0727-22 NY Times Crossword 27 Jul 22, Wednesday

Constructed by: Enrique Henestroza Anguiano
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: The Right Clothes

Themed answers are common phrases describing a particular type of PERSON, and each comprises an adjective before an item of clothing:

  • 20A Cowardly person : SCAREDY PANTS
  • 27A Villainous person : BLACK HAT
  • 35A Ineffectual person : EMPTY SUIT
  • 49A Traitorous person : TURNCOAT
  • 54A Pompous person : STUFFED SHIRT

Bill’s time: 10m 30s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Shoulder muscles, in gym lingo : TRAPS

The trapezius (commonly“traps”) is a muscle in the neck and upper back that moves the shoulder blade and supports the arm.

6 Spider-Man slings them : WEBS

Spider-Man is a creation of Stan Lee and Steve Ditko, and first appeared in comics in 1962. Spider-Man was a somewhat groundbreaking character in that his alter ego was a teenage high school student (Peter Parker), which marked the first time that a young person featured front and center as the superhero.

17 Clearwater’s neighbor across the bay : TAMPA

The Florida city of Tampa has been known as “the Big Guava” since the seventies. The term is imitative of New York’s “Big Apple”, and refers to the unsuccessful search for the reported wild guava trees that were once hoped to be the basis of a new industry for the area. Tampa has also been called “Cigar City”, a reference to the cigar industry that fueled the area’s growth starting in the 1880s.

Clearwater is the smallest of the three main cities in the Tampa Bay Area, the others being Tampa and St. Petersburg. One of Clearwater’s claims to fame is that it is home to the worldwide spiritual headquarters of the Church of Scientology, also known as Flag Land Base.

18 Taj Mahal’s locale : AGRA

Agra is a medieval city on the banks of the river Yamuna in India that was the capital of the Mughal Empire from 1556 to 1658. The city is home to three UNESCO World Heritage Sites:

  • The Taj Mahal: the famous mausoleum built in memory of Mumtaz Mahal.
  • Agra Fort: the site where the famous Koh-i-Noor diamond was seized.
  • Fatehpur Sikri: a historic city that’s home to well-preserved Mughal architecture.

19 Millennials, by another name : GEN-Y

The Millennial Generation are sometimes referred to as “Generation Y” (Gen-Y). Millennials were born after the “Gen-Xers”, from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.

23 Washington and Lincoln : CITIES

The District of Columbia (DC) was established by the Residence Act in 1790. Article One, Section 8 of the US constitution provides for the establishment of a district outside of the states, over which the federal government has authority. The constitution also specifies that the district cannot exceed an area of ten miles square. On the same day in 1791, the federal district was formally named Columbia, and the city within was named Washington in honor of the nation’s first president.

The city of Lincoln is the second-largest in Nebraska, and is the state capital. In the days of the Nebraska Territory, the capital was the larger city of Omaha. When the territory was being considered for statehood, most of the population (which lived south of the River Platte) was in favor of annexation to Kansas. The pro-statehood legislature voted to move the capital nearer to that population in a move intended to appease those favoring annexation. As this conflict was taking place just after the Civil War, a special interest group in Omaha arranged for the new capital to be named Lincoln, in honor of the recently-assassinated president. The thought was that the populace south of the River Platte had been sympathetic to the Confederate cause and so would not pass the measure to move the capital if the Lincoln name was used. But the measure passed, the capital was moved, and Nebraska became the thirty-seventh State of the Union in 1867.

26 Diarist Nin : ANAIS

“Fire: From A Journal of Love: the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (1934–1937)” is a 1995 publication of material from Nin’s diaries. The excerpts were released after her death, and deal with matters considered too sensitive to have been published during her lifetime, or the lifetimes of others mentioned.

27 Villainous person : BLACK HAT

In western movies and television, the bad guys tend to wear black hats, and the good guys wear white. Well, that’s the perception. As a result, we’ve come to use the phrase “black hat” to mean “villain”.

31 Scandinavian drinking cry : SKOL!

“Skoal” (sometimes “skol”) is a Scandinavian toast that has roots in the old Norse word “skaal” meaning “cup”.

34 Daisy Ridley’s role in “Star Wars” : REY

Rey is a central character in the “Star Wars” universe who first appeared in 2015’s “Star Wars: The Force Awakens”. Rey is played by British actress Daisy Ridley.

