0125-15 New York Times Crossword Answers 25 Jan 15, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications
Solution to today’s New York Times crossword found online at the Seattle Times website
Jump to a complete list of today’s clues and answers

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

CROSSWORD SETTER: Alan Arbesfeld
THEME: Twist Ending … each of today’s themed answers is a common phrase, but with the ENDING letters TWISTED, the last two letters reversed:

23A. “Those wreaths all look the same to me!”? : I CANNOT TELL A LEI (from “I cannot tell a lie”)
39A. Start of an oral listing of African nations, perhaps? : YOU’VE GOT MALI (from “You’ve got mail”)
53A. Showing less cleavage? : RAISING THE BRA (from “raising the bar”)
84A. Cheap roadside assistance? : A QUARTER TO TOW (from “a quarter to two”)
99A. Knockoff dress labeled “Armani,” say? : ILLEGAL A-LINE (from “illegal alien”)
116A. Caution to an orphan girl not to leave her wildebeest behind? : ANNIE GET YOUR GNU (from “Annie Get Your Gun”)
3D. Group of actors who all have stage fright? : SCAREDY CAST (from “scaredy cats”)
70D. Lovely but stupid person? : OBTUSE ANGEL (from “obtuse angle”)

BILL BUTLER’S COMPLETION TIME: 25m 04s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … I CANNOT TELL A LEI (I cannot telt a lei … slip of the keyboard!), BIL (Bit)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

8. Confidentially : SUB ROSA
“Sub rosa” is a Latin term that translates literally as “under the rose”. The term is used to denote confidentiality, as the rose has been a symbol of secrecy since ancient times.

15. N.J. Army base : FT DIX
Fort Dix is the name commonly used for what is now more correctly called Joint Base McGuire -Dix-Lakehurst, a US Army base located near Trenton, New Jersey. Fort Dix was established in 1917 by the Army, and was consolidated with nearby Air Force and Navy facilities in 2009.

23. “Those wreaths all look the same to me!”? : I CANNOT TELL A LEI (from “I cannot tell a lie”)
“Lei” is the Hawaiian word for “garland, wreath”, although in more general terms a “lei” is any series of objects strung together as an adornment for the body.

26. Law school class : TORTS
The word “tort” is a French word meaning “mischief, injury or wrong”. Tort law is generally about negligence, when the action of one party causes injury to another but that action falls outside of the scope of criminal law.

31. Summers on the Seine : ETES
One might spend the summer (été) under the sun (le soleil) on the Seine in Paris.

The Seine is the river that flows through Paris. The Seine empties into the English Channel to the north, at the port city of Le Havre.

34. Cutlass model of the 1980s-’90s : CIERA
Oldsmobile made the Cutlass Ciera from 1982 to 1996. The Ciera was the brand name’s most successful model.

36. Senile sort : DOTARD
A dotard is a person who is in his or her dotage, someone who has become senile.

39. Start of an oral listing of African nations, perhaps? : YOU’VE GOT MALI (from “You’ve got mail”)
The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in western Africa, south of Algeria. Formerly known as French Sudan, Mali’s most famous city is Timbuktu.

The iconic phrase “You’ve got mail” was first used by AOL in 1989. The greeting was recorded by voice actor Elwood Edwards. Edwards has parlayed his gig with AOL into some other work. He appears in an episode of “The Simpsons” as a doctor who says the line “You’ve got leprosy”. Edwards also worked as a weatherman for a while and got to use the line “You’ve got hail” …

42. Texas home of the Bears : BAYLOR
Remember Ken Starr of Whitewater fame? Starr is now President of Baylor University in Waco, Texas.

46. Store : ARSENAL
Our word “arsenal” comes from the Italian “arzenale”, a work adapted from the Arabic for “workshop”. There was a large wharf in Venice called the Arzenale that became associated with the storage of weapons and ammunition, and this led to our contemporary usage of “arsenal”.

47. Asked to come back, in a way : ENCORED
“Encore” is French for “again, one more time”, and is a shout that an audience member will make here in North America to request another song, say. But, the term is not used this way in France. Rather, the audience will shout “Bis!” instead, which is the Italian for “twice!”

