0704-21 NY Times Crossword 4 Jul 21, Sunday

Constructed by: Howard Barkin
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme I’ve Got a Feeling …

Happy 4th, everyone! Themed answers are common phrases that express emotion. Each has been reinterpreted with reference to something/someone specified in the clue:

  • 22A Upbeat sentry’s emotion? : GUARDED OPTIMISM
  • 37A Bacteriologist’s emotion upon a new discovery? : CULTURE SHOCK
  • 55A Novice window-washer’s emotion? : HIGH ANXIETY
  • 76A Jester’s emotion after the king’s laughter? : COMIC RELIEF
  • 90A Wild horse’s emotion? : UNBRIDLED JOY
  • 110A Cat’s emotion while sitting in its human’s lap? : CREATURE COMFORT
  • 15D Evil genie’s emotion? : BOTTLED-UP ANGER
  • 49D Farmer’s emotion during a dry season? : GROWING CONCERN

Bill’s time: 17m 56s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Like “American Pie,” “American Psycho” and “American Beauty” : RATED R

The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) film-rating system (PG-13, R, etc.) is purely voluntary and is not backed by any law. Movie theaters agree to abide by the rules that come with the MPAA ratings in exchange for access to new movies.

13 Like sports fans who paint their faces, say : RABID

“Rabies” is actually the Latin word for “madness”. The name is a good choice for the viral disease, as once the virus spreads to the brain the infected person or animal exhibits very tortured and bizarre behavior including hydrophobia, a fear of water. The virus is passed on to humans most often through a bite from an infected dog. It is curable if it is caught in time, basically before symptoms develop. Once the virus passes up the peripheral nervous system to the spine and the brain, there isn’t much that can be done. We can also use the derivative term “rabid” figuratively, to mean extremely violent, to have extreme views.

18 Drink with tapioca pearls : BOBA TEA

Bubble tea, sometimes called “boba tea”, is a tea-based drink from Taiwan. The “bubbles” are chewy tapioca balls that are usually added to the drink.

The cassava plant is a woody shrub native to South America grown largely for its carbohydrate-rich tubers. In fact, cassava is the third largest food source of carbohydrates (for humans) in the world. Ordinarily, that carbohydrate is extracted from the plant and dried as flour, and is known as tapioca.

26 More, on a music score : PIU

“Più” is the Italian word for “more” and is often seen on musical scores, as in “più allegro” (more quickly) and “più mosso” (with more movement).

28 King’s collaborator on the Grammy-winning blues album “Riding With the King” : CLAPTON

Can you believe that the great Eric Clapton only had one chart-topper in the US? In 1974, Clapton released a cover version of the Bob Marley classic “I Shot the Sheriff” and ended up selling more copies of that song than Bob Marley did himself. Clapton is the only person to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame three times: once as a member of the Yardbirds, once as a member of the supergroup Cream, and once as a solo artist.

“B.B. King” was the stage name of Riley B. King, the celebrated blues guitarist and singer-songwriter. Referred to as the King of the Blues, King truly was a dedicated performer. He was doing gigs for over 50 years, and made over 15,000 appearances on stage. King’s first hit was “3 O’Clock Blues”, recorded in 1952. He passed away in May of 2015.

31 Actress Blanchett : CATE

Cate Blanchett is a great actress from Australia, and a winner of an Academy Award for playing Katherine Hepburn in “The Aviator”. Winning for that role made Blanchett the first person to win an Academy Award for playing an actor (Hepburn) who had also won an Oscar. Now that, that is trivial information …

33 Scotland’s ___ Lomond : LOCH

I would guess that Loch Lomond is one of the two most famous lakes in Scotland. Loch Ness is famous for its “monster”, and Loch Lomond is famous for the lovely song “The Bonnie Banks o’ Loch Lomond”. Oh, ye’ll tak’ the high road, and I’ll tak’ the low road …

35 Winter Olympics maneuver : AXEL

An axel is a forward take-off jump in figure skating. The maneuver was first performed by Norwegian Axel Paulsen at the 1882 World Figure Skating championships.

36 Some H.S. yearbook staff : EDS

Editor (ed.)

