0718-21 NY Times Crossword 18 Jul 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Jesse Goldberg
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme Dig In

Themed answers are quotes from the original celebrity chef, JULIA CHILD:

  • 119A Chef quoted in this puzzle’s starred clues : JULIA CHILD
  • 31A *”With enough butter, ___” : ANYTHING IS GOOD
  • 38A *”A party without cake is ___” : REALLY JUST A MEETING
  • 65A *”If you’re alone in the kitchen and you drop the lamb, you can always just pick it up. ___?” : WHO’S GOING TO KNOW?
  • 92A *”I enjoy cooking with wine. Sometimes I ___” : EVEN PUT IT IN THE FOOD
  • 101A *”The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for ___” : THE STEAK TO COOK

Bill’s time: 19m 02s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Certain music royalties collector, for short : ASCAP

ASCAP (the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers) collects licence fees for musicians and distributes royalties to composers whose works have been performed. BMI (Broadcast Music Incorporated) provides the same service.

6 Viva ___ (aloud) : VOCE

“Viva voce” translates literally from Latin as “with living voice”, and we use the phrase today to mean “by word of mouth”. The term might also be used for an oral exam in university, or for a voice vote in a governing assembly.

19 Part of R.I. : RHODE

Rhode Island is the smallest state in the union, and is the second-most densely populated. (after New Jersey). Rhode Island is known as the Ocean State (and more informally “Little Rhody”), largely because about 14% of the state’s area is made up of ocean bays and inlets. Exactly how Rhode Island got its name is a little unclear. What is known is that way back in 1524, long before the Pilgrims came to New England, the Italian explorer Giovanni da Verrazzano likened an island in the area to the Island of Rhodes in the Mediterranean. There were subsequent references to “Rhode Island” in English publications, before the colonists arrived.

20 Big exporter of saffron : IRAN

Saffron is the world’s most expensive spice by weight. It is derived from the saffron crocus. The spice itself is the dried stigma found in the flower of the plant.

23 “Enjoy the food!” : BON APPETIT!

The phrase “Enjoy your meal” translates into French as “Bon appétit”, and into German as “Guten Appetit”.

25 Sportscaster who memorably asked “Do you believe in miracles?” : AL MICHAELS

Team USA won the gold medal in men’s hockey at the 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid. The victory was a surprising one given the decades-long dominance of the USSR team. The “big result” for the American team was the epic victory against the Soviets, a victory often referred to as the “Miracle on Ice”. The US went on to defeat Finland in the final and secured the gold medal. The moniker “miracle” comes from words uttered by sportscaster Al Michaels, who was calling the game for ABC. He declared, in the final seconds, “Do you believe in miracles?! Yes!”

30 Challenger astronaut Judith : RESNIK

Judith Resnik was an engineer and astronaut, and one of the crew that died in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster in 1986. Prior to the accident, Resnik had logged 145 hours in orbit, and was the second American woman in space.

36 Fuel economy authority, for short : EPA

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) routinely estimates the expected miles per gallon (mpg) for vehicles.

37 Main artery : AORTA

The aorta originates in the heart and extends down into the abdomen. It is the largest artery in the body.

48 Retin-A target : ACNE

Retin-A is a brand name for the drug Tretinoin, the acid form of vitamin A that is used to treat acne.

50 Chicken or veal dish, in brief : PARM

Parmigiana (familiarly “parm”) is a dish from southern Italy. The original parmigiana was made with an aubergine (eggplant) filling, with cheese and tomato layers and then baked. Versions originating outside of Italy have replaced the aubergine with breaded cutlets of chicken or veal.

59 The Powerpuff Girls, e.g. : TRIO

“The Powerpuff Girls” is a children’s animated television show that airs on the Cartoon Network.

60 Filmmaker with a distinctive style : AUTEUR

We use the term “auteur” to describe a film director with a distinctive style, and someone who is distinguished enough to overcome the influence of a movie studio and other commercial pressures. Examples often cited are Akira Kurosawa, Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hawks and Jean Renoir. “Auteur” is a French word meaning “author”.

71 Word mistakenly heard at a Springsteen concert : BOO!

“BRUUUUUCE!” can be misheard as “BOOOOO!”