39 Knicks’ arena, familiarly : MSG

Madison Square Garden (MSG) is an arena in New York City used for a variety of events. In the world of sports it is home to the New York Rangers of the NHL, as well as the New York Knicks of the NBA. “The Garden” is also the third busiest music venue in the world in terms of ticket sales. The current arena is the fourth structure to bear the name, a name taken from the Madison Square location in Manhattan. In turn, the square was named for James Madison, the fourth President of the US.

42 “___ vincit amor” : OMNIA

“Omnia vincit amor” is a line from Eclogue X, one of the major works of the Latin poet Virgil. We know the phrase in English as “love conquers all”.

43 Date to be wary of : IDES

In Act I of William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar”, a soothsayer warns the doomed leader to “beware the ides of March”. Caesar ignores the prophecy and is subsequently killed on the steps of the Capitol by a group of conspirators on that fateful day.

49 Traitorous person : TURNCOAT

Back in the mid-1300s, a coat of arms literally was a coat, a tunic embroidered with heraldic symbols that was often worn over armor. This usage also gave us the term “turncoat”, which described someone who turned his coat inside-out in order to hide his badge of loyalty.

52 New York City’s Mount ___ Hospital : SINAI

Mount Sinai Hospital in New York is a large teaching hospital, one of the oldest in the country. It was opened in 1852 and originally called the Jews’ Hospital in the City of New York, with the remit of serving the city’s rapidly growing Jewish immigrant community.

60 Bite at a Spanish bar : TAPA

“Tapa” is the Spanish word for “lid”. There is no clear rationale for why this word came to be used for an appetizer. There are lots of explanations cited, all of which seem to involve the temporary covering of one’s glass of wine with a plate or item of food to either preserve the wine or give one extra space at the table.

61 Like the Valkyries : NORSE

In Norse mythology, the valkyries are beautiful female attendants of Odin who choose those who must die in battle and those who must live. Half of those who die go to Fólkvangr, the “army field” ruled over by the goddess Freyja. The other half of those who perish go to Valhalla, the hall of the slain that is ruled over by the god Odin. The etymology of “valkyrie” is Old Norse for “chooser of the slain”.

65 Oscar nominee Rowlands : GENA

Gena Rowlands is an actress best known for the films made with her husband, actor and director John Cassavetes. Notably, Rowlands played a lead role opposite James Garner in the weepy, weepy 2004 film “The Notebook”. “The Notebook” was directed by her son Nick Cassavetes. Rowlands was nominated for Oscars for her performances in two films: “Gloria” (1980) and “A Woman Under the Influence” (1974).

66 Celia known as the “Queen of Salsa” : CRUZ

Celia Cruz was born and grew up in Cuba, but spent most of her working life in the United States, playing out her salsa singing career in New Jersey. Around the world, Cruz was known as the “Queen of Salsa”.

70 Director Kurosawa : AKIRA

Akira Kurosawa was an Oscar-winning Japanese film director. His most famous movie to us in the West has to be “The Seven Samurai”, the inspiration for “The Magnificent Seven” starring Yul Brynner, and indeed a basis for “Star Wars: The Clone Wars”.

Down

2 Biochem strand : RNA

Both DNA and RNA are complex molecules comprising nucleotide bases arranged in chains. Famously, DNA molecules form a double-helix structure, with two chains coiled around each other. RNA chains are single-stranded structures that usually fold onto themselves.

3 PIN point? : ATM

One enters a Personal Identification Number (PIN) when using an Automated Teller Machine (ATM). Given that the N in PIN stands for “number”, then “PIN number” is a redundant phrase. And, given that the M in ATM stands for “machine”, then “ATM machine” is a redundant phrase as well. Grr …!

4 Snack item on a stick : POPSICLE

The term “ice pop” has largely been supplanted in the US by “popsicle”, as the Popsicle brand of ice pop became so popular. We still use “ice pop” in Ireland, and in the UK the same thing is called an “ice lolly”, and in Australia it’s an “ice block”.

5 Actress Sissy : SPACEK

Actress Sissy Spacek got her big break in the movies when she played the title role in the 1976 horror movie “Carrie”, which is based on a Stephen King novel. Her most acclaimed role is the lead in the 1980 biopic about Loretta Lynn called “Coal MIner’s Daughter”, for which she won a Best Actress Oscar. Spacek’s first cousin was the actor Rip Torn.

8 Twitter icon : BIRD

The familiar blue Twitter logo is known as “Larry the Bird”. The logo was named for former Boston Celtics player Larry Bird.

9 Command to Fido : STAY

“Fido”, the name for many a dog, is Latin for “I trust”.