44 Maker of Regenerist skin cream : OLAY

Oil of Olay was developed in South Africa in 1949. When Oil of Olay was introduced internationally, it was given slightly different brand names designed to appeal in the different geographies. In Ireland we know it as Oil of Ulay, for example, and in France it is Oil of Olaz.

47 Pellet shooter : BB GUN

A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.070″ in diameter) to size FF (.230″). Birdshot that is size BB (0.180″ in diameter) gives the airgun its name.

50 What Kit Kat bars come in : TWOS

I grew up eating Kit Kat bars as a kid. The Kit Kat hit the shelves on the other side of the pond in the 1930s, but didn’t make it into US stores until the 1970s. I’ve seen new varieties of Kit Kat bars over in Britain and Ireland, such as an orange-flavored version, but haven’t seen anything like that over here.

53 It’s full of hot air : SAUNA

As my Finnish-American wife will tell you, “sauna” is a Finnish word, and is pronounced more correctly as “sow-nah” (with “sow” as in the female pig).

54 Mongolian shelters : YURTS

A yurt is a wood-framed dwelling that is used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. Although a yurt is a substantial structure, it is also extremely portable.

58 Scathing review : PAN

To pan something is to criticize it harshly.

59 Complete set of showbiz awards, for short : EGOT

The acronym “EGOT” stands for “Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony”, and is a reference to performers who have won all four awards. Also known as the “Showbiz Award Grand Slam”, there are relatively few individuals who have been so honored. The first five to do so were:

  1. Richard Rodgers in 1962
  2. Helen Hayes in 1977
  3. Rita Moreno in 1977
  4. John Gielgud in 1991
  5. Audrey Hepburn in 1994 (posthumously)

60 Clownish : ZANY

Something described as zany is clownish and bizarre. “Zany” can also be a noun, a term used for a clown or buffoon. The original noun was “Zanni”, a Venetian dialect variant of Gianni, short for Giovanni (John). Zanni was a character who appeared in comedy plays of the day, and was someone who aped the principal actors.

61 Really play that saxophone : WAIL

The saxophone was invented by Belgian musician Adolphe Sax, hence the name. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax’s grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

62 Egypt’s Sadat : ANWAR

Anwar Sadat was the third President of Egypt right up to the time of his assassination in 1981. Sadat won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1978 along with Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin for the role played in crafting the Israel-Egypt Peace Treaty of 1978 at Camp David. It was this agreement that largely led to Sadat’s assassination three years later.

67 Art gallery tour leader : DOCENT

“Docent” is a term used for a university lecturer. There are also museum docents, people who serve as guides for visitors to their institutions and who usually provide their services for free. The term comes from the Latin “docere” meaning “to teach”.

69 Modern reading option … or where to read it? : NOOK

The Barnes & Noble electronic-book reader is called the Nook. The reader’s name is intended to evoke the usage of “nook” as a familiar place to sit and read quietly.

73 Apt anagram of GIFT : TGIF

“Thank God It’s Friday” (TGIF) is a relatively new expression that apparently originated in Akron, Ohio. It was a catchphrase used first by disk jockey Jerry Healy of WAKR in the early seventies. That said, one blog reader wrote to me to say that he had been using the phrase in the fifties.

79 Like Ignatius J. Reilly in “A Confederacy of Dunces” : OBESE

“A Confederacy of Dunces” is a novel by John Kennedy Toole that was first published in 1980. Toole had committed suicide eleven years before publication, when he was just 31 years old. The author’s mother found a smudged carbon copy of the book’s manuscript after her son had passed, and she persisted in her efforts to get the novel published. She was finally successful in 1980, and the following year “A Confederacy of Dunces” won a Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. Well done, Mom …

83 Dionysian ritual : ORGY

Dionysus was the party animal of Greek mythology. Dionysus was the god of wine, ritual madness and ecstasy! His Roman equivalent was Bacchus.

87 Duchess of ___ (Goya model) : ALBA

María Cayetana de Silva was the 13th Duchess of Alba. She was a favorite subject of the Spanish painter Francisco Goya. The duchess is the subject in the famous portraits known as “La maja desnuda” (The Nude Maja) and “La maja vestida” (The Clothed Maja). “Maja” translates from Spanish as “beautiful lady”.

