0728-22 NY Times Crossword 28 Jul 22, Thursday

Constructed by: Bill Pipal & Jeff Chen
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Cut Corners

Themed answers in the across-direction seem to make no sense at first. We have to CUT out the circled letters, which spell “CORNERS”, and realize that across-answers turn a CORNER and finish in the down-direction. Very devious …

  • 69A With the circled letters, a hint to solving seven Across clues : CUT (CORNERS)
  • 1A Like some face creams and serums, supposedly : ANTI-AGING
  • 6A Cost for a commercial : AD RATE
  • 9A Class now known as Family and Consumer Sciences, informally : HOME-EC
  • 28A “Go ahead, try this!” : HAVE ONE!
  • 35A Rumble in the Jungle promoter : DON KING
  • 47A 1985 benefit concert watched by nearly two billion people : LIVE AID
  • 53A To boot : AS WELL

Bill’s time: 11m 45s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

9 Class now known as Family and Consumer Sciences, informally : HOME-EC

Home economics (home ec)

14 W.N.B.A. star Taurasi with five Olympic gold medals : DIANA

WNBA player Diana Diana Taurasi was the first pick in the 2004 draft, and signed up with the Phoenix Mercury. That first season, she won the league’s Rookie of the Year Award, the first of many, many awards in her career, including five Olympic gold medals.

23 N.L. West team, on scoreboards : ARI

The Arizona Diamondbacks (also “D-backs”) joined Major League Baseball’s National League in 1998. By winning the World Series in 2001, the Diamondbacks became the fastest expansion team to do so in Major League history.

27 Plant used to make mescal : AGAVE

Mezcal (also “mescal”) is a distilled spirit made from the agave plant. Technically, tequila is a type of mezcal that is distilled specifically from the blue agave.

32 Pear cultivar : BOSC

Bosc is a cultivar of the European pear that is grown mainly in the northwest of the United States. It is named for French horticulturist Louis Bosc. The cultivar originated in Belgium or France in the early 19th century. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck.

35 Rumble in the Jungle promoter : DON KING

The Rumble in the Jungle was the celebrated 1974 fight between Muhammad Ali and George Foreman that took place in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The fight was set in Zaire because of financial arrangements between promoter Don King and Zaire’s President Mobutu Seko. Ali coined the term “rope-a-dope” to describe his incredibly successful strategy in the contest. From the second round onwards, Ali adopted a protected stance on the ropes letting Foreman pound him with blows to the body and head, with Ali using his arms to dissipate the power of the punches. He kept this up until the eighth round, and then opened up and downed the exhausted Foreman with a left-right combination. I hate boxing but I have to say, that was an interesting fight …

37 Gal in Hollywood : GADOT

Gal Gadot is an actress and former Miss Israel. She played Gisele Yashar in the “Fast & Furious” film franchise, and then began portraying Wonder Woman in superhero movies.

39 Tube rider, e.g. : BRIT

The terms “United Kingdom”, “Great Britain” and “England” can sometimes be confused. The official use of “United Kingdom” originated in 1707 with the Acts of Union that declared the countries of England and Scotland as “United into One Kingdom by the Name of Great Britain”. The name changed again with the Acts of Union 1800 that created the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland” (much to the chagrin of most of the Irish population). This was partially reversed in 1927 when the current name was introduced, the “United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland”, in recognition of an independent Irish Free State in the south of the island of Ireland.

The official name of the London “Underground” rail network is a little deceptive, as over half of the track system-wide is actually “over ground”, with the underground sections reserved for the central areas. It is the oldest subway system in the world, having opened in 1863. It was also the first system to use electric rolling stock, in 1890. “The Tube”, as it is known by Londoners, isn’t the longest subway system in the world though. That honor belongs to the Shanghai Metro. My personal favorite part of the Tube is the Tube map! It is a marvel of design …

40 Port of Alaska : SITKA

The city of Sitka is located on Baranof Island and part of Chichagof Island in the Alexander Archipelago off the coast of Alaska. Sitka used to be known as Redoubt Saint Michael and then New Archangel when it was ruled by the Russians. The current city name comes from a local term meaning “People on the Outside of Baranof Island”. Immediately after the purchase of Alaska by the US, Sitka served as the capital of the Alaska Territory until the seat of government was relocated north to Juneau. Sitka is a consolidated city-borough, and so by one definition, Sitka is the largest city in the US. The city-borough covers 2,870 square miles of land, although Urban Sitka covers just 2 square miles of land.

