0325-22 NY Times Crossword 25 Mar 22, Friday

Constructed by: Evans Clinchy
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: None

Bill’s time: 21m 30s

Bill’s errors: 2

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

8 They might help with the dishes : RECIPES

The Latin “recipere” means “to take”, and the imperative form “recipe” was written at the top of medical prescriptions as an instruction, i.e. “take (the following)”. This use of “recipe” evolved into the instruction for preparing a dish of food in the mid-1700s.

15 Adage attributed to Virgil’s “Eclogue X” : LOVE CONQUERS ALL

“Omnia vincit amor” is a line from Eclogue X, one of the major works of the Latin poet Virgil. We know the phrase in English as “love conquers all”.

18 Letters seen on N.F.L. scoreboards between 1995 and 2015 : STL

The Los Angeles Rams are the only franchise to have won NFL championships in three different cities, i.e. Cleveland (1945), Los Angeles (1951 & 2021) and St. Louis (1999). The Rams were based in Cleveland from 1936 to 1945, in Los Angeles from 1946 to 1994, in St. Louis from 1995 to 2015, and returned to Los Angeles in 2016.

19 Unless, to a lawyer : NISI

A decree nisi is a court order, one that only comes into force when certain specified conditions are met. At the point where the conditions are met, it becomes a decree absolute and is binding. “Nisi” is Latin for “unless”.

20 Kids’ rhyme starter : EENIE …

Eeny, meeny, miny, moe,
Catch the tiger/monkey/baby by the toe.
If it hollers/screams let him go,
Eeny, meeny, miny, moe, you are it!

23 “Fiddlesticks!” : CRUD

We’ve been using “fiddlesticks” to mean “nonsense” since the early 17th century. Prior to that time, “fiddlestick” referred to the bow of a fiddle.

26 4.92892 ml : TSP

For the purpose of cooking and dosing medicines, a teaspoon (tsp.) is 5 mL and a tablespoon (tbsp.) is 15 mL.

27 Where to see license plates that say “Greatest Snow on Earth” : UTAH

The first city to introduce license plates for cars was Paris, 1893. The first national plates were introduced by the Netherlands, in 1898. The first US plates were issued by Massachusetts in 1903, although New York State had required an owner’s initials to be displayed on the back of the vehicle since 1901.

31 Alternative to an autocamp : MOTEL

The term “motel” is a portmanteau of “motor” and “hotel”.

33 Exam where 100 is not a perfect score : IQ TEST

Although it is correct these days to say that the abbreviation IQ stands for “intelligence quotient”, the term was actually coined by German psychologist William Stern, and so is actually an abbreviation for the German “Intelligenz-Quotient”.

41 Crown topper : ENAMEL

The outer layer of our teeth is made from enamel. It covers the dentin layer, which supports the enamel.

47 Car with open-source patents : TESLA

Tesla Motors shortened its name to just “Tesla” in early 2017.

49 Org. that was the subject of a 2021 Supreme Court antitrust ruling : NCAA

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) dates back to the Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. When his son broke his nose playing football at Harvard, President Roosevelt turned his attention to the number of serious injuries and even deaths occurring in college sports. He instigated meetings between the major educational institutions, leading to the formation of the Intercollegiate Athletic Association of the United States (IAAUS) in 1906, which was given the remit of regulating college sports. The IAAUS became the NCAA in 1910. The NCAA has been headquartered in Indianapolis since 1999.

50 Maude’s widower on “The Simpsons” : NED

Ned Flanders lives next door to Homer Simpson on TV’s “The Simpsons”. Ned is voiced by actor Harry Shearer, and has been around since the very first episode aired in 1989.

51 Minimal change : CENT

The official name of our smallest denomination coin is “cent”, and our use of the word “penny” is just a colloquialism derived from the British coin of the same name. In the UK, the plural of penny is “pence”, whereas we have “pennies” in our pockets.

52 Palindromic title : MADAM

The three most famous palindromes in English have to be:

  • Able was I ere I saw Elba
  • A man, a plan, a canal, Panama!
  • Madam, I’m Adam

One of my favorite terms is “Aibohphobia”, although it doesn’t appear in the dictionary and is a joke term. “Aibohphobia” is a great way to describe a fear of palindromes, by creating a palindrome out of the suffix “-phobia”.

54 Traditional 20th wedding anniversary gift : CHINA

Some traditional gifts for wedding anniversaries are:

  • 5th: wooden
  • 10th: tin
  • 15th: crystal
  • 20th: china
  • 25th: silver
  • 30th: pearl
  • 40th: ruby
  • 50th: gold
  • 60th: diamond

56 Goddess of fertility : ISIS

Isis was the ancient Egyptian goddess of fertility, as well as the protector of the dead and the goddess of children. She was the personification of the pharaoh’s power. The name “Isis” translates as “throne”, and she is usually depicted with a headdress shaped like a throne.