89 Notation on a party invite : BYOB

Bring Your Own Beer/Bottle/Booze (BYOB)

97 One who’s able to rattle off digits of pi, perhaps : NERD

The ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter is often referred to as Archimedes’ constant, which we denote with the Greek letter pi (π). The ratio pi can be used to calculate the area of a disk, by multiplying the constant by the square of the radius (πr²).

99 Wine: Prefix : OENO-

In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oeno-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

100 Like Eeyore : DOUR

Eeyore is the donkey character in A. A. Milne’s “Winnie-the-Pooh”. Eeyore is very lovable, but has a gloomy and pessimistic outlook on life.

101 Hard-to-please type : DIVA

The term “diva” comes to us from Latin via Italian. “Diva” is the feminine form of “divus” meaning “divine one”. The word is used in Italy to mean “goddess” or “fine lady”, and especially is applied to the prima donna in an opera. We often use the term to describe a singer with a big ego.

105 Eddie Murphy’s org. in “48 Hrs.” : SFPD

The San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) is the 11th largest police department in the country. The SFPD dates back to the days of the Gold Rush, being founded in 1849 as a force of 35 officers. SFPD has featured a lot in movies and on television. The most famous films are probably “Bullitt”, the “Dirty Harry” series and “48 HRS.” On television there was “Ironside”, “The Streets of San Francisco” and “Monk”.

“48 HRS.” is a hilarious 1982 movie starring Eddie Murphy and Nick Nolte. Even though the lead characters play a convict and a cop who team up, “48 HRS.” is often cited as the first of the modern “buddy cop” movies, a precursor to the likes of “Beverly Hills Cop” and “Lethal Weapon”.

109 ÷ and †, in typography : OBELI

The division symbol consists of a horizontal line with a dot above and below. It is called an “obelus” (plural “obeli”). “Obelus” is the Greek word for “sharpened stick, pointed pillar”. Prior to 1659, the obelus was used as the symbol for subtraction, and not division.

A dagger (also “obelisk”, plural “obeli”) is a typographical symbol. The dagger is usually used to indicate a footnote.

115 Brazilian beach made famous in song : IPANEMA

Ipanema is a beach community in the south of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. The name Ipanema is a local word meaning “bad water”, signifying that the shore is bad for fishing. The beach became famous worldwide following the release of the song “The Girl from Ipanema” in 1962.

116 Coming or going : EN ROUTE

“En route” is a French term that means “on the way”.

Down

3 Wheel of Fortune’s place : TAROT

Tarot cards have been around since the mid-1400s, and for centuries were simply used for entertainment as a game. It has only been since the late 1800s that the cards have been used by fortune tellers to predict the future. The list of tarot cards includes the Wheel of Fortune, the Hanged Man and the Lovers.

4 Airport info, for short : ETD

Estimated time of departure (ETD)

6 Kind of tire : RADIAL

Radial (actually “radial-ply”) tires are so called because the cord plies embedded in the rubber are arranged radially from the centre of the tire. This means that the plies are at right angles to the direction of travel. In older tires the plies were criss-crossed over each other, at angles of 60 and -60 degrees from the direction of travel. Such tires are cross-ply or bias tires.

9 Actor Wilford of “The Natural” : BRIMLEY

Bernard Malamud wrote the novel “The Natural”, published in 1952. It tells the story of a baseball player named Roy Hobbs, who gets shot early in his career and makes a remarkable comeback many years later. Although Roy Hobbs is a fictional character, the story is apparently based on the real-life Phillies player Eddie Waitkus, who was indeed shot in his hotel room by an obsessed fan in 1949. The film adaptation, released in 1984, is an excellent movie starring Robert Redford as “The Natural”.

10 Old-style copies : MIMEOS

A mimeograph (also “mimeo”) is a cheap printing press that applies ink to paper through a stencil wrapped around a rotating drum. Mimeographs are still around, but have largely been replaced by offset printers and photocopiers.

