0310-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Mar 13, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Finn Vigeland
THEME: Condensation … there’s a drop of water replacing several letters in today’s grid. That drop is represented by a black disk in my grid, and is read as WATER in the across answers, and as HHO (i.e. H2O) in the down answers:

27A. Subject of big 1970s headlines : WATERGATE SCANDAL
35A. The second African-American, after Hattie McDaniel, to be nominated for an Oscar : ETHEL WATERS
50A. Seltzer : CARBONATED WATER
67A. Best Picture inspired by a Pulitzer-winning series of newspaper articles : ON THE WATERFRONT
85A. Necklace decoration that’s not from the sea : FRESHWATER PEARL
102A. Coastal structures countering erosion : BREAKWATERS
109A. Historic event on June 18, 1815 : BATTLE OF WATERLOO
1D. Refuse to hand over : WITHHOLD
14D. Last possible moment : ELEVENTH HOUR
16D. Ski mask feature : MOUTH HOLE
51D. Where people are always changing? : BATHHOUSE
68D. What an optimist has : HIGH HOPES
80D. “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” song : HEIGH-HO
84D. Prominent features of the theme from “Star Wars” : FRENCH HORNS

COMPLETION TIME: 26m 17s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 2 … SANO (sane), SCHOTT (Schett)

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

1. Direct descendant of the Mayflower Pilgrims, e.g. : WASP
The not-so-nice term “WASP”, standing for White Anglo-Saxon Protestant, is used for Americans with a relatively high position in society, and usually of British descent.

5. Way up a mountain : T-BAR
A T-bar is a type of ski lift in which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, a similar device, but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

9. Dutch flower : TULIP
We usually associate the cultivation of tulips with the Netherlands, but they were first grown commercially in the Ottoman Empire. The name “tulip” ultimately derives from the Ottoman Turkish word “tulbend” which means “muslin, gauze”.

14. Humorist Bombeck : ERMA
Erma Bombeck wrote for newspapers for about 35 years, producing more than 4,000 witty and humorous columns describing her home life in suburbia.

18. Sun Valley locale : IDAHO
The resort city of Sun Valley, Idaho was developed by W. Averell Harriman in the 1930s as he was convinced that there was a call for a winter resort destination after the success of the 1932 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York. A 220-room hotel called the Sun Valley Lodge was opened in 1936, quickly followed by the Swiss-style Sun Valley Inn in 1937. Sun Valley became home to the world’s first chairlifts, installed in 1936, a replacement for rope tows.

20. Tony of the Dallas Cowboys : ROMO
Tony Romo is a quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys.

21. Lancaster County folk : AMISH
The Amish are a group of Christian churches, a sub-group of the Mennonite churches. The Amish church originated in Switzerland and Alsace in 1693 when it was founded by Jakob Ammann. It was Ammann who gave the name to the Amish people. Many Amish people came to Pennsylvania in the 18th century.

22. Kings of ___ (“Use Somebody” band) : LEON
Kings of Leon is an American rock band formed in Nashville, Tennessee in 1999. The band members are all related to each other and chose the group’s name in honor of their common grandfather whose given name is Leon.

24. Puccini piece : ARIA
Giacomo Puccini is was an Italian composer, famous for his operas that are so often performed all over the world. Included in the list of his works are “La bohème”, “Tosca”, “Madama Butterfly” and “Turandot”. Puccini died in Brussels, Belgium in 1924 having suffered from throat cancer. An audience attending a performance of “La bohème” in Rome heard of the composer’s death in the middle of the performance. At the news, the opera was stopped, and the orchestra instead played Chopin’s “Funeral March”.

27. Subject of big 1970s headlines : WATERGATE SCANDAL
The Watergate scandal is so named because it involved a break-in at the Democratic National Committee (DNC) headquarters in the Watergate office complex in Washington, D.C. The Watergate complex is made up of five units, three of which are apartment buildings, one an office building, and one a hotel-office building (which housed the DNC headquarters). Watergate led to the “-gate” suffix being used for many subsequent scandals.

31. Adriatic resort : LIDO
The Lido di Venezia is a famous sandbar, about 11 km long, in Venice, Italy. It may be a sandbar, but it is home to about 20,000 residents, as well as the Venice Film Festival that takes place there every September. The Lido is also the setting for Thomas Mann’s famous novel “Death in Venice”. The name “lido” has become a term for any fashionable beach resort.

