1114-22 NY Times Crossword 14 Nov 22, Monday

Constructed by: Taylor Johnson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Pizza Party

Themed answers each end with PART of a PIZZA:

  • 62A Social event hinted at by the ends of 18-, 28- and 48-Across : PIZZA PARTY
  • 18A High-society, metaphorically : UPPER CRUST
  • 28A Something unimpressive, slangily : WEAK SAUCE
  • 48A “Smi-i-i-i-le!” : SAY “CHEESE”!

Bill’s time: 8m 04s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 The “A” of U.A.E. : ARAB

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a federation of seven emirates (states) in the Middle East. Included in the seven are Abu Dhabi and Dubai, with the city of Abu Dhabi being the UAE capital and cultural center.

5 West Coast N.F.L. player, informally : LA RAM

The Los Angeles Rams are the only franchise to have won NFL championships in three different cities, i.e. Cleveland (1945), Los Angeles (1951 & 2021) and St. Louis (1999). The Rams were based in Cleveland from 1936 to 1945, in Los Angeles from 1946 to 1994, in St. Louis from 1995 to 2015, and returned to Los Angeles in 2016.

16 Cuisine with tom yum gai : THAI

Tom yum is a delicious spicy soup served in Thai restaurants. It is usually described as “hot and sour”, and I love it …

17 “At Last” singer ___ James : ETTA

Etta James was best known for her beautiful rendition of the song “At Last”. Sadly, as she disclosed in her autobiography, James lived a life that was ravaged by drug addiction leading to numerous legal and health problems. Ms. James passed away in January 2012 having suffered from leukemia.

20 Like a bad day for a picnic, say : RAINY

Our term “picnic” comes from the French word that now has the same meaning, namely “pique-nique”. The original “pique-nique” was a fashionable potluck affair, and not necessarily held outdoors.

38 Pigeon sound : COO

Taxonomically, doves and pigeons are the only members of the order Columbidae. The terms “dove” and “pigeon” are often used interchangeably. Scientifically speaking, dove species tend to be smaller than pigeon species. Colloquially though, many refer to doves as the white or nearly white species in the family.

39 Rock’s Joan ___ & the Blackhearts : JETT

“Joan Jett” is the stage name of rock guitarist and singer Joan Marie Larkin. She is best known as a member of the band Joan Jett & the Blackhearts, which formed in 1979.

41 Italian mojito garnish : BASIL

Traditionally, basil is considered “the king of herbs”. In fact, the herb’s name comes from the Greek “basileus” meaning “king”.

A mojito is a Cuban cocktail, although the exact origins appear to be unclear, as does the derivation of the name. Want one? Put 4 mint leaves in a glass, and add the juice of half a lime and a teaspoon of powdered sugar. Muddle the ingredients, smashing them together with a muddler or a spoon. Add some crushed ice, two ounces of white rum and stir. Top with a couple of ounces of club soda, and garnish with a sprig of mint and/or a slice of lime. Cheers!

42 The “A” of B.A. : ARTS

Bachelor of Arts (BA)

46 North Dakota city that’s the title of a Coen brothers film : FARGO

Fargo, North Dakota is the biggest city in the state. The original name for the city was Centralia, when it was a stopping point for steamboats that traveled the Red River in the late 19th century. The town really grew with the arrival of the Northern Pacific Railway, so the name “Fargo” was adopted in honor of one of the railroad company’s directors, William Fargo (of Wells Fargo Express fame).

“Fargo” is one of my favorite films of all time, and stars perhaps my favorite actress, Frances McDormand. “Fargo” was directed by the Coen brothers, Joel and Ethan. Frances McDormand is Joel’s wife.

48 “Smi-i-i-i-le!” : SAY “CHEESE”!

Photographers often instruct us to say “cheese” to elicit a smile-like expression. Even Japanese photographers use the word “cheese” to achieve the same effect. Bulgarians use the word “zele” meaning “cabbage”. The Chinese say “eggplant”, the Danish “orange”, the Iranians “apple” and many Latin Americans say “whiskey”.