11 Easy as pie : A CINCH

The term “cinch” was absorbed into American English from Spanish in the mid-1800s, when it was used to mean a “saddle-girth”. “Cincha” is the Spanish for “girdle”. In the late 1800s, “cinch” came to mean a ‘sure thing”, in the sense that a saddle-girth can provide a “sure hold”.

The idiom “as easy as pie” is used to describe something that is simple to do. It appears that the reference here is to the simplicity of eating pie, rather than making a pie.

14 Hair loss : ALOPECIA

Alopecia is hair loss, usually from the head. The term “alopecia” comes from the Greek for “loss of fur” and originally referred to the fur of a fox. The Greek for “fox” is “alopix”.

15 Evil genie’s emotion? : BOTTLED-UP ANGER

The “genie” in the bottle takes his or her name from “djinn”. “Djinns” were various spirits considered lesser than angels, with people exhibiting unsavory characteristics said to be possessed by djinn. When the book “The Thousand and One Nights” was translated into French, the word “djinn” was transformed into the existing word “génie”, because of the similarity in sound and the related spiritual meaning. This “génie” from the Arabian tale became confused with the Latin-derived “genius”, a guardian spirit thought to be assigned to each person at birth. Purely as a result of that mistranslation the word genie has come to mean the “djinn” that pops out of the bottle. A little hard to follow, I know, but still quite interesting …

16 ___ facto : IPSO

“Ipso facto” is Latin, meaning “by the fact itself”. Ipso facto describes something that is a direct consequence of a particular act, as opposed to something that is the result of some subsequent event. For example, my father was born in Dublin and was an Irish citizen, ipso facto. My son was born in California and is an Irish citizen by virtue of being the son of an Irish citizen (i.e. “not” ipso facto).

17 “MacGyver” actor Richard ___ Anderson : DEAN

“MacGyver” is an action-adventure TV show that started airing in 2016. It is described as a reboot of the successful show of the same name from the late eighties and early nineties. The title character is an agent with a unique ability to solve problems and jury-rig technical fixes when he is in a bind. Actor Lucas Till plays MacGyver this time round, whereas Richard Dean Anderson played him 25 years ago.

20 Cable option for film buffs : TMC

The Movie Channel is owned by Showtime, which in turn is a subsidiary of CBS. The channel’s name is often abbreviated to “TMC”, although this is informal usage.

29 Death Valley was once one : LAKE

Death Valley is a spectacular desert valley in California that is part of the Mojave Desert. Badwater Basin in Death Valley is the lowest point in North America, sitting at 282 feet below sea level. Remarkably, Badwater Basin is located just 84 miles from Mount Whitney, the highest point in the contiguous United States.

32 The Gettysburg Address, e.g. : EULOGY

A eulogy is a speech or piece of writing that praises someone who has recently passed away or who is retiring. “Eulogy” comes from the Greek word “eulogia” meaning “praise”.

I admit to having profound respect and admiration for great speeches delivered by great men and women. Forgive me as I reproduce here the full text of Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address:

Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that “all men are created equal.”

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do. But in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow, this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.

42 Gusto : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

“Gusto” is an Italian word meaning “taste”. We use it in English in the phrase “with gusto” meaning “with great enjoyment”.

46 Justin Timberlake’s former group : NSYNC

Justin Timberlake got his break by appearing on TV’s “Star Search” from which he was given a starring role in “The New Mickey Mouse Club”. It was on “The New Mickey Mouse Club” that he met his future girlfriend Britney Spears, as well JC Chasez who would join Timberlake in the lineup of the boy band NSYNC.

47 When said three times, hit song for 46-Down : BYE

“Bye Bye Bye” is a 2000 hit song recorded by the boy band NSYNC. It was originally written for another boy band, the English group 5ive, but they passed on it.

48 Famous toon with a Brooklyn accent : BUGS BUNNY

Bugs Bunny first said “What’s up, Doc?” in the 1940 cartoon short “A Wild Hare”, while addressing the hunter Elmer Fudd.

52 Commercial lead-in to Clean : OXI-

OxiClean is a bleaching agent and cleaner that was famously marketed using infomercials that featured the late Billy Mays.