75 Beethoven’s Third : EROICA

Beethoven originally dedicated his “Symphony No. 3” to Napoleon Bonaparte. Beethoven admired the principles of the French Revolution and as such respected Bonaparte who was “born” out of the uprising. When Napoleon declared himself Emperor, Beethoven (and much of Europe) saw this as a betrayal to the ideals of the revolution so he changed the name of his new symphony from “Bonaparte” to “Eroica”, meaning “heroic, valiant”.

87 ___ o’clock (when happy hour begins) : BEER

I personally think that Happy Hour is best enjoyed shaken, not stirred; and with a good crossword …

91 Focal points : LOCI

“Locus” (plural “loci”) is Latin for “place”, and is used in English with the same meaning. The term can also be used to describe a center of power or activity.

99 Word with noodle or nap : WET …

“Wet nap” is a term commonly used for a wet wipe, a manufactured paper tissue that comes pre-moistened. Wet naps are often provided after a meal at some restaurants after a finger-food dish, or perhaps as a refresher on an airplane. I think that “nap” is short for “napkin”, and that “Wet-Nap” is a brand name.

100 ___ lepton (elementary particle) : TAU

Leptons are subatomic particles, of which there are two major classes. There are charged leptons, and neutral leptons. The most common charged leptons are electrons. Neutral leptons are also known as “neutrinos”.

113 One of Abraham Lincoln’s is in the Smithsonian : HAT

The Smithsonian Institution was established in 1846 as the United States National Museum. The institution was renamed in honor of British scientist James Smithson who indirectly provided the initial funding. The funds were collected from England on the orders of President Andrew Jackson, and arrived in the form of 105 sacks containing 104,960 gold sovereigns.

114 “Welcome to the Jungle” rocker : AXL ROSE

Axl Rose is the lead vocalist of the American rock band Guns N’ Roses.

119 Chef quoted in this puzzle’s starred clues : JULIA CHILD

Julia Child was an American chef who is recognized for bringing French cuisine to the American public. During WWII, Julia Child joined the OSS (Office of Strategic Services), the predecessor to the CIA. She worked for the OSS in Washington, Ceylon and China. While in the OSS, she met her husband Paul Child who was also an OSS employee. Paul joined the Foreign Service after the war, and it was his posting to France that created the opportunity for Julie to learn about French cuisine. If you haven’t seen it, I highly, highly recommend the movie “Julie & Julia”, one of the best films of 2009. Meryl Streep does a fabulous job playing the larger-than-life Julia Child.

120 Guitar part : NECK

A kithara (also “cithara”) was a lyre-like instrument in ancient Greece. Our word “guitar” is ultimately derived from “kithara”. Indeed, “kithara” is the modern Greek word for “guitar”.

121 Member of la famiglia : MAMMA

In Italian, “Mamma” (Mom) is part of the “la famiglia” (the family).

124 1975 Wimbledon champ : ASHE

The great American tennis player Arthur Ashe spent the last years of his life writing his memoir called “Days of Grace”. He finished the manuscript just a few days before he passed away, dying from AIDS caused by a tainted blood transfusion.

The Wimbledon Championships of tennis are held at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club located in Wimbledon, a district of London. The Wimbledon Championships started in 1877, and have been played on grass since day one.

125 Like voile and chiffon : SHEER

Voile is a soft and sheer fabric, usually made from cotton, that is often used as a window treatment. Voile curtains are similar to net curtains and may be used as mosquito nets, for example. Aptly enough, “voile” is the French word for “veil”.

Chiffon is a sheer fabric usually made from silk, cotton, nylon or rayon. The French word “chiffon” is a diminutive of “chiffe” meaning “rag, piece of cloth”.

Down

6 Penthouse perk : VIEW

Originally, the term “penthouse” described a modest building attached to a main structure. In fact, in centuries past, the manger in which Jesus was born was often referred to as a penthouse. The modern, more luxurious connotation dates back to the early twenties.

8 Stone memorial : CAIRN

A cairn is a man-made pile of stones that can have various uses. A cairn might be a prosaic trail marker, or a distinctive landmark or monument. Our term “cairn” derives from the Gaelic “carn” meaning “rocky hill, heap of stones”.

10 Actor Jason who was once on Britain’s national diving team : STATHAM

Jason Statham is an actor from England best known for playing tough characters on screen. I liked him in the remake of “The Italian Job” from 2003.

