1113-22 NY Times Crossword 13 Nov 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Samuel A. Donaldson
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Collision Courses

Shaded letters in the grid spell out the names for foodstuffs. But those foodstuffs COLLIDE, and are deflected 90-degrees after the COLLISION:

  • 62A Lab-engineered fare, facetiously … or a hint to the six crossings of shaded squares : FRANKENFOOD
  • 73A Bountiful harvests for farmers … or another hint to the crossings of shaded squares : BUMPER CROPS

The COLLISION COURSES are:

  • OLIVE & RICE
  • OAT & SQUASH
  • MANGO & BANANA
  • CORN & TOMATO
  • CHIVE & LIME
  • MELON & BEET

Bill’s time: 19m 53s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Sell, as bicycles? : PEDDLE

In its purest sense, a peddler is someone who sells his or her wares on the street or from door to door. The term probably comes from the Latin “pedarius” meaning “one who goes on foot”.

13 What might prompt a run for congress? : LIBIDO

“Libido” is a term popularized by Sigmund Freud. Freud’s usage was more general than is understood today, as he used “libido” to describe all instinctive energy that arose in the subconscious. He believed that we humans are driven by two desires, the desire for life (the libido, or Eros) and the desire for death (Thanatos).

19 Arctic jacket : ANORAK

Anoraks really aren’t very popular over here in America. Everyone has one in Ireland! An anorak is a heavy jacket with a hood, often lined with fur (or fake fur), and is an invention of the Inuit people.

21 Big name in pain relief : ANACIN

Anacin is a brand of pain reliever that comprises aspirin and caffeine as active ingredients.

22 Band whose final album, “Synchronicity,” was their most popular, with “The” : … POLICE

The Police were a trio formed in London in 1977, with Sting being the most famous member and the lead singer. The band’s long list of hits includes “Roxanne” (1977), “Message in a Bottle” (1979), “Walking on the Moon” (1979) and “Every Breath You Take” (1983). The Police broke up in 1986, but their reunion tour of 2007/2008 made them the world’s highest-earning musicians for the year 2008.

24 24 horas from now : MANANA

In Spanish, the day after “hoy” (today) is “mañana” (tomorrow).

25 Big name in pain relief : ALEVE

“Aleve” is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

26 Disembark : GO ASHORE

In getting on and off a seagoing vessel, one embarks and debarks (also “disembarks”). The terms “embark” and “debark” come from the name of the small ship known as a barque.

27 Used an unspoken language : SIGNED

American Sign Language (ASL)

29 Chinese zodiac animal : RAT

The 12-year cycle in the Chinese calendar uses the following animals in order:

  • Rat
  • Ox
  • Tiger
  • Rabbit
  • Dragon
  • Snake
  • Horse
  • Goat
  • Monkey
  • Rooster
  • Dog
  • Pig

30 Tiny amount of time: Abbr. : NSEC

“Nanosecond” is more correctly abbreviated to “ns” (as opposed to “nsec”) and really is a tiny amount of time: one billionth of a second.

33 Game typically played in the dark : LASER TAG

The name “Laser Tag” is really a misnomer as lasers are rarely used in the game. The “guns” actually send out infrared light, and not laser light, that is picked up by infrared detectors worn by the players.

39 Calf site : LEG

The calf muscle actually consists of two muscles, both of which connect to the foot through the Achilles tendon.

46 Like diamonds : RED

In most trick-taking games, especially bridge, the suits are ranked from highest to lowest, i.e. spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs.

52 Politico Cheney : LIZ

Liz Cheney is the eldest daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney. She was elected to the US House of Representatives in 2016, representing the state of Woming’s single seat. Her father held that same seat for ten years.

54 Color wheel options : TONES

A color wheel is a visual device that illustrates the relationship between various colors and hues.

55 Old yellers? : CRIERS

Town criers make public announcements on the streets, usually shouting “Oyez! Oyez! Oyez!” to attract attention. The term “oyez” derives from the Anglo-Norman word for “listen” and is used in this instance to me “Hear ye!”

57 Animal with a prominent proboscis : TAPIR

All four species of tapir are endangered. Even though the tapir looks much like a pig, it is more closely related to the horse and the rhinoceros.

A proboscis is a long appendage attached to the head of an animal, and is sometimes referred to as an elongated “nose”. Many an insect has a proboscis, as does an elephant.

62 Lab-engineered fare, facetiously … or a hint to the six crossings of shaded squares : FRANKENFOOD

“Frankenfood” is a slang term used for genetically modified food.

67 Totenberg of NPR : NINA

Nina Totenberg is a very able legal affairs correspondent who works for National Public Radio. Totenberg’s main focus is on the activities of the US Supreme Court. Famously, she was the journalist who uncovered the allegations of sexual harassment by Clarence Thomas made by Anita Hill.

70 Thing moving through a tube, maybe : OVUM

The Fallopian tubes leading from the ovaries of female mammals in the uterus. The tubes are named for the 16th-century Italian anatomist Gabriello Fallopio, who was the first to describe them.

71 Qom home : IRAN

Qom (also “Qum”) is a city in Iran located about 100 miles southwest of Tehran. Qom is a holy city in the Shi’a Islam tradition, and a pilgrimage destination.

72 Lenovo competitor : ACER

Acer is a Taiwanese company that I visited a couple of times when I was in the electronics business. I was very impressed back then with the company’s dedication to quality, although I have heard that things haven’t gone so well in recent years …

Lenovo is a Chinese manufacturer of computers that was founded as “Legend” in 1984. The name was changed to “Lenovo” in 2002. “Lenovo” is a portmanteau of “Le” (from “Legend”) and “novo” (Latin for “new”). IBM sold off its personal computer division to Lenovo in 2005.

78 What gorillas have that giraffes lack? : HARD G

The word “gorilla” starts with a hard letter G, whereas the word “giraffe” starts with a soft letter G.

81 Prefix with biology : ASTRO-

Astrobiology is the study of extraterrestrial life, as well as life on earth. The term “exobiology” applies to the study and search for life beyond earth.

82 Peter Pan alternative : JIF

Jif is the leading brand of peanut butter in the US, and has been since 1981. Introduced in 1958, Jif is now produced by Smuckers.

86 Hiking group? : NFL TEAM

The quarterback (QB) starts each play in football with a snap (also called a “hike”). He announces to his teammates the exact moment of the snap by calling out signals, usually including the word “hut” one or more times in a prearranged sequence.

88 Email symbols, informally : ATS

The “at symbol” (@) originated in the commercial word, as shorthand for “each at, per” and similar phrases. I suppose we see the symbol most commonly these days as part of email addresses.

91 Target of an annual shot : FLU

Influenza (the “flu”) is an ailment that is caused by a virus. The virus is readily inactivated by the use of soap, so washing hands and surfaces is especially helpful in containing flu outbreaks, and other virus pandemics …

95 Producers of multiple outs, for short : DPS

Double play (DP)

96 Like a very heavy sleeper : COMATOSE

Our term “coma” comes from the Greek “koma” meaning “deep sleep”.

102 It’s “rarely pure and never simple,” per Oscar Wilde : TRUTH

Oscar Wilde was an Irish writer who led a very public life in his adopted home of London. Although he was a prolific writer of many forms of literature, Wilde penned only one novel, “The Picture of Dorian Gray”. He was perhaps more renowned in his own time as a dramatist. Several of his plays are performed regularly today, including “Lady Windermere’s Fan”, “An Ideal Husband” and “The Importance of Being Earnest”. Wilde’s last work was a poem titled “The Ballad of Reading Gaol”, which recounted his time in prison after being convicted of homosexual offences in 1895 and sentenced to two years’ hard labor. Oscar Wilde died in 1900 at the age of 46 in Paris, destitute.

106 Mop’s partner, in a brand name : GLO

Mop & Glo is a brand of floor cleaner and polish.

116 Pinkerton who founded the Pinkerton detective agency : ALLAN

The Pinkerton National Detective Agency was founded in 1850 by Scottish American detective and spy Allan Pinkerton. Apparently, in the late 19th century, Pinkerton had more agents than the US Army had soldiers.

119 “Brille Brille Petite ___” (children’s song abroad) : ETOILE

“Twinkle Twinkle Little Star” is an English nursery rhyme. The words for the rhyme are taken from a poem called “The Star” written by Jane Taylor, by far her most famous work (although she rarely gets the credit). The rhyme is sung to a French folk tune called “Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman”, the same tune used by Mozart for a charming and famous set of variations.

120 Mesopotamian metropolis : EDESSA

Mesopotamia was the land that lay between two rivers, the Tigris and the Euphrates, that flow through modern-day Iraq. The name “Mesopotamia” means “between the rivers”.

122 Experience sharer : MENTOR

A mentor is a trusted teacher or counselor. The term “mentor” comes from Homer’s “Odyssey” in which there is a character named Mentor. He is a friend of Odysseus, although he is a relatively ineffective old man. The goddess Athena takes on Mentor’s appearance in order to guide Odysseus’s young son Telemachus through difficult times.

Down

1 Tree of the custard apple family : PAPAW

The papaw (also “pawpaw”) tree is native to North America and has a fruit that looks similar to a papaya. Papaw probably gets its name from the word papaya, but papaw and papaya are two distinct species.

The custard apple or sugar apple is the fruit of a small deciduous tree native to the New World. It is also called a “sweetsop” in some parts of the world. The soursop, the fruit of an evergreen tree that’s related to the paw-paw, has a more sour taste.

2 “The ___ Holmes Mysteries” (young adult series) : ENOLA

“The Enola Holmes Mysteries” is a series of detective novels for young adults by American author Nancy Springer. The title character is the 14-year-old sister of 34-year-old Sherlock Holmes, the detective created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Springer’s novels were adapted into a 2020 film “Enola Holmes” that Netflix picked up at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. I saw this one, and enjoyed it …

10 Garnish for a Gibson cocktail : ONION

A Gibson is simply a regular martini (gin and vermouth) with the traditional olive garnish replaced with a pickled onion.

13 Quick escapes : LAMS

To be on the lam is to be in flight, to have escaped from prison. “On the lam” is American slang that originated at the end of the 19th century. The word “lam” also means “beat” or “thrash”, as in “lambaste”. So “on the lam” might derive from the phrase “to beat it, scram”.

14 Cry of perfection from a carpenter? : I NAILED IT

A carpenter is someone who shapes and assembles structural woodwork. The term “carpenter” comes from the Late Latin “carpentarius” meaning “wagon or carriage maker”. Both “carpenter” and “car” probably derive ultimately from the Gaulish word “karros” meaning “chariot”. Quite interesting …

15 City NW of Bar Harbor : BANGOR

Bangor is the third-most populous city in the state of Maine (after Portland and Lewiston). The city was given its name in 1791, after the hymn “Antiphonary of Bangor” that was written at Bangor Abbey in Northern Ireland.

Bar Harbor is a town on the Maine coast that is a popular place to visit in the summer. Cruise ships are a common sight in the harbor from May through October. One of the town’s more famous sons was former US Vice President Nelson Rockefeller, who was born there in 1908.

26 “For ___, all nature is too little”: Seneca : GREED

Seneca the Younger was a tutor and advisor to Nero, emperor of ancient Rome. Although maybe innocent, Seneca was forced to commit suicide by Nero as it was alleged that Seneca participated in a plot to kill the emperor. To kill himself, Seneca cut into a number of veins in order to bleed to death.

31 Tesla but not Edison : CAR

Tesla Motors was founded in 2003 as a manufacturer of electric vehicles based in Palo Alto, California. Tesla is noted for producing the first electric sports car, called the Tesla Roadster. The company followed the sports car with a luxury sedan, the Model S. The Model S was the world’s best selling plug-in electric vehicle of 2015. Tesla Motors shortened its name to Tesla in early 2017.

35 Smart ___ : ALECK

Apparently, the original “smart Alec” (sometimes “Aleck”) was one Alec Hoag, a pimp, thief and confidence trickster who plied his trade in New York City in the 1840s.

38 Kenan’s comedy partner : KEL

“Kenan & Kel” is a sitcom that aired on Nickelodeon from 1996 to 2000. It starred Kenan Thompson (now of “Saturday Night Live”), and Kel Mitchell.

39 Queen commemorated on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : LATIFAH

Queen Latifah is the stage name of the multitalented Dana Owens. The name “Latifah” is Arabic in origin and translates as “delicate, very kind”. Owens found the name and was attracted to it when she was just eight years old.

40 Objects from faraway lands : EXOTICA

The word “exotic” means “belonging to another country”, and is derived from the Greek “exo-” meaning “outside”. Exotica are things that are excitingly strange, often from foreign parts.

44 Land of leprechauns : ERIN

A leprechaun is a mischievous fairy of Irish folklore. Traditionally, they spend their days making shoes and hide all their money in a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow. Our word “leprechaun” comes from the Irish name for such a sprite, i.e. “leipreachán”.

51 Seat of Utah County : PROVO

Provo, Utah is a city located just over 40 miles south of South Lake City. Provo is home to Brigham Young University. The city was originally called Fort Utah, and the name was changed to Provo in 1850 in honor of Étienne Provost. Provost was a French-Canadian fur trader who was perhaps the first man of European descent to see the Great Salt Lake.

53 Most off-the-wall : ZANIEST

Something described as zany is clownish and bizarre. “Zany” can also be a noun, a term used for a clown or buffoon. The original noun was “Zanni”, a Venetian dialect variant of Gianni, short for Giovanni (John). Zanni was a character who appeared in comedy plays of the day, and was someone who aped the principal actors.

56 Alphabet ___ : SOUP

Believe it or not, alphabet pasta (pasta shaped like letters of the alphabet) has been around since the 1870s. Campbell’s introduced its Alphabet Soup brand in the 1950s.

64 “Knives Out” actress Ana de ___ : ARMAS

Ana de Armas is an actress from Cuba. Having attended the National Theater School of Cuba, she moved to Spain at the age of 18. Thre, she made a name for herself in a Spanish TV series called “El Internado”. De Armas moved to Los Angeles in 2014, after which her performance opposite Ryan Gosling in 2017’s “Blade Runner 2049” earned her critical acclaim.

“Knives Out” is an intriguing murder mystery film released in 2019. There’s a great cast including Daniel Craig, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Collette and Christopher Plummer. I really enjoyed this one, partly because it’s a clever, contemporary take on a classic whodunit movie …

66 Contacts via Instagram, informally : DMS

Direct message (DM)

74 Singer/songwriter ___ Mai : ELLA

Ella Mai is an R&B singer from England. Mai went to high school in New York City before returning to Britain.

75 They start in the corners : ROOKS

The corner piece in the game of chess is called a “rook”, a word coming from the Persian “rokh” meaning a “chariot”. The rook has also been called, perhaps incorrectly, the castle, tower, marquess and rector.

76 Bygone magazine for rock music enthusiasts : CREEM

The American rock n’ roll magazine called “Creem” was first published in 1969, and turned out its last issue in 1989. Apparently, “Creem” coined the terms “punk rock” and “heavy metal”.

79 Beast with a mouth best left unexamined : GIFT HORSE

Someone using the idiom “don’t look a gift horse in the mouth” is giving a warning not to be ungrateful on receiving a gift. One way to be ungrateful, if being given a horse, is to immediately verify the horse’s age by looking in its mouth and checking the shape and size of its teeth. The phrase is ancient, and a form of it can be found in a letter penned circa 400 CE. In the missive, St. Jerome says “Noli equi dentes inspicere donati” (Never inspect the teeth of a given horse).

81 Where you went : ALMA MATER

The literal translation for the Latin term “alma mater” is “nourishing mother”. The phrase was used in ancient Rome to refer to mother goddesses, and in Medieval Christianity the term was used to refer to the Virgin Mary. Nowadays, one’s alma mater is the school one attended, either high school or college, usually one’s last place of education.

83 Longtime Progressive spokeswoman : FLO

Progressive is a popular auto insurance company, the one that uses the perky character named “Flo” as a spokesperson. Flo is played by comedian and actress Stephanie Courtney.

85 Vehicle that might have parachute brakes : DRAGSTER

Back in the 18th century, “drag” was slang for a wagon or buggy, as it was “dragged” along by a horse or horses. In the 1930s, the underworld adopted “drag” as slang for an automobile. This sense of the word was imported into automobile racing in the 1940s, giving the name to “drag racing”. A drag race is basically a competition between two cars to determine which can accelerate faster from a standstill.

86 Brand name-checked in Paul Simon’s “Kodachrome” : NIKON

The Japanese company Nikon was founded in 1917 with the merger of three manufacturers of various optical devices. After the merger, Nikon’s main output was lenses (including the first lenses for Canon cameras, before Canon made its own). During the war, Nikon sales grew rapidly as the company focused on (pun!) equipment for the military including periscopes and bomb sights.

89 Relative of a waterspout : TORNADO

Although a tornado (plural “tornadoes, tornados”) can be encountered in many locations around the world, it is most likely to be experienced in North America, and particularly in “Tornado Alley” in the central US. The Canadian Tornado Alley in southern Canada is where one is second most likely in the world to encounter a tornado.

90 More cocksure : SMUGGER

To be cocksure is to be confident, as assured as a “cock”. English author D. H. Lawrence introduced us to a female version of the term: “hensure”.

92 Sch. for which John Wayne played tackle : USC

John Wayne was named Marion Mitchell Morrison at birth, after his grandfather who was a Civil War veteran. When young Marion was a little boy, a local fireman used to call him “Little Duke” because he was always seen walking with his large dog called “Duke”. Marion liked the name “Duke” and so he called himself Duke Morrison for the rest of his life. That said, Duke Morrison also used John Wayne as a stage name.

97 Wedding proposal? : A TOAST

The tradition of toasting someone probably dates back to the reign of Charles II, when the practice was to drink a glass of wine to the health of a beautiful or favored woman. In those days, spiced toast was added to beverages to add flavor, so the use of the word “toast” was an indicator that the lady’s beauty would enhance the wine. Very charming, I must say …

98 So-called “father of geometry” : EUCLID

Euclid of Alexandria was a Greek mathematician who lived in the first millennium, often referred to as the “Father of Geometry”. He wrote a famous book called “Elements” on the subject of mathematics, and the title was so enduring that it was used as the main textbook for the subject right up to the late 19th century.

100 Honors in the ad biz : CLIOS

The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

104 “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” spinoff : RHODA

The seventies sitcom “Rhoda” was a spinoff of “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” that starred Valerie Harper. The eighth episode of the show was an hour-long special in which Rhoda married her fiance Joe (played by David Groh). At the time of airing it was the second-most watched television episode in history, second only to the 1953 birth of Little Ricky on “I Love Lucy”.

105 Unpopular food that’s rich in minerals : LIVER

The human liver has many functions, one of which is to store vital substances. The list of substances stored in the liver includes glucose (as glycogen), vitamin A, vitamin D, vitamin B12, vitamin K, iron and copper. Another function of the liver is to produce bile, a substance stored in the gallbladder that aids in the digestion of fats.

109 Claw : TALON

A talon is a claw of a bird of prey. The term “talon” ultimately derives from “talus”, the Latin word for “ankle”.

110 Hägar the Horrible’s hound : SNERT

“Hägar the Horrible” is a comic strip that was created by the late Dik Browne and is now drawn by his son, Chris Browne. “Hägar the Terrible” (not “Horrible”) was the nickname given to Dik by his sons. The strip’s title character is a red-bearded Viking living on the Norwegian coast during the Middle Ages. Hägar lives with his overbearing wife Helga, his sensitive son Hamlet, his pretty daughter Honi, and his clever dog Snert.

115 Spanish dirección : ESTE

“Este” (east) is a “dirección” (direction), in Spanish.

119 Source of big green eggs : EMU

Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs. It is the male emu that incubates the eggs. The incubation period lasts about 8 weeks, during which time the male neither eats nor drinks, just lapping up any morning dew that is nearby. While incubating a clutch of eggs, male emus lose about a third of their weight.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Sell, as bicycles? : PEDDLE
7 Coups in journalism : SCOOPS
13 What might prompt a run for congress? : LIBIDO
19 Arctic jacket : ANORAK
20 Hairspray brand since the 1950s : AQUA NET
21 Big name in pain relief : ANACIN
22 Band whose final album, “Synchronicity,” was their most popular, with “The” : … POLICE
23 More in need of practice : RUSTIER
24 24 horas from now : MANANA
25 Big name in pain relief : ALEVE
26 Disembark : GO ASHORE
27 Used an unspoken language : SIGNED
28 One not getting in too deep : WADER
29 Chinese zodiac animal : RAT
30 Tiny amount of time: Abbr. : NSEC
32 Hella : LOTSA
33 Game typically played in the dark : LASER TAG
37 Become established : TAKE ROOT
39 Calf site : LEG
42 Common concert merch : TEE
43 Pronoun for Frenchwomen : ELLES
46 Like diamonds : RED
47 It shares a key with “!” : ONE
48 It might be stuck on the chopping block : AXE-HEAD
50 Rise, as a steed might : REAR UP
52 Politico Cheney : LIZ
54 Color wheel options : TONES
55 Old yellers? : CRIERS
57 Animal with a prominent proboscis : TAPIR
61 Trifling, informally : ITTY
62 Lab-engineered fare, facetiously … or a hint to the six crossings of shaded squares : FRANKENFOOD
67 Totenberg of NPR : NINA
68 “___ at 11” (local news promo) : FILM
69 Prefix with biology : AERO-
70 Thing moving through a tube, maybe : OVUM
71 Qom home : IRAN
72 Lenovo competitor : ACER
73 Bountiful harvests for farmers … or another hint to the crossings of shaded squares : BUMPER CROPS
77 Grub : EATS
78 What gorillas have that giraffes lack? : HARD G
80 Spot for a tattoo : PARLOR
81 Prefix with biology : ASTRO-
82 Peter Pan alternative : JIF
84 Achieved a flight training milestone : SOLOED
86 Hiking group? : NFL TEAM
88 Email symbols, informally : ATS
91 Target of an annual shot : FLU
93 Worker who makes a ton of dough : BAKER
94 Terse affirmation : I AM!
95 Producers of multiple outs, for short : DPS
96 Like a very heavy sleeper : COMATOSE
99 Precisely : SMACK-DAB
102 It’s “rarely pure and never simple,” per Oscar Wilde : TRUTH
103 Bit of hairstyling : CURL
106 Mop’s partner, in a brand name : GLO
107 Measures up to : MEETS
111 Tight (with) : IN GOOD
113 Pipes up : CHIMES IN
116 Pinkerton who founded the Pinkerton detective agency : ALLAN
117 Unpredictable change : VAGARY
118 Is delighted by the invitation : LOVES TO
119 “Brille Brille Petite ___” (children’s song abroad) : ETOILE
120 Mesopotamian metropolis : EDESSA
121 Thinks up : IDEATES
122 Experience sharer : MENTOR
123 Got in order : SORTED
124 Fast-sounding freshwater fish : DARTER
125 Eye-grabbing email subject line : URGENT!

Down

1 Tree of the custard apple family : PAPAW
2 “The ___ Holmes Mysteries” (young adult series) : ENOLA
3 Gave (out) : DOLED
4 Claptrap : DRIVEL
5 Makes some deep cuts in : LACERATES
6 Barely squeeze (by) : EKE
7 Unlawful occupant : SQUATTER
8 Swear word : CUSS
9 Swear word : OATH
10 Garnish for a Gibson cocktail : ONION
11 Jurors, to a defendant : PEERS
12 Word with food, clothes or entertainment : STREET …
13 Quick escapes : LAMS
14 Cry of perfection from a carpenter? : I NAILED IT
15 City NW of Bar Harbor : BANGOR
16 Retort to “No, you’re not able” : I CAN TOO!
17 Has for supper : DINES ON
18 Seeing someone socially : ON A DATE
20 Loud, as a crowd : AROAR
26 “For ___, all nature is too little”: Seneca : GREED
31 Tesla but not Edison : CAR
34 Vast quantity : SEA
35 Smart ___ : ALECK
36 Bad look : GLARE
38 Kenan’s comedy partner : KEL
39 Queen commemorated on the Hollywood Walk of Fame : LATIFAH
40 Objects from faraway lands : EXOTICA
41 Not so harsh : GENTLER
44 Land of leprechauns : ERIN
45 Seek, as punitive payment : SUE FOR
49 1993 R&B hit with the lyric “Keep playin’ that song all night” : HEY MR DJ
51 Seat of Utah County : PROVO
53 Most off-the-wall : ZANIEST
56 Alphabet ___ : SOUP
58 Illegal, as a download : PIRATED
59 Ensnared : IN A TRAP
60 Return payments? : RANSOMS
62 Totally terrif : FAB
63 Go back for more : RE-UP
64 “Knives Out” actress Ana de ___ : ARMAS
65 “Happy to!” : NO PROB!
66 Contacts via Instagram, informally : DMS
74 Singer/songwriter ___ Mai : ELLA
75 They start in the corners : ROOKS
76 Bygone magazine for rock music enthusiasts : CREEM
79 Beast with a mouth best left unexamined : GIFT HORSE
81 Where you went : ALMA MATER
83 Longtime Progressive spokeswoman : FLO
85 Vehicle that might have parachute brakes : DRAGSTER
86 Brand name-checked in Paul Simon’s “Kodachrome” : NIKON
87 It’s hot right now : FAD
88 Some skin care ingredients, informally : ACTIVES
89 Relative of a waterspout : TORNADO
90 More cocksure : SMUGGER
92 Sch. for which John Wayne played tackle : USC
97 Wedding proposal? : A TOAST
98 So-called “father of geometry” : EUCLID
100 Honors in the ad biz : CLIOS
101 Fit in : BELONG
104 “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” spinoff : RHODA
105 Unpopular food that’s rich in minerals : LIVER
108 A-listers : ELITE
109 Claw : TALON
110 Hägar the Horrible’s hound : SNERT
112 Twosome : DYAD
114 105-Down, e.g. : MEAT
115 Spanish dirección : ESTE
119 Source of big green eggs : EMU

6 thoughts on “1113-22 NY Times Crossword 13 Nov 22, Sunday”

  1. 28:28. Got bogged down in the bottom–where the theme actually helped me out a little–and then had to find a couple of errors.

  2. 44:30. I got bogged down…everywhere. The theme helped me in a few spots and I started out fast only to run SMACKDAB into a wall.

  3. 32:58 with 2 errors (2 squares/4 words take your pick), but once again it was only due to my not knowing the answers…

    Tough slog overall. I completely punted on the theme. Didn’t notice anything until I came here to the blog.

    Also couldn’t figure out how diamonds are RED until I finally thought of playing cards. Duh. I think I was still half asleep doing this one.

    Best –

  4. 1:25:33 with one wrong letter…44D I had Erie and had no clue what 62A was.
    To spend that much time and have one wrong letter is more than discouraging 😥😥
    Stay safe😀

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