of Boston’s Fenway Park, the team’s home since 1912, has dictated that every game the Red Sox have played there has been a sell-out from May of 2003 to April 2013. I recently had the pleasure of touring Fenway Park. It’s quite a place …

119 Bit of sports equipment that may be electrified : EPEE

The French word for sword is “épée”. In competitive fencing the épée is connected to a system that records an electrical signal when legal contact is made on an opponent’s body.

120 Casino tool : RAKE

At a poker table, a croupier might use a rake to pull in the chips, and that rake has tines, projecting points.

121 Philippine money : PESO

The writing on bank notes in the Philippines used to be in English, so the national currency was recorded as the “peso”. Since 1967 the language on the notes has been Filipino, and now the name of the currency is written as “piso”.

Down

2 Windsor, e.g. : HOUSE

King George V was ruler of the United Kingdom during WWI. It was George V who changed the Royal Family’s name from Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, creating the House of Windsor in 1917. He did this in response to anti-German feeling in Britain during the war.

3 A criminal’s may be unbelievable : ALIBI

“Alibi” is the Latin word for “elsewhere” as in, “I claim that I was ‘elsewhere’ when the crime was committed, I have an ‘alibi’”.

5 Big name in jelly : WELCH

Welch’s is a beverage and food company that was founded in 1869 by Thomas Bramwell Welch and Lee Steger Welch in Vineland, New Jersey. The company’s first product was “Dr. Welch’s Unfermented Wine”, which was later rebranded as “Welch’s Grape Juice”.

6 Like mosaic tiles : INLAID

In the Middle Ages, mosaics were often dedicated to the Muses. The term “mosaic” translates as “of the Muses”.

7 Lose possession? : EXORCISE

An exorcist is a religious figure who is believed to be able to cast out demons that have possessed a person or perhaps a building.

8 One of the books of the Torah: Abbr. : LEV

In the Hebrew Bible, the Book of Leviticus comes after the Book of Exodus and before the Book of Numbers.

9 Where Wagner’s “Tannhäuser” was first performed : DRESDEN

The German city of Dresden was almost completely destroyed during WWII, especially as a result of the famous firebombing of the city in 1945. Restoration work in the inner city in recent decades led to it being designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. However, in 2006 when the city built a highway bridge close to the city center, UNESCO took Dresden off the list. This marked the only time a European location has lost World Heritage status.

10 Prima ___ : FACIE

“Prima facie” is Latin for “first encounter” or “at first sight”. In the world of the law, a prima facie case is one in which the evidence is deemed to be sufficient for a judgment to be made unless the evidence is contested.

23 Man of La Mancha : HOMBRE

La Mancha is a region in Spain, a plateau lying south of Madrid. The area became especially famous after the publication of the novel “Don Quixote de La Mancha” by Miguel de Cervantes.

39 Most likely to win at Trivia Night, maybe : NERDIEST

Trivia are things of little consequence. “Trivia” is the plural of the Latin word “trivium” which means “a place where three roads meet”. Now that’s what I call a trivial fact …

41 Long-billed wader : IBIS

The ibis is a wading bird that was revered in ancient Egypt. “Ibis” is an interesting word grammatically speaking. You can have one “ibis” or two “ibises”, and then again one has a flock of “ibis”. And if you want to go with the classical plural, instead of two “ibises” you would have two “ibides”!

44 Home for Holmes : LONDON

In the “Sherlock Holmes” stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the famous detective has lodgings at 221b Baker Street in London. Holmes shares rooms with his friend and chronicler Dr. Watson. The landlady in the residence is the amiable Mrs. Hudson.

49 Berliner’s “old” : ALTE

Berlin is the capital of Germany. It is the nation’s largest city, and is the second-most populous city in the European Union (after London).

54 Prefix that’s mega mega? : TERA-

The prefix “tera-” signifies a trillion, and comes from the Greek word “teras” meaning “monster”.

60 BuzzFeed staple : LISTICLE

A “listicle” is a form of writing used by some journalists and bloggers that is basically a list, but which is fleshed out with extra information for each list item. Typically, listicles have title such as “10 Ways to …”, “The 100 best …” or “The 10 Most …” The term “listicle” is a portmanteau of “list” and “article”.

