0303-13 New York Times Crossword Answers 3 Mar 13, Sunday

QuickLinks:
Solution to today’s crossword in the New York Times
Solution to today’s SYNDICATED New York Times crossword in all other publications

CROSSWORD SETTER: Samuel A. Donaldson
THEME: Seven Blurbs for Seven Biographies … each of today’s theme answers is a well-known term in the format “The X of Y” but with the nouns X and Y swapped. The result is a phrase that could be the name of a celebrity’s biography. Each of the clues is a plausible “blurb” for said biography:

22A. “It’s worth it just for Ms. Behar’s famous lasagna recipe” : THE COOKING OF JOY (from “The Joy of Cooking”)
35A. “An insightful look at how playing Miss Brooks took its toll on Ms. Arden” : THE DESTRUCTION OF EVE (from “the eve of destruction”)
48A. “You don’t have to be a gardener to dig this book about Kerouac’s tools” : THE SPADES OF JACK (from “the jack of spades”)
58A. “Finally, we learn how one Jonas brother defined an entire generation” : THE TIME OF NICK (from “the nick of time”)
73A. “Clinton’s a well-known southpaw, so this exposé on his other-handed punches is an eye-opener” : THE RIGHTS OF BILL (from “The Bill of Rights”)
87A. “Required reading for all ‘Purple Rain’ fans who think their idol is too goody-goody” : THE DARKNESS OF PRINCE (from “The Prince of Darkness”)
103A. “A gripping narrative about one folk singer’s violent turn against Paul Simon” : THE WARFARE OF ART (from “The Art of Warfare”)

COMPLETION TIME: 31m 01s
ANSWERS I MISSED: 0

Today’s Wiki-est, Amazonian Googlies
Across

22. “It’s worth it just for Ms. Behar’s famous lasagna recipe” : THE COOKING OF JOY (from “The Joy of Cooking”)
Joy Behar is a comedian, and is also co-host of the hit talk show “The View”.

Irma Rombauer was the author of the famous cookbook “The Joy Of Cooking”. Rombauer self-published the book back in 1931 in St. Louis, Missouri. She and her family continued to publish privately as demand was high, and then a commercial printing house picked it up in 1936. “The Joy of Cooking” has been in print continuously ever since.

26. TV’s Peter and literature’s Ben : GUNNS
“Peter Gunn” is a crime drama about a private eye that ran on NBC and ABC in the late fifties and early sixties. The show was created by Blake Edwards, with many episodes being directed by Robert Altman.

In Robert Louis Stevenson’s “Treasure Island”, Ben Gunn is a character who had been marooned on the island by his shipmates. Gunn had lived there alone for three long years when Jim Hawkins comes across him. Author R. F. Delderfield wrote a “prequel” to “Treasure Island” called “The Adventures of Ben Gunn” telling the story of Gunn, a parson’s son who became a pirate.

28. Mathematician Paul : ERDOS
Paul Erdős was a famous Hungarian mathematician, and a very prolific writer. Erdős published more papers than any other mathematician in history.

29. Bolivian bears : OSOS
In Spanish, “osa” is a female bear, and “oso” is a male.

31. Born as : NEE
“Née” is the French word for “born” when referring to a female. The male equivalent is “né”.

32. British actress Diana : DORS
I remember Diana Dors in the movies of my youth. Dors was considered the English equivalent of the “blonde bombshell” of Hollywood in the fifties. She was so successful early in her career that at the age of 20 she became the UK’s youngest registered owner of a Rolls Royce car.

35. “An insightful look at how playing Miss Brooks took its toll on Ms. Arden” : THE DESTRUCTION OF EVE (from “the eve of destruction”)
Eve Arden’s most famous role early in her career was playing the high school teacher in the 1950’s radio and television show “Our Miss Brooks”. Years later she played the Principal of Rydell High School in the movies “Grease” (a great film!) and “Grease 2” (a terrible film!).

“Eve of Destruction” is a protest song most famously recorded in 1965 by Barry McGuire. The track that was released was originally intended as a rough mix as it had an unpolished vocal track. Somehow the rough cut made it onto the airwaves. It quickly became a big hit for McGuire and so a more polished version of “Eve of Destruction” was never recorded.