49. “Over There” subj. : WWI
“Over There” is a song that was popular in both WWI and WWII. “Over There” was written in 1917 by George M. Cohan, soon after the US declared war against Germany. The song’s title refers to being “over there” in Europe, fighting the good fight.

51. D halved : CCL
In Roman numerals, 250 (CCL) is half of 500 (L).

52. Alternative to JFK : LGA
The three big airports serving New York City are John F. Kennedy (JFK), La Guardia (LGA) and Newark (EWR).

62. Mrs., abroad : SRA
The equivalent of “Mrs.” in French is “Mme.” (Madame) and in Spanish is “Sra.” (Señora).

64. Himalayan myth : YETI
A yeti is a beast of legend, also called an abominable snowman. “Yeti” is a Tibetan term, and the beast is fabled to live in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Our equivalent legend in North America is that of Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch. The study of animals whose existence have not yet been substantiated is called cryptozoology.

69. March org.? : ROTC
The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school’s curriculum.

73. Rally killers in baseball: Abbr. : DPS
Double plays (DPs)

81. Middle of summer? : EMS
There are two letters M (em) in the middle of the word “summer”.

87. “I don’t need to hear that,” informally : TMI
Too much information! (TMI)

88. Skip town : LAM
To be “on the lam” is to be in flight, to have escaped from prison. “On the lam” is American slang that originated at the end of the 19th century. The word “lam” also means to “beat” or “thrash”, as in “lambaste”. So “on the lam” might derive from the phrase “to beat it, to scram”.

89. Big ___ : SUR
Big Sur is a lovely part of the California Coast, south of Monterey and Carmel. The name “Big Sur” comes from the original Spanish description of the area as “el sur grande” meaning “the big south”.

93. Setting for most of “Moby-Dick” : OPEN SEA
The full title of Herman Melville’s novel is “Moby-Dick; or, The Whale”. Note that the convention is to hyphenate “Moby-Dick” in the title, as that was how the book was first published, in 1851. However, there is no hyphen in the name of the whale “Moby Dick” as reproduced throughout the text.

95. Kind of TV : PLASMA
Plasma televisions are so called because the screen is made up tiny cells containing electrically charged ionized gases (plasmas). Each of the cells is effectively a tiny fluorescent lamp.

98. Liqueur flavorers : ANISES
The essential oil in the anise plant is anethole. Anethole has a licorice-like flavor, and is used extensively in cooking.

99. Knockoff dress labeled “Armani,” say? : ILLEGAL A-LINE (from “illegal alien”)
Giorgio Armani is an Italian fashion designer and founder of the company that has borne his name since 1975. Although Armani is famous for his menswear, the company makes everything from jewelry to perfume.

101. Rob : BURGLE
The crime of burglary is the breaking into and entering of a building with the intent to steal. The actual theft is a separate crime.

103. Popular Hispanic newspaper name : EL SOL
“El Sol” is Spanish for “The Sun”.

105. Son of, in foreign names : IBN
In Arabic names, “ibn” is a word meaning “son of”. The words “bin” and “ben” are also used for “son of”. The word “bint” means “daughter of”. Similarly, in Hebrew “ben” is used to mean “son of”, and “bat” is used to mean “daughter of”.

109. E.R. “A.S.A.P.” : STAT
The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

112. Longtime Yankee nickname : A-ROD
Poor old Alex Rodriguez earned more nicknames than just A-Rod. He has been called “the Cooler” by some players as there is a perception that teams go cold when he joins them and hot when he leaves. He has also been called “A-Fraud” by teammates because of another perception, that he is over-demanding. Rodriguez now seems to be in a world of hurt for using illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

114. Ban competition : ARRID
Arrid is an antiperspirant deodorant brand introduced in the thirties. Slogans associated with Arrid have been “Don’t be half-safe – use Arrid to be sure”, “Stress stinks! Arrid works!” and “Get a little closer”.