51 Frittata ingredient : EGG

A frittata is an omelet dish from Italy. The word “frittata” is Italian, and comes from “fritto” meaning “fried”.

53 “Dexter” airer, for short : SHO

“Dexter” is a crime show that airs on Showtime. The title character works for the Miami Police Department as an expert in blood spatter patterns by day, but is a serial killer by night. The original series was based on the “Dexter” novels written by Jeff Lindsay. I haven’t seen this show myself, but my eldest son really enjoys it …

60 Sidekick of Mario and Luigi : YOSHI

Yoshi is a dinosaur-like character in some Nintendo video games. Yoshi first appeared as a sidekick to Mario and Luigi in the 1991 game called “Super Mario World”.

62 Social event hinted at by the ends of 18-, 28- and 48-Across : PIZZA PARTY

October is National Pizza Month, an observance that was designated by the US Congress in 1987. Really …?

66 Ingredient in some skin-care products : ALOE

Aloe vera is a succulent plant that grows in relatively dry climates. The plant’s leaves are full of biologically-active compounds that have been studied extensively. Aloe vera has been used for centuries in herbal medicine, mainly for topical treatment of wounds.

67 Hemingway’s “The Sun Also ___” : RISES

“The Sun Also Rises” was Ernest Hemingway’s first major novel, published in 1926. Hemingway originally titled the work “Fiesta”, and indeed it was originally published under this title outside of America. At the recommendation of the publisher, Scribner’s, the title was changed to “The Sun Also Rises”, taken from Ecclesiastes 1:5 “The sun also ariseth, and the sun goeth down, and hasteth to his place where he arose.”

69 “Here’s a brief summary,” in internet-speak : TL;DR

Too long, didn’t read (TL;DR)

70 “The Big Podcast With Shaq” host : O’NEAL

Retired basketball player Shaquille O’Neal now appears regularly as an analyst on the NBA TV show “Inside the NBA”. Shaq has quite a career in the entertainment world. His first rap album, called “Shaq Diesel”, went platinum. He also starred in two of his own reality shows: “Shaq’s Big Challenge” and “Shaq Vs.”

71 Big fan, in modern lingo : STAN

“Stan” is a song by rapper Eminem (featuring Dido) that was recorded in 2000. The title refers to a fictional Eminem fan named “Stan” who becomes obsessed with the rapper, and who grows irate when his letters to his idol go unanswered. Stan’s final act is to make a voice recording as he drives into a river, with his pregnant girlfriend locked in the trunk. One of the legacies of the song is that “stan” is now used as a slang term for an obsessed and maniacal fan.

Down

3 Warp drive power source on “Star Trek” : ANTIMATTER

In the “Star Trek” universe, starships were powered by matter-antimatter reactions. The warp speed achieved by the engines is very much like our real-world Mach number. Just as a plane traveling at Mach 1 is moving at the speed of sound, a starship traveling at warp factor 1 is moving at the speed of light. Mach 2 is twice the speed of sound, and warp factor 2 is twice the speed of light. Cool, huh …?

In the “Star Trek” universe, starships were powered by matter-antimatter reactions. The warp speed achieved by the engines is very much like our real-world Mach number. Just as a plane traveling at Mach 1 is moving at the speed of sound, a starship traveling at warp factor 1 is moving at the speed of light. Mach 2 is twice the speed of sound, and warp factor 2 is twice the speed of light. Cool, huh …?

4 Coffee tidbit : BEAN

The species Coffea arabica is thought to be the first plant cultivated for coffee. Today, 75-80% of the world’s coffee comes from Coffea arabica.

5 Baton Rouge sch. : LSU

LSU’s full name is Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, and is located in Baton Rouge. LSU was founded in 1860 as a military academy, with then-Colonel William Tecumseh Sherman as superintendent.