41. Cole Porter title woman : KATE
“Kiss Me, Kate” is a musical written by Cole Porter first produced on Broadway in 1948. Cole Porter had a string of successes in the twenties and thirties including “Gay Divorce” and “Anything Goes”, but he found his career in decline in the forties. “Kiss Me, Kate” proved to be a dramatic come back, and was the only one of his shows that ran for more than 1,000 performances on Broadway.

43. Conger catcher : EELER
Conger eels can grow to be very, very large, perhaps up to 10 feet in length.

44. Captain Hook’s alma mater : ETON
Captain Hook is the bad guy in “Peter Pan”, the famous play by J. M. Barrie. Hook is Peter Pan’s sworn enemy, as Pan cut off Hook’s hand causing it to be replaced by a “hook”. It is implied in the play that Hook attended Eton College, just outside London. Hook’s last words are “Floreat Etona”, which is Eton College’s motto.

47. Crumbs : ORTS
Orts are small scraps of food left after a meal. “Ort” comes from Middle English, and originally described scraps left by animals.

48. “You don’t have to be a gardener to dig this book about Kerouac’s tools” : THE SPADES OF JACK (from “the jack of spades”)
Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg were part of the Beat Generation, American writers who embraced the beat culture of the fifties. The term “Beat Generation” was coined by Kerouac back in 1948, describing the youth of the day who had been “beaten down” and who were refusing to conform to the social norms of the time. The beatniks of the fifties, were to morph into the hippies of the sixties.

58. “Finally, we learn how one Jonas brother defined an entire generation” : THE TIME OF NICK (from “the nick of time”)
Nick Jonas is one of the pop rock band known as the Jonas Brothers, along with his siblings Joe and Kevin Jonas.

63. Jaguar rival : BMW
BMW stands for Bayerische Motoren Werke, which translates into “Bavarian Motor Works”. BMW was making aircraft engines during WWI, but had to cease that activity according to the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The company started making motorcycles, and then moved into automobile production starting in 1928. BMW moved back into aircraft engine manufacturing during the build-up of the Luftwaffe prior to WWII.

Jaguar started out as a manufacturer of sidecars for motorcycles back in 1922, when the company was known as the Swallow Sidecar Company (SS for short). The company changed its name to Jaguar after WWII, because of the unfortunate connotations of the letters “SS” at that time.

66. Frozen dessert name : EDY
Dreyers’ ice cream sells its products under the name Dreyers in the Western United States, and Edy’s in the Eastern states. The company’s founders were William Dryer and Joseph Edy.

69. On the safe side : ALEE
“Alee” is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing “aweather”.

73. “Clinton’s a well-known southpaw, so this exposé on his other-handed punches is an eye-opener” : THE RIGHTS OF BILL (from “The Bill of Rights”)
The Constitution of the United States was adopted on September 17, 1787. There have been 27 amendments to the constitution, the first ten of which are collectively called the Bill of Rights. In essence the Bill of Rights limits the power of the Federal Government and protects the rights of individuals. For example, the First Amendment states:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

79. Writer ___ Hubbard : L. RON
L. Ron Hubbard wrote a self-improvement book in 1950 called “Dianetics: The Modern Science of Mental Health”. A few years later the concepts were used in the founding of the Church of Scientology.

81. Notable flop : EDSEL
It was Henry Ford’s son Edsel who gave his name to the Edsel brand of automobile, a name that has become synonymous with “failure”.

82. Chicago lakefront attraction : NAVY PIER
Navy Pier is the biggest tourist attraction in Chicago. The pier is 3,300 feet long and juts out into Lake Michigan. Navy Pier was built in 1916 primarily as a facility for lake freighters, but was also intended as a place of entertainment for the public. The intent was that the end of the pier would provide a cool location in those pre-air conditioning summers.

84. Family head : CAPO
More properly called a “caporegime”, a “capo” is high-ranking member of the Mafia (Cosa Nostra).

87. “Required reading for all ‘Purple Rain’ fans who think their idol is too goody-goody” : THE DARKNESS OF PRINCE (from “The Prince of Darkness”)
The singer Prince was born in Minneapolis, and he lives there to this day. He took his stage name from his father, a jazz musician who used the name Prince Rogers when performing.

