0103-22 NY Times Crossword 3 Jan 22, Monday

Constructed by: Beth Rubin & Trent H. Evans
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Gut Feeling

Themed answers each include a FEELING as a hidden word in its GUT, inside:

  • 61A Intuition without logical explanation, or a hint to this puzzle’s circled letters : GUT FEELING
  • 17A Telepathic sort : MIND READER (hiding “DREAD”)
  • 27A Embedded spy awaiting a mission : SLEEPER AGENT (hiding “RAGE”)
  • 37A Scattered here, there and everywhere : ALL OVER THE PLACE (hiding “LOVE”)
  • 45A “Quit arguing, kids!” : STOP IT, YOU TWO! (hiding “PITY”)

Bill’s time: 5m 25s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 “First, do no ___” (physician’s maxim) : HARM

“First, do no harm” is a translation of the Latin phrase “Primum non nocere”. The phrase is a principle used in the world of medicine that reminds a provider of healthcare that to do nothing might be better than intervening in some situations. It is often said that “First, do no harm” is found in the text of the Hippocratic Oath, but that’s just not true. What is true is that the line “I will use those dietary regimens which will benefit my patients according to my greatest ability and judgment, and I will do no harm or injustice to them” is included.

5 Claim on some food packaging : NO MSG

Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the sodium salt of a naturally-occurring,non-essential amino acid called glutamic acid. It is used widely as a flavor enhancer, particularly in many Asian cuisines. Whether or not it is harmful seems to be still under debate. I say that something produced in a test tube shouldn’t be in our food …

14 Cookie often dipped in milk : OREO

There’s a smartphone app featuring the Oreo cookie. It’s a game in which one twists Oreo cookies apart, “licks” the cream from the center and then dunks the remainder of the cookie in a glass of milk.

15 Barclays Center in Brooklyn, for one : ARENA

The Barclays Center is an arena in Brooklyn, New York that is home to the Brooklyn Nets of the NBA, and to the New York Islanders of the NHL. Barclays ended up paying over $200 million for the naming rights, even though the London-based banking group has no retail banks or ATMs in the US.

16 Ending with Insta- : GRAM

Instagram (often abbreviated to “Insta”) is a photo-sharing application, one that is extremely popular. Instagram started in San Francisco in 2010. Facebook purchased Instagram two years later, paying $1 billion. The billion-dollar Instagram company had just 13 employees at the time of the sale …

19 Halliwell of the Spice Girls : GERI

Geri Halliwell was nicknamed Ginger Spice when she was with the Spice Girls, because of her red hair. Halliwell was quite a bit older than the rest of the group and so sometimes she was less charitably referred to as “Old Spice”. After launching her solo career, Halliwell released a fabulous 2001 version of the song “It’s Raining Men”, which was originally recorded by the Weather Girls in 1982. Great song …

20 Makeup mogul Lauder : ESTEE

Estée Lauder was a very successful businesswoman, and someone with a great reputation as a salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

26 Greek letter that one might expect to come last : ZETA

Zeta is the sixth letter of the Greek alphabet, and is a precursor of our Roman letter Z. The word “zeta” is also the ancestor of the letter name “zed”, which became “zee”, the term that we use here in the US.

35 With 59-Across, “Madam Secretary” star : TEA …
59 See 35-Across : … LEONI

Téa Leoni is an American actress. One of Leoni’s early parts was in the great film “A League of Their Own” (a minor role: Racine at first base). She also played the fiancée of Sam Malone from “Cheers” on the spin-off sitcom “Frasier”. A leading role on the big screen was opposite Adam Sandler in “Spanglish”. My favorite of her more prominent movie roles was as Jane in “Fun with Dick and Jane”. Leoni started playing the title role in the drama series “Madam Secretary” in 2014, and that’s a show I quite enjoy …

“Madam Secretary” is A TV show that first aired from 2014 to 2019. It is about an ex-CIA analyst who is appointed as US Secretary of State. Téa Leoni plays the title role, ably supported by a favorite actress of mine, Bebe Neuwirth. I like this show …

36 Curbside coin collector : METER

An early patent for a parking meter, dated 1928, was for a device that required the driver of the parked car to connect the battery of his or her car to the meter in order for it to operate!