35. The second African-American, after Hattie McDaniel, to be nominated for an Oscar : ETHEL WATERS
Ethel Waters was a singer and actress. Waters was the second African American to be nominated for an Academy Award (after Hattie McDaniel). She received the nomination as Best Supporting Actress in 1949, for her performance in the film “Pinky” in which she played the title character’s grandmother.

39. Old TV’s ___ Club : PTL
“The PTL Club” was a daily television show hosted by TV evangelists Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker. PTL is short for both “Praise the Lord” and “People that Love”. The show ended its run of over ten years in 1987 when it was revealed that Jim Bakker was involvement in financial and sexual scandals. Bakker served 5 years in jail, part of an 18-year sentence.

40. Hero of a Hindu epic : RAMA
In the Hindu tradition, the god known as Vishnu has seven different avatars i.e. incarnations or manifestations. Rama is the seventh of these avatars.

43. Papal court : HOLY SEE
Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

46. ___ Bo : TAE
Tae Bo isn’t an ancient martial art, and rather was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s. The discipline was introduced by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of “taekwondo” and “boxing”.

50. Seltzer : CARBONATED WATER
The name “seltzer” comes from the village of Selters in Germany. Selters has natural springs of carbonated mineral water that is bottled and sold as Selters water. In English-speaking countries the name has morphed into “Seltzer” water.

53. Many altar paintings of the Middle Ages : TRIPTYCHS
A triptych is a work of art divided into three panels. The word “triptych” comes from the Greek adjective for “three-fold”.

57. Onetime art glass manufacturer : STEUBEN
Steuben Glass Works was a manufacturer of art glass that was founded in 1903 and was shut down not so long ago, in 2011. The glass factory was located in Corning, New York. The city of Corning is in Steuben County, giving the company its name.

61. Rock subgenre : EMO
The musical genre of “emo” originated in Washington D.C. in the 80s, and takes its name from “emotional hardcore”. Not my cup of tea …

62. Not loco : SANO
In Spanish, if one isn’t sane (sano) one might be described as crazy (loco).

67. Best Picture inspired by a Pulitzer-winning series of newspaper articles : ON THE WATERFRONT
The 1954 drama “On the Waterfront”, starring Marlon Brando, told a story of violence and corruption among longshoremen, and was based on a series of 24 articles written by investigative journalist Malcolm Johnston and published in “The New York Sun”. The original news stories uncovered mob infiltration on the New York City Waterfront, but in the film the location was changed to Hoboken, New Jersey.

71. Sporty cars : GTS
GT stands for “Grand Touring” or “Gran Turismo”.

72. In other words : ID EST
i.e. = id est = that is …

75. Book after II Timothy : TITUS
The “Epistle of Paul to Titus” is one the Book of the New Testament in the Christian Bible. Saint Titus was a companion of Saint Paul, and is known today as the patron saint of the US Army Chaplain Corps.

76. Sitcom diner : MEL’S
The TV sitcom “Alice” ran from 1976 to 1985, a story about a widow named Alice who takes a job at Mel’s Diner. The show was based on a very successful 1974 movie called “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore” directed by Martin Scorsese (his first Hollywood production) and starring Ellen Burstyn and Kris Kristofferson.

79. Femme fatale of cartoons : NATASHA
Natasha Fatale is a cartoon character who hangs out with Rocky and Bullwinkle in the cartoon series from the sixties. Natasha is a spy in the cartoon storylines, hence the “Fatale” name.

82. Director Van Sant : GUS
Gus Van Sant is a movie director (among other things) who has been nominated twice for an Oscar, for “Good Will Hunting” in 1997 and for “Milk” in 2008.

91. Places to eat a late breakfast, maybe : IHOPS
The International House of Pancakes (IHOP) was founded back in 1958. IHOP was originally intended to be called IHOE, the International House of Eggs, but that name didn’t do too well in marketing tests …

95. Sound at a checkup : AHH
Open wide and say “Ahh” …

97. Unilever soap brand : LUX
The British company Lever Brothers introduced a brand of household soap known as Sunlight in 1884. A flaked version of Sunlight was then introduced first in India, under the brand name “Lux”. The same name was used when the product was launched in the US in 1916. The flaked form of soap meant that much less lye was needed as an ingredient, making a “gentler” product. So, in the US, the original marketing hook was to use Lux for laundering a woman’s “delicates” without fear of lye yellowing the satins and silks.