57 New Mexico art hub : TAOS

The town of Taos, New Mexico is named for the Native American village nearby called Taos Pueblo. Taos is famous for its art colony. Artists began settling in Taos in 1899, and the Taos Society of Artists was founded in 1915.

60 One of his paradoxes claims that two objects can never really touch : ZENO

Zeno of Elea was a Greek philosopher who lived in Elea, a Greek colony in Southern Italy. Zeno is famous for his paradoxes, a set of problems that really make you think! In the problem known as “Achilles and the Tortoise”, Zeno tells us that Achilles races a tortoise, giving the tortoise a head start (of say 100 meters). By the time Achilles reaches the starting point of the tortoise, the tortoise will have moved on, albeit only a small distance. Achilles then sets his sights on the tortoise’s new position and runs to it. Again the tortoise has moved ahead a little. Achilles keeps on moving to the tortoise’s new position but can never actually catch his slower rival. Or can he …?

63 Home mixologist’s spot : WET BAR

A mixologist is someone who is well versed in the mixing of cocktails, said he, reaching for the shaker …

66 Big name in lawn care : TORO

Toro is a manufacturer of lawn mowers and snow removal equipment that is based in Bloomington, Minnesota. The company was founded in 1914 to build tractor engines.

69 Silk Road city near the East China Sea : NINGBO

The Silk Road was a network of trading routes that crossed North Africa and Asia, connecting Europe to West Asia. The routes get the name from the lucrative trade in silk from China.

The East China Sea is part of the Pacific Ocean lying off the east coast of China between Japan to the north and Taiwan to the south.

70 What “10” might mean: Abbr. : OCT

October is the tenth month in our calendar but was the eighth month in the old Roman calendar, hence the prefix “octo-”. Back then there were only ten months in the year. “Ianuarius” (January) and “Februarius” were then added as the eleventh and twelfth months of the year. Soon after, the year was reset and January and February became the first and second months.

74 Youngest recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor (2010) : FEY

Comedian and actress Tina Fey was born Elizabeth Stamatina Fey in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. Fey is perhaps best known to television viewers as a cast member on “Saturday Night Live” (1997-2006), and as the creator and star of the sitcom “30 Rock” (2006-2013).

The Mark Twain Prize for American Humor has been awarded annually since 1998 by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. The first recipient of the award was Richard Pryor. George Carlin won in 2008, and was the only person to be awarded posthumously.

81 Identified, in Ipswich : LABELLED

Ipswich is the county town of Suffolk in the south of England. It is an ancient town that owes much of its development to its proximity to the North Sea, located about 10 miles downriver. The Ipswich docks on the River Orwell have operated since the 7th century.

86 Birth control options : IUDS

It seems that it isn’t fully understood how the intrauterine device (IUD) works. The design that was most popular for decades was a T-shaped plastic frame on which was wound copper wire. It’s thought that the device is an irritant in the uterus causing the body to release chemicals that are hostile to sperm and eggs. This effect is enhanced by the presence of the copper.

93 Took steroids, informally : JUICED

Steroids are found commonly in nature, with familiar examples being cholesterol and testosterone. The controversial class of drugs called anabolic steroids (known informally as “‘roids” or simply “steroids”) are artificially produced chemicals designed to mimic the effect of the male sex hormone, testosterone. They are termed “anabolic” as they build up cellular tissue (particularly muscle) in a process called anabolism. Taking anabolic steroids can be termed “juicing”, and the aggressive behavior that can be a side-effect is known as “‘roid rage”.

94 Brio, to Brits : VIGOUR

“Brio” is borrowed from Italian, in which language the term means “vigor and vivacity”. “Con brio” is a musical direction often found on a score, instructing the musicians to play “with energy, vigor”.

95 Staves off : AVERTS

The word “stave” was originally the plural of “staff”, a word describing a wooden rod. To “stave off” originated with the concept of holding off with a staff. In the world of barrel-making, a stave is a narrow strip of wood that forms part of a barrel’s side.