11 Four-stringed instruments : CELLI

The word “cello” (plural “celli” or “cellos”) is an abbreviation for “violoncello”, an Italian word for “little violone”, referring to a group of stringed instruments that were popular up to the end of the 17th century. The name violoncello persisted for the instrument that we know today, although the abbreviation “‘cello” was often used. Nowadays, we just drop the apostrophe.

12 Financial adviser Suze : ORMAN

Suze Orman is a financial advisor who has gotten her message out on television, in books and on the speaking circuit. She often appears on PBS, and indeed is the most successful fundraiser public television has ever had.

14 Milk: Prefix : LACTI-

The sugar known as lactose is a disaccharide, comprising a molecule of galactose combined with a molecule of glucose. Lactose is a major component in milk, and it is broken down in the body by an enzyme called lactase. The production of lactase used to diminish over time in humans, as babies stopped nursing and transitioned to solid food. Many human populations have evolved to maintain lactose production throughout life, in response to the inclusion of animal milk in the diet. Individuals and populations that do not have the genes enabling lifelong production of lactase are said to be lactose intolerant.

15 NASA spacewalk : EVA

Extravehicular activity (EVA) is the name given to any work done by an astronaut outside of his or her spacecraft. The term would encompass walking on the moon, as well as making a space walk i.e. floating around in space tethered to spacecraft.

17 Page who became the first openly trans man to appear on the cover of Time magazine (2021) : ELLIOT

Canadian actor Elliot (formerly “Ellen”) Page came to prominence playing the female lead in the 2007 hit film “Juno”. Page also played the female lead in one of my favorite films of recent time, namely 2010’s “Inception”. Elliot came out as a gay woman in 2014, and then as a trangender man in 2020.

18 L.A. neighborhood referenced in Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin'” : RESEDA

Singer-songwriter Tom Petty first became interested in rock and roll music when he met Elvis Presley at ten-years-old. Later Petty was inspired to get into a band when he saw the Beatles on “The Ed Sullivan Show”. He became the lead singer of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, and later co-founded the supergroup called the Traveling Wilburys.

24 Coolers : POKEYS

“Pokey” (also “poky”) is a slang term meaning “prison”. It might be a corruption of “pogie”, a term for a “poorhouse”.

28 How some bonds are sold : AT PAR

Stocks and other financial vehicles may be sold “at par”, meaning at the original price, neither discounted nor at a premium.

32 Himalayan legends : YETIS

The yeti, also known as the abominable snowman, is a beast of legend. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology, and a cryptid is a creature or plant that isn’t recognized by the scientific community, but the existence of which has been suggested.

The magnificent Himalaya range of mountains in Asia takes its name from the Sanskrit for “abode of snow”. Geographically, the Himalaya separates the Indian subcontinent from the Tibetan Plateau to the north.

35 Provided tunes for a party, in brief : DJ’ED

The world’s first radio disc jockey (DJ) was one Ray Newby of Stockton, California who made his debut broadcast in 1909, would you believe? When he was 16 years old and a student, Newby started to play his records on a primitive radio located in the Herrold College of Engineering and Wireless in San Jose. The records played back then were mostly recordings of Enrico Caruso.

38 Backbone of Indian classical music : RAGA

Raga isn’t really a genre of music, but has been described as the “tonal framework” in which Indian classical music is composed. Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous raga virtuoso (to us Westerners). Western rock music with a heavy Indian influence might be called raga rock.

39 Earth tone : ECRU

The color ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

40 Body sci. : ANAT

Anatomy (anat.)

41 Toon first introduced in the 1945 short “Odor-able Kitty” : LE PEW

Pepé Le Pew is a very likeable cartoon character from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series. Pepé is a French skunk, first introduced way back in 1945. He is always thinking of “l’amour” and chases the lady skunks, or a black cat with a white stripe accidentally painted down her back.

42 Neighbor of Oman: Abbr. : UAE

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

44 Florida attraction with 11 themed pavilions : EPCOT

EPCOT Center (now just called “Epcot”) is the theme park beside Walt Disney World in Florida. EPCOT is an acronym standing for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, and is a representation of the future as envisioned by Walt Disney. Walt Disney actually wanted to build a living community for 20,000 residents at EPCOT, but he passed away without that vision being realized.

45 “His wife could ___ lean” : EAT NO

“Jack Sprat” is a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:

Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.

Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:

Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

46 Family name in Steinbeck’s “East of Eden” : TRASK

John Steinbeck considered “East of Eden” his magnum opus. Most of the storyline takes place near Salinas, just south of the San Francisco Bay Area. Two of the characters in the story are brothers Cal and Aron Trask, representative of the biblical Cain and Abel.

54 Drink garnished with nutmeg : NOG

It’s not really clear where the term “nog” (as in “eggnog”) comes from although it might derive from the word “noggin”, which was originally a small wooden cup that was long associated with alcoholic drinks.

The fruit of the nutmeg tree yields two very different spices. What we call “nutmeg” comes from the seed of the tree. “Mace” is the dried covering of the seed.

58 Part of NGO: Abbr. : ORG

Non-governmental organization (NGO)

62 Neither red nor blue: Abbr. : IND

On political maps, red states are usually Republican and blue states usually Democrat. The designation of red and blue states is a very recent concept, only introduced in the 2000 presidential election by TV journalist, the late Tim Russert. In retrospect, the choice of colors is surprising, as in other democracies around the world red is usually used to describe left-leaning socialist parties (the reds under the bed!), and blue is used for conservative right-wing parties. In election cycles, swing/battleground states are often depicted in purple.

63 Benchmark : NORM

A benchmark is something that serves as a standard used to measure others. The original benchmark was a point of reference used by surveyors. Literally, a benchmark was an angle-iron driven into the ground as a support (or “bench”) for a levelling instrument.

67 Any set of elements in a column on the periodic table : GROUP

Dmitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist. When Mendeleev classified elements according to their chemical properties, he noticed patterns and was able to group elements into his famous 1869 Periodic Table. So powerful was his table that he actually predicted the properties of some elements that had not even been discovered in 1869. Element number 101 is mendelevium and was named after Mendeleev.

68 Japanese port near Sapporo : OTARU

The Japanese city and port of Otaru is just a 25-minute drive northwest from Sapporo. Just like Sapporo, Otaru has a famous beer that shares the city’s name.

Sapporo is the fourth largest city in Japan, and lies on the island of Hokkaido. The city and surrounding area was home in 1972 to the first Winter Olympic Games to be held in Asia. For the beer drinkers out there, Sapporo is also home to Sapporo Brewery, with the Sapporo beer being one of the more internationally recognizable.

69 War zone danger, for short : IED

Improvised explosive device (IED)

70 “A Room of One’s Own” novelist : WOOLF

Virginia Woolf was an English author who was active in the period between the two World Wars. Woolf’s most famous novels were “Mrs. Dalloway”, “To the Lighthouse” and “Orlando”. She also wrote a long essay entitled “A Room of One’s Own” in which she states “A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.”

“A Room of One’s Own” is an essay by Virginia Woolf that was first published in 1929. It is celebrated as a feminist text.

72 Gastric acid, on the pH scale : ONE

Gastric acid is produced by cells lining the stomach, and is composed of hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium chloride (NaCl). Other cells lining the stomach produce bicarbonate to ensure the contents of the stomach do not become too acidic. Those same cells also produce mucus that lines the stomach wall to protect it from the acid.

As we all recall from chemistry class, a pH of 7 is considered neutral. Anything less than 7 is an acid, and anything above 7 is a base.

76 Classic Langston Hughes poem : I, TOO …

Langston Hughes was a poet active in the Harlem Renaissance, and someone who helped develop the literary form known as “jazz poetry”. His poem “I, Too, Sing America” was published in 1925.

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed–

I, too, am America.

77 First name in fashion : COCO

Coco Chanel was a French fashion designer. I’m no fashionista, but if I had to pick a designer whose clothes I really liked, it would be Chanel. She had a way of creating simpler designs that look so elegant on a woman.

78 Saharan : ARID

The name “Sahara” means “greatest desert” in Arabic. The Sahara is just that, a great desert covering almost 4 million square miles of Northern Africa. That’s almost the size of the United States.

80 Snacks that sometimes come in sleeves : OREOS

How the Oreo cookie came to get its name seems to have been lost in the mists of time. One theory is that it comes from the French “or” meaning “gold”, a reference to the gold color of the original packing. Another suggestion is that the name is the Greek word “oreo” meaning “beautiful, nice, well-done”.

83 The Cardinals, on scoreboards : ARI

The Arizona Cardinals were founded in 1898 as the Chicago Cardinals. That makes the Cardinals the oldest, continuously-run, professional football team in the whole country.