104. Tale written in runes, perhaps : SAGA
A rune is a character in an alphabet that is believed to have mysterious powers. In Norse mythology, the runic alphabet was said to have a divine origin.

106. Unconvincing reason, informally : CUZ
“Cuz” is a slang abbreviation for “because”.

107. ___ Islands : COOK
The Cook Islands is a grouping of 15 small islands in the South Pacific that is an associated state with New Zealand. under this arrangement, New Zealand is responsible for the defense of the Cook Islands and represents them on the world stage. Cook Islanders are citizens of New Zealand, but they are also Cook Island nationals. The Cook Islands have their own democratically elected parliament and are self-governed.

108. Pong maker : ATARI
Do you remember the arcade video game that was like a game of tennis, with paddles moving up and down to hit what looked like a ball, over what looked like a net? Well, that was “Pong”.

109. Historic event on June 18, 1815 : BATTLE OF WATERLOO
The Battle of Waterloo was fought in 1815 between the Imperial French army led by Emperor Napoleon and an Anglo-Allied army led by the Irish-born British Field Marshal, the Duke of Wellington. Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo led to his abdication and the restoration of King Louis XVIII to the throne of France. Bonaparte was exiled to the British-owned island of Saint Helena in the South Atlantic, where he died in 1821.

112. Like many Playboy Playmate photos : AIRBRUSHED
The term “centerfold”, as it is now used to describe a nude model pictured in the center pages of a magazine, was first coined by Hugh Hefner, founder of “Playboy” magazine. “Playboy’s” first centerfold was Marilyn Monroe, appearing in the debut issue in 1953. In that first issue, Monroe was given the title of “Sweetheart of the Month”. In January of 1954, the centerfold was Margie Harrison, the first model to be given the title of “Playmate of the Month”. Nowadays a “Playmate of the Month” is apparently paid $25,000 for posing, and the “Playmate of the Year” gets another $100,000, and a car, and a motorcycle.

118. Actress Eleniak : ERIKA
Erika Eleniak is a former Playboy Playmate from Glendale, California. After modeling, Eleniak turned to acting and is perhaps best known for playing Shauni McClain on the TV show “Baywatch”.

119. Greek war goddess : ENYO
Enyo was a Greek goddess of war, a companion to the war god Ares. Enyo was also the sister of Ares, and the daughter of Zeus and Hera.

120. SeaWorld resident : SHAMU
Shamu was the name of the third orca, or killer whale, ever to be featured in a public exhibition. Shamu starred in a popular SeaWorld show in San Diego in the sixties. After she died in 1971, her name lived on as the name “Shamu” is still used by SeaWorld for its killer whale shows. That original Shamu was retired after she grabbed and refused to let go of the leg of one of her trainers.

121. Irish county : CORK
County Cork in is in the southwest of Ireland, and takes its name from Cork, the country’s “second city”. County Cork has many claims to fame. For example, it is home to Cobh, the port where many emigrants set off to the US, Canada and Australia. Nearby is the Royal Cork Yacht Club in Crosshaven, the oldest yacht club in the world (founded in 1720). And Cobh was the last port of call for the Titanic on its fateful crossing of the Atlantic.

125. Chop ___ : SUEY
Many believe that the Chinese dish known as chop suey was invented in America, by Chinese immigrants. In fact, by the time it showed up in the US it already existed in the Taishan district of Guangdong in southeast China, the origin of many of those immigrants. “Chop suey” translates as “assorted pieces”, and is made up of some meat and eggs quickly cooked with vegetables in a thickened sauce.

Down
2. Slowly : ADAGIO
An adagio is a piece of music with a slow tempo. The “adagio” marking on the score is an instruction to play the piece slowly and in a stately manner. The word adagio is Latin for “at ease”.

3. ___ niçoise : SALADE
A Niçoise salad is known as a salade Niçoise in its native France, where it was named for the city of Nice in the south of the country. The original contains no cooked vegetables, but here in North America there are almost always included some boiled potatoes.

5. Gothic window ornamentation : TRACERY
Tracery is the name given to the ornamental stonework that supports the glass in a Gothic window.

6. Cleansing agent : BORAX
Borax is also known as sodium borate, and is a salt of boric acid. Borax is a white powder that dissolves easily in water. The compound has many uses, for example as an antifungal agent and an antiseptic.