43 Antilles resident : CARIB

The Island Caribs are an American Indian people who are native to the Lesser Antilles islands, part of the West Indies. It is thought that the Island Caribs are possibly descended from the Kalina (also “Mainland Carib”) people who are native to the northern coastal areas of South America. The Caribbean Sea takes its name from the Island Carib people.

47 1985 benefit concert watched by nearly two billion people : LIVE AID

Live Aid was a concert held in 1985 to raise funds for famine victims in Ethiopia. It was held simultaneously in London and Philadelphia, and was organized by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure. Almost 2 billion people watched the live broadcast.

49 Fastidious roommate of classic TV : UNGER

“The Odd Couple” is a play by the wonderfully talented Neil Simon that was first performed on Broadway, in 1965. This great play was adapted for the big screen in 1968, famously starring Jack Lemmon (as Felix Unger) and Walter Matthau (as Oscar Madison). The success of the play and the film gave rise to an excellent television sitcom that ran from 1970-1975, starring Tony Randall and Jack Klugman. In 1985, Neil Simon even went so far as to adapt the play for an all-female cast, renaming it “The Female Odd Couple”. I’d like to see that one …

53 To boot : AS WELL

The noun “boot” was once used to describe something of advantage in trying to accomplish a goal. This obsolete term really only exists in the adverb “to boot” meaning “in addition, over and above”, literally “to advantage”.

64 Creator of Heffalumps and Woozles : MILNE

The elephant-like creatures in the “Winnie the Pooh” stories by A.A. Milne are known as Heffalumps.

Down

1 Actress Uzo : ADUBA

Uzo Aduba is an actress best known for playing prison inmate Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren on the Netflix TV show “Orange Is the New Black”.

2 Montana, once : NINER

Joe Montana played most of his NFL career with the San Francisco 49ers, and the last two seasons with the Kansas City Chiefs. With the 49ers, Montana went to the Super Bowl four times, winning every time. In retirement one of his activities is to produce wine, so keep an eye out for his “Montagia” label.

3 Ankle bones : TARSI

The tarsals (also “tarsi”) are the ankle bones, and are equivalent to the carpals in the wrist.

6 Loan letters : APR

Annual percentage rate (APR)

7 “Why did I do that?!” : D’OH!

“The Simpsons” is one of the most successful programs produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. Homer Simpson’s catchphrase is “D’oh!”, which became such a famous exclamation that it has been included in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) since 2001. “D’oh!” can be translated as “I should have thought of that!”

9 Character that’s popular on social media : HASHTAG

The # symbol is usually referred to as the “number sign”, but here in the US the name “pound sign” is very common as well, as is “hash mark”.

11 Most frequent number, in math : MODE

In a set of numbers, the mean is the average value of those numbers. The median is the numeric value at which half the numbers have a lower value, and half the numbers a higher value. The mode is the value that appears most often in the whole set of numbers.

12 “May the forces of ___ become confused on the way to your house”: George Carlin : EVIL

George Carlin was a stand-up comic famous for pushing the envelope of comedy in the broadcast media. Despite all the controversies surrounding his act, his passing in 2008 occasioned major tributes by networks and fellow entertainers alike.

19 Ritzy : POSH

No one really knows the etymology of the word “posh”. The popular myth that “posh” is actually an acronym standing for “port out, starboard home” is completely untrue, and is a story that can actually be traced back to the 1968 movie “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang”. The myth is that wealthy British passengers traveling to and from India would book cabins on the port side for the outward journey and the starboard side for the home journey. This trick was supposedly designed to keep their cabins out of the direct sunlight.

The adjective “ritzy” meaning “high quality and luxurious” derives from the opulent Ritz hotels in New York, London, Paris, etc.

27 End of Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” e.g. : ACT IV

“The Crucible” is a 1952 play by Arthur Miller that tells the story of the Salem witch trials. Miller wrote it as an allegory for the House Committee on Un-American Activities hearings that were being chaired by Senator Joe McCarthy around that time. Miller was called before the Committee himself, and was convicted of contempt of Congress for refusing to “name names”.