91. Night lights : AURORAS
The spectacular aurora phenomenon is seen lighting up the night sky at both poles of the earth (the Aurora Borealis in the north, and the Aurora Australis in the south). The eerie effect is caused by charged particles colliding with atoms at high latitudes.

94. Duffer’s hazard : TRAP
A “duffer” is a bad golfer.

97. Drives a getaway car, maybe : ABETS
The word “abet” comes into English from the Old French “abeter” meaning “to bait” or “to harass with dogs” (it literally means “to make bite”). This sense of encouraging something bad to happen morphed into our modern usage of “abet” meaning to aid or encourage someone in a crime.

98. British submachine gun : STEN
The STEN gun was an iconic armament used by the British military forces. The name STEN is an acronym. The S and the T comes from the name of the gun’s designers, Shepherd and Turpin. The EN comes from the Enfield brand name, which in turn comes from the Enfield location where the guns were manufactured for the Royal Small Arms Factory, an enterprise owned by the British government.

99. Reach rival : ORAL-B
The Oral-B toothbrush was introduced to the world in 1950, designed by a California periodontist. The first “model” was the Oral-B 60, a name given to reflect the 60 tufts in the brush. In 1969, the Oral-B was the first toothbrush to get to the moon as it was the toothbrush of choice for the crew of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

101. Duffer’s org. : PGA
The Professional Golfers’ Association (PGA) was founded in 1916 and today has its headquarters (unsurprisingly) in Florida, where so many golfers live. Back in 1916, the PGA was based in New York City.

103. “A gripping narrative about one folk singer’s violent turn against Paul Simon” : THE WARFARE OF ART (from “the art of warfare”)
Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel performed together as “Simon & Garfunkel”, as I am sure we all know. The friends started singing together way back in the fifties when they were still in school together. The name of their act at that time was “Tom & Jerry”.

“The Art of War(fare)” is the famous military treatise written by Sun Tzu, a Chinese general from the 6th century BC. I’ve even seen the principles in Sun Tzu’s book applied to modern business.

108. “___ Restaurant” : ALICE’S
“Alice’s Restaurant Masacree” is the name of the Arlo Guthrie song, all 18m 48s of it, that takes up one whole side of the album “Alice’s Restaurant”.

110. Northeast nickname : BAY STATE
“The Bay State” is one of the nicknames of Massachusetts. Other nicknames for Massachusetts are “The Old Colony State” and “The Codfish State”.

111. Political symbol : DONKEY
Thomas Nast was an American caricaturist and cartoonist. He was the creator of the Republican Party elephant, the Democratic Party’s donkey, Uncle Sam and the image of the plump and jocular Santa Claus that we use today.

Down
2. Fruity sodas : NEHIS
The brand of Nehi cola has a name that sounds like “knee-high”, a measure of a small stature. Back in the mid-1900’s, the Chero-Cola company that owned the brand went for a slightly different twist on “knee-high” in advertising. The logo for Nehi was an image of a seated woman’s stockinged legs, with her skirt pulled up to her knees, to hint at “knee-high”.

3. Dry ones : TEETOTALERS
Teetotalism is the practice of abstaining from alcohol. The teetotalism movement started in England in the 1800s.

5. Trivial Pursuit category: Abbr. : GEOG
Trivial Pursuit was invented in 1979 by two Canadians from Montreal. The pair decided to come up with their own game after they discovered that there were pieces missing from the game of Scrabble that they wanted to play. There was a full blown launch of a commercial version of the game in 1982. In 2008, Hasbro bought the complete rights to Trivial Pursuit, for US$80 million! On a personal note, I met my lovely wife over a game of Trivial Pursuit …

6. French press remnants : GROUNDS
A French press is a type of coffee pot in which the grounds are separated from the coffee when a fine mesh filter is pressed to the bottom of the pot using a plunger. Back in Ireland, our name for a French press is a cafetière.