7. Bygone Ugandan tyrant : AMIN
Idi Amin received most of his military training in the British armed forces, eventually achieving the highest rank possible for a Black African in the British Colonial Army in 1959, that of Warrant Officer. On his return to Uganda Amin joined his country’s military and quickly rose to the rank of Deputy Commander of the Army. During that time he was quite the athlete. He was a noted rugby player and swimmer, and for nine years held the Ugandan national light-heavyweight boxing title. By the early seventies, Amin was commander of all the armed forces of Uganda and in 1971 seized power in a military coup, displacing the country’s president Milton Obote. There followed seven years of brutal rule by Amin during which it is estimated that between 100,000 and 500,000 people were murdered. Amin was ousted from power in 1979 after a war with Tanzania, and fled to Libya where he stayed for a year. He then moved to Saudi Arabia, where he was financially supported by the Saudi Royal Family for the remainder of his life. Amin died in 2003.

8. MG, e.g. : ROADSTER
My neighbor used to keep his MG Midget roadster in my garage (away from his kids!) back in Ireland many moons ago. The Midget was produced by MG division of the British Motor Corporation from 1961 to 1979, with the MG acronym standing for “Morris Garages”.

9. Marvin Gaye’s record label : TAMLA
Tamla Records was started in 1959 by Berry Gordy, Jr. Gordy started a second record label the following year, Motown …

10. Actress Thurman : UMA
Robert Thurman was the first westerner to be ordained a Tibetan Buddhist monk. Robert raised his children in the Tibetan Buddhist tradition and called his daughter “Uma” as it is a phonetic spelling of the Buddhist name “Dbuma”.

11. D.M.V. issue : LIC
In most states, the government agency responsible for vehicle registration and the issuing of drivers licenses is called the DMV. This acronym usually stands for the Department of Motor Vehicles, but there are “variations on the theme”. For example, in Arizona the responsible agency is called the Motor Vehicle Division (MVD), and in Colorado the familiar acronym DMV stands for “Division” of Motor Vehicles.

13. Symbol of the golden ratio : PHI
The golden ratio, denoted by the Greek letter phi, is a mathematical constant that often turns up in the world of art. Phi is approximately equal to 1.61, and is represented by the two distances, a and b, where (a+b)/a = a/b. Somehow we perceive the ratio of 1.61 as “pleasing” so it appears in many works of art and in building design. For example, many aspects of the Parthenon in Athens have the ratio of 1.61 (width compared to height). Leonardo da Vinci’s famous drawing of the Vitruvian Man also illustrates the golden ratio in the proportions of the human body, where he shows that the distance from the foot to the navel, compared to the distance from the navel to the head, is 1.61.

17. Queen ___ lace : ANNE’S
What we call “Queen Anne’s Lace” over here in the US is known by many in the British Isles as “wild carrot”. The roots of Queen Anne’s Lace are indeed edible, just like carrots, but only when they are very young because later in life they get very woody. The wild carrot was given the name Queen Anne’s Lace when it was introduced into America as the flowers do resemble white lace. There is one small red flower in the center of the plant that is said to be a drop of blood that Queen Anne spilled when she pricked herself as she was making the lace.

19. 20/20 : ONE
20 divided by 20 equals 1.

26. Japanese drama : NOH
Noh is a form of musical drama in Japan that has been around since the 14th century. Many of the Noh performers are masked, allowing all the roles to be played by men, both male and female parts.

28. Adaptable aircraft, for short : STOL
STOL is an acronym, and stands for Short Take-Off and Landing.

34. HP product : PRINTER
The giant multinational called HP (originally Hewlett-Packard) was founded in 1939 with an investment of $538, in a one-car garage in Palo Alto, California by Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard. The company name would have been Packard-Hewlett if Dave Packard had won a coin toss!

36. “Be quiet,” on scores : TACET
“Tacet” is a musical direction meaning “be silent”. It is typically written on a score to instruct a particular voice or instrument to remain silent for a whole movement. “Tacet” is Latin for “it is silent”.

39. Pasta primavera ingredients : PEAS
Pasta primavera is one of my favorite Italian dishes. It is made of pasta with firm fresh vegetables. Although the origin of the dish is disputed, it almost certainly was created on this side of the Atlantic. “Primavera” is Italian (and Spanish) for the season of spring.

41. Doc grp. : AMA
The American Medical Association (AMA) was founded in 1847 at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia. The first female member was allowed to join the AMA in 1868, but the first African American members weren’t admitted until one hundred years later, in 1968.