116. Caution to an orphan girl not to leave her wildebeest behind? : ANNIE GET YOUR GNU (from “Annie Get Your Gun”)
A gnu is also known as a wildebeest, an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is actually the Dutch word for “wild beast”.

“Annie Get Your Gun” is an Irving Berlin musical, first performed on Broadway in 1946. The show is a fictionalized account of the life of sharpshooter Annie Oakley. It was written as a vehicle for Ethel Merman, and when she sang the hit tune “There’s No Business Like Show Business”, she apparently brought down the house.

119. Reeves of “John Wick” : KEANU
Keanu Reeves is a Canadian actor whose most celebrated roles were a metalhead in “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989), a cop in “Speed” (1994) and the main antagonist Neo in “The Matrix” series of films. Although Reeves is a Canadian national, he was born in Beirut, Lebanon. Reeves has some Hawaiian descent, and the name “Keanu” is Hawaiian for “the coldness”.

“John Wick” is a 2014 action movie starring Keanu Reeves in the title role. Reeves plays a retired hitman who goes on a killing spree to avenge the murder of his dog.

121. “With Reagan” memoirist : ED MEESE
Ed Meese was born in Oakland, California just down the road here and spent 24 years in the office of the Treasurer of Alameda County, the county in which I live. After military service, Meese earned himself a law degree at UC Berkeley. Later, as Chief of Staff for President Reagan, he was instrumental in a famous decision to crack down on student protesters at Berkeley which resulted in one protester dying and a two-week occupation of the city by the California National Guard.

123. One in a tight spot? : SARDINE
We use the idiom “packed in like sardines” to mean “extremely crowded”. The idea is that sardines are usually packed very closely together in cans.

Sardines are oily fish related to herrings. Sardines are also known as pilchards, although in the UK “sardine” is a noun reserved for a young pilchard. Very confusing …

Down
2. Embroidery loop : PICOT
A picot is a loop of thread, either for function or for decoration, at the edge of some knitted or tatted material.

4. Emulated Diana Ross (1970) and Justin Timberlake (2002) : WENT SOLO
Diana Ross is one of the most prolific recording artists in history. She sang with the Supremes from 1959 to 1970 and then launched an incredibly successful solo career. Ross was listed in the 1993 edition of “The Guinness Book of World Records” as the most successful music artist ever, with eighteen #1 records.

Justin Timberlake got his break by appearing on TV’s “Star Search” from which he was given a starring role in “The New Mickey Mouse Club”. It was on “The New Mickey Mouse Club” that he met his future girlfriend Britney Spears, as well JC Chasez who would join Timberlake in the lineup of the boy band ‘N Sync.

6. Roxy Music co-founder : ENO
Roxy Music is a British band formed by Bryan Ferry, who also served as the lead singer. One of the group’s more famous former band members was Brian Eno, someone who turns up in crosswords far too often …

8. French sister : SOEUR
“Soeur” is the French word for “sister’. “Frère” is the French word for “brother”.

9. They may be bookmarked : URLS
Internet addresses (like NYTCrossword.com and LAXCrossword.com) are more correctly called Uniform Resource Locators (URLs).

10. “The Family Circus” cartoonist Keane : BIL
Bil Keane is a cartoonist most associated with his strip “The Family Circus”. Once Bil sketches out the text and idea for the cartoon, he sends it off to his son Jeff Keane who inks and colors the pictures so that the strip is ready for publication. In the storyline itself, the main characters are based on Bil’s own family. In fact, the son “Jeffy” in the story is based on Jeff, Bil’s son and production assistant.

13. Republican politico Michael : STEELE
Michael Steele served as Chairman of the Republican National Committee from 2009 to 2011 and was the first African American to fill the post.

15. National Do Not Call Registry overseer, for short : FTC
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) was established in 1914 with the mission of protecting consumers. The FTC runs the National Do Not Call Registry which can limit the amount of telemarketing calls that consumers receive. To register your number, simply go to the website www.donotcall.gov.