7. Des ___ : MOINES
The city of Des Moines is the capital of Iowa, and takes its name from the Des Moines River. The river in turn takes its name from the French “Riviere des Moines” meaning “River of the Monks”. It looks like there isn’t any “monkish” connection to the city’s name per se. “Des Moines” was just the name given by French traders who corrupted “Moingona”, the name of a group of Illinois Native Americans who lived by the river. However, others do contend that French Trappist monks, who lived a full 200 miles from the river, somehow influenced the name.

9. Certain frat boy : SIG
Sigma Chi is Greek-letter social fraternity that was founded back in 1855 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

13. Christian name? : DIOR
Christian Dior was a French fashion designer. As WWII approached, Dior was called up by the French military, imposing a temporary halt to his career in fashion. He left the army in 1942 and for the duration of the war designed clothes for wives of Nazi officers and French collaborators. After the war his designs became so popular that he helped reestablish Paris as the fashion center of the world.

14. Bond, for one : SPY
James Bond was of course the creation of the writer Ian Fleming. Fleming “stole” the James Bond name from an American ornithologist. The number 007 was also “stolen”, from the real life English spy John Dee who was active in the late 16th century. Dee would sign his reports to Queen Elizabeth I with a stylized 007 to indicate that the reports were for “her eyes only”.

15. Winter supply usually stored outside : CORD OF WOOD
A cord of wood has a volume of 128 cubic feet. More commonly it’s a neat stack measuring 4 feet high, 8 feet long and 4 feet deep.

16. Start of Willa Cather’s Great Plains trilogy : O, PIONEERS!
American novelist Willa Cather wrote what’s called the “prairie trilogy”, books that tell the story of Swedish immigrants living in Nebraska. The titles in the trilogy are “O, Pioneers!”, “The Song of the Lark” and “My Antonia”. Cather won the Pulitzer Prize for another novel, “One of Ours”, that is set in Nebraska and the French battlefields of WWI.

28. Start of an elimination process : EENIE

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

32. Some bathroom crystals : DRANO
To clean out drains we might buy Crystal Drano which is sodium hydroxide (lye) mixed with sodium nitrate, sodium chloride (table salt) and aluminum. The contents of Drano work in concert to clear the clog. The lye reacts with any fats creating soap which may be enough to break up the clog. Also, the finely-divided aluminum reacts with water creating tremendous heat so that that mixture boils and churns, then any hair or fibers are cut by the sharp edges of the nitrate and chloride crystals. Having said all that, I find that boiling water poured down the drain almost always does the job …

34. Like tweets, by necessity : TERSE
I have never tweeted in my life, and have no plans to do so. Twitter is a micro-blogging service that limits any post sent to just 140 characters. In a sense, it is similar to this blog. Here I send out a post once a day containing information that I think might be useful to folks (thank you for reading!). I don’t think I could send out much of interest using just 140 characters. I believe that many people who do tweet tend to send out messages like “I’m at dinner now. I am having sushi” and “There’s nothing on TV. I’m bored”. Nope, I don’t think so!

36. “Tombstone” role : EARP
The legendary Western gunfighter and lawman Wyatt Earp has been portrayed on the big and small screen many, many times. Kevin Costner played the title role in 1994’s “Wyatt Earp”, and Val Kilmer played Earp in 2012’s “The First Ride of Wyatt Earp”. Joel McCrea had the part in 1955’s “Wichita”, and Kurt Russell was Earp in 1993’s “Tombstone”.

37. Some fight finishes, for short : TKOS
In boxing, a knockout (KO) is when one of the fighters can’t get up from the canvas within a specified time, usually 10 seconds. This can be due to fatigue, injury, or the participant may be truly “knocked out”. A referee, fighter or doctor may also decide to stop a fight without a physical knockout, especially if there is concern about a fighter’s safety. In this case the bout is said to end with a technical knockout (TKO).

38. ___-Z (classic car) : IROC
The IROC-Z is a model of Camaro, introduced in 1978. The IROC-Z takes its name from a famous stock car race, the International Race of Champions.