44. Marge who owned the Cincinnati Reds : SCHOTT
Marge Schott was the controversial owner of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team from 1984 to 1999. Schott was banned from managing the team from 1996 to 1998 due to statements she made supporting Adolf Hitler and Nazi party policies.

48. Fleet : ARMADA
The most famous Armada was the Spanish fleet that sailed against England in order to overthrow Queen Elizabeth I in 1588. It failed in its mission, partly due to bad weather encountered en route. Ironically, the English mounted a similar naval attack against Spain the following year, and it failed as well.

49. N.Y.U. athlete : VIOLET
The Violets are the sports teams of New York University. The nickname comes from the violet and white colors the teams have worn for over a hundred years.

52. One coming out : DEB
Deb is short for “debutante”, which translates from French as “female beginner”.

54. N.B.A. star Ming : YAO
Yao Ming is a retired professional basketball player from Shanghai who played for the Houston Rockets. At 7’6″, Yao was the tallest man playing in the NBA.

55. “AC360” channel : CNN
“AC360” is the shortened title to the CNN news show “Anderson Cooper 360”.

Anderson Cooper is a great news personality on CNN and on various shows around the dial. My favorite appearances of his, although he would call them trivial I am sure, was as host of a great reality game show called “The Mole” that aired in 2001.

58. Nabob : BIGWIG
A nabob is a person of wealth and prominence. “Nabob” derives from the title of a governor in India.

60. Like matryoshka dolls : NESTED
Matryoshka dolls are those wooden nesting dolls that are on sale at every tourist trap across Russia. “Matryoshka” is Russian for “little matron”.

64. Horn of Africa resident : SOMALI
The Horn of Africa is that horn-shaped peninsula at the easternmost tip of the continent, containing the countries Eritrea, Djibouti, Ethiopia as well as Somalia. The Horn of Africa is also known as the Somali Peninsula.

70. Antique restorer’s “touch,” in brief : TLC
Tender loving care (TLC).

74. Old Dungeons & Dragons co. : TSR
Dungeons & Dragons is a complex role-playing game first published in 1974, by Tactical Studies Rules Incorporated (TSR). Dungeons & Dragons was probably the first of the modern role-playing games to be developed, and the most successful. It is still played by lots of people today, including my nerdy son …

77. Coach Don with two Super Bowl victories : SHULA
Don Shula is a former football player and coach. Shula appeared as head coach in a record six Super Bowls, including a run of three successive Super Bowls (1971-73, winning twice).

80. “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” song : HEIGH-HO
In the original Brothers Grimm fairy tale called “Snow White”, the seven dwarfs were not given any names. The names were added for the 1937 classic Disney film “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”. The seven dwarfs are:

– Doc (the leader of the group)
– Grumpy (that would be me, according to my wife …)
– Happy
– Sleepy
– Bashful
– Sneezy
– Dopey

84. Prominent features of the theme from “Star Wars” : FRENCH HORNS
The “Star Wars” theme was written by John Williams. In fact, Williams composed the musical score for all six of the “Star Wars” movies.

89. Open-faced sandwich topped with a fancy spread : TARTINE
“Tartine” is a fancy name for an open sandwich. “Tartine” is the French for “slice of bread”.

97. N.Y.C. airport : LGA
Fiorello La Guardia was the Mayor of New York from 1934 to 1945, racking up three full terms in office. The famous airport that bears La Guardia’s name was built at his urging, stemming from an incident that took place while he was in office. He was taking a TWA flight to “New York” and was outraged when the plane landed at Newark Airport, in the state of New Jersey. The Mayor demanded that the flight take off again and land at a small airport in Brooklyn. A gaggle of press reporters joined him on the short hop and he gave them a story, urging New Yorkers to support the construction of a new commercial airport within the city’s limits. The new airport, in Queens, opened in 1939 as New York Municipal, often called “LaGuardia” as a nickname. The airport was officially relabeled as “LaGuardia” in 1947.

99. Early stone tool : EOLITH
Eoliths are chipped flint nodules. They were once thought to be the first stone tools, but the general opinion today is that eoliths are produced by natural processes such as glaciation.

100. First-year : ROOKIE
The term “rookie”, used for a raw recruit, first appeared in Rudyard Kipling’s collection of songs and poems called the “Barrack-Room Ballads” originally published in 1892.