84 Large Hadron Collider bit : ION

The Large Hadron Collider is the world’s largest particle accelerator. It is located on the French-Swiss border near Geneva, in a circular tunnel that is a whopping 17 miles in circumference.

85 Many a rescue dog : MUTT

The original use of the term “mutt” was for a foolish person, and was probably short for “muttonhead”. The usage evolved into today’s “mongrel dog”.

90 Mount ___, California volcano : SHASTA

Mount Shasta is in northern California. The origin of the name “Shasta” seems to be unclear. It may have come from the Russian “tchastal” meaning “white, clean, pure”, a name given to the volcanic peak by early Russian immigrants.

94 Rank for a rear admiral : TWO-STAR

The rank of rear admiral is usually the lowest of the admiral ranks. The term originated with the Royal Navy. In days gone by, an admiral would head up the activities of a naval squadron from the central vessel. He would be assisted by a vice admiral who acted from the lead vessel. There would also be a lower-ranking admiral to command the ships at the rear of the squadron, and this was the “rear” admiral.

95 What the Unsullied warriors are on “Game of Thrones” : EUNUCHS

The word “eunuch” comes from the Greek words “eune” meaning “bed” and “ekhein” meaning “to keep”, so literally, a eunuch is a bed-keeper. Indeed, in many early cultures a eunuch was a slave who had been castrated at an early age to render him “safe”, and who was then given lowly domestic tasks such as making the master’s bed, bathing him etc.

96 She turned Arachne into a spider after losing a weaving contest : ATHENA

In Greek and Roman mythology, Arachne was a mortal woman who was a great weaver. Arachne boasted that her weaving was greater than that of the goddess Athena (or Minerva in Roman myth), and this was proven true in a contest. As a result, Arachne was turned into a spider by Athena. “Arachne” is the Greek word for spider.

103 Bayt ___ (destination for a Muslim pilgrim) : ALLAH

The Kaaba (sometimes referred to as the “Bayt Allah”) is a large, cube-shaped structure that resides in a mosque in Mecca, in Saudi Arabia. According to the Qur’an, the Kaaba was constructed by Abraham and his son, Ishmael. When Muslims turn to face Mecca during prayers, they are actually turning to the Kaaba.

104 Krispy ___ : KREME

The Krispy Kreme chain of doughnut stores was founded in 1937 in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. The company introduced the Whole Wheat Glazed doughnut in 2007, which is great news for folks looking to eat a healthy diet, I am sure …

105 Crooner Mel : TORME

Mel Tormé was a jazz singer, with a quality of voice that earned him the nickname “The Velvet Fog”. Tormé also wrote a few books, and did a lot of acting. He was the co-author of the Christmas classic known as “The Christmas Song”, which starts out with the line “Chestnuts roasting on an open fire …”

107 Caffeine-rich nuts : KOLAS

The nut of the kola tree has a bitter taste, and is loaded with caffeine. Despite the taste, the nut is habitually chewed in some cultures, especially in West Africa where the tree is commonly found in the rainforest. Here in the US we best know the kola nut as a flavoring used in cola drinks.

110 Laissez-___ : FAIRE

“Laissez-faire” is a French term that we use to describe non-interference in the affairs of others. The literal translation is “to let to allow”.

111 N.J. city on the Hudson : FT LEE

Fort Lee, New Jersey is located at the western side of the George Washington Bridge that spans the Hudson River. Fort Lee is known as the birthplace of the motion picture industry. The world’s first movie studio was built there by Thomas Edison, in a facility known as the Black Maria.

112 Meal at which parsley is dipped in salt water : SEDER

The Passover Seder is a ritual feast that marks the beginning of the Jewish Passover holiday, celebrating the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt.

