0107-24 NY Times Crossword 7 Jan 24, Sunday

Constructed by: Michael Schlossberg
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Gimme a Second!

Themed answers come in pairs, side-by-side in the grid and each having the same clue. The SECOND answer includes a FEELING as a hidden word:

  • 68A Bandleader’s urging … or an alternative title for this puzzle : ONCE MORE, WITH FEELING
  • 23A It might be pressed before work : POWER SUIT
  • 24A It might be pressed before work : SNOOZE ALARM (i.e. once more with “ZEAL”)
  • 42A They’re home to spinners : SPIDER WEBS
  • 46A They’re home to spinners : PR AGENCIES (i.e. once more with “RAGE”)
  • 91A One sailing through long passages : SEA CAPTAIN
  • 95A One sailing through long passages : AVID READER (i.e. once more with “DREAD”)
  • 117A Target of many a viral marketing campaign : GENERATION Z
  • 119A Target of many a viral marketing campaign : FLU STRAIN (i.e. once more with “LUST”)

Bill’s time: 25m 11s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

13 Purchase at a cannabis dispensary : EDIBLE

Hemp, also known as “cannabis”, is a hardy, fast-growing plant that has many uses mainly due to the strength of the fibers in the plant’s stalks. Hemp is used to make rope, paper and textiles. The term “hemp” is sometimes reserved for varieties of the plant grown for non-drug use.

22 Fine parchment : VELLUM

The writing material known as “parchment” is made by processing the untanned skins of animals. If calfskin is used, the writing material is known as “vellum”. Parchment is usually made from the skins of goats, sheep and cows. The term “parchment” comes from the name of the city of Pergamon, which was a major center of parchment production in ancient Greece.

26 Post concerned with etiquette : EMILY

Emily Post was a writer from Baltimore, Maryland who is best known for her writings on the subject of etiquette. Her work giving advice on etiquette is continued by the Emily Post Institute, which she founded in 1946.

27 “Capeesh?” : HEAR ME?

“Capeesh?” is a slang term meaning “do you understand?” It comes from the Italian “capisce” meaning “understand”.

34 “On Photography” author Susan : SONTAG

Susan Sontag was a writer and political activist from New York City. Sontag wrote extensively on a number of subjects, including photography. She spent the last decade of her life in a relationship with renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz.

36 1918-2004 Fenway Park phenomenon, familiarly : THE CURSE

The Curse of the Bambino was a superstition cited as a reason for the failure of the Boston Red Sox the World Series from 1918 until 2004. The Curse was said to have been placed on the Red Sox by Babe “The Bambino” Ruth, who was reportedly angry at being traded to the Yankees.

42 They’re home to spinners : SPIDER WEBS

The silk that makes up a web is a protein fiber that is “spun” by a spider. Spider silk is about one sixth of the density of steel, yet has a comparable tensile strength.

50 Luxury fashion label : ARMANI

Giorgio Armani is an Italian fashion designer and founder of the company that has borne his name since 1975. Although Armani is famous for his menswear, the company makes everything from jewelry to perfume.

51 1990s workout fad : TAE BO

Tae Bo isn’t an ancient martial art, even though it perhaps sounds like one. The discipline was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of “taekwondo” and “boxing”.

52 “The Racer’s Edge” sloganeer : STP

STP is a brand name of automotive lubricants and additives. The name “STP” is an initialism standing for “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

54 Bay Area gallery, for short : SFMOMA

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMoMA) was founded in 1935 in the city’s War Memorial Building. The museum’s collection moved to its own building in 1995.

63 “___ and the Night Visitors” (opera) : AMAHL

Composer Gian Carlo Menotti’s “Amahl and the Night Visitors” has a special place in the repertoire, in that it is the first opera specifically composed for American television. It was commissioned by NBC and had its debut at the NBC studios in Rockefeller Center on Christmas Eve, 1951. In today’s world of commercially-driven television, I can’t imagine a network commissioning a classical work …

65 Fragrant bloomers : LILACS

The ornamental flowering plant known as lilac is native to the Balkans, and is a member of the olive family. The name “lilac” comes from the Persian word “lilaq,” which means “flower.”

