0626-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 26 Jun 2018, Tuesday

Constructed by: Zhouqin Burnikel
Edited by: Will Shortz

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Today’s Reveal Answer: Altogether

Themed answer each include two occurrences of “AL” TOGETHER, side-by-side:

  • 59A. On the whole … or, when read in two parts, what the answer to each starred clue has : ALTOGETHER or “AL” TOGETHER
  • 18A. *Spaced out : IN LA-LA LAND
  • 33A. *Meals permissible under Islamic law : HALAL FOOD
  • 44A. *Autobiography of Nobel laureate Yousafzai : I AM MALALA
  • 3D. *Popular European skiing region : CENTRAL ALPS
  • 26D. *Capital of Malaysia : KUALA LUMPUR

Bill’s time: 6m 21s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1. Original “Top Gear” channel : BBC

“Top Gear” is a motoring show that first aired in 1977 on the BBC. The original show had legs, and ran until 2001, when it was cancelled due to falling ratings. The show was then relaunched in a new format in 2002. At its peak, the old “Top Gear” had 6 million viewers per week. The relaunched “Top Gear” commanded a staggering 350 million viewers per week at its peak, in 170 different countries. The new version of the show suffered a bump in the road when the main host Jeremy Clarkson was fired by the BBC for inappropriate behavior. The three “Top Gear” hosts all left together, and were hired by Amazon to host a new competing show called “The Grand Tour”.

16. Sister brand of Nilla wafers : OREO

If you take a close look at the embossed design on the front and back of an Oreo cookie, you’ll spot the main elements of the Nabisco logo. Those elements are an oval with a cross on top, a cross with two bars. Usually the company name “Nabisco” is inside the oval, but for the cookie it’s the brand name “Oreo”. The current embossed design was introduced 1952.

As one might expect, “Nilla” is a shortened form of “vanilla”. However, you won’t find any vanilla in Nilla brand cookies or wafers. They have always been flavored with vanillin, which is synthetic vanilla. Is nothing sacred …?

18. *Spaced out : IN LA-LA LAND

“La-la land” is a euphemism for a state of unconsciousness or a dreamworld.

20. Tibetan legends : YETIS

The yeti, also known as “the abominable snowman”, is a beast of legend. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

22. Gas in fuel : ETHANE

Ethane is the second largest component of natural gas, after methane. Ethane’s main use is in the production of ethylene, a compound that is widely used in the chemical industry.

25. Small change : NICKEL

The 5-cent American coin known as a nickel is actually made up of 75% copper and 25% nickel. The first nickel was introduced in 1866, and was named the Shield nickel due to the shield design on the front of the coin. The current design is the Jefferson nickel, which was introduced in 1938.

33. *Meals permissible under Islamic law : HALAL FOOD

“Halal” is a term for an action or object that is permissible under Islamic Law. In particular “halal” is used to describe food that can be consumed. Anything that is not allowed is described as “haram”.

36. Console pioneer : ATARI

The kids today probably don’t realize that we had a video game console back in the seventies, and it wasn’t a Nintendo nor was it a PlayStation. The Atari 2600 game system introduced the idea of separating out computing hardware (the console) from the game code (a cartridge). The same concept persists to this day, although cartridges have been displaced by discs and downloads.

37. Reddit Q&A feature : AMA

Ask me anything (AMA)

38. It may be delayed by snow: Abbr. : ETD

Estimated time of departure (ETD)

42. Bantu speakers : ZULUS

There are hundreds of Bantu languages, which are mainly spoken in central, east and southern Africa. The most commonly spoken Bantu language is Swahili, with Zulu coming in second.

44. *Autobiography of Nobel laureate Yousafzai : I AM MALALA

“I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban” is a memoir co-written by Malala Yousafzai and British journalist Christina Lamb. The title tells the essence of her Malala’s story. She started a blog when she was 11 or 12, outlining her life in northwest Pakistan under occupation by the Taliban. As the Pakistani military regained control of the area, Malala’s story was told in a documentary and she was frequently giving interviews. One day a gunman came looking for her, and found her on a school bus. He shot Malala three times, with one bullet going into her forehead. She survived, and was taken to England to recuperate. She was a co-recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014 at the age of 17, making her the youngest ever Nobel laureate.

47. “College GameDay” channel : ESPN

There are several sports shows on ESPN called “College GameDay”, the oldest of which is the one covering college football.

