0719-21 NY Times Crossword 19 Jul 21, Monday

Constructed by: Stephanie Lesser
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme (according to Bill) Summery Quip

Collectively, themed answers give us a SUMMERY QUIP:

  • 17A Summery quip, part 1 : TAKING A DOG …
  • 35A Quip, part 2 : … NAMED “SHARK” …
  • 40A Quip, part 3 : … TO THE BEACH …
  • 57A End of the quip : … IS A BAD IDEA

Bill’s time: 5m 22s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Included in an email, in brief : CC’ED

I wonder if the kids of today know that “cc” stands for carbon copy, and do they have any idea what a carbon copy was? Do you remember how messy carbon paper was to handle? A kind blog reader pointed out to me a while back that the abbreviation has evolved and taken on the meaning “courtesy copy” in our modern world.

14 Wax-wrapped cheese : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

16 “O ___ Night” (Christmas song) : HOLY

The Christmas carol known in English as “O Holy Night” is also known as “Cantique de Noël” in the original French. The melody was written by French composer Adolphe Adam, and the French lyrics are a poem called “Minuit, chrétiens” written by Placide Cappeau. Interestingly, it was the second piece of music ever to be broadcast on radio. The Canadian-American inventor Reginald Fessenden made what is thought to be the first AM radio broadcast on Christmas Eve 1906. He included some music, starting with a piece by Handel, followed by “O Holy Night” played on the violin.

23 Decorates with bathroom tissue, as in a Halloween prank : TP’S

TP’ing (toilet papering) is a prank involving the covering of some object or location with rolls and rolls of toilet paper. If you live in Texas or Minnesota, that little “prank” is legal, but if you live here in California it is classed as mischief or vandalism.

26 Trio of Greek goddesses : FATES

The three Fates of Greek mythology were white-robed deities, and were also called the Moirai. The three Fates were Clotho the spinner, Lachesis the allotter and Atropos the unturnable.

34 Pizazz : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

Pizazz (also “pizzazz”) is energy, vitality. There’s a kind of cool thing about the “pizzazz” spelling, namely that it is the only 7-letter word in English that cannot be played in Scrabble. You can get close by using the Z-tile with the two blank tiles to get to three of the required four Zs, but there’s no way to get to the fourth Z.

37 Vice president Gore and others : ALS

Al Gore was born in Washington DC, and is the son of Al Gore, Sr., then a US Representative for the state of Tennessee. After deferring his military service in order to attend Harvard, the younger Gore became eligible for the draft on graduation. Many of his classmates found ways of avoiding the draft, but Gore decided to serve and even took the “tougher” option of joining the army as an enlisted man. Actor Tommy Lee Jones shared a house with Gore in college and says that his buddy told him that even if he could find a way around the draft, someone with less options than him would have to go in his place and that was just wrong.

39 Opus ___ : DEI

Opus Dei is a Roman Catholic institution that was founded in Spain in 1928, and officially approved by the church in 1950. In 2010, Opus Dei had over 90,000 members, mostly lay people. The institution’s mission is to promote certain aspects of the Roman Catholic doctrine. Opus Dei was portrayed as a sinister organization by Dan Brown in his novel “The Da Vinci Code”.

44 Clean air and water org. : EPA

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

52 JetBlue or Delta : AIRLINE

jetBlue is a low-cost airline that is mainly based at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The airline was founded by former Southwest Airline executives in 1999 as NewAir. The approach taken by jetBlue was to model itself on Southwest in terms of cost control, but to add amenities that made low-cost air travel more enjoyable.

Delta was the world’s largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta’s roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers when it was Huff Daland Dusters, a crop-dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name “Delta Air Service” was introduced in 1928.

56 Native of Glasgow, e.g. : SCOT

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and sits on the River Clyde. Back in the Victorian Era, Glasgow earned a reputation for excellence in shipbuilding and was known as “Second City of the British Empire”. Glasgow shipyards were the birthplaces of such famous vessels as the Lusitania, the Queen Mary and the Queen Elizabeth. People from Glasgow are known as Glaswegians.

65 Scarce as ___ teeth : HEN’S

Something might be described as scarcer than hen’s teeth, as hens don’t have teeth at all!

Down

1 Ballet leap : JETE

A jeté is a leap in ballet, with the term “jeté” coming from the French word “jeter” meaning “to throw”. A “jeté en avant” is a “leap to the front”, towards the audience. A “grand jeté” is a long horizontal jump, a split in the air, leaping from one foot to the other.

2 “Madam, I’m ___” (palindromic greeting) : ADAM

The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

  • Able was I ere I saw Elba
  • A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
  • Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite terms is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

3 Relative of a great white : MAKO

The shortfin mako shark can appear on restaurant menus, and as a result the species is dying out in some parts of the world. The mako gets its own back sometimes though, as attacks on humans are not unknown. It is the fastest-swimming shark, and has been clocked at speeds of over 40 miles/hour. And the shark in Ernest Hemingway’s “The Old Man and the Sea”, that’s a mako. “Mako” is the Maori word for “shark” or “shark tooth”.