Baton Rouge is the capital city of the state of Louisiana. The name “Baton Rouge” is French for “red stick” or “red staff”. The exact reason why such a name was given to the city isn’t really clear.

6 Swiss peak : ALP

There are eight Alpine countries:

  • Austria
  • Slovenia
  • France
  • Switzerland
  • Liechtenstein
  • Germany
  • Monaco
  • Italy

7 Jump ___ (double Dutch equipment) : ROPE

Double Dutch is a skipping game that uses two jump ropes that are turned in opposite directions.

8 Alternative to Visa or Mastercard, informally : AMEX

“Amex” is short for “American Express”, the name of the financial services company that is best known for its credit card, charge card and traveler’s check businesses. The company name is indicative of its original business. American Express was founded in 1850 in Buffalo, New York as an express mail service.

10 Flashing light at a concert : STROBE

A strobe light is a device that produces regular flashes, like the light on top of a police car. The term derives from the Greek “strobos” meaning “twisting, whirling”.

25 1990s fitness fad using karate moves : TAE BO

Tae Bo isn’t an ancient martial art, even though it perhaps sounds like one. The discipline was developed as a form of aerobic exercise in the 1990s by taekwondo expert Billy Blanks who gave it the name Tae Bo, a melding of “taekwondo” and “boxing”.

26 Some quality cigars : CUBANS

The production of all cigars and cigarettes in Cuba is managed by a state tobacco company called Cubatabaco. The marketing and distribution of all Cuban tobacco products is handled by Habanos, which is a subsidiary of Cubatabaco. Habanos works with just one company in each country where it markets products. As a result, customers seeking out genuine Cuban cigars know that there is a limited and defined list of suppliers around the world.

30 ___ Rica : COSTA

Costa Rica is a country in Central America that is bordered by Nicaragua to the north and Panama to the South. Costa Rica is remarkable in my opinion, a leader on the world stage in many areas. It has been referred to as the “greenest” country in the world, the “happiest” country in the world, and has a highly educated populace. In 1949, the country unilaterally abolished its own army … permanently!

31 Brontë and Dickinson, for two : EMILYS

In terms of age, Emily Brontë was the middle of the three Brontë sisters, younger than Charlotte and older than Anne. Emily was a poet and a novelist, and is best remembered for her only novel, “Wuthering Heights”. Emily died very young, at 30 years old. She never recovered from a severe cold that she caught at the funeral service of Branwell Brontë, her only brother. The cold developed into tuberculosis, for which she eschewed medical attention. She passed away after three months of illness.

Emily Dickinson wrote nearly 1800 poems in her lifetime, with less than a dozen published before she died in 1886. Emily’s younger sister discovered the enormous collection, and it was published in batches over the coming decades.

35 Letters spelled out with rocks on a desert island, in cartoons : SOS

The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots). That said, in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so “SOS” is really only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are back-formations that were introduced after the SOS signal was adopted.

39 What “choosy moms” choose, according to ads : JIF

Jif is the leading brand of peanut butter in the US, and has been since 1981. Introduced in 1958, Jif is now produced by Smuckers.

40 Obama ___ (2009-17) : ERA

Not only did future president Barack Obama attend Harvard University, so did his birth father, Barack Obama, Sr. President Obama’s parents separated when Barack Obama, Sr. went off to Harvard, leaving his wife and child back in Hawaii. Barack Obama, Jr. enrolled in Harvard Law School in 1988, and later became the first black president of the “Harvard Law Review”.

42 Pennsylvania, in D.C.: Abbr. : AVE

Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C. is sometimes called “America’s Main Street”, as it runs between the White House and the US Capitol. The exact reason why this important thoroughfare was given the name “Pennsylvania” seems to be unclear. One favored theory is that it was a gesture to the state of Pennsylvania after moving the country’s capital from Philadelphia.