39. Retailer for Rover : PETCO
The PETCO logo includes the two company mascots, Red Ruff the dog and Blue Mews the cat.

40. Composer of the “Gold and Silver” waltz : LEHAR
Franz Lehar was a Hungarian composer who had a difficult relationship with the Nazi regime after it took control of his country. His wife was born Jewish, but converted to Catholicism. Fortunately, Hitler enjoyed Lehar’s music and as a result Goebbels intervened and made Sophie Lehar “an honorary Aryan by marriage”.

44. Falco of “Nurse Jackie” : EDIE
Edie Falco won her three Emmy Awards for playing Carmela Soprano on HBO’s outstanding drama series called “The Sopranos”.

50. Food Network host Guy : FIERI
Guy Fieri is a restaurant owner and television personality. Fieri is known as “the face of the Food Network” as his television series on that channel is very popular.

51. Former “Idol” judge : J.LO
J.Lo is the nickname of singer and actress Jennifer Lopez. “J.Lo” is also the title of her second studio album, released in 2001.

“American Idol” is a spin-off show that was created after the amazing success of the British television show “Pop Idol”. I can’t abide either program(me) …

52. An ending to beat : -NIK
The term “beatnik” was coined by journalist Herb Caen in 1958 when he used it to describe the stereotypical young person of the “beat generation” that was oft associated with the writer Jack Kerouac. That stereotypical beatnik would be playing the bongos and rolling his or her own cigarettes. Male beatniks tended to sport goatees and wear berets.

56. Prefix with phobia : ACRO-
Our prefix “acro-” comes from the Greek “akros” meaning “at the top”. Examples are “acrophobia” (fear of heights) and “Acropolis” (“city at the top”).

59. Calif.-to-Fla. hwy. : I-TEN
I-10 is the most southerly of the interstate routes that crosses from the Atlantic to the Pacific. I-10 stretches from Santa Monica, California to Jacksonville, Florida.

64. Donnybrook : MELEE
A “donnybrook” is a free-for-all, named after a famous historic fair in Donnybrook, a district in Dublin, Ireland. Donnybrook Fair had the reputation as a place where there was lots of drinking and fighting. I used to hang out a lot in Donnybrook in my student days and didn’t see any fighting. Lots of drinking, but no fighting …

65. Fargo’s partner : WELLS
Back in the mid-1800s, Henry Wells founded an express package delivery service called Wells and Company. Around the same time, William Fargo founded Fargo and Company as a competitor. The two decided to join forces instead of competing, and took on a partner and formed the American Express Company (which is still around today). Fargo and Wells then decided to set up a company in California to provide express delivery and banking services, a company they called Wells Fargo.

69. Take aboard a spaceship, maybe : ABDUCT
“To abduct” is a carry off by force, like maybe aliens abducting humans and taking them away on their spaceship!

70. One of a nautical trio : PINTA
As we all know, Christopher Columbus used three ships in his first voyage across the Atlantic: the Santa Maria, the Niña and the Pinta. The Pinta was the fastest of the three, and it was from the Pinta that the New World was first spotted, by a sailor called Rodrigo de Triana who was a lookout on the fateful day. Pinta was a nickname for the ship that translated as “the painted one”. The Pinta’s real name has been lost in mists of time.

71. Last Incan emperor : ATAHUALPA
Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro discovered the Incas in 1526, marking the beginning of the end for an ancient civilization that was to be ravaged by brutal Spanish colonists and by imported smallpox. The last leader of the Inca was Atahualpa. Pizarro staged a mock trial and then condemned Atahualpa to execution by burning. A Spanish friar intervened on behalf of the condemned man, as Atahualpa believed that if he was burned his soul would not move on to the afterlife. Pizarro, was kind enough to have Atahualpa garroted instead.

72. Casino that’s partly underwater? : RIVERBOAT
One way that a casino owner can circumvent local regulation and prohibition of gambling is to locate the casino on a boat. This is particularly true for larger ships that sail outside of a country’s territorial waters before opening up the on-board casino for business. I think that some riverboat casinos might be exploiting loopholes in regulations as well, but I could be wrong …

75. Sexologist’s subject : G-SPOT
The full name for the G-Spot is the “Gräfenberg Spot”, named after German doctor Ernst Gräfenberg. Gräfenberg is best known for developing the intrauterine device (IUD).