118 Candy aisle name : IKE

“Mike and Ike” is a brand of fruit-flavored candy made by Just Born starting in 1940. Just Born launched quite a unique marketing campaign in 2012 asserting that Mike and Ike had “split up due to creative differences”. The campaign involved production of two different boxes for the candy showing one or the other name scratched out. Clever …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Certain music royalties collector, for short : ASCAP
6 Viva ___ (aloud) : VOCE
10 Dirty look : SCOWL
15 Even once : EVER
19 Part of R.I. : RHODE
20 Big exporter of saffron : IRAN
21 Sci-fi intro to “forming” : TERRA-
22 Foul : VILE
23 “Enjoy the food!” : BON APPETIT!
25 Sportscaster who memorably asked “Do you believe in miracles?” : AL MICHAELS
27 Crush : OVERPOWER
28 Emmy-winning FX series created by Donald Glover : ATLANTA
29 “Curses!” : FIE!
30 Challenger astronaut Judith : RESNIK
31 *”With enough butter, ___” : ANYTHING IS GOOD
34 Commanded : LED
36 Fuel economy authority, for short : EPA
37 Main artery : AORTA
38 *”A party without cake is ___” : REALLY JUST A MEETING
48 Retin-A target : ACNE
49 Healthful property of a beach town : SEA AIR
50 Chicken or veal dish, in brief : PARM
51 Merit : EARN
55 Boardroom plot? : GRAPH
57 Hangout rooms : DENS
58 Pair of quads : OCTAD
59 The Powerpuff Girls, e.g. : TRIO
60 Filmmaker with a distinctive style : AUTEUR
62 Affixes, as a cloth patch : IRONS ON
64 Something that’s gone bad if it floats when placed in a bowl of water : EGG
65 *”If you’re alone in the kitchen and you drop the lamb, you can always just pick it up. ___?” : WHO’S GOING TO KNOW?
71 Word mistakenly heard at a Springsteen concert : BOO!
74 Under way : STARTED
75 Beethoven’s Third : EROICA
79 Reverse : UNDO
81 Tons : A LOAD
82 Seriously hurt : MAIM
86 Move quickly, informally : MOTOR
87 ___ o’clock (when happy hour begins) : BEER
88 Host’s offer at a housewarming : TOUR
89 Spongelike : POROUS
91 Focal points : LOCI
92 *”I enjoy cooking with wine. Sometimes I ___” : EVEN PUT IT IN THE FOOD
96 “Same here” : AS DO I
99 Word with noodle or nap : WET …
100 ___ lepton (elementary particle) : TAU
101 *”The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for ___” : THE STEAK TO COOK
108 Stamps (out) : SNUFFS
113 One of Abraham Lincoln’s is in the Smithsonian : HAT
114 “Welcome to the Jungle” rocker : AXL ROSE
115 Born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth : FORTUNATE
117 Cause of a smartphone ding, perhaps : EMAIL ALERT
119 Chef quoted in this puzzle’s starred clues : JULIA CHILD
120 Guitar part : NECK
121 Member of la famiglia : MAMMA
122 Letters on an F-22 Raptor : USAF
123 One given onboarding : HIREE
124 1975 Wimbledon champ : ASHE
125 Like voile and chiffon : SHEER
126 What may make the grade : TEST
127 Direct : STEER