16. Ancient galley : TRIREME
Triremes were galleys used in the Mediterranean by a number of cultures, including the Ancient Greeks and Romans. The trireme was so called because there were three rows of oars on each side of the vessel. The term “trireme” comes from the Latin “tres remi” meaning “three-oar”. There was also a less ambitious version of the trireme that had only two banks of oars, and that was known as a bireme.

19. Gen ___ : XERS
The term Generation X originated in the UK where it was the name of a book by Jane Deverson. Her book detailed the results of a study of British youths in 1964, contrasting their lifestyle to those of previous generations. It was Canadian author Douglas Coupland who was responsible for popularizing the term, with his more successful publication “Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture”. By the latest accepted definition, Gen-Xers were born between 1961 and 1981.

24. Silents star Bara : THEDA
A “vamp” (short for vampire) is a seductive woman. The term was first used in reference to the sultry performance of actress Theda Bara in the 1915 film “A Fool There Was”. The movie’s title is a quotation from Rudyard Kipling’s 1897 poem “The Vampire”. Bara’s role was positioned as a “vampire”, a woman out to seduce a man, launching the use of “vamp” as an alternative term for a “femme fatale”.

37. Former A.L. manager who was an N.L. M.V.P. : TORRE
As a manager, Joe Torre was part of four World Series wins, all of them with the New York Yankees baseball team. Torre is an Italian American who was born in Brooklyn, New York. During the run up (pun intended!) to the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Torre carried the Olympic flame part of the way through Florence in Italy, handing it over to the next runner at the famous Ponte Vecchio. I’d guess that was quite a thrill for him …

43. She’s asked “When will those clouds all disappear?” in a 1973 #1 hit : ANGIE
For my money, “Angie” is the greatest ballad ever performed by the Rolling Stones. Despite rumors to the contrary, “Angie” doesn’t refer to a particular woman. If fact, songwriter Keith Richard says that “Angie” is a pseudonym for heroin, and the lyrics tell of his efforts to get off the drug at a detox facility in Switzerland.

48. Per ___ : DIEM
“Per diem” is the Latin for “by the day”. We tend to use the term for a daily allowance for expenses when traveling for work.

54. Popular après-ski place : SAUNA
As my Finnish-American wife will tell you, “sauna” is a Finnish word, and is correctly pronounced “sow-nah” (with “sow” as in the female pig).

Après-ski is a French term, meaning “after skiing”, and refers to the good times to be had after coming off the slopes.

55. Spot in the afternoon? : TEA
I guess the reference here is to the oft quoted English phrase “a spot of tea”. Mind you, I’ve only ever heard that said in jest …

57. Janvier, across the Pyrenees : ENERO
In Spanish, a year (año) starts in January (Enero) and ends in December (Diciembre).

“Janvier” is French for “January”.

The Pyrénées is a mountain range that runs along the border between Spain and France. Nestled between the two countries, high in the mountains, is the lovely country of Andorra, an old haunt of my family during skiing season …

68. Subway Series team : METS
The term “Subway Series” has been used to describe World Series baseball games when both participating teams are based in New York.

The New York Mets baseball team was founded in 1962, a replacement for two teams that the city had lost, namely the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants. For several years the Mets played very poorly, finishing no better than second-to-last in their division. Then of course along came the “Miracle Mets” who beat the Baltimore Orioles in 1969 to claim the World Series in a huge upset.

70. Lovely but stupid person? : OBTUSE ANGEL (from “obtuse angle”)
An acute angle is less than 90 degrees, less than a right angle. On obtuse angle is greater than the right angle.

71. U.S. city whose name becomes another city’s name if you change both its vowels to A’s : TEMPE
Tempe is a city in the metropolitan area of Phoenix. The city is named for the Vale of Tempe in Greece.

The Florida city of Tampa has been known as the Big Guava since the seventies. The term is imitative of New York’s “Big Apple”, and refers to the unsuccessful search for the reported wild guava trees that were once hoped to be the basis of a new industry for the area.

72. Kiss drummer Peter : CRISS
KISS is a hard rock band from New York City. KISS is the group whose band members use all that scary face paint and wear wacky outfits on stage.