BuzzFeed is an Internet media company that was founded in 2006 in New York City. Buzzfeed’s original focus was the publication of online quizzes and pop culture articles. The company branched into serious journalism in 2011 with the launch of the “Buzzfeed News” website.

64 Wide ties : ASCOTS

An ascot is a wide tie that narrows at the neck, which these days is only really worn at weddings or part of a dress uniform. The tie takes its name from the Royal Ascot horse race at which punters still turn up in formal wear at Ascot Racecourse in England.

66 Netflix series set at Green Gables : ANNE WITH AN E

“Anne of Green Gables” is a 1908 novel by Lucy Maud Montgomery that she set in the fictional Prince Edward Island community of Avonlea. Montgomery wrote several sequels to “Anne”, with them all being set on Prince Edward Island (PEI), from where the author hailed.

68 Place to go on a ship : HEAD

In old sailing ships, the toilet area for the regular sailors was located in the forward part (the head) of the ship. As a result, the term “head” has been used since then for any toilet on board a boat.

71 Neighbor of Siberia, in Risk : URAL

Risk is a fabulous board game that was introduced in France in 1957. It was invented by a very successful French director of short films called Albert Lamorisse. Lamorisse called his new game “La Conquête du Monde”, which translates into English as “The Conquest of the World”. A game of Risk is a must during the holidays in our house …

87 A narcissist may go on one : EGO TRIP

Narcissus was a proud and vain hunter in Greek mythology. He earned himself a fatal punishment, falling in love with his own reflection in a pool. So, taken was he by his own image that he could not leave it, and wasted away and died by the pool. Narcissus gives us our term “narcissism” meaning “excessive love of oneself”.

88 Shockingly bizarre : OUTRE

The word “outré”, meaning “unconventional, bizarre”, comes to us from French, as one might imagine. It is derived from the verb “outrer” meaning “to overdo, exaggerate”. “Outrer” is also the ultimate root of our word “outrage”.

89 What the quadriceps muscle connects to : KNEECAP

The quadriceps femoris is the muscle group at the front of the thigh. It is the strongest muscle in the human body, and is also the leanest. The “quads” are actually a group of four muscles in the upper leg, hence the use of the prefix “quad-”.

92 N.Y.C. commuting inits. : MTA

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has public transportation responsibility in the state of New York (as well as part of Connecticut).

96 Where bile is produced : LIVER

The human liver has many functions, one of which is to store vital substances. The list of substances stored in the liver includes glucose (as glycogen), vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin B12, vitamin K, iron and copper. Another function of the liver is to produce bile, a substance stored in the gallbladder that aids in the digestion of fats.

97 Loos who wrote “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” : ANITA

Anita Loos was an American screenwriter and author who was most famous for her novel “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” that was first published in 1925. “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” was originally published as a series of short stories in “Harper’s Bazaar”. The heroine of the story was Lorelei Lee, a “flapper” who was less interested in marriage than she was in collecting expensive gifts from her many gentleman admirers.

99 Panasonic subsidiary : SANYO

Sanyo is a Japanese electronics manufacturer based near Osaka and founded in 1947. The company name means “three oceans” reflecting the company’s original aim to sell its products all around the world (across three oceans: the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian).

109 Rhinitis treater, in brief : ENT

The branch of medicine known as “ear, nose and throat” (ENT) is more correctly called “otolaryngology”.

Rhinitis is irritation and inflammation of the mucous membrane inside the nose. Usually, rhinitis is a result of inhalation of allergens such as pollen and pet dander.