101 Willem of the “Spider-Man” series : DAFOE

Willem Dafoe is an American actor, one from Wisconsin. He was born just plain “William” Dafoe, but didn’t like being called “Billy”. So, he changed his name to “Willem”, which was the pronunciation of his name by his Scottish babysitter.

The Green Goblin is a supervillain from Marvel Comics who generally is pitted against Spider-Man. The Green Goblin is the antagonist in the 2002 movie “Spider-Man”, and is played by Willem Dafoe.

103 Theatrical award : OBIE

The Obies are the Off-Broadway Theater Awards. The Obies have been presented annually since 1956. The recipients used to be chosen by “The Village Voice” newspaper, but now are jointly administered with the American Theatre Wing.

104 Nobel pursuit?: Abbr. : SCI

The Peace Prize is the most famous of the five prizes bequeathed by Alfred Nobel. The others are for Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. There is also a Nobel Prize in Economics that is awarded along with the original five, but it is funded separately and is awarded “in memory of Alfred Nobel”. Four of the prizes are awarded by Swedish organizations (Alfred Nobel was a Swede) and so the award ceremonies take place in Stockholm. The Peace Prize is awarded by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, and is presented in Oslo.

106 Putin’s parliament : DUMA

A duma is a representative assembly in Russia. The Russian word “dumat” means “to think, consider”.

111 N.Y. tech school : RPI

The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) is a private school in Troy, New York. The university is named after its founder Stephen Van Rensselaer who set up the school in 1824. The goal of RPI has always been the “application of science to the common purposes of life”, an objective set by the founder. Given that, the name for the school’s sports teams is quite apt: the Engineers.

113 Actor who was once crowned “America’s Toughest Bouncer” : MR T

Mr. T’s real name is Laurence Tero Tureaud. Mr. T is famous for many things, including the wearing of excessive amounts of jewelry. He started this habit when he was working as a bouncer, wearing jewelry items that had been left behind by customers at a nightclub so that the items might be recognized and claimed. It was also as a bouncer that he adopted the name Mr. T. His catch phrase comes from the movie “Rocky III”. In the film, before he goes up against Rocky Balboa, Mr. T says, “No, I don’t hate Balboa, but I pity the fool”. He parlayed that line into quite a bit of success. He had a reality TV show called “I Pity the Fool”, and produced a motivational video called “Be Somebody … or Be Somebody’s Fool!”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Like “American Pie,” “American Psycho” and “American Beauty” : RATED R
7 Proposed portrait for the $20 bill : TUBMAN
13 Like sports fans who paint their faces, say : RABID
18 Drink with tapioca pearls : BOBA TEA
19 Peach relative : APRICOT
21 Run off (with) : ELOPE
22 Upbeat sentry’s emotion? : GUARDED OPTIMISM
24 Many, informally : LOTSA
25 Regarding : AS TO
26 More, on a music score : PIU
27 Auspice : OMEN
28 King’s collaborator on the Grammy-winning blues album “Riding With the King” : CLAPTON
30 Take the next step in an online relationship : MEET
31 Actress Blanchett : CATE
33 Scotland’s ___ Lomond : LOCH
35 Winter Olympics maneuver : AXEL
36 Some H.S. yearbook staff : EDS
37 Bacteriologist’s emotion upon a new discovery? : CULTURE SHOCK
40 Jess’s best friend on TV’s “New Girl” : CECE
43 Glib : PAT
44 Maker of Regenerist skin cream : OLAY
45 Any member of BTS, e.g. : TEEN IDOL
47 Pellet shooter : BB GUN
50 What Kit Kat bars come in : TWOS
51 “I’m glad to hear it” : GOOD
53 It’s full of hot air : SAUNA
54 Mongolian shelters : YURTS
55 Novice window-washer’s emotion? : HIGH ANXIETY
58 Scathing review : PAN
59 Complete set of showbiz awards, for short : EGOT
60 Clownish : ZANY
61 Really play that saxophone : WAIL
62 Egypt’s Sadat : ANWAR
64 Powerhouse in international men’s ice hockey : SWEDEN
66 Haul away : TOW
67 Art gallery tour leader : DOCENT
68 #46 : BIDEN
69 Modern reading option … or where to read it? : NOOK
71 ___ Building, Boston’s first skyscraper : AMES
73 Apt anagram of GIFT : TGIF
75 Brownish-gray : DUN
76 Jester’s emotion after the king’s laughter? : COMIC RELIEF
79 Like Ignatius J. Reilly in “A Confederacy of Dunces” : OBESE
80 English-speaking : ANGLO
82 A fan of : INTO
83 Dionysian ritual : ORGY
84 Ashleigh ___, 2019 French Open champion : BARTY
85 Apathetic : UNCARING
87 Duchess of ___ (Goya model) : ALBA
88 One-named winner of the 2021 Grammy for Song of the Year : HER
89 Notation on a party invite : BYOB
90 Wild horse’s emotion? : UNBRIDLED JOY
94 Huge tub : VAT
97 One who’s able to rattle off digits of pi, perhaps : NERD
99 Wine: Prefix : OENO-
100 Like Eeyore : DOUR
101 Hard-to-please type : DIVA
102 Result of a snow day : NO CLASS
105 Eddie Murphy’s org. in “48 Hrs.” : SFPD
107 Lifelike video game, for short : SIM
108 A mighty long time : AGES
109 ÷ and †, in typography : OBELI
110 Cat’s emotion while sitting in its human’s lap? : CREATURE COMFORT
114 Stuck : MIRED
115 Brazilian beach made famous in song : IPANEMA
116 Coming or going : EN ROUTE
117 Hits the paper airplane icon, perhaps : SENDS
118 PC support group : IT TEAM
119 Blocks : DETERS