10 Site of the 1998 Winter Olympics : NAGANO

Nagano is a city on Japan’s largest island, Honshu. Nagano hosted the 1998 Winter Olympic Games.

13 Long and perilous journey : ODYSSEY

“Odyssey” is one of two epic poems from ancient Greece that are attributed to Homer. It is largely a sequel to Homer’s other epic “Iliad”. “Odyssey” centers on the heroic figure Odysseus, and his adventures on his journey home to Greece following the fall of Troy. We now use the term “odyssey” to describe any long series of adventures.

21 Bonfire residue : ASH

Back in the mid-1500s, a “bonfire” was a fire used for burning bones, a “bone fire”.

22 Broadway star LuPone : PATTI

Singer Patti LuPone won Tonys for playing Eva Peron in “Evita ” and Rose in “Gypsy”.

23 It has one eye on the TV : CBS

CBS used to be known as the Columbia Broadcasting System. CBS introduced its “eye” logo in 1951. That logo is based on a Pennsylvania Dutch hex sign.

25 What Lao-tzu said “is hidden but always present” : TAO

Lao Tse (also “Lao-Tzu”, “Laozi”) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism. Tradition holds that Lao-Tzu wrote the “Tao Te Ching”, a classical Chinese text that is fundamental to the philosophy of Taoism.

30 Glace after melting : EAU

In French, frozen “eau” (water) is “glace” (ice).

33 Biblical son of Rebekah : ESAU

Esau was the grandson of Abraham and the twin brother of Jacob, the founder of the Israelites. When Esau was born to Isaac and Rebekah, the event was described with “Now the first came forth, red all over like a hairy garment”. Esau is portrayed later in life as being very different from his brother Jacob, as a hunter and someone who loves the outdoor life.

37 British political V.I.P.s : PMS

The Prime Minister (PM) of the UK has powers equivalent to the US President, but with major differences. The office of prime minister exists by convention and not by any constitution. The convention is that the King or Queen of England appoints as PM the person most likely to have the confidence of the House of Commons, and that person is usually the leader of the party with the most seats in the Commons. There is no term limit and the PM serves “at His/Her Majesty’s pleasure”. The first UK PM wasn’t actually called “Prime Minister”, and the person first attributed with the equivalent powers was Sir Robert Walpole, the First Lord of the Treasury in 1721.

39 It might come in a bottle : MESSAGE

Messages in bottles can float around the sea for a long time. One of the oldest messages ever delivered was found in 1999 in the River Thames in England. A ginger-beer bottle had been thrown into the English Channel in 1914 during WWI by British soldier Thomas Hughes, containing a letter to his wife. Private Hughes was killed two days after sending off his message, and his wife passed away in 1979. The message was delivered after its 85-year journey to the 86-year-old daughter of the couple, who was living in New Zealand at the time.

44 Anonymous last name : DOE

Though the English court system does not use the term today, “John Doe” first appeared as the “name of a person unknown” in England in 1659, along with the similar “Richard Roe”. An unknown female is referred to as “Jane Doe ”, and the equivalent to Richard Roe is Jane Roe (as in Roe v. Wade, for example). Variants of “John Doe” used outside of the courts are “Joe Blow” and “John Q. Public”.

48 Traditional garment in West Africa : CAFTAN

A kaftan (also “caftan”) is a long robe that has been associated for centuries with Islamic cultures.

50 Box score stat : RBI

In the world of sports, a box score lists the score of a game as well as achievements of the competing teams and team members.

51 Fictional world entered through a wardrobe : NARNIA

Apparently, it’s not certain how C. S. Lewis came to choose Narnia as the name of the fantasy world featured in his series of children’s books, including “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe”. There was an ancient city in Umbria that the Romans called Narnia, but there is no evidence of a link.

57 Egg on : SPUR

The verb “to edge” has been used to mean to incite, to urge on, from the 16th century. Somewhere along the way “edge” was mistakenly replaced with “egg”, giving us our term “to egg on” meaning “to goad”.

58 “Purple ___” : HAZE

“Purple Haze” is a 1967 song written and recorded by Jimi Hendrix that has been described as a “psychedelic drug song of the sixties”. In fact, the term “purple haze” came to refer to LSD. Hendrix denied any relation of the lyrics to drugs at all.