4 In love : SMITTEN

“Smitten” is the past participle of “to smite”, meaning “to inflict a heavy blow”. We tend to use “smitten” to mean “affected by love, love-struck”.

5 Breakfast items in a toaster : EGGOS

Eggo is a line of frozen waffles and related products made by Kellogg’s. When they were introduced in the 1930s, the name “Eggo” was chosen to promote the “egginess” of the batter. “Eggo” replaced “Froffles”, the original name chosen by melding “frozen” and “waffles”.

10 Large cat you shouldn’t trust on a test? : CHEETAH

“Cheetah” sounds like “cheater”.

The cheetah can run faster than any other land animal, achieving speeds of 70-75 mph. The name “cheetah” comes into English from Sanskrit via Hindi, from the word for “variegated”. Something that is variegated has different colored zones, like the mottled hide of the cheetah.

22 Showy garden flower : PANSY

The pansy is a garden flower that takes its name from the French word “pensée” meaning “thought”. This name was chosen as the flower was often used as a symbol of remembrance. The petals of pansies have dark blotches that often appear to form the outline of a face.

24 Words With Friends, for one : GAME APP

“Words With Friends” (WWF) is a word game application that can be played on smartphones and other electronic devices. “Words With Friends” is basically Scrabble under a different name, or so I hear.

25 Coca-Cola soft drink brand : FRESCA

Fresca is a Coca-Cola product introduced in 1966 that is a little unusual in that it has no Pepsi Cola equivalent. It has always been marketed as a zero-calorie grapefruit drink, and so is artificially sweetened.

31 Consumer advocate Ralph : NADER

The Center for Auto Safety is a consumer advocacy group that was founded in 1970 by political activist Ralph Nader and Consumers Union. The group lists a number of successes in its quest for protection of automobile owners, including the introduction of Lemon Laws that provide consumer protections in all fifty states.

33 Garment below a blouse : SKIRT

A blouse is a loose-fitting shirt, particularly one worn by women or children. The term “blouse” is French, and originally described a peasant’s smock.

36 “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-___” : DAH

“Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah” is a song from the Disney film “Song of the South” released in 1946. “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah” won that season’s Oscar for Best Original Song. The song is also featured at the end of the Disney theme parks’ ride called Splash Mountain.

38 Indian megacity : DELHI

New Delhi is the capital city of India. New Delhi resides within the National Capital Territory of Delhi (otherwise known as the metropolis of Delhi). New Delhi and Delhi, therefore, are two different things.

41 #, in social media : HASHTAG

A hashtag is a word preceded by the symbol #. Hashtags are big these days because of Twitter, a microblogging service that I don’t think I will ever understand …

45 The ___ of Avon (Shakespeare) : BARD

William Shakespeare is referred to as the Bard of Avon, as he was born and raised in the lovely town of Stratford-upon-Avon in the English Midlands.

47 Group of five to which is added “and sometimes y” : A-E-I-O-U

The vowels are A, E, I, O, U and sometimes Y.

49 Old Russian ruler : TSAR

The last ruler of Imperial Russia was Tsar Nicholas II (of the House of Romanov). Famously, the Tsar and his family were murdered in 1918 in the basement of a house in Yekaterinburg, Russia by members of the Bolshevik secret police. The Tsar’s youngest daughter was 16-year-old Anastasia and rumors of her escape have persisted for years. The rumors grew with the help of numerous women who claimed to be Anastasia. In 2009, DNA testing finally proved that the remains of all of the Tsar’s immediate family, including Anastasia, have been found and identified.

50 Sandy hue : ECRU

The color ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

51 Penny or nickel : COIN

The official name of our smallest denomination coin is “cent”, and our use of the word “penny” is just a colloquialism derived from the British coin of the same name. In the UK, the plural of penny is “pence”, whereas we have “pennies” in our pockets.

The 5-cent American coin known as a nickel is actually made up of 75% copper and 25% nickel. The first nickel was introduced in 1866, and was named the Shield nickel due to the shield design on the front of the coin. The current design is the Jefferson nickel, which was introduced in 1938.

52 Help in wrongdoing : ABET

The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (literally “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

54 Like some advertising lights : NEON

The basic design of neon lighting was first demonstrated at the Paris Motor Show in 1910. Such lighting is made up of glass tubes containing a vacuum into which has been introduced a small amount of neon gas. When a voltage is applied between two electrodes inside the tube, the neon gas “glows” and gives off the familiar light.

58 Break one of the Ten Commandments : SIN

According to the Book of Exodus, God inscribed the Ten Commandments on two stone tablets and gave them to Moses on Mount Sinai.