Down

1 Pandora releases : ILLS

According to Greek mythology, Pandora was the first woman. She was created by the gods, with each god bestowing on her a gift. Her name can be translated from Greek as “all-gifted”. Pandora is famous for the story of “Pandora’s Box”. The story should be about Pandora’s “Jar”,as a 16th-century error in translation created a “box” out of the “jar”. In the story of Pandora’s Box, curiosity got the better of her and she opened up a box she was meant to leave alone. As a result she released all the evils of mankind, just closing it in time to trap hope inside.

6 Group of signs : ZODIAC

In astronomical terms, the zodiac is a group of 13 constellations that together form a roughly circular pattern in the night sky. Most of these constellations are named for animals, which explains why the word “zodiac” comes from the Greek “zodiakos” meaning “circle of little animals”. We can’t see the whole Zodiac at any one time in the year, but one constellation does dominate the sky every four weeks. In astrological terms, there are only 12 signs of the zodiac. Astrologists skip the constellation Ophiuchus (visible November/December). Ophiuchus is the serpent bearer.

7 Nephew of Cain and Abel : ENOS

Enos was the son of Seth, and therefore the grandson of Adam and Eve, and nephew of Cain and Abel. According to the ancient Jewish work called the Book of Jubilees, Enos married his own sister Noam.

8 Difficulty : RUB

The phrase “To sleep — perchance to dream” comes from Hamlet’s famous “To be or not to be” soliloquy:

To die — to sleep.
To sleep — perchance to dream: ay, there’s the rub!

A rub is a difficulty or obstruction. The usage of the term “rub” predates Shakespeare, and comes from the game of lawn bowls in which a rub is a fault in the bowling surface.

10 Something to believe in : CREED

A creed or credo is a profession of faith, or a system of belief or principles. “Credo” is Latin for “I believe”.

11 Man is one : ISLE

The Isle of Man is a large island located in the middle of the Irish Sea between Great Britain and Ireland. I used to spend a lot of time there in my youth, and find it a very interesting place indeed. The Isle of Man is classed as a British Crown Dependency and isn’t part of the United Kingdom at all. It is self-governing and has its own parliament called the Tynwald. The Tynwald was created in AD 979 and is arguably the oldest continuously-running parliament in the world. The inhabitants of the island speak English, although they do have their own language called Manx, which is very similar to Irish Gaeilge and Scottish Gaelic. And then there are those Manx cats, the ones without any tails. I’ve seen lots of them, and can attest that they are indeed found all over the island.

24 Spin, as old yarn? : RETELL

The phrase “to spin a yarn”, meaning “to tell a tall tale”, originated in the early 1800s with seamen. The idea was that sailors would tell stories to each other while engaged in mindless work such as twisting yarn.

29 Aces, of a sort : AIRMEN

A flying ace (also “air ace”) is an aviator who has shot down a number of enemy planes during combat. The qualifying number of kills seems to vary, but five is common. The first use of “ace” was during WWI, when the French newspapers dubbed pilot Adolphe Pegoud “l’as” (French for “the ace”) when he shot down his fifth German plane.

34 Boomer that went bust, in brief : SST

The first supersonic transport (SST) to fly was the Tupolev Tu-144, which was constructed in the Soviet Union. The Tu-144 first flew in 1968, but did not carry passengers until 1977. The aircraft was permanently grounded as a passenger craft in 1978 due to concerns about safety (there had been two Tu-144 crashes). The second SST to fly was the Anglo-French Concorde, which operated at a profit for over 27 years until it was withdrawn from service in 2003. There was one Concorde crash, in Paris in July 2000. Since then, there have been no commercial SST services.

39 The sun’s is approximately 865,370 miles : DIAMETER

Sol was the Roman god personifying the Sun. For centuries, English astronomers have used the name “Sol” for our sun, to distinguish it from suns in other planetary systems.

40 Govt. org. since 1946 : SSA

The Social Security Administration (SSA) was set up as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal. The first person to receive a monthly retirement benefit was Ida May Fuller of Vermont who received her first check for the sum of $22.54 after having contributed for three years through payroll taxes. The New Deal turned out to be a good deal for Ms. Fuller, as she lived to be 100 years of age and received a total benefit of almost $23,000, whereas her three years of contributions added up to just $24.75.

48 Key of Beethoven’s “Für Elise” : A MINOR

“Für Elise” is a beautiful piece of solo piano music by Beethoven that is also known as “Bagatelle in A Minor”. “Für Elise” simply means “For Elise”, but sadly no one knows for sure the identity of the mysterious dedicatee.

53 The crane pose, for one : ASANA

“Asana” is a Sanskrit word that translates literally as “sitting down”. The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called “padmasana”.

55 Squishy material : NERF

Nerf is a soft material used in a whole series of toys designed for “safe” play indoors. The Nerf product is used to make darts, balls and ammunition for toy guns. “NERF” is an acronym, standing for Non-Expanding Recreational Foam.