76 Athleisure portmanteau : SKORT

The wearing of clothing designed for athletic activity in casual, non-athletic environments is termed “athleisure”, which is a portmanteau of “athletic” and “leisure”.

85 Many a Yemeni : ARAB

Yemen is a country located in the southwestern part of the Arabian Peninsula in Western Asia. It is bordered by Saudi Arabia to the north, Oman to the east, the Red Sea to the west, and the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea to the south. Yemen has a population of over 30 million people and its capital and largest city is Sana’a.

86 Piece de resistance? : OHM

The unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (with the symbol omega) named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm. Ohm was the guy who established experimentally that the amount of current flowing through a circuit is directly proportional to the voltage applied, (V=IR) a relationship that every school kid knows as Ohm’s Law.

89 Some goofs : ERRATA

“Errata” is the past participle of the Latin word “errare” meaning “to err”. We use “errata” (singular “erratum”) to describe a list of errors that have been noted in some publication.

100 Gadgets for truckers : CB RADIOS

A CB’er is someone who operates a Citizens Band (CB) radio. In 1945, the FCC set aside certain radio frequencies for the personal use of citizens. The use of the Citizens Band increased throughout the seventies as advances in electronics brought down the size of transceivers and their cost. There aren’t many CB radios sold these days though, as they have largely been replaced by cell phones.

114 The yoke’s on them : OX TEAM

A yoke is a wooden beam used between a pair of animals so that they are forced to work together.

116 Chuck ___, TV director/producer who’s known as the “King of Sitcoms” : LORRE

Chuck Lorre created many great sitcoms that have stood the test of time. Included in the list of his shows are “Grace Under Fire”, “Cybil”, “Dharma & Greg”, “Two and a Half Men” and “The Big Bang Theory”. Lorre is famous for the “vanity cards” that appear for a few seconds at the end of his shows. The cards include a message directly from Lorre, perhaps an observation on life, and maybe something quite controversial. CBS has had to censor several of Lorre’s vanity cards, but you can read the uncensored versions on his website.

117 Target of many a viral marketing campaign : GENERATION Z

Definitions vary, but it seems that the term “Generation Z” is reserved for the children of “Generation X”, and for the generation that follows the “Millennials” (Generation Y). Gen-Zers are also known as “Zoomers”, a portmanteau of “Z” and “boomer” (as in “baby boomer”).

123 Lead role in 1978’s “La Cage aux Folles” : RENATO

The musical “La Cage aux Folles” opened on Broadway in 1985. It is an adaptation of the French play of the same name by Jean Poiret that was first staged in 1973. I’ve never had the pleasure of seeing the stage play nor the musical, but I love the wonderful movie adaptation called “The Birdcage”, which was released in 1996. The film has a very strong cast that includes Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman and Hank Azaria.

124 Kind of terrier : SKYE

The Skye terrier is a breed of dog that is under threat of extinction. A few years ago, there were only 30 Skye terriers born in the breed’s native land of the UK. The breed was named for the Isle of Skye in Scotland.

126 Warm coat : ANORAK

Anoraks really aren’t very popular over here in America. Everyone has one in Ireland! An anorak is a heavy jacket with a hood, often lined with fur (or fake fur), and is an invention of the Inuit people.

Down

3 Bird also known as a lapwing : PEWIT

“Pewit” (also “Peewit”) is an alternative name for the Northern Lapwing. The name “Peewit” is imitative of the bird’s “pee-wit” call.

4 150-mile-per-hour train : ACELA

The Acela Express is the fastest train routinely running in the US, as it gets up to 150 mph at times. The service runs between Boston and Washington D.C. via Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York. Introduced in 2000, the brand name “Acela” was created to evoke “acceleration” and “excellence”.