44 You’d better believe it! : DOGMA

A dogma is a set of beliefs. The plural of “dogma” is “dogmata” (or “dogmas”, if you’re not a pedant like me!)

45 Sailor’s “Hello!” : AHOY!

“Ahoy!” is a nautical term used to signal a vessel. When the telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, he suggested that “ahoy” be used as a standard greeting when answering a call. However, Thomas Edison came up with “hello”, and we’ve been using that ever since.

47 Many a TikTok user, informally : GEN-ZER

Definitions vary, but it seems that the term “Generation Z” is reserved for the children of “Generation X”, and for the generation that follows the “Millennials” (Generation Y). Gen-Zers are also known as “Zoomers”, a portmanteau of “Z” and “boomer” (as in “baby boomer”).

TikTok is a video-sharing service that is based in China, and is very popular with the younger set I am told). The TikTok mobile app provides tools facilitating production of sophisticated selfie videos that use special effects.

49 Largest hot desert in the world : SAHARA

The name “Sahara” means “greatest desert” in Arabic. The Sahara is just that, a great desert covering almost 4 million square miles of Northern Africa. That’s almost the size of the United States.

On average, Antarctica is the coldest, driest and windiest of all seven continents. Although Antarctica is very cold, it is essentially a desert, the largest desert on the planet. It receives only 8 inches of precipitation annually at the coasts, and even less inland.

50 Lifesaving device for one with severe allergies : EPIPEN

EpiPen is a brand of epinephrine auto-injector. An EpiPen delivers a measured dose of epinephrine, which is a common treatment for an extreme allergic reaction.

56 Little clump on a sweater : PILL

“Pill” is the name given to small, ball-like fuzz found on woolen garments. The term comes from the Latin “pilula” meaning “little ball”, which also gives us the word “pill” that is used for a tablet of medicine.

57 Preppy clothing brand : IZOD

Jack Izod was a tailor of some repute over in England producing shirts for King George V, as well as other members of the Royal Family. As Izod was about to retire, he was approached for the use of his name by an American clothing manufacturer based in New York. The brand Izod of London was introduced to America in 1938.

A preppy is a student or graduate of a preparatory school. Such a school is designed to prepare students for college, and is often private with expensive fees.

59 Gaelic language : ERSE

There are actually three Erse languages: Irish, Manx (spoken on the Isle of Man) and Scots Gaelic. In their own tongues, these would be “Gaeilge” (in Ireland), “Gaelg” (on the Isle of Man) and “Gaidhlig” (in Scotland).

61 Birds that can twist their heads almost 360° : OWLS

Owls have 14 vertebrae in their necks (compared to our 7). The extra bones in the neck, along with other adaptations allow owls to rotate the head and neck about 270 degrees.

64 Fashion monogram : YSL

Yves Saint Laurent (YSL) was an Algerian-born French fashion designer. Saint Laurent started off working as an assistant to Christian Dior at the age of 17. Dior died just four years later, and as a very young man Saint-Laurent was named head of the House of Dior. However, in 1950 Saint Laurent was conscripted into the French Army and ended up in a military hospital after suffering a mental breakdown from the hazing inflicted on him by his fellow soldiers. His treatment included electroshock therapy and administration of sedatives and psychoactive drugs. He was released from hospital, managed to pull his life back together and started his own fashion house. A remarkable story …

