0317-24 NY Times Crossword 17 Mar 24, Sunday

Constructed by: Simeon Seigel
Edited by: Joel Fagliano

Today’s Theme: All Over the Map

Happy Paddy’s Day, everyone! We have what’s been dubbed a Schrödinger puzzle today. Several squares can take more than one letter so that the intersecting clues still make sense. Very clever …

  • 69A Locale of this puzzle’s attractions (really, all eight of them!) : THE NORTH/SOUTH EAST/WEST
  • 28A Attraction in 69-Across that once froze over for 30 hours in 1848 : NIAGARA FALLS (in the northeast)
  • 37A Attraction in 69-Across that withstands dozens of lightning strikes a year, familiarly : LADY LIBERTY (in the northeast)
  • 104A Attraction in 69-Across overseen by the Navajo Nation : FOUR CORNERS (in the southwest)
  • 116A Attraction in 69-Across on the Extraterrestrial Highway : AREA FIFTY-ONE (in the southwest)
  • 2D Attraction in 69-Across that’s part of America’s first national park : OLD FAITHFUL (in the northwest)
  • 4D Attraction in 69-Across that’s almost 2,000 feet deep : CRATER LAKE (in the northwest)
  • 73D Attraction in 69-Across designed to be a “city of the future” : EPCOT CENTER (in the southeast)
  • 80D Attraction in 69-Across where crocodiles and alligators uniquely coexist : EVERGLADES (in the southeast)
  • 56D Word before fly : HORSE/HOUSE
  • 59D “No,” in a certain dialect : NAE/NAW
  • 66D Touch gently : PAT/PET
  • 70D Division for a tennis match : NET/SET

Bill’s time: 23m 52s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

1 Pear variety : BOSC

Bosc is a cultivar of the European pear that is grown mainly in the northwest of the United States. It is named for French horticulturist Louis Bosc. The cultivar originated in Belgium or France in the early 19th century. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck.

5 Universal, as a motor : AC/DC

There are two types of electric current. The 120V supply that is distributed throughout our homes provides us with alternating current (AC). The AC current moves back and forth every 1/60 second, in two different directions. AC is great for transmission around the country, and that’s the main reason that AC is piped into our homes. However, all of our electronic devices need direct current (DC), current that flows in one direction. That’s why those devices have adapters at the end of a power cable. The 120V AC supply is converted by the adapter into the DC supply used by the device.

9 Short hedge? : OTOH

On the other hand (OTOH)

19 The right one is usually slower : LANE

On a US multi-lane highway, the lane closest to the median is the passing lane. Often referred to as the “fast lane” in error, the passing lane should only be used when overtaking another vehicle. Well, that’s the law in most US jurisdictions …

21 Title character for Tyler Perry : MADEA

Tyler Perry is an actor, comedian and writer who is perhaps best known in front of the camera for his drag performances as a tough elderly woman named Madea. Perry also created the sitcom “Tyler Perry’s House of Payne” that ran for eight seasons from 2006 until 2012.

22 Bright pink shade : HOT MAGENTA

The colors fuchsia and magenta are identical when used on the Web. The name “magenta” comes from an aniline dye that was patented in 1859 in France and called “fuchsine”. The dye was renamed in honor of a victory against the Austrians in the Battle of Magenta of 1859, which was fought near the northern Italian town of Magenta.

24 Literary friend of Sam, Merry and Pippin : FRODO

Frodo Baggins is a principal character in J. R. R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”. He is a Hobbit, and is charged with the quest of destroying Sauron’s Ring in the fires of Mount Doom. Frodo is portrayed by American actor Elijah Wood in Peter Jackson’s film adaptations of the novels.

25 “___ With Marc Maron” (podcast) : WTF

Stand-up comedian Marc Maron has been hosting the podcast “WTF with Marc Maron” since 2009. The online show features interviews with comedians and celebrities. The list of interviewees is pretty impressive, and includes Conan O’Brien, Robin Williams and even President Barack Obama.

28 Attraction in 69-Across that once froze over for 30 hours in 1848 : NIAGARA FALLS (in the northeast)

The mighty Niagara River flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, and forms part of the border between the US and Canada. The river is only about 35 miles long, so some describe it as a “strait”. It has a drop in elevation of 325 feet along its length, with 165 feet of that drop taking place at Niagara Falls.

37 Attraction in 69-Across that withstands dozens of lightning strikes a year, familiarly : LADY LIBERTY (in the northeast)

The Statue of Liberty was a gift from the people of France to the United States. It was designed by sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and constructed in France by civil engineer Gustave Eiffel (of Eiffel Tower fame). The statue was disassembled, shipped to the US, and reassembled on its pedestal on Bedloe’s Island (now “Liberty Island”). A ceremony of dedication was held in 1886. If you take a boat ride down the Seine in Paris you will probably see a one-third replica of Lady Liberty standing on a small island in the river, looking quite magnificent. That copy was given to the people of Paris by the city’s American community in 1889.’