Arthur Miller was a remarkable playwright, best known for his plays “Death of a Salesman” and “The Crucible”. Famously, Arthur Miller left his first wife to marry Marilyn Monroe in 1956. The two divorced five years later, just over a year before Monroe died of an apparent drug overdose.

30 Cheese wrapped in wax : EDAM

Edam cheese takes its name from the Dutch town of Edam in North Holland. The cheese is famous for its coating of red paraffin wax, a layer of protection that helps Edam travel well and prevents spoiling. You might occasionally come across an Edam cheese that is coated in black wax. The black color indicates that the underlying cheese has been aged for a minimum of 17 weeks.

32 Largest TV network in the world, by number of employees : BBC

The marvelous British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is mainly funded by the UK government through a television “licence” (British spelling, as opposed to “license”!) fee that is levied annually on all households watching TV transmissions.

38 What you get when you put your hands together? : TEN

Those would be ten fingers.

41 Scottish noble in “Macbeth” : ANGUS

Thanes were Scottish aristocrats. The most famous thanes have to be the Shakespearean characters Macbeth (Thane of Glamis, later “Thane of Cawdor”, and still later “King of Scotland”) and MacDuff (Thane of Fife). Other thanes in “Macbeth” are Ross, Lennox and Angus, as well as Menteith and Caithness.

50 Crown covering : ENAMEL

Tooth enamel covers the crowns of our teeth. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body. It is composed of 96% crystalline calcium phosphate.

52 One of many in Indiana Jones’s possession : RELIC

A relic is something that has survived from the past, reminding us of that past.

The title character in the “Indiana Jones” series of movies was born Henry Jones, Junior in Princeton, New Jersey. He adopted the nickname “Indiana” because that was the name of his dog when he was growing up. George Lucas, who created the character, used to have an Alaskan malamute dog named Indiana.

54 First name on the Supreme Court : SONIA

Sonia Sotomayor was the first Hispanic justice appointed to the US Supreme Court, and the third female justice. Sotomayor was nominated by President Barack Obama to replace the retiring Justice David Souter.

56 Chaucer chapter : TALE

“The Canterbury Tales” is a collection of stories penned by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. Written in MIddle English, the tales are presented as a storytelling contest held by a group of pilgrims as they travel from London to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket in Canterbury Cathedral. “The Canterbury Tales” is often cited as a landmark piece of English literature as it popularized the use of vernacular English, as opposed to the French or Latin works that were commonly published up to that time.

57 Chimp who orbited Earth in 1961 : ENOS

Enos was a chimpanzee that was launched into Earth orbit in 1961 by NASA on a Mercury Atlas 4 rocket. Enos’s flight was a rehearsal for the first orbital flight made by an American, astronaut John Glenn. Enos returned from his mission safely, but died the following year from dysentery.

58 Go kaput, with “out” : CONK …

The phrase “conk out” was coined by airmen during WWI, and was used to describe the stalling of an engine.

“Kaput” is a familiar term meaning “incapacitated, destroyed”, and comes to us from French (via German). The original word “capot” means “not having won a single trick” in the French card game Piquet.

61 No-goodnik : CAD

Our word “cad”, meaning “person lacking in finer feelings”, is a shortening of the word “cadet”. “Cad” was first used for a servant, and then students at British universities used “cad” as a term for a boy from the local town. “Cad” took on its current meaning in the 1830s.

62 See 63-Down : … EDU
63 With 62-Down, end of a college address : DOT …

The .edu domain was one of the six original generic top-level domains specified. The complete original list is:

  • .com (commercial enterprise)
  • .net (entity involved in network infrastructure e.g. an ISP)
  • .mil (US military)
  • .org (not-for-profit organization)
  • .gov (US federal government entity)
  • .edu (college-level educational institution)