74. Reach the Mediterranean, say? : PASS GO
Mediterranean Avenue is a property in the game of Monopoly. The street names in the US version of Monopoly are locations in or around Atlantic City, New Jersey.

79. Canine cousin : MOLAR
Molars are grinding teeth. The term “molar” comes from the Latin “mola” meaning “millstone”.

The canine teeth of a mammal are also called the eye teeth. The name “canine” is used because these particular teeth are very prominent in dogs. The name “eye” is used because in humans the eye teeth are located in the upper jaw, directly below the eyes.

80. “Dallas” family name : EWING
The TV soap “Dallas” revolved around the Ewings family. The series that ran for 13 years was originally intended as a five-part mini-series, with the main characters being newlyweds Bobby and Pam Ewing. The devious character in the piece, Bobby’s brother J. R., became so popular with audiences that the series was extended with J. R. at the center of the story. The original show ran from 1978 to 1991, and a revival was made starting in 2012. The new version of “Dallas” includes some of the old characters, such as Bobby and Pam Ewing, as wellas J.R. Ewing. Larry Hagman, who played J. R., passed away at the end of 2012.

81. Race in classic science fiction : ELOI
In the 1895 novel by H. G. Wells called “The Time Machine”, there are two races that the hero encounter in his travels into the future. The Eloi are the “beautiful people” who live on the planet’s surface. The Morlocks are a race of cannibals living underground who use the Eloi as food.

82. “Whirlybird” source : MAPLE TREE
“Helicopter seed” and “whirlybird” are familiar names given to a type of fruit more correctly called a samara. A samara has a flattened wing or wings made of papery tissue from the ovary wall. These wings enable the wind to carry the seed farther from the parent tree.

85. Caspian Sea feeder : URAL
The Ural River rises in the Ural Mountains in Russia and flows for half its length through Russian territory until it crosses the border into Kazakhstan, finally emptying into the Caspian Sea.

86. Trojan horse, e.g. : RUSE
The story of the Wooden Horse of Troy is told in the Virgil’s poem “The Aeneid”. According to the tale, the city of Troy finally fell to Greeks after a siege that had lasted for ten years. In a ruse, the Greeks sailed away in apparent defeat, leaving behind a large wooden horse. Inside the horse were hidden 30 crack soldiers. When the horse was dragged into the city as a victory trophy, the soldiers sneaked out and opened the city’s gates. The Greeks returned under cover of night and entered the open city.

92. Like the Parthenon : PILLARED
The Parthenon is ruined temple that sits on the Athenian Acropolis. Although the Parthenon was dedicated to the goddess Athena as a sacred building in the days of the Athenian Empire, it was actually used primarily as a treasury. In later centuries, the Parthenon was repurposed as a Christian Church dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and was used as a mosque after Ottoman conquest.

96. Did a 1930s dance : LINDIED
The Lindy Hop is a dance based on the Charleston and dates back to the twenties and thirties. The name Lindy is a homage to the famous 1927 flight across the Atlantic by Charles Lindbergh.

100. Luxor Temple deity : AMEN-RA
Amun (also Amon, Amen and “Amun-Ra”) was a god in Egyptian mythology. Amun lends his name to our word “ammonia”. This is because the Romans called the ammonium chloride that they collected near the Temple of Jupiter Amun, “sal ammoniacus” (salt of Amun).

The modern city of Luxor grew up around the ruins of the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes. Thebes was the city of the god Amon-Ra and was the religious capital of the country until the Greeks took control. Luxor is often called “the world’s greatest open-air museum”. Tourists flock there to see the Luxor and Karnak Temple ruins, as well as the Valley of the Kings and the Valley of the Queens immediately opposite Luxor on the other side of the River Nile.

105. Ryan of old TV : IRENE
Irene Ryan was the wonderful American actress who played “Granny” on “The Beverly Hillbillies”. Ryan was remarkable in that she had a successful career in vaudeville, on radio and television, on film and on Broadway.