46 Either end of America? : SCHWA

A schwa is an unstressed and toneless vowel found in a number of languages including English. Examples from our language are the “a” in “about”, the “e” in “taken” and the “i” in pencil.

47 “I goofed,” in slang : MY B

My b … my bad

48 Fish fittingly found in “anemone” : NEMO

“””Finding Nemo”” is a 2003 animated blockbuster from Pixar. The film was the winner of the Oscar that year for Best Animated Feature. Believe it or not, “”Finding Nemo”” is the best-selling DVD of all time and, until 2010’s “”Toy Story 3″”, it was the highest-grossing, G-rated movie at the box office.”

Clownfish are very colorful, attractive-looking fish. They are orange and often have broad strips of white and black on their bodies depending on species. Clownfish spend their lives in a symbiotic relationship with sea anemones.

54 Actor Kutcher : ASHTON

Ashton Kutcher played the character Michael Kelso on Fox’s “That ‘70s Show”. Kelso was Kutcher’s breakthrough acting role. Kutcher then starred in the sitcom “Two and a Half Men”, replacing the “disgraced” Charlie Sheen. In 2009, Kutcher became the first user on Twitter to get over 1 million followers.

67 Occasion for fireworks: Abbr. : NYE

New Year’s Eve (NYE)

68 Capital city founded by King Harald : OSLO

Oslo, the capital of Norway, is an ancient city that was founded around 1048. The medieval city was destroyed by fire in 1624 and was rebuilt by the Danish-Norwegian king Christian IV and renamed to Christiania. In 1877 there was an official change of the spelling of the city’s name to “Kristiana”, and then more recently in 1925 the name was restored to the original Oslo. Things have almost gone full circle and now the center of Oslo, the area that would have been contained by the original medieval walls, has apparently been renamed to Christiania.

76 Pro ___ (for now) : TEM

“Pro tempore” can be abbreviated to “pro tem” or “p.t.” “Pro tempore” is a Latin phrase that best translates as “for the time being”. It is used to describe a person who is acting for another, usually a superior. The President pro tempore of the US Senate is the person who presides over the Senate in the absence of the Vice President of the US. It has been tradition since 1890 that the president pro tem is the most senior senator in the majority party. The president pro tem ranks highly in the line of succession to the presidency, falling third in line after the Vice President and the Speaker of the House.

78 Bleep out : CENSOR

The original “censor” was an officer in ancient Rome who had responsibility for taking the “census”, as well as supervising public morality.

81 Voicer of Olaf in “Frozen” : JOSH GAD

Josh Gad is an actor and comedian who was born in Hollywood, although that would be Hollywood, Florida. Gads big break came on the stage, when he originated the role of Elder Cunningham in “The Book of Mormon”. On the big screen Gad played Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak in “Jobs” and Hector McQueen in the 2017 adaptation of “Murder on the Orient Express”. Gad also voiced Olaf in the “Frozen” films.

85 Typical sock hopper : TEENER

Sock hops were high school dances typically held in the school gym or cafeteria. The term “sock hop” arose because the dancers were often required to remove their shoes to protect the varnished floor in the gym.

94 Wood used to make chess pieces and pool cues : EBONY

Ebony is a dark black wood that is very dense, one of the few types of wood that sinks in water. Ebony has been in high demand so the species of trees yielding the wood are now considered threatened. It is in such short supply that unscrupulous vendors have been known to darken lighter woods with shoe polish to look like ebony, so be warned …

96 Scarfs (down) : BOLTS

To snarf down is to gobble up, to eat voraciously. “Snarf” is a slang term that is probably related to “scarf”, which has the same meaning.

101 Name of two “Groundhog Day” characters : PHIL

“Groundhog Day” is a 1993 comedy film that has already become a classic. The star of the movie is Bill Murray, with Andie MacDowell putting in a great supporting performance. “Groundhog Day” is set in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania although it was actually filmed in the town of Woodstock, Illinois.

Punxsutawney is a borough in Pennsylvania that is located about 80 miles northeast of Pittsburgh. Punxsutawney Phil is the famous groundhog that lives in the area. Phil comes out of his hole on February 2 each year and if he sees his shadow he goes back into his hole predicting six more weeks of winter weather. February 2 is known as “Groundhog Day”.

104 Attraction in 69-Across overseen by the Navajo Nation : FOUR CORNERS (in the southwest)

The Four Corners region of the US surrounds the meeting point of the four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah. It is the only point in the US that is shared by four states.