63. Boy of Mayberry : OPIE

Opie Taylor is the character played by Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”. Opie lives with widowed father Andy Taylor (played by Andy Griffith) and his great-aunt Beatrice “Aunt Bee” Taylor (played by Frances Bavier). Ron Howard first played the role in 1960 in the pilot show, when he was just 5 years old. Howard sure has come a long way since playing Opie Taylor. He has directed some fabulous movies including favorites of mine like “Apollo 13”, “A Beautiful Mind” and “The Da Vinci Code”.

65. Twin of He-Man : SHE-RA

“She-Ra: Princess of Power” is an animated television show, a spinoff of the very successful “He-Man and the Masters of the Universe”. Both shows are aimed at young people, with “He-Man” targeted at boys and “She-Ra” at girls.

67. Major Iowa crop : CORN

The Corn Belt (sometimes “Grain Belt”) is a region in the Midwest where, since the mid-1800s, corn has been the major crop. Geographically, the Corn Belt covers Iowa, Illinois, Indiana and parts of Michigan, Ohio, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota and Missouri. About 40% of the world’s corn production comes from the region, and most of that production is used for the feeding of livestock.

69. Word with curtain or hot : ROD

A hot rod is an American car that has been modified for speed by installing a larger than normal engine. A street rod is generally a more comfortable type of hot rod, with the emphasis less on the engine and more on custom paint jobs and interiors. By definition, a street rod must be based on an automobile design that originated prior to 1949.

Down

3. *Popular European skiing region : CENTRAL ALPS

There are eight Alpine countries:

  • Austria
  • Slovenia
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Germany
  • Monaco
  • Italy

4. One of the Manning brothers : ELI

Eli Manning plays as quarterback for the New York Giants. Eli’s brother Peyton Manning retired from football as the quarterback for the Denver Broncos in 2015. Eli and Peyton’s father is Archie Manning, who was also a successful NFL quarterback. Eli, Peyton and Archie co-authored a book for children titles “Family Huddle” in 2009. It describes the Mannings playing football together as young boys.

5. Front and back, at Augusta : NINES

The Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia was founded in 1933 by Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Famously, Augusta hosts the Masters Tournament each year. Augusta is very much a private club, and some of its policies have drawn criticism over the years. Prior to 1959, the club had a bylaw requiring that all caddies be African American. There were no African-American club members admitted until 1990, and no women until 2012.

6. Benicio ___, Best Supporting Actor winner for “Traffic” : DEL TORO

Benicio Del Toro is an actor from Puerto Rico. He is an Academy Award winner, for the role he played in “Traffic”, released in 2000. He also played the title role in the 2008 movie “Che”.

The 2000 film “Traffic” explores the illegal drug trade. The movie is adapted from a 1989 British TV miniseries called “Traffik”. There was a lso 2004 American TV miniseries produced called “Traffic”, which was based on both the prior TV show and the movie.

7. Home of the Jazz : UTAH

The Utah Jazz professional basketball team moved to their current home in Salt Lake City in 1979. As one might guess from the name, the team originated in New Orleans, but only played there for five seasons. New Orleans was a tough place to be based because venues were hard to come by, and Mardi Gras forced the team to play on the road for a whole month.

8. Where bagels and vodka originated : POLAND

The bagel was invented in the Polish city of Kraków in the 16th century. Bagels were brought to this country by Jewish immigrants from Poland who mainly established homes in and around New York City.

The distilled beverage we call “vodka” takes its name from the Slavic word “voda” meaning “water”, with “vodka” translating as “little water”.

9. Skunk : POLECAT

“Polecat” is a term used for several different animals, most of which are in the weasel family.

19. Alex and ___ (jewelry retailer) : ANI

The jewelry retailer Alex and Ani was founded in 2004 and is headquartered in Cranston, Rhode Island. The founder Carolyn Rafaelian named her business for her two daughters: Alex and Ani.

26. *Capital of Malaysia : KUALA LUMPUR

The capital city of Malaysia is Kuala Lumpur, which is very often abbreviated to “KL”. The name “Kuala Lumpur” translates into English as “muddy estuary”. Famously, KL is home to the spectacular Petronas Twin Towers, which are currently the tallest twin towers in the world and was the tallest of any building from 1998 to 2004.

27. “Captain Blood” star Flynn : ERROL

Actor Errol Flynn was born 1909 in Tasmania, Australia where he was raised. In his twenties, Flynn lived in the UK where he pursued his acting career. Around the same time he starred in an Australian film “In the Wake of the Bounty” and then appeared in a British film “Murder at Monte Carlo”. It was in the latter film that he was noticed by Warner Brothers who brought him to America. Flynn’s non-American heritage shone through even while he was living the American dream in California. He regularly played cricket, along with his friend David Niven, in the Hollywood Cricket Club.