115 “Do the ___” (soft drink slogan) : DEW

If you check the can, you’ll see that “Mountain Dew” is now marketed as “Mtn Dew”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Tobacco plug : CHAW
5 Manipulate : WIELD
10 Graduates of Quantico, informally : FEDS
14 Taller roommate of 15-Down : BERT
18 Showgirl in the 1978 hit “Copacabana” : LOLA
19 Boomer’s kid, maybe : GEN XER
20 Declare : AVOW
21 Snack item with approximately 53 calories : OREO
22 Positive thinker’s motto? : OUI SHALL OVERCOME (from “We Shall Overcome”)
25 Textbook section : UNIT
26 FireWire alternative : USB
27 Letter between November and Papa in the NATO alphabet : OSCAR
28 It might be set at sea : SAIL
29 When a prime-time drama might air : AT NINE
31 Reason-based belief in God : DEISM
33 Repeated sound that’s hard to get rid of : HIC
34 Means of becoming a god? : DIEU PROCESS (from “due process”)
36 “Call the Midwife” network : PBS
38 Had something nice : DINED
40 Nonsense : TRIPE
41 Place in danger : IMPERIL
45 Ernst and Young, e.g.: Abbr. : SENS
46 Peroxide ___ : ION
47 It’s an affront : SLAP
51 Where Rapunzel let down her hair? : BELLE TOWER (from “bell tower”)
53 Quarrel : ROW
54 It matures quickly, in brief : T-BILL
55 Angled to get attention: Abbr. : ITAL
56 Suffix with serpent or opal : -INE
57 Offed : DID IN
60 Reach quickly, as a conclusion : LEAP TO
61 Perhaps : SAY
62 Doc. to ensure secrecy : NDA
63 It surrounds a pupil : IRIS
64 United group, e.g. : AIRCREW
65 Holy water? : EAU FOR HEAVEN’S SAKE (from “oh, for heaven’s sake”)
70 Excites : TURNS ON
72 “Salus populi suprema lex ___” (motto of Missouri) : ESTO
73 Charade : ACT
74 One of 17 in Monopoly: Abbr. : AVE
77 One with pressing work : IRONER
78 Feed the guests, maybe : CATER
79 Dish that’s cooked underground : POI
80 Feb. 14 : V-DAY
81 673 parts of the Louvre Pyramid : PANES
82 “Old man” : DAD
83 Answer to “What is Roquefort or Brie?”? : C’EST CHEESE (from “say ‘cheese’”)
86 Offed : SLEW
87 Go the wrong way : ERR
88 Green-lit : OK’ED
90 Like drunken speech : SLURRED
91 Announcement on National Coming Out Day : I’M GAY
93 Inappropriate : UNDUE
95 Early bird? : EGG
96 Spilled milk? : LAIT TO WASTE (from “lay to waste”)
100 Front of a semi : CAB
102 Ubiquitous advertiser with an acronymic name : GEICO
106 Seeing as : IN THAT
107 Weight of an empty container : TARE
108 What’s clothed in summer and naked in winter, per an old riddle : A TREE
110 China’s largest ethnic group : HAN
111 What BankAmericard became in 1976 : VISA
112 The queen with her pets? : REINE CATS AND DOGS (from “rain cats and dogs”)
116 School where some of “Shakespeare in Love” was filmed : ETON
117 Annual Memorial Day race, informally : INDY
118 Red Sox’ div. : AL EAST
119 Bit of sports equipment that may be electrified : EPEE
120 Casino tool : RAKE
121 Philippine money : PESO
122 Fleas and flies : PESTS
123 What’s left on a map? : WEST

Down

1 Obscure : CLOUD
2 Windsor, e.g. : HOUSE
3 A criminal’s may be unbelievable : ALIBI
4 “Time ___ …” : WAS
5 Big name in jelly : WELCH
6 Like mosaic tiles : INLAID
7 Lose possession? : EXORCISE
8 One of the books of the Torah: Abbr. : LEV
9 Where Wagner’s “Tannhäuser” was first performed : DRESDEN
10 Prima ___ : FACIE
11 Word that becomes more dramatic when you add an “R” in front : EVOLUTION
12 Caribbean land, at the Olympics : DOM
13 Administer an oath to : SWEAR IN
14 Echoes : BOUNCES BACK
15 Shorter roommate of 14-Across : ERNIE
16 Control, metaphorically : REINS
17 Completely, in slang : TOTES
19 Pedal on the right : GAS
23 Man of La Mancha : HOMBRE
24 Late-night trips to the fridge, e.g. : RAIDS
30 Shirt or blouse : TOP
32 Bit of magic : SPELL
35 Projecting front : PROW
37 Temporarily replace : SIT IN FOR
39 Most likely to win at Trivia Night, maybe : NERDIEST
41 Long-billed wader : IBIS
42 Parent company of Facebook : META
43 Game starter : PLAYER ONE
44 Home for Holmes : LONDON
48 One who sees what you’re saying? : LIP-READER
49 Berliner’s “old” : ALTE
50 Sight on winter roads : PLOW
52 Sign of overuse : WEAR
53 “All ___!” : RISE
54 Prefix that’s mega mega? : TERA-
58 Not merely annoyed : IRATE
59 Split : DIVORCED
60 BuzzFeed staple : LISTICLE
64 Wide ties : ASCOTS
66 Netflix series set at Green Gables : ANNE WITH AN E
67 Manipulates : USES
68 Place to go on a ship : HEAD
69 Them’s the breaks! : NAPS
70 List in “The Idiot’s Guide to …” : TIPS
71 Neighbor of Siberia, in Risk : URAL
75 Common still-life prop : VASE
76 Looked at : EYED
78 Architectural columns in the form of sculpted female figures : CARYATIDS
80 Threshold : VERGE
82 Gunslinger’s command : DRAW
84 Schools : EDUCATES
85 Held tight : HUGGED
87 A narcissist may go on one : EGO TRIP
88 Shockingly bizarre : OUTRE
89 What the quadriceps muscle connects to : KNEECAP
92 N.Y.C. commuting inits. : MTA
94 Bugs : EATS AT
96 Where bile is produced : LIVER
97 Loos who wrote “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” : ANITA
98 Casual response to an apology : IT’S OK
99 Panasonic subsidiary : SANYO
101 Orchestra section : BRASS
103 “If my luck holds out …” : I HOPE
104 Pens : CAGES
105 Beginning : ONSET
109 Rhinitis treater, in brief : ENT
113 Phoenix-to-Albuquerque dir. : ENE
114 Bottle labeled “XXX” in the comics : ALE
115 “Do the ___” (soft drink slogan) : DEW

10 thoughts on “0220-22 NY Times Crossword 20 Feb 22, Sunday”

  1. Hmm … how badly do I want to embarrass myself? … 😜

    At about the 25-minute mark, when I filled the last square in the grid, I didn’t get the “success” message. Okay, been there, done that – I found a typo and corrected it. Still no message. Laboriously checked the entire grid without finding any more typos. Checked it again. And again. And again. Much time passed. Considered using the “check” function and refused. (I used it once, on the very first of what has now become 2254 solves, and resolved never to do so again.) And … I finally found the error: I had used DIVERGED instead of DIVORCED for “Split”, giving me ESTE instead of ESTO for the last word of the state motto and GEST CHEESE (which almost works – think “guest cheese”) instead of C’EST CHEESE (which completely works – “say cheese”!). Finally got the “success” message at 49:17.

    Being stubborn isn’t all bad … 😜.

    1. 38:18. Similar experience. I also had DIVERGED because I started out with GOAT CHEESE, before I fully caught on to the theme.

  2. 18:16. Nothing too hard, but a little slow on some of the fill. Dusted off my high school French, although most of what’s in there are pretty commonly known French words I suppose.

    1. Well, that was a slipped finger. Anyway 53:40 with a OUI bit of help. I’m crying OUI, OUI, OUI all the way HOLMES. way above my usual for Sunday

  3. 33:11. Tough one until it became pretty easy (more brilliant analysis). Once I got the theme, the theme answers filled in a lot of letters quickly. It just took me too long to get there.

    I was born in 1963 so I’m technically a baby boomer AND a Gen Xer? I guess that makes me double something. I just don’t know what.

    Is an IRONER really a profession?

    A doctor told me long ago that hiccups are usually caused by a hyperacidic stomach. An antacid (e.g. Tums), a little water, and something soothing to the stomach like cheese usually takes care of them for me.

    Best –

  4. 46:07, no errors. Note that the clue for 63A was changed in the syndicated version to: “A pupil may grow in it”. My initial entry was DARK.

  5. With pen and paper I don’t have a “check” or “success” option so I take my hits. And I took some in this one.

    Wasn’t a fan with the varied French lead ins. Wasn’t sure on several though I ended up doing well on them.

    I really messed up in the cross with DIVERGE and CATER and CARYATIDS.

    Had DIVESTED SATES and SARYATIDS

    bit of a slog otherwise and misdirection.

    BTW – CHAW is not the proper word for Tobacco plug. CHAW is informal. CHEW is the proper word.

  6. 29:25, no errors, no issues. Fair time for me given how much trouble I can have doing 21x with writing instrument.

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