5 Dawn figure, in myth : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora. Rather delightfully, Homer referred to Eos as “rosy-fingered dawn” in both “Iliad” and “Odyssey”.

6 Bovid named for the sound it makes : GNU

The gnu is also known as the wildebeest, and is an antelope native to Africa. “Wildebeest” is a Dutch word meaning “wild beast”.

A bovid is an animal in the family Bovidae. Bovids are ruminants with hoofs and hollow horns, such as cattle, sheep and goats.

8 Part of an ellipsis : DOT

An ellipsis (plural “ellipses”) is a series of dots (usually three) used to indicate an omission in some text. The term comes from the Greek word “élleipsis”, which means “omission”.

9 Skinflints : MISERS

A skinflint is a miser. The term “skinflint” arose as slang around 1700, to describe a person who would “skin a flint” in order to save or make money.

10 Novelist Ferber : EDNA

Edna Ferber was a novelist and playwright from Kalamazoo, Michigan. Ferber won a Pulitzer for her novel “So Big”, which was made into a film a few times, most famously in 1953 starring Jane Wyman. Ferber also wrote “Show Boat”, “Cimarron” and “Giant”, which were adapted successfully for the stage and/or big screen.

14 Start of a classic request for advice : DEAR ANN …

“Ask Ann Landers” was an advice column written by Eppie Lederer from 1955 to 2002. Eppie was the twin sister to Pauline Phillips, the person behind “Dear Abby”. Eppie took over the “Ask Ann Landers” column from Ruth Crowley who started it in 1943.

20 Actress Ritter of “Jessica Jones” : KRYSTEN

“Jessica Jones” is a TV series produced by Marvel Television. The title character is a former superhero, played by Krysten Ritter, who runs her own private detective agency.

25 Serene, informally : ZEN

Zen is a Buddhist school that developed its own tradition in China back in the 7th century AD. “Zen” is a Japanese spelling of the Chinese word “chan”, which in turn derives from the Sanskrit word “dhyana” meaning “meditation”.

33 Place for a porter : PUB

Porter is a dark beer that originated in London in the 1700s. It is named for the street and river porters with whom it was very popular. Porter is a well-hopped beer made using brown malt, which gives it the dark color.

37 Superfund grp. : EPA

The 1980 law called the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is more usually referred to as “Superfund”. Superfund gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to compel polluters to clean up contaminated sites.

40 Titan who gave birth on Delos : LETO

In Greek mythology, the goddess Leto and her sister Asteria are daughters of the Titans Coeus and Phoebe. Leto’s twin children Apollo and Artemis were fathered by Zeus, the king of the gods.

43 BOGO, e.g. : PROMO

Buy one, get one (BOGO) or buy one, get one free (BOGOF).

44 Words after a verbal gaffe : I MEAN

Our word “gaffe”, meaning “social blunder”, comes from the French “gaffe” meaning “clumsy remark”, although it originally was a word describing a boat hook. The exact connection between a boat hook and a blunder seems to be unclear.

45 Accessory for a rideshare vehicle : DASHCAM

Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a board placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from “dashing” against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hooves of the horses. Quite interesting …

47 ___ cycle : REM

“REM” is an acronym standing for “rapid eye movement”. REM sleep takes up 20-25% of the sleeping hours and is the period associated with one’s most vivid dreams.

48 “Aladdin” sidekick : ABU

Abu is a monkey in the Disney production of “Aladdin”. The character is based on Abu, a thief in the 1940 film “The Thief of Baghdad”.

51 “Agricola” author : TACITUS

Gnaeus Julius Agricola was a Roman general who led campaigns during the conquest of Britain. Agricola was rewarded for his military success by being named consul and governor of Britannia.

62 Dakota tribe : ARIKARA

The Arikara (also “Ree”) are a Native-American tribe based in North Dakota. In the 2015 film “The Revenant”, the war party that the trappers go up against comprises Arikara warriors.