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 The “A” of U.A.E. : ARAB
5 West Coast N.F.L. player, informally : LA RAM
10 Hearty one-pot meal : STEW
14 “Watch your ___!” (“Attitude check!”) : TONE
15 Playback option, in brief : SLO-MO
16 Cuisine with tom yum gai : THAI
17 “At Last” singer ___ James : ETTA
18 High-society, metaphorically : UPPER CRUST
20 Like a bad day for a picnic, say : RAINY
22 Blows up : EXPLODES
23 After-hours bank convenience : ATM
24 List-ending abbreviation : ETC
27 Center of activity : HUB
28 Something unimpressive, slangily : WEAK SAUCE
32 Finest efforts : BESTS
36 They get defused in some action films (one hopes!) : TIME BOMBS
38 Pigeon sound : COO
39 Rock’s Joan ___ & the Blackhearts : JETT
41 Italian mojito garnish : BASIL
42 The “A” of B.A. : ARTS
43 Wrath : IRE
44 “Stay, please!” : DON’T LEAVE!
46 North Dakota city that’s the title of a Coen brothers film : FARGO
48 “Smi-i-i-i-le!” : SAY “CHEESE”!
51 Frittata ingredient : EGG
53 “Dexter” airer, for short : SHO
54 Take a midday snooze : NAP
55 Revolutionary maneuver in sports or break dancing? : SPIN MOVE
60 Sidekick of Mario and Luigi : YOSHI
62 Social event hinted at by the ends of 18-, 28- and 48-Across : PIZZA PARTY
65 Sound of a flyswatter : WHAP!
66 Ingredient in some skin-care products : ALOE
67 Hemingway’s “The Sun Also ___” : RISES
68 Tales passed down through generations : LORE
69 “Here’s a brief summary,” in internet-speak : TL;DR
70 “The Big Podcast With Shaq” host : O’NEAL
71 Big fan, in modern lingo : STAN

Down

1 Consumed no cooked food : ATE RAW
2 Turn clockwise or counterclockwise : ROTATE
3 Warp drive power source on “Star Trek” : ANTIMATTER
4 Coffee tidbit : BEAN
5 Baton Rouge sch. : LSU
6 Swiss peak : ALP
7 Jump ___ (double Dutch equipment) : ROPE
8 Alternative to Visa or Mastercard, informally : AMEX
9 Change from Jason into a Power Ranger, say : MORPH
10 Flashing light at a concert : STROBE
11 Dull sound of impact : THUD
12 Slide (into) : EASE
13 Mental resourcefulness : WITS
19 Black card suit : CLUBS
21 Polite affirmative, in the South : YES’M
25 1990s fitness fad using karate moves : TAE BO
26 Some quality cigars : CUBANS
29 Word with shaving or sewing : … KIT
30 ___ Rica : COSTA
31 Brontë and Dickinson, for two : EMILYS
33 Image captured with Shift+Command+3 on a Mac : SCREENSHOT
34 One in nursery school : TOT
35 Letters spelled out with rocks on a desert island, in cartoons : SOS
37 “Disgusting!” : BLECH!
39 What “choosy moms” choose, according to ads : JIF
40 Obama ___ (2009-17) : ERA
42 Pennsylvania, in D.C.: Abbr. : AVE
44 You’d better believe it! : DOGMA
45 Sailor’s “Hello!” : AHOY!
47 Many a TikTok user, informally : GEN-ZER
49 Largest hot desert in the world : SAHARA
50 Lifesaving device for one with severe allergies : EPIPEN
52 Start getting paid, as an athlete : GO PRO
55 Petty fight : SPAT
56 Little clump on a sweater : PILL
57 Preppy clothing brand : IZOD
58 Self-absorbed : VAIN
59 Gaelic language : ERSE
61 Birds that can twist their heads almost 360° : OWLS
63 Brewed beverage : TEA
64 Fashion monogram : YSL

4 thoughts on “1114-22 NY Times Crossword 14 Nov 22, Monday”

  1. 9:50,no errors. I thought I was going faster than that. However, I did have a bunch of fat fingers I was constantly correcting.

  2. 6:24. Yet another error as my error-free-free streak continues. Didn’t know that usage of the word PILL, nor did I know TLDR. However, I do find TLDR to be rather amusing now that I know what it is.

    Most DOGMA tends to be DOGMAnure IMHO…

    Best –

  3. 9:00 apparently showing my age when, after I finished the puzzle, I looked up “TLDR”. I guess my electronic communications have been sufficiently short…..or ignored anyway.

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