107 “Life would be ___ if it weren’t funny”: Stephen Hawking : TRAGIC

Stephen Hawking was a theoretical physicist from Oxford, England. Hawking owed much of his fame in the world of popular science to his incredibly successful book called “A Brief History of Time”. “A Brief History of Time” has sold over 10 million copies and was on London’s “Sunday Times” bestseller list for over four years. Hawking does a wonderful job of explaining many aspects of cosmology without losing the average reader. There is only one equation in the whole book, and that equation is “E = mc²”. Hawking’s life story is recounted in the excellent 2014 film “The Theory of Everything”.

109 French eatery : BISTRO

“Bistro” was originally a Parisian slang term describing a little wine shop or restaurant.

111 Noted name in 2005 news : KATRINA

2005’s Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest hurricane in US history since 1928, with over 1200 people perishing in the event itself and in the subsequent flooding.

116 Attraction in 69-Across on the Extraterrestrial Highway : AREA FIFTY-ONE (in the southwest)

The famed Area 51 is a remote base in the USAF Nevada Test and Training Range. There’s no question that Area 51 is an unusual base in that frontline operational units are not deployed there. It seems that it is used for developing and testing new and classified weapons facilities for the US Military and other US agencies like the CIA. The government did not even acknowledge that Area 51 existed until 1995, and this official position fueled a theory that the base is home to UFOs that landed on Earth.

118 “Nature of a ___” (1991 Queen Latifah album) : SISTA

“Queen Latifah” is the stage name of the multitalented Dana Owens. The name “Latifah” is Arabic in origin and translates as “delicate, very kind”. Owens found the name and was attracted to it when she was just eight years old.

121 Children’s author Eric : CARLE

Eric Carle is a very successful children’s author and book illustrator, with over 100 million of his books sold around the world. Carle’s most famous title is “The Very Hungry Caterpillar”, and it alone has sold 30 million copies.

128 Skipjacks and bluefins : TUNAS

Skipjack tuna would be considered a medium-sized tuna, growing to about three feet long. Albacore tuna is a little larger.

Bluefin tuna is one of those species (actually there are three species of bluefin) that has been overfished, and is no longer found in some parts of the world.

132 Former L.A. center : SHAQ

Retired basketball player Shaquille O’Neal now appears regularly as an analyst on the NBA TV show “Inside the NBA”. Shaq has quite a career in the entertainment world. His first rap album, called “Shaq Diesel”, went platinum. He also starred in two of his own reality shows: “Shaq’s Big Challenge” and “Shaq Vs.”

Down

1 Political party founded in Syria : BA’ATH

The Ba’ath Party was founded in Syria in 1947. The party promotes the unification of the Arab world into one nation, and has the motto “Unity, Liberty, Socialism”.

2 Attraction in 69-Across that’s part of America’s first national park : OLD FAITHFUL (in the northwest)

Old Faithful is a geyser in Yellowstone National Park. It erupts almost every 63 minutes on the nose, making it one of the most predictable geographic features on the planet. It was this predictability that led to the name “Old Faithful”. In the early days of Yellowstone’s existence as a park, the geyser was used as a laundry. Dirty linen clothing was placed in the geyser’s crater during the quiet period. The clothing was ejected during the eruption, thoroughly washed.

4 Attraction in 69-Across that’s almost 2,000 feet deep : CRATER LAKE (in the northwest)

Crater Lake is my favorite locale in the whole country. It sits in a volcanic crater giving it a near perfect circular shape. The water appears to have a deep, deep blue color and is extremely pure. There are no rivers running into the lake, so man hasn’t really had the chance to contaminate it with pollutants.

7 Many a lib : DEM

The modern-day Democratic Party was founded in 1828, when supporters of Andrew Jackson broke away from the former Democratic-Republican Party during the presidency of John Quincy Adams. That date makes the Democratic Party the oldest voter-based political party in the world. Andrew Jackson became the first Democratic US president, in 1829.

8 Heady? : CRANIAL

The human skull is made up of two parts: the cranium (which encloses the brain) and the mandible (or “jawbone”).

9 Owners of an infamous cow : O’LEARYS

The Great Chicago Fire blazed for almost three full days in October of 1871. By the time it was extinguished, hundreds of people had died and four square miles of the city had been destroyed. It is known that the fire started in or near a small barn owned by an Irish immigrant, Mrs. Catherine “Cate” O’Leary. A reporter called Michael Ahern wrote in the “Chicago Tribune” that the fire was ignited when a cow in the barn kicked over a lantern. Years later, Ahern admitted that he made up the story about the cow and the lantern, as he felt it made for colorful copy. Supposedly, Mrs. O’Leary died a heartbroken woman, as she spent the rest of her life with the public blaming her for the tragic loss of life and property.

10 Citrus with a portmanteau name : TANGELO

The fruit called a tangelo is a hybrid between a tangerine and either a grapefruit or a pomelo (which gives it the name). A pomelo is a very large, pear-shaped citrus fruit native to Southeast Asia. The Jamaican form of tangelo is known as the ugli fruit.