77. “Charlotte’s Web” girl : FERN
“Charlotte’s Web” is a children’s novel by author E. B. White. Charlotte is a barn spider, who manages to save the life of a pig named Wilbur. Wilbur is a pet pig, owned by the farmer’s daughter, Fern Arable.

79. Old Italian dough : LIRAS
The word “lira” is used in a number of countries for currency. “Lira” comes from the Latin for “pound” and is derived from a British pound sterling, the value of a Troy pound of silver. For example, the lira (plural “lire”) was the official currency of Italy before the country changed over to the euro.

84. Author with a fan site called “Into the Wardrobe” : C S LEWIS
Irishman C. S. Lewis moved to Britain after serving in the British Army in WWI. A man of many achievements, he is perhaps today best remembered for his series of novels for children called “The Chronicles of Narnia” (which includes “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”). He also wrote the “The Four Loves”, a non-fiction work exploring the nature of love from a Christian perspective.

98. Actor LaBeouf : SHIA
Shia LaBeouf is an actor who started out in the Disney television series “Even Stevens”. Adult audiences might be more familiar with his leading role in the 2003 film “Holes”.

99. Spirit ___ Louis : OF ST
The Spirit of St. Louis is the single engine plane that Charles Lindbergh used to make the first solo non-stop flight from New York to Paris, in 1927. Lindbergh made the journey of 3,600 miles in 33½ hours.

100. String tie : BOLO
I’ve never worn a bolo tie, and was surprised to discover that it is a relatively recent invention. The first bolo tie was apparently produced in Wickenburg, Arizona in the late 1940s by a silversmith. The bolo takes its name from the boleadora, an Argentine lariat.

104. Mens ___ : REA
“Mens rea” is Latin for “guilty mind” and is a central concept in criminal law. The concept is expanded to “actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea” meaning “the act does not make a person guilty unless the mind be also guilty”. In other words, someone should not be deemed guilty of an illegal act unless he or she had a “guilty mind”, intended to do wrong.

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For the sake of completion, here is a full listing of all the answers:
Across
1. Insect pupa sold as fish food : ANT EGG
7. Doesn’t get the memo, maybe : MISREADS
15. Make do : COPE
19. Show instability : TEETER
20. Offering with potato chips : ONION DIP
21. Amount owed by an insurance policy holder : COPAY
22. “It’s worth it just for Ms. Behar’s famous lasagna recipe” : THE COOKING OF JOY (from “The Joy of Cooking”)
24. Crop up : ARISE
25. Cleverness : WIT
26. TV’s Peter and literature’s Ben : GUNNS
27. Walk through : TOUR
28. Mathematician Paul : ERDOS
29. Bolivian bears : OSOS
31. Born as : NEE
32. British actress Diana : DORS
33. “Start already!” : GET ON IT!
35. “An insightful look at how playing Miss Brooks took its toll on Ms. Arden” : THE DESTRUCTION OF EVE (from “the eve of destruction”)
39. Spanish beaches : PLAYAS
41. Cole Porter title woman : KATE
42. Slickers and galoshes : RAINWEAR
43. Conger catcher : EELER
44. Captain Hook’s alma mater : ETON
46. Engine attachment : HOSE
47. Crumbs : ORTS
48. “You don’t have to be a gardener to dig this book about Kerouac’s tools” : THE SPADES OF JACK (from “the jack of spades”)
52. Long time follower? : NO SEE
53. Sight at a supermarket or golf course : CART
54. Pack number : SIX
55. Indisposed : ILL
56. Relief : AID
57. Anesthesiologists’ locales, for short : ORS
58. “Finally, we learn how one Jonas brother defined an entire generation” : THE TIME OF NICK (from “the nick of time”)
63. Jaguar rival : BMW
66. Frozen dessert name : EDY
67. It could pave the way : TAR
68. Second most populous continent: Abbr. : AFR
69. On the safe side : ALEE
70. Legal helpers, briefly : PARAS
73. “Clinton’s a well-known southpaw, so this exposé on his other-handed punches is an eye-opener” : THE RIGHTS OF BILL (from “The Bill of Rights”)
78. “Really?” : IT IS?
79. Writer ___ Hubbard : L. RON
80. Many an aria : SOLO
81. Notable flop : EDSEL
82. Chicago lakefront attraction : NAVY PIER
84. Family head : CAPO
86. Nasty ones : BRUTES
87. “Required reading for all ‘Purple Rain’ fans who think their idol is too goody-goody” : THE DARKNESS OF PRINCE (from “The Prince of Darkness”)
91. Night lights : AURORAS
92. Very often : A LOT
93. Take the lion’s share of : HOG
94. Duffer’s hazard : TRAP
97. Drives a getaway car, maybe : ABETS
98. British submachine gun : STEN
99. Reach rival : ORAL-B
101. Duffer’s org. : PGA
102. Like some calls : CLOSE
103. “A gripping narrative about one folk singer’s violent turn against Paul Simon” : THE WARFARE OF ART (from “The Art of Warfare”)
106. It beats ace-high : A PAIR
107. Open quality : AIRINESS
108. “___ Restaurant” : ALICE’S
109. Bulb unit : WATT
110. Northeast nickname : BAY STATE
111. Political symbol : DONKEY