109. Fifth Avenue retailer : SAKS
Saks Fifth Avenue is a high-end specialty store that competes with the likes of Bloomingdales and Neiman Marcus. The original Saks & Company business was founded by Andrew Saks in 1867. The first Saks Fifth Avenue store was opened on Fifth Avenue in New York City in 1924. There are now Saks Fifth Avenue stores in many major cities in the US, as well in several locations worldwide.

111. Campaign grps. : PACS
A Political Action Committee (PAC) is a private group that works to influence the outcome of a particular election or group of elections. Any group becomes a PAC by law when it receives or spends more than $1,000 for the purpose of influencing the outcome of an election. In 2010 the Supreme Court ruled that PACS that did not make direct contributions to candidates or parties could accept unlimited contributions. These “independent-expenditure only committees” are commonly referred to as “super PACs”.

112. Backwoods con? : AGIN
If you’re not “fer” (for), then you could be “agin” (against).

113. Heavyweight bouts? : SUMO
Sumo is a sport that is practiced professionally only in Japan, the country of its origin. There is an international federation of sumo wrestling now, and one of the organization’s aims is to have the sport accepted as an Olympic event.

115. Indigo Girls, e.g. : DUO
Indigo Girls are a folk rock music duo made up of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers. Ray and Saliers are considered icons in the LGBT community as both identified themselves as lesbians a long time ago, although they have never been a couple.

117. Commercial lead-in to Pen : EPI-
EpiPen is a brand name of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, usually for the treatment of an allergic reaction.

118. Lead-in to meter : ODO-
An odometer measures distance traveled. The word derives from the Greek “hodos” meaning “path” and “metron” meaning “measure”.

Share today’s solution with a friend:
FacebookTwitterGoogleEmail

Return to top of page

For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Hairstyle that usually involves clips or pins : UPSWEEP
8. Confidentially : SUB ROSA
15. N.J. Army base : FT DIX
20. “Beautiful!” : NICE ONE!
21. Points in the right direction : ORIENTS
22. “Let’s stop fighting, O.K.?” : TRUCE?
23. “Those wreaths all look the same to me!”? : I CANNOT TELL A LEI (from “I cannot tell a lie”)
25. Something hard to drink? : CIDER
26. Law school class : TORTS
27. Start of a conclusion : THUS
28. Satisfies : MEETS
30. Sales force, informally : REPS
31. Summers on the Seine : ETES
32. Convention closing? : -EER
33. ___ black : COAL
34. Cutlass model of the 1980s-’90s : CIERA
36. Senile sort : DOTARD
39. Start of an oral listing of African nations, perhaps? : YOU’VE GOT MALI (from “You’ve got mail”)
42. Texas home of the Bears : BAYLOR
44. One small sip : A TASTE
46. Store : ARSENAL
47. Asked to come back, in a way : ENCORED
49. “Over There” subj. : WWI
50. VCR button : REW
51. D halved : CCL
52. Alternative to JFK : LGA
53. Showing less cleavage? : RAISING THE BRA (from “raising the bar”)
58. “Watch it!” : HEY!
59. Many a critic’s preference : AISLE SEAT
61. Superbright : NEON
62. Mrs., abroad : SRA
64. Himalayan myth : YETI
65. Remote button : MUTE
67. “Lemme ___!” : AT ‘EM!
69. March org.? : ROTC
73. Rally killers in baseball: Abbr. : DPS
76. “Warm” : NEAR
78. “There was the time …” : I REMEMBER …
81. Middle of summer? : EMS
84. Cheap roadside assistance? : A QUARTER TO TOW (from “a quarter to two”)
87. “I don’t need to hear that,” informally : TMI
88. Skip town : LAM
89. Big ___ : SUR
90. Stick in a rack : CUE
91. Mistakes : SLIP-UPS
93. Setting for most of “Moby-Dick” : OPEN SEA
95. Kind of TV : PLASMA
98. Liqueur flavorers : ANISES
99. Knockoff dress labeled “Armani,” say? : ILLEGAL A-LINE (from “illegal alien”)
101. Rob : BURGLE
103. Popular Hispanic newspaper name : EL SOL
104. Rider’s handful : MANE
105. Son of, in foreign names : IBN
106. Have legs : LAST
109. E.R. “A.S.A.P.” : STAT
110. Devote : SPEND
112. Longtime Yankee nickname : A-ROD
113. Less loopy : SANER
114. Ban competition : ARRID
116. Caution to an orphan girl not to leave her wildebeest behind? : ANNIE GET YOUR GNU (from “Annie Get Your Gun”)
119. Reeves of “John Wick” : KEANU
120. Enter stealthily : CREEP IN
121. “With Reagan” memoirist : ED MEESE
122. Ready followers? : SET GO
123. One in a tight spot? : SARDINE
124. Did some edgy writing? : DOODLED