71 “Good” day: Abbr. : FRI

In the Christian tradition, it is believed that three days after Jesus was put to death, he rose from the dead. Christians commemorate the crucifixion of Jesus on Good Friday, and celebrate the resurrection of Jesus on Easter Sunday, two days later.

72 Santa-tracking org. : NORAD

The North American Defense Command (NORAD) isn’t just a US operation but is a cooperative arrangement between Canada and the United States. The two countries entered into an agreement to establish NORAD in 1958, mainly due to the concern that there would be little or no warning of a missile attack from the Soviet Union that came over the North Pole. NORAD also tracks Santa Claus coming from the North Pole every Christmas, and these days publishes Santa’s location on Christmas Eve on its website. The tracking of Santa started into 1955 when a local Sears store placed an advertisement in a Colorado Springs newspaper with a phone number that could be used to call Santa Claus. The newspaper accidentally printed the number for the Continental Air Defense Command (a precursor to NORAD). The officer on duty instructed his staff to give all children who called a “current location” for Santa. Today, NORAD gets about 120,000 phone queries about Santa’s location every year, and the website gets about 20 million visitors.

77 Lift type : T-BAR

A T-bar is a ski lift on which the skiers are pulled up the hill in pairs, with each pair standing (not sitting!) either side of a T-shaped metal bar. The bar is placed behind the thighs, pulling along the skiers as they remain standing on their skis (hopefully!). There’s also a J-bar, which is a similar device but with each J-shaped bar used by one skier at a time.

81 Stephen of “Michael Collins” : REA

Stephen Rea is an actor from Belfast, Northern Ireland. His most successful role was Fergus in 1992’s “The Crying Game”, for which performance he was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar. In “The Crying Game”, Fergus was a member of the IRA. In real life, Rea was married to IRA bomber and hunger striker Dolours Price at the time he made the movie.

“Michael Collins” is a fabulous Neil Jordan film released in 1996 that tells the story of the Irish patriot Michael Collins. The title role is played by Liam Neeson, with British actor Alan Rickman doing an excellent job playing Éamon de Valera.

84 Bittern, e.g. : HERON

Bitterns are wading birds in the heron family. Unlike most of their heron cousins, bitterns tend to have short necks.

88 Bimonthly business magazine : INC

“Inc.” is a business magazine that specializes in articles about growing companies. “Inc.” publishes a list of the 500 fastest-growing private companies in the country each year, calling it the “Inc. 500”. The “Inc. 5000” is an expanded list also published by the magazine.

93 Landlocked province : ALBERTA

Alberta (Alta.) is a big province, one about the size of Texas. It is named after Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Princess Louise also donated her name to Lake Louise, the large glacial lake in the province, now within the bounds of Banff National Park.

94 Grp. once led by Arafat : PLO

Yasser (also “Yasir”) Arafat was born in Cairo in 1929, the son of two Palestinians and the second-youngest of seven children. Arafat was beaten by his father as a child and so did not have a good relationship with him. Arafat did not attend his father’s funeral, nor did he visit his grave. The beatings were apparently administered because the young Arafat was repeatedly attending religious services in the Jewish quarter of Cairo. Arafat’s explanation was that he wanted to “study the mentality” of the Jewish people.

95 Kind of lily : ARUM

Arum is a genus of flowering plant that is native to eastern North America. They can be nasty plants though, as some contain oxalic acid. Oxalic acid is a compound that can be very painful if ingested and can even cause death if taken in sufficient quantities.

96 Hoover, for one, in brief : VAC

The first practical portable vacuum cleaner was invented by James Spangler in 1907. Spangler sold the patent for the design to his cousin’s husband, William Henry Hoover. Hoover then made his fortune from manufacturing and selling vacuum cleaners. Hoover was so successful in my part of the world that back in Ireland we don’t use the verb “to vacuum” and instead say “to hoover”. Also, “hoover” is what we call a vacuum cleaner, regardless of who makes it.