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Like some face creams and serums, supposedly : ANTI-AGING
6 Cost for a commercial : AD RATE
9 Class now known as Family and Consumer Sciences, informally : HOME-EC
14 W.N.B.A. star Taurasi with five Olympic gold medals : DIANA
15 “___ qué?” : POR
16 Over : ABOVE
17 Strip, as a ship : UNRIG
18 Extravagantly emotional : RHAPSODIC
20 Rouse to action : BESTIR
22 Close behind, as a canine : TO HEEL
23 N.L. West team, on scoreboards : ARI
24 Dearest partner? : NEAREST
27 Plant used to make mescal : AGAVE
28 “Go ahead, try this!” : HAVE ONE!
32 Pear cultivar : BOSC
35 Rumble in the Jungle promoter : DON KING
37 Gal in Hollywood : GADOT
39 Tube rider, e.g. : BRIT
40 Port of Alaska : SITKA
42 Word with memory or bike : … LANE
43 Antilles resident : CARIB
45 Finish off : DO IN
46 Sign : OMEN
47 1985 benefit concert watched by nearly two billion people : LIVE AID
49 Fastidious roommate of classic TV : UNGER
51 One way to administer a tranquilizer : DART GUN
53 To boot : AS WELL
56 Electronics whiz : TECHIE
59 Opposite of ruddy : SALLOW
61 Engaged in some amorous behavior : CANOODLED
64 Creator of Heffalumps and Woozles : MILNE
65 Sing ___ : ALONG
66 Swear words? : I DO
67 It has options for “cc” and “bcc” : EMAIL
68 Newsroom positions : DESKS
69 With the circled letters, a hint to solving seven Across clues : CUT (CORNERS)
70 True-blue : LOYAL
Down
1 Actress Uzo : ADUBA
2 Montana, once : NINER
3 Ankle bones : TARSI
4 Still a contender : IN IT
5 Putting in an enclosure : CAGING
6 Loan letters : APR
7 “Why did I do that?!” : D’OH!
8 Exhibit grandiloquence : ORATE
9 Character that’s popular on social media : HASHTAG
10 Instrument with a bell : OBOE
11 Most frequent number, in math : MODE
12 “May the forces of ___ become confused on the way to your house”: George Carlin : EVIL
13 Partner of Parks : REC
19 Ritzy : POSH
21 Has a novel experience? : READS
25 Sidestep : AVOID
26 Lease : RENT OUT
27 End of Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” e.g. : ACT IV
29 Courage under fire : VALOR
30 Cheese wrapped in wax : EDAM
31 Abstainer’s amount : NONE
32 Largest TV network in the world, by number of employees : BBC
33 Word-of-mouth : ORAL
34 Cortana : Microsoft :: ___ : Apple : SIRI
36 Scraping (out) : EKING
38 What you get when you put your hands together? : TEN
41 Scottish noble in “Macbeth” : ANGUS
44 Ones always taking cover? : BED HOGS
48 Military move : RAID
50 Crown covering : ENAMEL
52 One of many in Indiana Jones’s possession : RELIC
53 Quell, as concerns : ALLAY
54 First name on the Supreme Court : SONIA
55 “Just peachy” : SWELL
56 Chaucer chapter : TALE
57 Chimp who orbited Earth in 1961 : ENOS
58 Go kaput, with “out” : CONK …
60 “The Beast” for the U.S. president, for one : LIMO
61 No-goodnik : CAD
62 See 63-Down : … EDU
63 With 62-Down, end of a college address : DOT …

5 thoughts on “0728-22 NY Times Crossword 28 Jul 22, Thursday”

  1. 20:25, no errors. Another pokey Thursday. I figured out the gimmick pretty early but it didn’t help all that much. No real problem areas, just slow.

  2. 15:04
    Figured out the theme late.
    Loved the cluing today.
    Needed the crosses for ENOS (didn’t know) and OBOE (should’ve known…doh!)
    Fun to hear from Carlin, too.

  3. 21:36. Felt appropriately foolish when I finally got the theme. I was trying all kinds of rebus combinations until those didn’t work. Finally saw CUT, but didn’t realize CORNERS until I’d finished. It’s like you can’t get the theme until you get the theme…. Finally DON KING was so obvious I got it.

    They still teach HOME EC in schools? It was never offered at mine.

    Overall, I made this puzzle much more difficult than it was. As always in crosswords, there’s always tomorrow.

    MaryInRealTime – HBO did a 2 part documentary on George Carlin earlier this year. It’s very well done. Check it out if you’re a Carlin fan.

    Best –

    1. Will do, thanks for that!

      Dating myself but we had such fun in high school trading quips from his album “Class Clown,” many I won’t repeat here🤣

      His wordplay was so unique…wonder if he did crossword puzzles?

  4. 39:20 a day behind. I kept trying to put in rebuses in spite of them not making much sense. Also confused my Milne with my Seuss :- (

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