59 What some dropouts go on to get, in brief : GEDS

The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a battery of four tests designed to demonstrate that a student has the academic skills of someone who has graduated from an American or Canadian high school.

62 ___ economy : GIG

Musicians use “gig” to describe a job, a performance. The term originated in the early 1900s in the world of jazz. The derivative phrase “gig economy” applies to a relatively recent phenomenon where workers find themselves jumping from temporary job to temporary job, from gig to gig.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Break down fully : ITEMIZE
8 They might help with the dishes : RECIPES
15 Adage attributed to Virgil’s “Eclogue X” : LOVE CONQUERS ALL
17 Not be completely open with everyone, to put it mildly : LEAD A DOUBLE LIFE
18 Letters seen on N.F.L. scoreboards between 1995 and 2015 : STL
19 Unless, to a lawyer : NISI
20 Kids’ rhyme starter : EENIE …
21 “___ sight” : OUTTA
23 “Fiddlesticks!” : CRUD
26 4.92892 ml : TSP
27 Where to see license plates that say “Greatest Snow on Earth” : UTAH
28 Encrusts : CAKES
30 Gray, in a way : ASHY
31 Alternative to an autocamp : MOTEL
33 Exam where 100 is not a perfect score : IQ TEST
35 Dreaded words from a teacher : SEE ME
36 Stew over, say : RUE
37 Loses : SHEDS
41 Crown topper : ENAMEL
43 Prepares to take off : TAXIS
44 Sacked out : ABED
47 Car with open-source patents : TESLA
49 Org. that was the subject of a 2021 Supreme Court antitrust ruling : NCAA
50 Maude’s widower on “The Simpsons” : NED
51 Minimal change : CENT
52 Palindromic title : MADAM
54 Traditional 20th wedding anniversary gift : CHINA
56 Goddess of fertility : ISIS
58 Chill : VEG
60 Mantra in the face of criticism : HATERS GONNA HATE
64 Conceitedly dogmatic : OVER-OPINIONATED
65 Cause for concern : RED FLAG
66 What father knows best? : PRAYERS

Down

1 Pandora releases : ILLS
2 Like some confrontations : TOE-TO-TOE
3 Judge : EVALUATE
4 ___ school : MED
5 Defeatist’s wail : I CAN’T
6 Group of signs : ZODIAC
7 Nephew of Cain and Abel : ENOS
8 Difficulty : RUB
9 Member of the order Anguilliformes : EEL
10 Something to believe in : CREED
11 Man is one : ISLE
12 Puts on a coat : PAINTS
13 Mischief-prone : ELFISH
14 Somnolent : SLEEPY
16 “I just need to know this one thing …” : QUICK QUESTION …
22 Like many crossword puzzles (though not this one) : THEMED
24 Spin, as old yarn? : RETELL
25 Deploy : USE
27 Speakers’ hesitations : UMS
29 Aces, of a sort : AIRMEN
30 Within reach : AT HAND
32 Canadian band with the 1999 top 10 hit “Steal My Sunshine” : LEN
34 Boomer that went bust, in brief : SST
38 Really dig : EXCAVATE
39 The sun’s is approximately 865,370 miles : DIAMETER
40 Govt. org. since 1946 : SSA
42 Cleared one’s cookies? : ATE
44 Something that’s thrown out while using it : ANCHOR
45 Act one’s age : BEHAVE
46 Minced words, say : EDITED
48 Key of Beethoven’s “Für Elise” : A MINOR
51 Winter air : CAROL
53 The crane pose, for one : ASANA
55 Squishy material : NERF
57 Short cut : SNIP
59 What some dropouts go on to get, in brief : GEDS
61 Rest area : SPA
62 ___ economy : GIG
63 Baleful? : HAY

10 thoughts on “0325-22 NY Times Crossword 25 Mar 22, Friday”

  1. 12:15, no errors. This one seemed unusually easy … and, yes, I did do the same puzzle as Bill and Tom. I’m always bemused by this sort of thing: a sort of a “Slumdog Millionaire” phenomenon in which, by pure chance, a puzzle plays well to a particular knowledge base … or … one just happens to be in the right kind of mood … or … the stars are aligned just right … or … something … 🤨.

  2. 23:26 with “uhs” instead of “ums”. Apparently my autocamp alternatives have free breakfasts… :- )

  3. 25:40, no errors…and glad to have it! I thought this one was tough and I got my foothold at the bottom. Finished at the top as everything finally fell into place.

  4. 29:50. Bringing up the rear once again. I used to be able to count on Duncan being slower than I am, but now even he’s unreliable…

    AP TEST before IQ TEST, RUE before RUB (before I saw RUE elsewhere in the grid), also WOE before RUE (bad luck with those), SLIT before SNIP…well you get the idea. A lot of missteps. The only answer that came quickly to me was CRUD which shows what kind of a week I’ve had….

    TGIF

    Best –

  5. Jeff, not to worry…I’ll take my rightful place in the back of the pack tomorrow…and Sunday, too. :- )

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