97 “No idea,” in a text : IDK

I don’t know (IDK)

101 Sports jacket : BLAZER

A blazer is a less formal version of a suit jacket, usually one with a less formal cut and often metal buttons. The original “blazer” was a red jacket worn by members of the rowing club at Cambridge University in England. The “blazer” is so called because the Cambridge version was “blazing red” in color.

109 People of western New York : ERIES

The Erie people lived on lands south of Lake Erie, in parts of the modern-day US states of New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. The Erie were sometimes referred to as the Cat Nation, a reference to the mountain lions that were ever-present in the area that they lived. The name “Erie” is a shortened form of “Erielhonan” meaning “long tail”, possibly a further reference to the mountain lion or cat, which was possibly used as a totem. The Erie people gave their name to the Great Lake.

111 Tourist mecca in southern Asia : AGRA

Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India that was the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

  • The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
  • Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
  • Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

112 “Never ___ Kissed” (1999 Drew Barrymore film) : BEEN

Drew Barrymore has quite the pedigree, being a granddaughter of Hollywood icon John Barrymore. She appeared in her first movie at the age of five, in 1980’s “Altered States”, but her big break was in 1982’s “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial”. That same year she became the youngest host of “Saturday Night Live” at the age of seven. She has been invited back to host the show quite a few times and has now hosted six times, more than any other female celebrity.

113 Part of A.D. : ANNO

The designations Anno Domini (AD, “year of Our Lord”) and Before Christ (BC) are found in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The dividing point between AD and BC is the year of the conception of Jesus, with AD 1 following 1 BC without a year “0” in between. The AD/BC scheme dates back to AD 525, and gained wide acceptance soon after AD 800. Nowadays a modified version has become popular, with CE (Common/Christian Era) used to replace AD, and BCE (Before the Common/Christian Era) used to replace BC.

115 Singer with the album “Watermark” : ENYA

Enya’s real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

118 Hunky-dory : A-OK

Surprisingly (to me), the term “hunky-dory” has been around a long time, and is documented back in the mid-1800s. Nobody’s really sure of its origin, but some say it is an Anglicization of Honcho dori, that back in the day was a street of ill repute in Yokohama, Japan.

119 Email chain abbr. : FWD

Forward (fwd.)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 “Old man” : PAPA
5 “Yikes!” : EGAD!
9 Childproof bottle contents, for short : MEDS
13 Purchase at a cannabis dispensary : EDIBLE
19 “Sounds ’bout right to me” : I RECKON SO
21 False ___ : IDOL
22 Fine parchment : VELLUM
23 It might be pressed before work : POWER SUIT
24 It might be pressed before work : SNOOZE ALARM (i.e. once more with “ZEAL”)
26 Post concerned with etiquette : EMILY
27 “Capeesh?” : HEAR ME?
28 Up-and-down, as a relationship : ROCKY
29 Internet harvesting tool : DATA SCRAPER
34 “On Photography” author Susan : SONTAG
36 1918-2004 Fenway Park phenomenon, familiarly : THE CURSE
38 Nothing-doing? : IN IDLE
42 They’re home to spinners : SPIDER WEBS
46 They’re home to spinners : PR AGENCIES (i.e. once more with “RAGE”)
50 Luxury fashion label : ARMANI
51 1990s workout fad : TAE BO
52 “The Racer’s Edge” sloganeer : STP
53 Says, informally : GOES
54 Bay Area gallery, for short : SFMOMA
59 Late winter/early spring, weather-wise : MUD SEASON
63 “___ and the Night Visitors” (opera) : AMAHL
65 Fragrant bloomers : LILACS
67 Animal that becomes a plant if spelled backward : DEER
68 Bandleader’s urging … or an alternative title for this puzzle : ONCE MORE, WITH FEELING
74 New ___ : AGER
75 Guides : STEERS
76 Athleisure portmanteau : SKORT
78 Certain beach top : SWIM SHIRT
83 Snooty : UPPISH
85 Many a Yemeni : ARAB
86 Piece de resistance? : OHM
87 Tourney round : SEMIS
89 Some goofs : ERRATA
91 One sailing through long passages : SEA CAPTAIN
95 One sailing through long passages : AVID READER (i.e. once more with “DREAD”)
99 Ready and waiting : ON CALL
100 Gadgets for truckers : CB RADIOS
102 Porterhouse alternatives : T-BONES
106 Inspiration for many a lottery pick : LUCKY NUMBER
111 Shame, e.g. : ABASE
114 The yoke’s on them : OX TEAM
116 Chuck ___, TV director/producer who’s known as the “King of Sitcoms” : LORRE
117 Target of many a viral marketing campaign : GENERATION Z
119 Target of many a viral marketing campaign : FLU STRAIN (i.e. once more with “LUST”)
123 Lead role in 1978’s “La Cage aux Folles” : RENATO
124 Kind of terrier : SKYE
125 Exclamation after a rescue : WE’RE SAVED!
126 Warm coat : ANORAK
127 Dash : TEAR
128 Measurable impact, so to speak : DENT
129 Bad news for an investor : LOSS