62 Big name in outdoor gear : REI

REI is a sporting goods store, with the initialism standing for Recreational Equipment Inc. REI was founded in Seattle by Lloyd and Mary Anderson in 1938 as a cooperative that supplies quality climbing gear to outdoor enthusiasts. The first full-time employee hired by the Andersons was Jim Whittaker, who was the first American to climb Mount Everest.

63 South, south of the border : SUR

The cardinal directions in Spanish are “norte” (north), “este” (east), “sur” (south) and “oeste” (west).

64 Clean Air Act org. : EPA

The Clean Air Act of 1963 is administered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Shoulder muscles, in gym lingo : TRAPS
6 Spider-Man slings them : WEBS
10 Called off : NO-GO
14 #1 in the rankings : ON TOP
15 Correct copy : EDIT
16 Imitated : APED
17 Clearwater’s neighbor across the bay : TAMPA
18 Taj Mahal’s locale : AGRA
19 Millennials, by another name : GEN-Y
20 Cowardly person : SCAREDY PANTS
23 Washington and Lincoln : CITIES
26 Diarist Nin : ANAIS
27 Villainous person : BLACK HAT
30 French for “star” : ETOILE
31 Scandinavian drinking cry : SKOL!
32 Meaty bone, for a dog : TREAT
34 Daisy Ridley’s role in “Star Wars” : REY
35 Ineffectual person : EMPTY SUIT
39 Knicks’ arena, familiarly : MSG
42 “___ vincit amor” : OMNIA
43 Date to be wary of : IDES
47 Votes in : ELECTS
49 Traitorous person : TURNCOAT
52 New York City’s Mount ___ Hospital : SINAI
53 Shop with aromas : BAKERY
54 Pompous person : STUFFED SHIRT
59 Working hard : AT IT
60 Bite at a Spanish bar : TAPA
61 Like the Valkyries : NORSE
65 Oscar nominee Rowlands : GENA
66 Celia known as the “Queen of Salsa” : CRUZ
67 Freeze over : ICE UP
68 Idyllic place : EDEN
69 Roll call response : HERE
70 Director Kurosawa : AKIRA

Down

1 Small child : TOT
2 Biochem strand : RNA
3 PIN point? : ATM
4 Snack item on a stick : POPSICLE
5 Actress Sissy : SPACEK
6 Represent, as a designer at a fashion show : WEAR
7 Sharp but appealing quality : EDGE
8 Twitter icon : BIRD
9 Command to Fido : STAY
10 Site of the 1998 Winter Olympics : NAGANO
11 Like some markets : OPEN-AIR
12 Non-Jewish : GENTILE
13 Long and perilous journey : ODYSSEY
21 Bonfire residue : ASH
22 Broadway star LuPone : PATTI
23 It has one eye on the TV : CBS
24 Similar kind : ILK
25 What Lao-tzu said “is hidden but always present” : TAO
28 Abbr. before a name on an envelope : ATTN
29 “Have some!” : TRY IT!
30 Glace after melting : EAU
33 Biblical son of Rebekah : ESAU
36 Recurring pattern : MOTIF
37 British political V.I.P.s : PMS
38 “Time’s running out” sound : TICK TOCK
39 It might come in a bottle : MESSAGE
40 Open to the thigh, as an evening gown : SLITTED
41 Heartfelt : GENUINE
44 Anonymous last name : DOE
45 Put a ring on it : EAR
46 Place to get a mud bath? : STY
48 Traditional garment in West Africa : CAFTAN
50 Box score stat : RBI
51 Fictional world entered through a wardrobe : NARNIA
55 Work on glass, perhaps : ETCH
56 Be bold enough (to) : DARE
57 Egg on : SPUR
58 “Purple ___” : HAZE
62 Big name in outdoor gear : REI
63 South, south of the border : SUR
64 Clean Air Act org. : EPA

3 thoughts on “0727-22 NY Times Crossword 27 Jul 22, Wednesday”

  1. 7:46. Right off the bat, I had “delts” for 1A. When I saw that nothing else fit, I thought of TRAPS instead. I guess they’re both considered part of the shoulders.

    According to Wordplay, the theme also implies that these are clothes meant to be thrown out e.g. while cleaning your closet. Similarly, the theme answers are people you should throw out – i.e. not associate with them. An EMPTY SUIT, a BLACK HAT, a STUFFED SHIRT etc. are all types of people you should throw out along with with the clothes.

    Just a little added wrinkle to the theme that doesn’t jump out at you.

    Best –

  2. 9:48, no errors. Straightforward for a Wednesday. It’s a rare day that my time is better than Bill’s. Tomorrow-back to reality.

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