42 Animal that dances ballet in “Fantasia” : HIPPO

“Fantasia” was Disney’s third feature length movie, and was released in 1940. The film had a disappointing critical reception and pushed the Disney company into financial difficulties. RKO took over the film’s distribution in 1946. The folks at RKO cut a full hour off the running time and relaunched the movie into a successful run. If you haven’t seen “Fantasia”, I urge you to do so. It’s a real delight …

43 Apple mobile devices run on it : IOS

iOS is what Apple now calls its mobile operating system. Previously, it was known as iPhone OS.

50 Cuatro + cuatro : OCHO

In Spanish, “cuatro y cuatro” (four plus four) is “ocho” (eight).

51 1988 Best Picture winner starring Dustin Hoffman : RAIN MAN

“Rain Man” is an entertaining and thought-provoking film released in 1988 starring Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman. It’s all about a self-possessed yuppie (Cruise, appropriate casting!) who discovers he has a brother who is an autistic savant (Hoffman). Hoffman won the Best Actor Oscar for his performance, and “Rain Man” won the Best Picture award.

60 Antioxidant-rich berry : ACAI

Açaí (pronounced “ass-aye-ee”) is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

64 Dryer fuzz : LINT

“Lint”, meaning “fluff”, is one of those terms that I had to learn when I moved to the US. We call the same thing “fuzz” on the other side of the Atlantic.

65 “Ciao” in Chihuahua : ADIOS

The city of Chihuahua is the capital of the Mexican state of the same name. The city was founded in 1709 by Spanish explorers as a village called El Real de Minas de San Francisco de Cuéllar. However, the current name “Chihuahua” predates the Spanish conquest of Mexico, although the name wasn’t adopted until 1823.

66 Singer India.___ : ARIE

India.Arie is an American soul and R&B singer who was born India Arie Simpson in Denver, Colorado.

68 H. Ross ___, candidate of 1992 and 1996 : PEROT

Ross Perot graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1953, as president of his class. Perot served his 4-year commitment but then resigned his commission, apparently having become somewhat disillusioned with the navy. He was ranked number 101 on the Forbes 400 List of Richest Americans in 2012, and at that time was worth about $3.5 billion. Back in 1992, Perot ran as an independent candidate for US president. He founded the Reform Party in 1995, and ran as the Reform Party candidate for president in 1996.

Down

3 Amounts on Monopoly cards : RENTS

The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of “The Landlord’s Game” created in 1903 by a Quaker woman named Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord’s Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

4 X and Y, for Tesla : MODELS

Tesla Motors shortened its name to just “Tesla” in early 2017.

6 Pop star Rita : ORA

Rita Ora is a British singer who was born Rita Sahatçiu in Pristina, Yugoslavia to Albanian parents. The family name “Sahatçiu” comes from a Turkish word meaning “watchmaker”. Rita’s parents changed their name to make it easier to pronounce. So, the family name morphed from “watchmaker” to “time”, which is “ora” in Albanian.

8 “Gesundheit!” elicitor : SNEEZE

“Gesundheit” is the German word for “health”, and is used in response to a sneeze in Germany, as indeed it is quite often here in the US.

9 Hose holder, or a kind of snake : GARTER

The garter snake is found right across the continent, It is in fact the most widely distributed genus of reptile in North America, being found anywhere from Southeast Alaska to Central America.

12 Dress in India : SARI

The item of clothing called a “sari” (also “saree”) is a strip of cloth, as one might imagine, unusual perhaps in that it is unstitched along the whole of its length. The strip of cloth can range from four to nine meters long (that’s a lot of material!). The sari is usually wrapped around the waist, then draped over the shoulder leaving the midriff bare. I must say, it can be a beautiful item of clothing.

13 Jannings who won the first Best Actor Oscar : EMIL

Emil Jannings was an actor from Switzerland who also held German and Austrian citizenship. Jannings was the first person to receive an Oscar, as the star of the 1928 silent movie called “The Last Command”. He also starred opposite Marlene Dietrich in the 1930 classic “The Blue Angel”.

22 “Forever” purchase : STAMP

The forever stamp for first-class postage was introduced in 2006 (and about time!). Now we have stamps that are good for first-class postage forever, no matter how often the rates change.

25 Clairvoyant sort : SEER

We’ve been using the term “clairvoyant” to describe a psychic since the nineteenth century. Prior to that, a clairvoyant was a clear-sighted person. The term comes from French, with “clair” meaning “clear” and “voyant” meaning “seeing”.

29 Sched. listings at JFK or LAX : ETAS

Estimated time of arrival (ETA)

The Idlewild Golf Course was taken over by the city of New York in 1943 and construction started on a new airport to serve the metropolis and relieve congestion at LaGuardia. The Idlewild name still persists, even though the airport was named after Major General Alexander E. Anderson from the first days of the project. When the facility started operating in 1948 it was known as New York International Airport, Anderson Field. It was renamed to John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) in 1963, one month after the President was assassinated.

Los Angeles International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world in terms of passenger traffic, and the busiest here on the West Coast of the US. The airport was opened in 1930 as Mines Field and was renamed to Los Angeles Airport in 1941. On the airport property is the iconic white structure that resembles a flying saucer. This is called the Theme Building and I believe it is mainly used as a restaurant and observation deck for the public. The airport used to be identified by the letters “LA”, but when the aviation industry went to a three-letter standard for airport identification, this was changed to “LAX”. Apparently, the “X” has no significant meaning.

30 Long part of a giraffe : NECK

The giraffe is the tallest terrestrial animal on the planet. Its main source of food is acacia leaves that they eat from high, high up in trees, where other herbivores cannot reach.

31 Card above deuce : TREY

A trey is a three in a deck of cards. The term “trey” can also be used for a domino with three pips, and even for a three-point play in basketball.

A two in a deck of playing cards might be called a “deuce”, from the Middle French “deus” (or Modern French “deux”) meaning “two”.

34 Fido fare, maybe : ALPO

Alpo is a brand of dog food introduced by Allen Products in 1936, with “Alpo” being an abbreviation for “Allen Products”. Lorne Greene used to push Alpo in television spots, as did Ed McMahon and Garfield the Cat, would you believe?

“Fido”, the name for many a dog, is Latin for “I trust”.

40 60 minutes : HOUR

We use base-10, the decimal system for our numbers. Base-60, the sexagesimal system, was used by the ancient Babylonians. This ancient usage gives rise to our 60 seconds in a minute, and 360 (6 x 60) degrees in a circle.

46 Something to “mind” at a British train station : THE GAP

“Mind the gap” is a very famous announcement made in several stations on the London Underground. The announcement is needed as there can be a large gap between the doorways of trains and the platform. This gap arises because the platforms of some stations are quite curved, while the train cars are, of course, straight.

47 “What’s up, my man?!” : YO, DUDE!

Our term “dude” arose as slang in New York City in the 1880s, when it was used to describe a fastidious man. In the early 1900s, the term was extended to mean “city slickers”, easterners who vacationed in the West. The first use of the term “dude ranch” was recorded in 1921.

48 ___ E. Coyote : WILE

Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner are two much-loved cartoon characters from Warner Bros. Wile E. Coyote was created first, and Road Runner was invented as someone for Wile E. to play off. I love this cartoon; it’s definitely one of the best …

52 Wavy-patterned fabric : MOIRE

A moiré pattern is a phenomenon in physics, a so-called interference pattern. If you lay two sheets of mesh over each other for example, slightly offset, then what you see is a moiré pattern. “Moiré” is the French name for a textile that we know simply as “moire”. The rippled pattern of the textile resembles that of the interference pattern.

53 Photographer Leibovitz : ANNIE

The wonderful, wonderful photographer Annie Leibovitz was given the assignment to capture images of the iconic musician John Lennon. During the photoshoot, Lennon insisted that his wife Yoko Ono be included in the shot. The result was the memorable “Rolling Stones” cover in which a naked Lennon is kissing Yoko Ono while the two lie on the ground. Sadly, very sadly, Lennon was shot and killed just five hours later.