101. Toasts : SKOALS
Skoal is a Swedish toast, with roots in the old Norse word “skaal” meaning “cup”.

103. Wine aperitif : KIR
Kir is a French cocktail, made by adding a teaspoon or so of creme de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife (expensive tastes!) is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

105. Former “American Idol” judge : ABDUL
Paula Abdul is primarily a singer and dancer, and someone who endeared herself even more to the American public in recent years as a judge on “American Idol”. She had a famous husband for a couple of years, as she was married to actor Emilio Estevez from 1992-94.

106. Irish county : CLARE
One of my favorite counties in Ireland is Clare, home of the Burren, a beautiful, desolate landscape, as well as the world-famous Cliffs of Moher that greet the Atlantic Ocean.

110. Drop ___ : TROU
“Trou” is short for “trousers”.

113. Kind of connection from a mobile device to a PC : USB
Universal Serial Bus (USB) is an industry standard dealing with how computers and electronic devices connect and communicate, and deal with electrical power through those connections.

116. U.K. record co. : EMI
Emilio Estefan is a Cuban American producer and musician. Emilio is the husband of singer Gloria Estefan.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Direct descendant of the Mayflower Pilgrims, e.g. : WASP
5. Way up a mountain : T-BAR
9. Dutch flower : TULIP
14. Humorist Bombeck : ERMA
18. Sun Valley locale : IDAHO
20. Tony of the Dallas Cowboys : ROMO
21. Lancaster County folk : AMISH
22. Kings of ___ (“Use Somebody” band) : LEON
23. Claw : TALON
24. Puccini piece : ARIA
25. Prop in many an action film : MACHINE GUN
27. Subject of big 1970s headlines : WATERGATE SCANDAL
30. Elliptical : OVATE
31. Adriatic resort : LIDO
32. Western nickname : TEX
33. Exchange : SWAP
35. The second African-American, after Hattie McDaniel, to be nominated for an Oscar : ETHEL WATERS
37. Completes at the request of : DOES FOR
39. Old TV’s ___ Club : PTL
40. Hero of a Hindu epic : RAMA
42. Zip : NIL
43. Papal court : HOLY SEE
45. Ape : MIMIC
46. ___ Bo : TAE
47. Enjoy : SAVOR
50. Seltzer : CARBONATED WATER
53. Many altar paintings of the Middle Ages : TRIPTYCHS
56. Long-distance letters : ATT
57. Onetime art glass manufacturer : STEUBEN
61. Rock subgenre : EMO
62. Not loco : SANO
63. Some college dorm rooms : STIES
65. Pickle juice : BRINE
66. Bud : PAL
67. Best Picture inspired by a Pulitzer-winning series of newspaper articles : ON THE WATERFRONT
71. Sporty cars : GTS
72. In other words : ID EST
75. Book after II Timothy : TITUS
76. Sitcom diner : MEL’S
78. Quipster : WIT
79. Femme fatale of cartoons : NATASHA
82. Director Van Sant : GUS
83. Ignite : CATCH FIRE
85. Necklace decoration that’s not from the sea : FRESHWATER PEARL
88. Pressed upon : URGED
89. 20-20, e.g. : TIE
91. Places to eat a late breakfast, maybe : IHOPS
92. Nitpick : QUIBBLE
95. Sound at a checkup : AHH
96. Means of inheritance : GENE
97. Unilever soap brand : LUX
98. Auto shop offerings : LOANERS
102. Coastal structures countering erosion : BREAKWATERS
104. Tale written in runes, perhaps : SAGA
106. Unconvincing reason, informally : CUZ
107. ___ Islands : COOK
108. Pong maker : ATARI
109. Historic event on June 18, 1815 : BATTLE OF WATERLOO
112. Like many Playboy Playmate photos : AIRBRUSHED
117. Certain nest eggs, for short : IRAS
118. Actress Eleniak : ERIKA
119. Greek war goddess : ENYO
120. SeaWorld resident : SHAMU
121. Irish county : CORK
122. Up to : UNTIL
123. Snookums : DEAR
124. Leaves used in Mediterranean cuisine : BASIL
125. Chop ___ : SUEY
126. Hens and vixens : SHES