Down
1. Get together : UNITE
2. Embroidery loop : PICOT
3. Group of actors who all have stage fright? : SCAREDY CAST (from “scaredy cats”)
4. Emulated Diana Ross (1970) and Justin Timberlake (2002) : WENT SOLO
5. How long it takes mountains to form : EONS
6. Roxy Music co-founder : ENO
7. Attentive dog owner : PETTER
8. French sister : SOEUR
9. They may be bookmarked : URLS
10. “The Family Circus” cartoonist Keane : BIL
11. Castigate : REAM OUT
12. Away, in a way : ON LEAVE
13. Republican politico Michael : STEELE
14. “___ happens …” : AS IT
15. National Do Not Call Registry overseer, for short : FTC
16. Ancient galley : TRIREME
17. Western vacation spot : DUDE RANCH
18. Winter carnival attraction : ICE PALACE
19. Gen ___ : XERS
24. Silents star Bara : THEDA
29. They put points on the board : SCORERS
33. Help to secure a loan, maybe : COSIGN
35. “Them’s fightin’ words!” : IT’S WAR!
37. Former A.L. manager who was an N.L. M.V.P. : TORRE
38. Geometric figures : AREAS
39. Have a big mouth? : YAWN
40. Attire : GARB
41. In a bad way : ILLY
42. Secure, as a sailor’s rope : BELAY
43. She’s asked “When will those clouds all disappear?” in a 1973 #1 hit : ANGIE
45. Where many people may follow you : TWITTER
48. Per ___ : DIEM
54. Popular après-ski place : SAUNA
55. Spot in the afternoon? : TEA
56. Product that’s hard to keep in stock : HOT ITEM
57. Janvier, across the Pyrenees : ENERO
60. Cap : LID
63. Supply with weaponry : ARM
66. Put away : EAT
68. Subway Series team : METS
70. Lovely but stupid person? : OBTUSE ANGEL (from “obtuse angle”)
71. U.S. city whose name becomes another city’s name if you change both its vowels to A’s : TEMPE
72. Kiss drummer Peter : CRISS
74. Reach the Mediterranean, say? : PASS GO
75. Pig sounds : SQUEALS
77. Fix, as some lawn chairs : RECANE
79. Canine cousin : MOLAR
80. “Dallas” family name : EWING
81. Race in classic science fiction : ELOI
82. “Whirlybird” source : MAPLE TREE
83. Suspect duplicity : SMELL A RAT
85. Caspian Sea feeder : URAL
86. Trojan horse, e.g. : RUSE
92. Like the Parthenon : PILLARED
94. Fitting one inside the other : NESTING
95. Appointment book : PLANNER
96. Did a 1930s dance : LINDIED
97. Big brother : ABBOT
100. Luxor Temple deity : AMEN-RA
102. Natural : UNDYED
105. Ryan of old TV : IRENE
107. Intuit : SENSE
108. Straight, now : TRUED
109. Fifth Avenue retailer : SAKS
111. Campaign grps. : PACS
112. Backwoods con? : AGIN
113. Heavyweight bouts? : SUMO
115. Indigo Girls, e.g. : DUO
117. Commercial lead-in to Pen : EPI-
118. Lead-in to meter : ODO-

Return to top of page

The Best of the New York Times Crossword Collections
Amazon.com Widgets

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.