Down

1 Fired up : ROUSED
2 Quiets down : ABATES
3 Wheel of Fortune’s place : TAROT
4 Airport info, for short : ETD
5 Lesser-known song : DEEP CUT
6 Kind of tire : RADIAL
7 Pay with a chip-based credit card, perhaps : TAP
8 As much as : UP TO
9 Actor Wilford of “The Natural” : BRIMLEY
10 Old-style copies : MIMEOS
11 Easy as pie : A CINCH
12 Column of boxes on a questionnaire : NOS
13 “Chill out!” : RELAX!
14 Hair loss : ALOPECIA
15 Evil genie’s emotion? : BOTTLED-UP ANGER
16 ___ facto : IPSO
17 “MacGyver” actor Richard ___ Anderson : DEAN
18 Subpar athletic effort : B-GAME
20 Cable option for film buffs : TMC
23 Relentlessly competitive : OUT TO WIN
29 Death Valley was once one : LAKE
32 The Gettysburg Address, e.g. : EULOGY
34 Massage therapist’s substance : HOT OIL
37 Some recyclables : CANS
38 Jumping the gun : RASH
39 Turn over : CEDE
41 One might take you in : CON ARTIST
42 Gusto : ELAN
43 Finished a hole : PUTTED
46 Justin Timberlake’s former group : NSYNC
47 When said three times, hit song for 46-Down : BYE
48 Famous toon with a Brooklyn accent : BUGS BUNNY
49 Farmer’s emotion during a dry season? : GROWING CONCERN
50 As compared to : THAN
51 Eat (at) : GNAW
52 Commercial lead-in to Clean : OXI-
56 Responded to the alarm : AWOKE
57 New Mexico art hub : TAOS
60 One of his paradoxes claims that two objects can never really touch : ZENO
63 Home mixologist’s spot : WET BAR
65 Interior design : DECOR
66 Big name in lawn care : TORO
67 Oppose : DEFY
69 Silk Road city near the East China Sea : NINGBO
70 What “10” might mean: Abbr. : OCT
71 Sleeping spot for a guest, maybe : AIRBED
72 It’s way above the recommended amount : MEGADOSE
74 Youngest recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor (2010) : FEY
75 Apply sloppily : DAUB
77 St. Cloud State University’s state: Abbr. : MINN
78 Laze : LOLL
79 Follow : OBEY
81 Identified, in Ipswich : LABELLED
86 Birth control options : IUDS
87 Rescue dog, e.g. : ADOPTEE
88 Estrogen or testosterone : HORMONE
91 Move from aisle to window, maybe : RESEAT
92 Recent delivery : INFANT
93 Took steroids, informally : JUICED
94 Brio, to Brits : VIGOUR
95 Staves off : AVERTS
96 Auditory : sound :: gustatory : ___ : TASTE
98 Bursts in on : RAIDS
101 Willem of the “Spider-Man” series : DAFOE
102 Delicious food, in modern slang : NOMS
103 Theatrical award : OBIE
104 Nobel pursuit?: Abbr. : SCI
106 Putin’s parliament : DUMA
111 N.Y. tech school : RPI
112 Castle door destroyer : RAM
113 Actor who was once crowned “America’s Toughest Bouncer” : MR T