Down

1 Spoke (up) : PIPED
2 Petrichor, n.: The pleasant ___ of rainfall on dry soil : AROMA
3 Bird also known as a lapwing : PEWIT
4 150-mile-per-hour train : ACELA
5 Dawn figure, in myth : EOS
6 Bovid named for the sound it makes : GNU
7 “___ was saying …” : AS I
8 Part of an ellipsis : DOT
9 Skinflints : MISERS
10 Novelist Ferber : EDNA
11 Subject of a subway announcement : DOORS
12 Remedy for a blink-and-you-missed-it moment : SLO-MO
13 First lady? : EVE
14 Start of a classic request for advice : DEAR ANN …
15 Bad reasoning : ILLOGIC
16 Rap’s ___ Chyna : BLAC
17 Hang in the shadows : LURK
18 TV award : EMMY
20 Actress Ritter of “Jessica Jones” : KRYSTEN
25 Serene, informally : ZEN
27 For the lady : HERS
30 Country singer Stapleton : CHRIS
31 Remote button abbr. : REW
32 Hotshot : ACE
33 Place for a porter : PUB
35 Clip-on, for one : TIE
37 Superfund grp. : EPA
39 Bit of slander : DISS
40 Titan who gave birth on Delos : LETO
41 Disney subsidiary : ESPN
42 Story that isn’t a quick read : SAGA
43 BOGO, e.g. : PROMO
44 Words after a verbal gaffe : I MEAN
45 Accessory for a rideshare vehicle : DASHCAM
47 ___ cycle : REM
48 “Aladdin” sidekick : ABU
49 Amazing woman, slangily : GODDESS
51 “Agricola” author : TACITUS
55 Petal pusher? : FLORIST
56 Peace, in Russian : MIR
57 Stadium cheer : OLE!
58 Big mouths : MAWS
60 “Told you so!” : SEE?!
61 Ursine : bears :: anguilliform : ___ : EELS
62 Dakota tribe : ARIKARA
64 Staying power : LEGS
66 Part of a process : STEP
69 “I’ve seen better” : MEH
70 Cool, back in the day : HEP
71 “Good” day: Abbr. : FRI
72 Santa-tracking org. : NORAD
73 Really annoy, with “on” : GRATE …
77 Lift type : T-BAR
78 Just … all right : SO-SO
79 Info in a party invitation : WHEN
80 Apple variety : IMAC
81 Stephen of “Michael Collins” : REA
82 “Eww! Enough!” : TMI!
84 Bittern, e.g. : HERON
88 Bimonthly business magazine : INC
90 Election night news : RESULTS
92 Plant that may be mistaken for a dandelion : CAT’S EAR
93 Landlocked province : ALBERTA
94 Grp. once led by Arafat : PLO
95 Kind of lily : ARUM
96 Hoover, for one, in brief : VAC
97 “No idea,” in a text : IDK
98 Like Ikea furniture assembly, for short : DIY
101 Sports jacket : BLAZER
103 “As if!” : NOT!
104 Live and breathe : EXIST
105 Feed : STOKE
107 Storybook ending? : MORAL
108 “Nice job!” : BRAVO!
109 People of western New York : ERIES
110 Sunders : RENDS
111 Tourist mecca in southern Asia : AGRA
112 “Never ___ Kissed” (1999 Drew Barrymore film) : BEEN
113 Part of A.D. : ANNO
115 Singer with the album “Watermark” : ENYA
118 Hunky-dory : A-OK
119 Email chain abbr. : FWD
120 Min Jin ___, author of the 2017 best seller “Pachinko” : LEE
121 You can dispense with this : URN
122 Complete collection : SET