Errol Flynn plays the archetypal swashbuckler in the 1935 film “Captain Blood“. The movie is the second of three adaptations of the novel of the same name by Rafael Sabatini. Of course, Captain Blood happens to be an Irishman …

28. Ali with a perfect 24-0 record : LAILA

Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila’s professional record is an impressive 24 wins, including 21 knockouts. Now retired, she never lost a fight, and nor did she ever draw. One of those victories was against Jackie Frazier-Lyde, daughter of her father’s nemesis Joe Frazier. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

35. Father of Thor : ODIN

In Norse mythology, Odin was the chief of the gods. Odin’s wife Frigg was the queen of Asgard whose name gave us our English term “Friday” (via Anglo-Saxon). Odin’s son was Thor, and his name gave us the term “Thursday”. Odin himself gave us our word “Wednesday”, from “Wodin”, the English form of his name.

36. Qatar’s peninsula : ARABIA

Qatar is a sovereign state in the Middle East occupying the Qatar Peninsula, itself located in the Arabian Peninsula. Qatar lies on the Persian Gulf and shares one land border, with Saudi Arabia to the south. Qatar has more oil and gas reserves per capita of population than any other country in the world. In 2010, Qatar had the fastest growing economy in the world, driven by the petrochemical industry. Qatar is scheduled to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, although the nation’s eligibility to do so is under question after a far-reaching bribery scandal was uncovered at the sport’s governing body.

40. Mogadishu-born supermodel : IMAN

Iman Mohamed Abdulmajid is a supermodel from Somalia who goes simply by the name “Iman” these days. “Iman” is an Arabic word for “faith”. Iman is smart cookie. Imam has a degree in Political Science and is fluent in five languages: Somali, Arabic, Italian, French and English. Iman was married to English rock star David Bowie from 1992 until his death in 2016.

Mogadishu is a major port city on the west coast of Africa, and is the capital of Somalia. The city is known locally as Xamar.

43. Elusive horse with a horn : UNICORN

A unicorn is a mythical creature that resembles a horse with horn projecting from its forehead. The term “unicorn” comes from the Latin “uni-” (one) and “cornus” (horn).

46. James of the court : LEBRON

Basketball player LeBron James (nicknamed “King James”) seems to be in demand for the covers of magazines. James became the first African American man to adorn the front cover of “Vogue” in March 2008. That made him only the third male to make the “Vogue” cover, following Richard Gere and George Clooney.

53. Mike who starred in “Austin Powers” : MYERS

Mike Myers does do a great British accent, witness his performance in the madcap “Austin Powers” movies. He has an advantage though, as both his parents are British, and live in Ontario, Canada.

The character Austin Powers was created by the actor who plays him, namely Mike Myers. Apparently Myers came up with the idea for Powers while listening to the Burt Bacharach song “The Look of Love”.

54. Citizen competitor : SEIKO

Seiko Epson is a Japanese company, and one of the largest manufacturers of printers in the world. The company has its roots in the watch business, roots that go back to 1942. Seiko was chosen as the official timekeeper for the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo and was asked to supply a timer that produced a printed record. This request brought Seiko into the business of printer production. The company developed the world’s first mini-printer for the 1964 Games and called it EP-101 (EP standing for Electronic Printer). In 1975 Seiko introduced the next generation of EP printers which was called EPSON, from “SON of EP”. Cute, huh?

59. Shape of a rainbow : ARC

Sunlight shining through airborne water droplets can produce rainbows. The water droplets act as little prisms, dispersing the white light into its constituent colors. Sometimes we see double rainbows. If we look carefully, we can see that the order of the colors in the first and second arcs is reversed.

60. Summer sign : LEO

Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 23 to August 22 are Leos.

61. Sailor, informally : TAR

A jack tar, or just “tar”, was a seaman in the days of the British Empire. The term probably arose due to a sailor’s various uses of tar back then, including waterproofing his clothes and using tar in his hair to slick down his ponytail.

62. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE

Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on TV’s “Canadian Idol” when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1. Original “Top Gear” channel : BBC
4. Eventually become : END UP
9. Adopt-a-thon adoptees : PETS
13. Circle calculation : AREA
15. Not be straight with : LIE TO
16. Sister brand of Nilla wafers : OREO
17. Trash holders : BINS
18. *Spaced out : IN LA-LA LAND
20. Tibetan legends : YETIS
22. Gas in fuel : ETHANE
23. “Yep, sadly that’s true” : ‘FRAID SO
25. Small change : NICKEL
29. Forever ___ day : AND A
30. “Way cool!” : RAD!
32. Otherworldly glow : AURA
33. *Meals permissible under Islamic law : HALAL FOOD
36. Console pioneer : ATARI
37. Reddit Q&A feature : AMA
38. It may be delayed by snow: Abbr. : ETD
39. Soccer ball filler : AIR
41. [U r hilarious] : LOL
42. Bantu speakers : ZULUS
44. *Autobiography of Nobel laureate Yousafzai : I AM MALALA
47. “College GameDay” channel : ESPN
48. Roadside stopover : INN
49. ___ Tesfaye, real name of pop music’s the Weeknd : ABEL
50. Architect’s field : DESIGN
52. Literary collection : OMNIBUS
55. What a filling fills : CAVITY
57. Packing a piece : ARMED
59. On the whole … or, when read in two parts, what the answer to each starred clue has : ALTOGETHER or “AL” TOGETHER
63. Boy of Mayberry : OPIE
64. Part of the body that’s spanked : REAR
65. Twin of He-Man : SHE-RA
66. Warm up in seconds : NUKE
67. Major Iowa crop : CORN
68. Short, concise and to the point (unlike this clue) : TERSE
69. Word with curtain or hot : ROD

Down

1. Bundle of joy : BABY
2. Inform of everything that happened : BRIEF
3. *Popular European skiing region : CENTRAL ALPS
4. One of the Manning brothers : ELI
5. Front and back, at Augusta : NINES
6. Benicio ___, Best Supporting Actor winner for “Traffic” : DEL TORO
7. Home of the Jazz : UTAH
8. Where bagels and vodka originated : POLAND
9. Skunk : POLECAT
10. Notable time period : ERA
11. Rightmost bowling pin : TEN
12. Piece of lawn : SOD
14. Carrier to Seoul : ASIANA
19. Alex and ___ (jewelry retailer) : ANI
21. Moves with one’s back against a wall, say : SIDLES
24. Crazy : DAFT
26. *Capital of Malaysia : KUALA LUMPUR
27. “Captain Blood” star Flynn : ERROL
28. Ali with a perfect 24-0 record : LAILA
31. Alternative name for He-Man : ADAM
33. Put through hell night, say : HAZED
34. Make smile : AMUSE
35. Father of Thor : ODIN
36. Qatar’s peninsula : ARABIA
40. Mogadishu-born supermodel : IMAN
43. Elusive horse with a horn : UNICORN
45. “One more, please” : ANOTHER
46. James of the court : LEBRON
48. Buy stocks, perhaps : INVEST
51. Practical joke : GAG
53. Mike who starred in “Austin Powers” : MYERS
54. Citizen competitor : SEIKO
56. “Am ___ only one?” : I THE
58. Proof of ownership : DEED
59. Shape of a rainbow : ARC
60. Summer sign : LEO
61. Sailor, informally : TAR
62. Singer Carly ___ Jepsen : RAE

10 thoughts on “0626-18 NY Times Crossword Answers 26 Jun 2018, Tuesday”

  1. 6:02, no errors. Understood (basically) how the theme worked, but didn’t grok that it was motivated by the word “altogether” until I came here. (Bill, take a bow!)

  2. @Dale (responding to Friday)
    A suggestion I’d like to make to you (or whoever trying to gear up to do those): The Puzzle Society puzzles (as edited by David Steinberg) publish themeless grids on Saturdays and Sundays that are about a Tues/Wed NYT difficulty (I average around 12-16 minutes on them the times I’ve done them).

    I thought it might be handy to suggest if anyone is looking to get used to the Fri/Sat NYT puzzles without the added difficulty on top of the longer words/etc.

    1. Thanks, Glenn. I am belatedly seeing your message to me since I work only the syndicated puzzles five weeks later than you do. I was not aware of The Puzzle Society so am glad to learn of it. These relatively-easier late-week puzzles do sound interesting. I’ll give them a try.

  3. 7:56, and no errors. Theme was, like so many before and to come, irrelevant to completing the grid, and not even worth the effort to discuss (or to create, for that matter).

  4. 10:30, no errors. Realized that there was a theme when entering 59A, but the theme seemed to be more relevant to the setter than the solvers.

  5. No errors. I thought the theme was a good one although I may be biased because it did help me at a crucial point. I had four of the five theme answers but was stuck on 3-Down, “Popular European skiing region”. I kept looking for the name of one of the European countries. Since I could be assured that two AL’s had to come together I eventually was able to fill in the rather ambiguous CENTRAL. It’s funny how I will warm up to a theme if it is helping me. 🤔

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