14 thoughts on “0704-21 NY Times Crossword 4 Jul 21, Sunday”

  1. 14:34. I’d never heard of OBELI; seems like a pretty obscure word to those of us not in the typesetting biz.

  2. 31:50, no errors. Cute theme. As an ex-med tech and bio major in college, I enjoyed seeing CULTURESHOCK. And who wouldn’t love to see the genie with BOTTLEDUPANGER? But OBELI and NINGBO? Needed crosses for those.

  3. 22:48 Pretty smooth solve – I managed to find most of my fat fingers as I went along, rather than searching at the end. Also unfamiliar with OBELI, as well as PIU, NIGBO, CECE, BARTY, and a couple others. Guess that’s why we have crosses.

    Whenever I buy a Kit Kat, it seems to come in four sticks – or maybe I just can’t count.

    I graduated from RPI (see 111D) and while in grad school there I had to take a numerical analysis class, so I still remember PI to 10 places – nerd, I guess. Some years ago I saw a clever way to find it to get it to 5 places. You take the numbers 1,1,3,3,5,5 – easy to remember then take the first half 113, put that in the denominator, the rest goes in the numerator. So you have 355 divided by 113 –> 355 / 113. That result gives you 3.14159 – Pi to 5 places. Kind of nerdy, eh? Guilty as charged.

    1. @Ron F …

      Thank you for repeating this. As a certifiable math nerd myself (3.14159265358979323846…😜), I was also aware of 355/113, but the easy-to-remember memory aid had never occurred to me.

    2. @Ron F …

      One more thought: In the late 60’s, I worked at the Naval Ordnance Lab, just north of D.C., and had a co-worker named Ed Kobe, whose degree was from RPI. (I actually didn’t work too closely with him; my principal memory of him is that, every year, he made a big batch of sauerbraten and either brought it in for the assembled multitudes to devour or threw a party at which it was served. Good stuff!) Now, the chances of your knowing him, or knowing of him, are minute, but … you never can tell … 😜.

    1. @Ron F …

      I meant to comment about that … an absolutely amazing creation. Curiously, Stanley Newman’s Sunday puzzle, from Newsday, was built around the same quote as Evan’s and is also impressive (but doesn’t achieve quite the same level).

  4. A day late I know, but one square incorrect; the 102 Down intersection with 109 across. Never heard of OBELI and please tell me in what universe they use the expression NOMS for delicious food. Was also annoyed at the 105 Across clue; should have been Nick Nolte’s org in “48 Hrs.”

    1. I agree that the 105 clue should have been Nick Nolte. Also, what is apt about The GIFT anagram TGIF? And diva could have been clued better.

  5. No errors but over an hour…I had Canada for 64A and that slowed things up a bit.
    A lot of crosses and a couple of look ups.
    Stay safe😀

  6. 34:50. Clever theme, and I leaned on it heavily and often.

    Ron F and Nonny – I was a physics major in college and eventually got a masters degree. I know pi as 3.14. Anything after that, I just use a calculator….

    I would have thought PIU was something you’d say after hearing bad music…..

    Best –

  7. 34:46, no errors. Good challenging Sunday puzzle. In addition to all the previous posters comments, I finished this grid with a WAG at the ‘C’ intersection of ALOPECIA and CECE, complete unknowns to me.

  8. Couple of mess ups… worst was 118A.. thought it was ITTECH.. then I had CREATIVE COMFORT for 110A. Bit of a traffic jam down there..

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