9 thoughts on “0107-24 NY Times Crossword 7 Jan 24, Sunday”

  1. 40:01 after I finally realized I needed to go to sleep a lot more than I needed to finish yet another puzzle. At the end, after spending several minutes staring dumbly at “_LUST RAIN”, I looked up “FLU STRAIN”, which allowed me to get the “F” and “D” of “FWD” and then the “E” and “N” of “DENT”, thereby filling in the “E” of “(Min Jin) LEE”. So, lots of errors, but I then got to sleep, making up for what had been a long and difficult day (a whole ‘nother story … 😳).

  2. 36:20. 2 squares off. At times this felt like Friday’s puzzle, but I was able to slog through this one. Had CATSEer/RENeTO and UPPISt/tERON.

    Similar to Dave, I had trouble with FLUS TRAIN. Couldn’t figure out what PRAGENCIES were either at first.

    Decent theme. Interesting note about the setter from Wordplay. The setter is actually more a fan of themeless puzzles, but he says making them is too difficult in that he has too much freedom, i.e. it’s too blank of a canvas to create it. He needs the structure of a theme to build around.

    Best –

  3. 51:22, no errors. Very surprised to get the finished message after changing 39D from CUSS to DISS, giving me PRAGENCIES. Then the light finally came on: PR AGENCIES.

    1. In other words, you had at least 1 error when you completed the grid based on what you stated. There has to be something wrong with you to claim no errors in the same breath.

      Unless I’m able to see videos which include both the system or wall clock time and game clock time, I’m going to assume you all do that with that NYT helper screen. As I said awhile back when you guys claim “no errors” it doesn’t mean no errors.

      1. In case it’s not clear, I say that because you said you “got the finished message after changing 39D from CUSS to DISS. That means you already had CUSS and only after changing the CU to DI (actually 2 errors), you got the pop-up.
        Not that that’s the first time you’ve said that sort of thing.

        1. So, given what Bruce said about his solve, you can tell us exactly what he did, but you still quarrel with his use of the English language … 😳.

          And you will never understand the situation with the annoying message that pops up when you fill the last empty square and there is an error somewhere in the grid until you acquire an iPad Mini (or, even worse, a cell phone) and try to do a Sunday puzzle on it without somehow mistyping something, somewhere. (In the past, I, and others, have made many attempts to explain this, but the intended audience is predisposed not to understand what we write.)

  4. 1:13:17 NE corner had me bogged down, as I read “pragencies” as all one word, which made no sense to my feeble brain. Once I had an “aha” there the rest of the corner filled in hideously slowly, and the theme was totally lost on me. Time to fire up the snow blower and roof rake… :- (

  5. Tough time in NE corner.

    Didnt remember Dear Ann soon enough and ROCKY didn’t come quickly either. Why? I don’t know.

    Then there was that PEWIT bird. No help.

    The rest came pretty quick.

    Way too long on this one.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *