0808-22 NY Times Crossword 8 Aug 22, Monday

Constructed by: Kathy Lowden
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Makeup

Themed answers each start with an item of MAKEUP:

  • 50D Reconcile after a quarrel … or a hint to the starts of 17-, 25-, 52- and 61-Across : MAKE UP or MAKEUP
  • 17A Pale pink vineyard offerings : BLUSH WINES
  • 25A Practice punches with an imaginary opponent : SHADOWBOX
  • 52A Barrel of explosive stuff, or a situation that’s ready to blow : POWDER KEG
  • 61A Writings on an album sleeve or jewel case insert : LINER NOTES

Bill’s time: 5m 24s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

5 Jack who could consume no fat, in a nursery rhyme : SPRAT

“Jack Sprat” is a nickname given in the 16th century to people of small stature. Jack featured in a proverb of the day:

Jack will eat not fat, and Jull doth love no leane. Yet betwixt them both they lick the dishes cleane.

Over time, this mutated into a nursery rhyme that is still recited in England:

Jack Sprat could eat no fat. His wife could eat no lean. And so between them both, you see, they licked the platter clean.

10 “___ It Romantic?” (Rodgers and Hart classic) : ISN’T

“Isn’t It Romantic?” is a charming song by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart that was introduced in the 1932 movie “Love Me Tonight”. It is sung twice In the film, by Jeanette MacDonald and by Maurice Chevalier.

15 Big name in toothbrushes : ORAL-B

The Oral-B toothbrush was introduced to the world in 1950, designed by a California periodontist. The first “model” was the Oral-B 60, a name given to reflect the 60 tufts in the brush. In 1969, the Oral-B was the first toothbrush to get to the moon as it was the toothbrush of choice for the crew of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

16 Flatbread served with curry : NAAN

Naan (also “nan”) bread is very popular in Indian restaurants, as well as in other West, Central and South Asian cuisines. Indian Naan is traditionally baked in a clay oven known as a tandoor.

Curry powder is a mixture of spices used in South Asian dishes. The actual composition of curry powder varies depending on the cuisine. The term “curry” is an anglicization of the Tamil “kari” meaning “sauce”.

17 Pale pink vineyard offerings : BLUSH WINES

The term “blush” has only been used in the world of wine since the late seventies, and is really only used here in the US. Today, we think of a blush as a relatively sweet pink wine, and a rosé as something more dry.

19 Something Santa makes (and checks twice) : LIST

Santa checks his list of those who are naughty or nice.

30 Disobey James Bond when making a martini : STIR

Why have a vodka martini shaken and not stirred (like James Bond, 007)? For one thing, the shaken drink tends to be colder. And with more melted ice in the drink, it isn’t as strong. These are my personal observations. No need to write in …

31 Sound system : STEREO

Monophonic sound (“mono”) is sound reproduced using just one audio channel, which is usually played out of just one speaker. Stereophonic sound is reproduced using two audio channels, with the sound from each channel played out of two different speakers. The pair of stereo speakers are usually positioned apart from each other so that sound appears to come from between the two. Quadraphonic sound (4.0 surround sound) uses four audio channels with the sound played back through four speakers that are often positioned at the corners of the room in which one is listening.

33 Manhattan’s Madison or Lexington: Abbr. : AVE

Madison Avenue became the center of advertising in the US in the twenties, and serves as the backdrop to the great TV drama “Mad Men”. There aren’t many advertising agencies left on Madison Avenue these days though, as most have moved to other parts of New York City. The street takes its name from Madison Square, which is bounded on one side by Madison Avenue. The square in turn takes its name from James Madison, the fourth President of the United States.

Lexington Avenue in New York City is famous for many things, but my favorite fact is that it was the site of the first ever arrest for speeding in the city. In 1899 a police officer on a bicycle caught up with a cab driver who was tearing down Lexington Avenue, at the breakneck speed of 12mph …

37 Lends an ear : LISTENS

To lend an ear is to listen. The phrase “lend an ear”, like so many phrases, was coined by the Bard. There is a famous speech made by Mark Antony in William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” that starts with:

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar.

42 One experiencing gaps in memory : AMNESIAC

“Amnesia”, meaning “loss of memory”, is a Greek word that we imported into English in the 17th century. The Greek term comes from combining the prefixes “a-” meaning “not” and “mnesi-” meaning “remembering”.

45 Vietnamese noodle-and-broth dish : PHO

Pho (pronounced “fuh”) is a noodle soup from Vietnam that is a popular street food.

46 Source of seasonal sneezes : POLLEN

The pollen of ragweed is the most common allergen of all pollens. It seems that the pollen season has been lengthening in recent years, probably due to global warming.

48 Metrical foot in poetry : IAMB

An iamb is a metrical foot containing an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable. The lines in Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” use four sequential iambs, e.g. “Whose woods / these are / I think / I know”. With that sequence of four iambs, the poem’s structure is described as iambic tetrameter.

52 Barrel of explosive stuff, or a situation that’s ready to blow : POWDER KEG

Gunpowder is the earliest-known explosive chemical. Also called “black powder”, it is a mixture of sulfur, charcoal and saltpeter (i.e. potassium nitrate). The saltpeter is a powerful oxidizing agent, providing the oxygen to burn the sulfur and charcoal, which acts as the fuel in the mixture. Gunpowder was invented by the Chinese in the 8th century.

54 Steel support for concrete : REBAR

A steel bar or mesh used to reinforce concrete is called “rebar”, which is short for “reinforcing bar”.

55 Title bestowed on Mick Jagger in 2003 (although the queen refused to present the award herself) : SIR

The Rolling Stones lead singer’s full name is Sir Michael Philip Jagger. “Mick” was knighted for his services to popular music in 2003.

56 Oscar-winning Ben Affleck film set in Iran : ARGO

“Argo” is a 2012 movie that is based on the true story of the rescue of six diplomats hiding out during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. The film was directed by and stars Ben Affleck and is produced by Grant Heslov and George Clooney, the same pair who produced the excellent “Good Night, and Good Luck”. I highly recommend “Argo”, although I found the scenes of religious fervor to be very frightening …

Actor and filmmaker Ben Affleck started his career as a child actor in the PBS show “The Voyage of the Mimi”. His big break came with the release of the film “Good Will Hunting” which he co-wrote and co-starred in with his childhood friend Matt Damon. Affleck had a relationship with actress and singer Jennifer Lopez, with the celebrity couple often being referred to as “Bennifer” in the media. He was also married for several years to actress Jennifer Garner, with whom he has three children.

58 Letters preceding an alias : AKA

Also known as (aka)

61 Writings on an album sleeve or jewel case insert : LINER NOTES

These days, the term “liner notes” is used for the informational booklet which comes with a music CD. The original liner notes (also “sleeve notes”) were the informational text printed on the inner sleeve (“liner”) of a 12-inch vinyl record.

66 ___ ex machina : DEUS

“Deus ex machina” is a Latin phrase that translates as “god out of the machine”. It describes a plot device used in some works whereby some apparently inextricable problem is suddenly resolved by an unexpected intervention. The term was first used in Horace’s “Ars Poetica”.

68 A bit buzzed : TIPSY

The term “tipsy” comes from the verb “to tip” meaning “to overturn, knock over”, and has been meaning “drunk” since the late 1500s.

69 Award for athletic achievement : ESPY

The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

Down

1 Buffalo’s N.H.L. team : SABRES

The Buffalo Sabres joined the National Hockey League in the 1970-71 season. The team took the name “Sabres” as the result of a fan contest.

3 Tutti-___ : FRUTTI

The adjective “tutti-frutti” describes a prepared confection that has a combination of fruit flavors. “Tutti frutti” is Italian for “all fruits”.

4 Greek goddess of the dawn : EOS

In Greek mythology, Eos was the goddess of the dawn who lived at the edge of the ocean. Eos would wake each morning to welcome her brother Helios the sun. The Roman equivalent of Eos was Aurora. Rather delightfully, Homer referred to Eos as “rosy-fingered dawn” in both “Iliad” and “Odyssey”.

6 One officiating at communion or hearing confession : PRIEST

The Communion rite is the part of the Mass in the Roman Catholic tradition. The rite involves distribution of the Communion bread (the host, a wafer) to the faithful.

A member of the Roman Catholic church can participate in the sacrament of confession. A penitent confesses to a priest, starting with the words, “Bless me Father, for I have sinned. It has been [time period] since my last confession …”

8 Ginger ___ (soft drink) : ALE

The brand most closely associated with ginger ale is Canada Dry. “Canada Dry Pale Ginger Ale” was first formulated in 1904 by a Canadian chemist called John McLoughlin from Ontario. Prohibition in the United States helped sales of the drink as it was particularly effective in masking the taste of illegally-produced, homemade liquor.

9 Atlanta-based TV channel : TBS

The tbs cable television station started out in 1967 as a local broadcast TV station in Atlanta. The station’s first call letters were WJRJ-TV, and this was changed to WTCG in 1970 when it was acquired by Ted Turner (the TCG stood for Turner Communications Group). In 1976, Turner started distributing WTCG via satellite making its programming available in other parts of the country. WTCG was only the second channel to transmit via satellite, following HBO. The difference was that WTCG was broadcast without requiring a premium subscription. The station’s call sign was changed again in 1979 to WTBS, with “TBS” standing for Turner Broadcasting System. In 1981, the channel adopted the moniker “Superstation WTBS”.

11 Catamaran, for one : SAILBOAT

A catamaran is a boat that has two hulls. Catamarans have been around a long time, with the design having been used by the Ancient Greeks. Notably, the design was used by the locals in the Bay of Bengal and it was this design that was adopted by European boat builders. The name “catamaran” comes from the Tamil language of southeastern India, with “kattu maram” meaning “logs tied together”.

12 Rap’s Lil ___ X : NAS

“Lil Nas X” is the stage name of rapper Montero Lamar Hill. He was born and raised just outside of Atlanta. His first hit was “Old Town Road”, which is classified as country rap.

13 Explosive stuff, in brief : TNT

“TNT” is an abbreviation for “trinitrotoluene”. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

18 Boater or bowler : HAT

A boater is a straw hat often associated with boating, hence the name.

I think that a bowler hat is usually called a derby here in the US. The bowler was first produced in 1849 in London by hatmakers Thomas and William Bowler, hence the name. The alternative name of “derby” comes from the tradition of wearing bowler hats at the Derby horse race (a major race held annually in England).

28 Sheriff Andy Taylor’s boy on 1960s TV : OPIE
[54D 28-Down portrayer ___ Howard : RON]

Opie Taylor is the character played by Ron Howard on “The Andy Griffith Show”. Opie lives with widowed father Andy Taylor (played by Andy Griffith) and his great-aunt Beatrice “Aunt Bee” Taylor (played by Frances Bavier). Ron Howard first played the role in 1960 in the pilot show, when he was just 5 years old. Howard sure has come a long way since playing Opie Taylor. He has directed some fabulous movies including favorites of mine like “Apollo 13”, “A Beautiful Mind” and “The Da Vinci Code”.

34 Evening prayer : VESPER

I’m not sure that this clue is quite correct. “Vesper” is Latin for “evening”, but “vespers” is the name given to the evening prayer.

36 ___ Bauer, clothing store chain : EDDIE

The Eddie Bauer clothing chain was established in Seattle in 1920 by an outdoorsman named Eddie Bauer (unsurprisingly!). Bauer was the man who patented the first quilted down jacket, in 1940.

37 Reindeer herder of Scandinavia : LAPP

Lapland is a geographic region in northern Scandinavia, largely found within the Arctic Circle. Parts of Lapland are in Norway, Sweden and Finland. The people who are native to the region are called the Sami people. The Sami don’t like to be referred to as “Lapps” and they regard the term as insulting.

38 “The way I see it,” to texters : IMHO

In my humble opinion (IMHO)

40 Vaccine pioneer Jonas : SALK

Jonas Salk was an American medical researcher who developed the first safe polio vaccine. In the fifties, especially after the 1952 epidemic, polio was the biggest health fear in the US. It killed thousands and left even more with disabilities, and most of the victims were children. The situation was dire and the authorities immediately quarantined the family of any polio victim. That quarantine was so strict that in many cases the families were not even permitted to attend the funeral of a family member who died from the disease.

47 Exit door : EGRESS

Barnum’s American Museum opened in New York City in 1841, and sadly burned to the ground in 1865. The attractions in the museum included zoo animals, waxworks as well as theater shows and “freak shows”. Famously, a sign pointing to the exit of the museum read “This Way to the Egress”. Many visitors followed the sign, anxious to see the “egress” exhibit, only to find themselves out on the street!

51 Shrill and blaring, as a trumpet : BRASSY

We get our word “trumpet”, describing the brass instrument, from the Old French word “trompe”. A “trompe” was a long, tube-like instrument, and a “trompette” was a smaller version.

53 “Same here!” : DITTO

The word “ditto” was originally used in Italian (from Tuscan dialect) to avoid repetition of the names of months in a series of dates. So, “ditto” is another wonderful import from that lovely land …

57 ___ Poupon mustard : GREY

Grey Poupon mustard dates way back to 1777 when Maurice Grey started making mustard with Auguste Poupon in Dijon, France.

59 Org. sponsoring school fund-raisers : PTA

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

60 “Wise” bird : OWL

The Greek goddess Athena (sometimes “Athene”) is often associated with wisdom, among other attributes. In many representations. Athena is depicted with an owl sitting on her head. It is this linkage of the owl with the goddess of wisdom that led to today’s perception of the owl as being “wise”. Athena’s Roman counterpart was Minerva.

61 Biblical fellow with a salty wife? : LOT

Lot was a nephew of Abraham, with his story appearing in the Book of Genesis. At one point Lot had to flee the doomed city of Sodom with his wife. God gave instructions that the couple should not look back as they left the city, but Lot’s wife disobeyed and she was turned into a pillar of salt.

62 “___ Were a Rich Man” (song from “Fiddler on the Roof”) : IF I

If I Were a Rich Man” is a wonderful song from the 1964 musical “Fiddler on the Roof”. The musical is based on stories about “Tevye the Dairyman” by Yiddish author Sholem Aleichem. The song’s title is inspired by a specific Sholem Aleichem monologue entitled “If I Were a Rothschild”, a reference to the wealthy Rothschild family.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 In no danger : SAFE
5 Jack who could consume no fat, in a nursery rhyme : SPRAT
10 “___ It Romantic?” (Rodgers and Hart classic) : ISN’T
14 Hairstyle that may be parted and tied into two puffs : AFRO
15 Big name in toothbrushes : ORAL-B
16 Flatbread served with curry : NAAN
17 Pale pink vineyard offerings : BLUSH WINES
19 Something Santa makes (and checks twice) : LIST
20 Go bad : ROT
21 “Just ___!” (“Hold on!”) : A SEC
22 Buddy : PAL
23 Wipe out big-time : EAT IT
25 Practice punches with an imaginary opponent : SHADOWBOX
30 Disobey James Bond when making a martini : STIR
31 Sound system : STEREO
32 Choose : OPT
33 Manhattan’s Madison or Lexington: Abbr. : AVE
35 Stuffiness that lingers in an unventilated room : STALE AIR
37 Lends an ear : LISTENS
41 Refreshing summer beverage : ICED TEA
42 One experiencing gaps in memory : AMNESIAC
44 Quirky : ODD
45 Vietnamese noodle-and-broth dish : PHO
46 Source of seasonal sneezes : POLLEN
48 Metrical foot in poetry : IAMB
52 Barrel of explosive stuff, or a situation that’s ready to blow : POWDER KEG
54 Steel support for concrete : REBAR
55 Title bestowed on Mick Jagger in 2003 (although the queen refused to present the award herself) : SIR
56 Oscar-winning Ben Affleck film set in Iran : ARGO
58 Letters preceding an alias : AKA
59 Sulky expression : POUT
61 Writings on an album sleeve or jewel case insert : LINER NOTES
64 Ninny : TWIT
65 Handy : OF USE
66 ___ ex machina : DEUS
67 Soprano’s choirmate : ALTO
68 A bit buzzed : TIPSY
69 Award for athletic achievement : ESPY

Down

1 Buffalo’s N.H.L. team : SABRES
2 Not sinking : AFLOAT
3 Tutti-___ : FRUTTI
4 Greek goddess of the dawn : EOS
5 Opposite of reaps : SOWS
6 One officiating at communion or hearing confession : PRIEST
7 Cattle-raising estates : RANCHES
8 Ginger ___ (soft drink) : ALE
9 Atlanta-based TV channel : TBS
10 Family member acquired by marrying : IN-LAW
11 Catamaran, for one : SAILBOAT
12 Rap’s Lil ___ X : NAS
13 Explosive stuff, in brief : TNT
18 Boater or bowler : HAT
22 Combined, as money or resources : POOLED
24 Hopping mad : IRATE
26 Introductory drawing class : ART I
27 Subordinate of a 6-Down : DEACON
28 Sheriff Andy Taylor’s boy on 1960s TV : OPIE
29 More, in ads : XTRA
31 Fourth-year student : SENIOR
34 Evening prayer : VESPER
36 ___ Bauer, clothing store chain : EDDIE
37 Reindeer herder of Scandinavia : LAPP
38 “The way I see it,” to texters : IMHO
39 Toddler’s winter wear : SNOWSUIT
40 Vaccine pioneer Jonas : SALK
43 Really rake it in : CLEAN UP
47 Exit door : EGRESS
49 Dies down : ABATES
50 Reconcile after a quarrel … or a hint to the starts of 17-, 25-, 52- and 61-Across : MAKE UP or MAKEUP
51 Shrill and blaring, as a trumpet : BRASSY
53 “Same here!” : DITTO
54 28-Down portrayer ___ Howard : RON
57 ___ Poupon mustard : GREY
59 Org. sponsoring school fund-raisers : PTA
60 “Wise” bird : OWL
61 Biblical fellow with a salty wife? : LOT
62 “___ Were a Rich Man” (song from “Fiddler on the Roof”) : IF I
63 Poem of praise : ODE

10 thoughts on “0808-22 NY Times Crossword 8 Aug 22, Monday”

    1. That kept me from entering the answer until I got the crosses. It is a rule, I believe. I noticed that the clue is different from the one listed in this blog. The clue in my syndicated paper version was “Practice boxing”.

  1. 5:54, no errors. Bout the best I can do with writing implement.

    I got tickled pink with 0807, but won’t get into that story. As far as Croce and Stumper goes, it’s kinda amazing to me (as of late) that I can pick a quantity of puzzles out lately that are harder than those every week (six this week). But is what it is, I guess.

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