56 You’ll trip on it if you drop it : ACID

LSD (known colloquially as “acid”) is lysergic acid diethylamide. A Swiss chemist named Albert Hofmann first synthesized LSD in 1938 in a research project looking for medically efficacious ergot alkaloids. It wasn’t until some five years later when Hofmann ingested some of the drug accidentally that its psychedelic properties were discovered. Trippy, man …

62 Rock’s ___ Fighters : FOO

Foo Fighters are described as an alternative rock band, one formed in 1994 by the drummer from Nirvana, Dave Grohl. The term “foo fighters” originally applied to unidentified flying objects reported by allied airmen during WWII. Spooky …

63 Ballpark guess: Abbr. : EST

Estimate (est.)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “First, do no ___” (physician’s maxim) : HARM
5 Claim on some food packaging : NO MSG
10 Simplicity : EASE
14 Cookie often dipped in milk : OREO
15 Barclays Center in Brooklyn, for one : ARENA
16 Ending with Insta- : GRAM
17 Telepathic sort : MIND READER
19 Halliwell of the Spice Girls : GERI
20 Makeup mogul Lauder : ESTEE
21 Determines the money needed to get out of jail : SETS BAIL
23 Affirmative response to “Shall we dance?” : YES, LET’S
26 Greek letter that one might expect to come last : ZETA
27 Embedded spy awaiting a mission : SLEEPER AGENT
32 Minor-league level : AAA
35 With 59-Across, “Madam Secretary” star : TEA …
36 Curbside coin collector : METER
37 Scattered here, there and everywhere : ALL OVER THE PLACE
42 Animal that dances ballet in “Fantasia” : HIPPO
43 Apple mobile devices run on it : IOS
44 Locale for clouds : SKY
45 “Quit arguing, kids!” : STOP IT, YOU TWO!
50 Cuatro + cuatro : OCHO
51 1988 Best Picture winner starring Dustin Hoffman : RAIN MAN
55 People who “sow” evil : BAD SEEDS
59 See 35-Across : … LEONI
60 Antioxidant-rich berry : ACAI
61 Intuition without logical explanation, or a hint to this puzzle’s circled letters : GUT FEELING
64 Dryer fuzz : LINT
65 “Ciao” in Chihuahua : ADIOS
66 Singer India.___ : ARIE
67 Border : EDGE
68 H. Ross ___, candidate of 1992 and 1996 : PEROT
69 Banana skin : PEEL

Down

1 Invitingly warm and cozy : HOMEY
2 Come up, as issues : ARISE
3 Amounts on Monopoly cards : RENTS
4 X and Y, for Tesla : MODELS
5 Scottish refusal : NAE
6 Pop star Rita : ORA
7 Doc’s prescriptions : MEDS
8 “Gesundheit!” elicitor : SNEEZE
9 Hose holder, or a kind of snake : GARTER
10 Breakfast roll with another breakfast staple added in : EGG BAGEL
11 Locale : AREA
12 Dress in India : SARI
13 Jannings who won the first Best Actor Oscar : EMIL
18 Highlight ___ (sports compilation) : REEL
22 “Forever” purchase : STAMP
24 Head: Fr. : TETE
25 Clairvoyant sort : SEER
28 Outdoor furniture setting : PATIO
29 Sched. listings at JFK or LAX : ETAS
30 Long part of a giraffe : NECK
31 Card above deuce : TREY
32 Oohs and ___ : AAHS
33 Landed, as on a wire : ALIT
34 Fido fare, maybe : ALPO
38 Night, to day : OPPOSITE
39 Soprano or alto : VOICE
40 60 minutes : HOUR
41 This: Sp. : ESTA
46 Something to “mind” at a British train station : THE GAP
47 “What’s up, my man?!” : YO, DUDE!
48 ___ E. Coyote : WILE
49 Up and back, in a pool : ONE LAP
52 Wavy-patterned fabric : MOIRE
53 Photographer Leibovitz : ANNIE
54 ___ Barker, fashion photographer and reality TV judge : NIGEL
55 Bundle of hay : BALE
56 You’ll trip on it if you drop it : ACID
57 “Shoot!” : DANG!
58 Commotion : STIR
62 Rock’s ___ Fighters : FOO
63 Ballpark guess: Abbr. : EST

4 thoughts on “0103-22 NY Times Crossword 3 Jan 22, Monday”

  1. 7:59. Pretty cool theme for a Monday.

    Stunned to learn “First do no harm” is NOT a part of the Hippocratic oath. Had no idea. I can’t wait to throw that in someone’s face and act like I’ve known it my whole life……Life’s little pleasures.

    Best –

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.