Down
1. Refuse to hand over : WITHHOLD
2. Slowly : ADAGIO
3. ___ niçoise : SALADE
4. Software for touch-up artists : PHOTOSHOP
5. Gothic window ornamentation : TRACERY
6. Cleansing agent : BORAX
7. Bygone Ugandan tyrant : AMIN
8. MG, e.g. : ROADSTER
9. Marvin Gaye’s record label : TAMLA
10. Actress Thurman : UMA
11. D.M.V. issue : LIC
12. Relative of -esque : -ISH
13. Symbol of the golden ratio : PHI
14. Last possible moment : ELEVENTH HOUR
15. Robes, scepters and such : REGALIA
16. Ski mask feature : MOUTH HOLE
17. Queen ___ lace : ANNE’S
19. 20/20 : ONE
26. Japanese drama : NOH
28. Adaptable aircraft, for short : STOL
29. Cobbler’s tool : AWL
34. HP product : PRINTER
35. Gives off : EMITS
36. “Be quiet,” on scores : TACET
38. Line of defense? : FORTS
39. Pasta primavera ingredients : PEAS
41. Doc grp. : AMA
44. Marge who owned the Cincinnati Reds : SCHOTT
45. Recurring ideas : MOTIFS
47. Intervene : STEP IN
48. Fleet : ARMADA
49. N.Y.U. athlete : VIOLET
51. Where people are always changing? : BATHHOUSE
52. One coming out : DEB
54. N.B.A. star Ming : YAO
55. “AC360” channel : CNN
58. Nabob : BIGWIG
59. Unabridged : ENTIRE
60. Like matryoshka dolls : NESTED
63. Frame jobs : SETUPS
64. Horn of Africa resident : SOMALI
68. What an optimist has : HIGH HOPES
69. Kind of income : NET
70. Antique restorer’s “touch,” in brief : TLC
73. Sanctuary : SAFE HARBOR
74. Old Dungeons & Dragons co. : TSR
77. Coach Don with two Super Bowl victories : SHULA
80. “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” song : HEIGH-HO
81. Word on either side of “to” : ASHES
83. Pivotal point : CRUX
84. Prominent features of the theme from “Star Wars” : FRENCH HORNS
86. Cupcake : HON
87. Swimming, diving, etc. : AQUATICS
89. Open-faced sandwich topped with a fancy spread : TARTINE
90. “Amen to that!” : I HEAR YA!
93. It’s clear : BLUE SKY
94. Dolt : BOZO
97. N.Y.C. airport : LGA
99. Early stone tool : EOLITH
100. First-year : ROOKIE
101. Toasts : SKOALS
102. Responded sheepishly? : BAAED
103. Wine aperitif : KIR
105. Former “American Idol” judge : ABDUL
106. Irish county : CLARE
110. Drop ___ : TROU
111. Coup de ___ (gunshot: Fr.) : FEU
113. Kind of connection from a mobile device to a PC : USB
114. Doo-wop syllable : SHA
115. Suffers from : HAS
116. U.K. record co. : EMI

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5 thoughts on “0310-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 10 Mar 13, Sunday”

  1. Hi there, Louise.

    Yours is a common question!

    Why are the last few letters on the bottom-right of the grid always shaded?
    I pay for access to the New York Times crossword online, so I download the puzzle every evening into a crossword program called Across Lite, and solve it on my computer. When I am done, I take a "picture" of the finished puzzle on the screen and post it so that readers of the blog can see it everyday.

    The problem is that Across Lite always highlights the space in the grid where I am typing an answer, so there will always be one answer shaded. I try to make it a little less distracting by always tabbing down to the last answer leaving the shading in the bottom right of the grid.

  2. This was a nice puzzle. However, water is never represented as HHO; the molecule is oriented with the oxygen in the middle, and the two hydrogen atoms on roughly opposite sides (opening angle about 150 degrees), so HOH is correct, not HHO.

    Spencer Klein, Berkeley

  3. Hi there, Spencer.

    I have to admit, I was a little troubled as well by the HHO. I used to work as a chemist many moons ago, and I too was more comfortable with the HOH designation. But, I let it go, telling myself it was just me!

    But it wasn't …

    Regards to Berkeley, Spencer 🙂

  4. Also noteworthy about Don Shula and the Miami Dolphins, from Wikipedia:

    The 1972 Dolphins are the only National Football League team to win the Super Bowl with a perfect season. The undefeated campaign was led by coach Don Shula and notable players Bob Griese, Earl Morrall, and Larry Csonka (among many others). The 1972 Dolphins went 14–0 in the regular season and won all three post-season games, including Super Bowl VII against the Washington Redskins, to finish 17–0.

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