Down

1 Shady spot : ARBOR
2 Less-than-subtle basketball foul : SHOVE
3 Temporary road markers : CONES
4 “I don’t give ___!” : A DARN
5 Pharmaceutical picker-upper : PEP PILL
6 Penthouse perk : VIEW
7 “Coffee ___?” : OR TEA
8 Stone memorial : CAIRN
9 Suffix with exist : -ENT
10 Actor Jason who was once on Britain’s national diving team : STATHAM
11 Four-stringed instruments : CELLI
12 Financial adviser Suze : ORMAN
13 Dry with a twist : WRING
14 Milk: Prefix : LACTI-
15 NASA spacewalk : EVA
16 Try to win : VIE FOR
17 Page who became the first openly trans man to appear on the cover of Time magazine (2021) : ELLIOT
18 L.A. neighborhood referenced in Tom Petty’s “Free Fallin'” : RESEDA
24 Coolers : POKEYS
26 Comedian Minhaj : HASAN
28 How some bonds are sold : AT PAR
32 Himalayan legends : YETIS
33 Fetch : GO GET
35 Provided tunes for a party, in brief : DJ’ED
38 Backbone of Indian classical music : RAGA
39 Earth tone : ECRU
40 Body sci. : ANAT
41 Toon first introduced in the 1945 short “Odor-able Kitty” : LE PEW
42 Neighbor of Oman: Abbr. : UAE
43 Japanese honorific : SAN
44 Florida attraction with 11 themed pavilions : EPCOT
45 “His wife could ___ lean” : EAT NO
46 Family name in Steinbeck’s “East of Eden” : TRASK
47 “That’s it for me” : I’M DONE
52 Exist : ARE
53 Outfit : RIG
54 Drink garnished with nutmeg : NOG
56 Quizzical responses : HUHS
58 Part of NGO: Abbr. : ORG
61 Change from portrait to landscape, say : ROTATE
62 Neither red nor blue: Abbr. : IND
63 Benchmark : NORM
66 Locks-up shop? : SALON
67 Any set of elements in a column on the periodic table : GROUP
68 Japanese port near Sapporo : OTARU
69 War zone danger, for short : IED
70 “A Room of One’s Own” novelist : WOOLF
71 Mac : BUB
72 Gastric acid, on the pH scale : ONE
73 Tribute in verse : ODE
76 Classic Langston Hughes poem : I, TOO …
77 First name in fashion : COCO
78 Saharan : ARID
80 Snacks that sometimes come in sleeves : OREOS
82 Words to live by : MOTTO
83 The Cardinals, on scoreboards : ARI
84 Large Hadron Collider bit : ION
85 Many a rescue dog : MUTT
89 It’s not the whole thing : PIECE
90 Mount ___, California volcano : SHASTA
93 Critical : VITAL
94 Rank for a rear admiral : TWO-STAR
95 What the Unsullied warriors are on “Game of Thrones” : EUNUCHS
96 She turned Arachne into a spider after losing a weaving contest : ATHENA
97 Wags a finger at : SHAMES
98 Separate : DETACH
102 Tough period of the school year : EXAMS
103 Bayt ___ (destination for a Muslim pilgrim) : ALLAH
104 Krispy ___ : KREME
105 Crooner Mel : TORME
106 Handy : OF USE
107 Caffeine-rich nuts : KOLAS
109 Still alive, in dodgeball : UNHIT
110 Laissez-___ : FAIRE
111 N.J. city on the Hudson : FT LEE
112 Meal at which parsley is dipped in salt water : SEDER
116 Serious divide : RIFT
118 Candy aisle name : IKE
119 Protrude : JUT

10 thoughts on “0718-21 NY Times Crossword 18 Jul 21, Sunday”

  1. 29:22, no errors. Very amusing. The day I got my BA, I made a ham for relatives who came down for the event and, as I was transferring it to a serving platter, it slipped and went on the floor. My favorite aunt, who was the only other person besides me to have seen what happened, gave me the same advice as Julia Child (65-Across). How I loved that lady!

  2. 33:06. I also got stuck a bit in the SW (DITTO vs METOO vs SODOI vs ASDOI for 96A) and spent another 6-7 minutes looking for a couple of fat fingers. Cycled thru all the Across and found one fat finger. Cycled thru all the downs and found nothing amiss. Then cycled halfway thru the across again and found that I really had 71D wrong. Should have been BUB, giving BEER o clock for 87A. But I had BUD, giving DEER o clock. Not being a hunter, I have no idea when that would be. Early morning, perhaps??

    Clever retorts from Julia. Once I got her as the revealer (tho I’ve never watched her cooking shows) the other theme answers seemed to fall more easily

  3. 32:31. Fun theme. I’d heard the quip about butter, but I think it was specific to desserts when I heard it. You could probably do a whole series of puzzles based on stuff she said.

    The “..only eat diet food”…THE STEAK TO COOK quote reminds me of Frank Layden, the former coach of the Utah Jazz NBA team who was a bit on the portly side. He liked saying that he didn’t exercise. “I hate jogging because the ice keeps flying out of my drink” was my favorite.

    Best –

    1. Maybe there are no foreign words. Maybe we are one human race just all trying to communicate and relate. Unless it was a language from another star system. That might be considered a foreign language!
      Hm. But since we are actually not just global but cosmic citizens…

      1. I say that people from England do not have an accent, because they invented the English language. It’ s the Americans who have an accent because they don’t pronounce English the way the British do!

        1. But … what do you make of the fact that not all people from England pronounce English in the same way? In fact, across the pond, there are dozens of different … hmm … what can we call them but … accents!

  4. I felt some clues were really obscure! I’ve never heard of “coolers” and “pokeys”, and that old-english rhyme of “his wife could eat no lean” were inaccessible to me. Nonetheless, I love the theme! It was really cute, Julia Child is iconique, so it was nice to learn a bit about her.

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