59 Boxer who floated like a butterfly, stung like a bee : ALI

Muhammad Ali first used his famous catchphrase “float like a butterfly and sting like a bee” before his world title fight against Sonny Liston in 1964. Back then Ali still went by his birth name of Cassius Clay.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Printer paper problems : JAMS
5 Respected person in a tribe : ELDER
10 Included in an email, in brief : CC’ED
14 Wax-wrapped cheese : EDAM
15 Way overcharge : GOUGE
16 “O ___ Night” (Christmas song) : HOLY
17 Summery quip, part 1 : TAKING A DOG …
19 Relaxation : EASE
20 Love or hate : EMOTION
21 Pinnacles : APEXES
23 Decorates with bathroom tissue, as in a Halloween prank : TP’S
24 Musical note that’s a step and a half below A : G-FLAT
26 Trio of Greek goddesses : FATES
29 Auto : CAR
30 Grandmothers, informally : NANAS
34 Pizazz : ELAN
35 Quip, part 2 : … NAMED “SHARK” …
37 Vice president Gore and others : ALS
38 Venture to declare : DARE SAY
39 Opus ___ : DEI
40 Quip, part 3 : … TO THE BEACH …
42 Liqueur flavor : PEAR
43 Total bargain : STEAL
44 Clean air and water org. : EPA
45 What balloons do when you prick them with something 46-Across : BURST
46 Pointed, say : SHARP
48 Little bit, as of ointment : DAB
49 Computer whiz : TECHIE
52 JetBlue or Delta : AIRLINE
56 Native of Glasgow, e.g. : SCOT
57 End of the quip : … IS A BAD IDEA
60 Opera solo : ARIA
61 Tanker from the Mideast : OILER
62 Opening on a schedule : SLOT
63 Step on a ladder : RUNG
64 Oneness : UNITY
65 Scarce as ___ teeth : HEN’S

Down

1 Ballet leap : JETE
2 “Madam, I’m ___” (palindromic greeting) : ADAM
3 Relative of a great white : MAKO
4 In love : SMITTEN
5 Breakfast items in a toaster : EGGOS
6 Money you have to pay back : LOAN
7 Total flop : DUD
8 What’s all about me, me, me : EGO
9 Kingly or queenly : REGAL
10 Large cat you shouldn’t trust on a test? : CHEETAH
11 Encourage with sweet talk : COAX
12 “What ___ is new?” : ELSE
13 Easter egg colorers : DYES
18 Puppy bites : NIPS
22 Showy garden flower : PANSY
24 Words With Friends, for one : GAME APP
25 Coca-Cola soft drink brand : FRESCA
26 Outstanding accomplishments : FEATS
27 Apportion : ALLOT
28 Aesthetic judgment : TASTE
29 ___ counseling (aid for job-hunters) : CAREER
31 Consumer advocate Ralph : NADER
32 Geometric calculations : AREAS
33 Garment below a blouse : SKIRT
35 Catch in the act : NAB
36 “Zip-a-Dee-Doo-___” : DAH
38 Indian megacity : DELHI
41 #, in social media : HASHTAG
42 Issue a book or magazine : PUBLISH
45 The ___ of Avon (Shakespeare) : BARD
47 Group of five to which is added “and sometimes y” : A-E-I-O-U
48 Writing you might keep away from prying eyes : DIARY
49 Old Russian ruler : TSAR
50 Sandy hue : ECRU
51 Penny or nickel : COIN
52 Help in wrongdoing : ABET
53 Keep an engine running without moving : IDLE
54 Like some advertising lights : NEON
55 Has dinner : EATS
58 Break one of the Ten Commandments : SIN
59 Boxer who floated like a butterfly, stung like a bee : ALI

7 thoughts on “0719-21 NY Times Crossword 19 Jul 21, Monday”

  1. 5:24 Fairly smooth, but I’m not a big fam of these quip type themes.

    Having said that, about 50 years ago at about 17 yrs. old, my sister hitchhiked from the East coast where we lived, to Calif. with a girlfriend. They had a dog named “Freedom”. When on the beaches the dog occasionally got away so the girls would run down the beach yelling “Freedom, Freedom”!! Occasionally they’d hear comments from some “older” folks on the beach about the damn hippies running down the beach.

    So apparently, don’t take a dog named Freedom to the beach either. 🙂

  2. 6:17, no errors.

    I’m a bit late posting today, as I did an early-morning nine-mile hike around a nearby lake. After a shower and a protein shake, I sat down to do today’s New Yorker puzzle, got about halfway through it, dozed off, and didn’t finish it until I woke up. So I recorded my (rather large) time for that puzzle and then added an explanatory note that floated, unbidden, into my head: “Post hike, propter hike” … 😜

    (Oh, c’mon … surely you can spare a tiny snicker … 😜)

  3. 11:21. Sheesh. Unfortunately that’s not a typo.

    I don’t get the big deal of this quip. I take my dog, Beer Me, to the beach all the time…..

    Best –

    1. I thought it was kinda cute — nice picture — if you’re at the beach and yelling at your dog “Shark!,” there might be a reaction.

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