Down
1. When many bars close : AT TWO
2. Fruity sodas : NEHIS
3. Dry ones : TEETOTALERS
4. Abbr. sometimes seen twice in a row : ETC
5. Trivial Pursuit category: Abbr. : GEOG
6. French press remnants : GROUNDS
7. Des ___ : MOINES
8. Lodges : INNS
9. Certain frat boy : SIG
10. Completely remove : ROOT OUT
11. Put teeth into : ENFORCE
12. Fine-tune : ADJUST
13. Christian name? : DIOR
14. Bond, for one : SPY
15. Winter supply usually stored outside : CORD OF WOOD
16. Start of Willa Cather’s Great Plains trilogy : O, PIONEERS!
17. Give an anticorrosive coating : PASSIVATE
18. Check out : EYE
21. Cigarette purchase : CARTON
23. Reflex test site : KNEE
28. Start of an elimination process : EENIE
30. Reserved to the maximum extent : SHYEST
32. Some bathroom crystals : DRANO
33. “___ your mother” : GO ASK
34. Like tweets, by necessity : TERSE
36. “Tombstone” role : EARP
37. Some fight finishes, for short : TKOS
38. ___-Z (classic car) : IROC
39. Retailer for Rover : PETCO
40. Composer of the “Gold and Silver” waltz : LEHAR
44. Falco of “Nurse Jackie” : EDIE
45. Be all thumbs as a writer? : TEXT
46. Word with pay or page : HALF
49. Pale : ASHY
50. Food Network host Guy : FIERI
51. Former “Idol” judge : J.LO
52. An ending to beat : -NIK
56. Prefix with phobia : ACRO-
58. Receiving stats : TDS
59. Calif.-to-Fla. hwy. : I-TEN
60. Blemish : MAR
61. N.B.A. part: Abbr. : NATL
62. In that case : IF SO
63. Plastic casing for some pills : BLISTER PACK
64. Donnybrook : MELEE
65. Fargo’s partner : WELLS
66. “Nice and slow” : EASY DOES IT
69. Take aboard a spaceship, maybe : ABDUCT
70. One of a nautical trio : PINTA
71. Last Incan emperor : ATAHUALPA
72. Casino that’s partly underwater? : RIVERBOAT
73. Long expeditions : TREKS
74. Butt (in) : HORN
75. Sexologist’s subject : G-SPOT
76. Clop maker : HOOF
77. “Charlotte’s Web” girl : FERN
79. Old Italian dough : LIRAS
83. Two-___ (extended TV episode) : PARTER
84. Author with a fan site called “Into the Wardrobe” : C S LEWIS
85. Unvoiced : ASONANT
86. It may get squandered in a game : BIG LEAD
88. Diner : EATERY
89. “Wheel of Fortune” category : PHRASE
90. Din : ROAR
95. Match : AGREE
96. Stooge : PATSY
98. Actor LaBeouf : SHIA
99. Spirit ___ Louis : OF ST
100. String tie : BOLO
102. Avian call : CAW
103. File extension : TAB
104. Mens ___ : REA
105. End: Fr. : FIN

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