11 Person living in London : ONTARIAN

The city of London, Ontario lies about halfway between Detroit, Michigan and Toronto, Ontario. Just like the city’s better known namesake in England, Canada’s London is located on the Thames River.

13 Comedian Jimmy with a self-described “schnozzola” : DURANTE

Jimmy Durante was a very talented entertainer, with that wonderful, gravelly voice, as well as that large nose that he used in so much of his humor (and earned him the nickname “Schnozzola”). Durante appeared in the Broadway stage musical “Jumbo” in 1935. In one scene, he leads a live elephant across the stage, and gets stopped by a police officer who asks, “What are you doing with that elephant?” Durante replies “What elephant?” and brings the house down every night.

17 Some German rides : BMWS

The initialism “BMW” stands for “Bayerische Motoren Werke”, which translates into Bavarian Motor Works. BMW was making aircraft engines during WWI, but had to cease that activity according to the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. The company then started making motorcycles, and moved into automobile production starting in 1928. BMW moved back into aircraft engine manufacturing during the build-up of the Luftwaffe prior to WWII.

23 Prepare (oneself) for a challenge : GIRD

The phrase “gird your loins” dates back to ancient Rome. The expression describes the action of lifting “one’s skirts” and tying them between the legs to allow more freedom of movement before going into battle. Nowadays, “gird your loins” (or sometimes just “gird yourself”) is a metaphor for “prepare yourself for the worst”.

27 Debauchee : ROUE

“Roue” is a lovely word, but one used to describe a less than lovely man, someone of loose morals. “Roue” comes from the French word “rouer” meaning “to break on a wheel”. This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

33 Special attention, for short : TLC

Tender loving care (TLC)

41 Jazz group, for short : NBA

The Utah Jazz professional basketball team moved to Salt Lake City in 1979. As one might guess from the name, the team originated in New Orleans, but only played there for five seasons. New Orleans was a tough place to be based because venues were hard to come by, and Mardi Gras forced the team to play on the road for a whole month.

44 Distributor of 1933’s “King Kong” and “Little Women” : RKO

The RKO Pictures studio was formed when RCA (RADIO Corporation of America) bought the KEITH-Albee-ORPHEUM theaters (and Joe Kennedy’s Film Booking Offices of America). The RKO initialism then comes from the words “Radio”, “Keith” and “Orpheum”.

47 “Bulls get angry when they see the color red,” for one : MYTH

Bulls, like all cattle, are color blind, so the cape that’s used in bullfighting isn’t colored red to attract the unfortunate beast. Rather, it’s the movement of the cape that causes the bull to charge. The red is chosen just because it is a dramatic color.

49 Meditation aid : MANTRA

A mantra is a word that is used as a focus for the mind while meditating. The term is Sanskrit in origin, and is now used figuratively in English to describe any oft-repeated word or phrase.

53 Small role for Paul Rudd : ANT-MAN

In the Marvel universe, Ant-Man has been the superhero persona of three different fictional characters: Hank Pym, Scott Lang and Eric O’Grady. In the 2015 film “Ant-Man”, Michael Douglas plays Hank Pym, and Paul Rudd plays Scott Lang.

57 Wyoming’s ___ Range : TETON

The Teton Range is located just to the south of Yellowstone National Park, and is part of the Rocky Mountains. The origins of the name “Teton” is not very clear, although one story is that it was named by French trappers, as the word “tetons” in French is a slang term meaning “breasts”.

61 Default consequence, perhaps : REPO

Repossession (repo)

63 “The lady ___ protest too much …” : DOTH

“The lady doth protest too much, methinks” is a line spoken by Queen Gertrude, Hamlet’s mother in the play by William Shakespeare.

64 Brut-ish? : SEC

Sparkling wines can be classified according to sweetness. These classifications are, from driest to sweetest:

  • Brut Nature
  • Extra Brut
  • Brut
  • Extra Dry
  • Dry
  • Semi-Dry
  • Sweet

73 Attraction in 69-Across designed to be a “city of the future” : EPCOT CENTER (in the southeast)

EPCOT Center (now just called “Epcot”) is the theme park beside Walt Disney World in Florida. EPCOT is an acronym standing for Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, and is a representation of the future as envisioned by Walt Disney. Walt Disney actually wanted to build a living community for 20,000 residents at EPCOT, but he passed away without that vision being realized.

75 Fictional archaeologist with a whip, familiarly : INDY

George Lucas created a lead character named “Indiana Smith” for what was to be his “Indiana Jones” series of films. Lucas asked Steven Spielberg to direct the first film, and Spielberg wasn’t too fond of the name “Smith”. Lucas then suggested “Jones” as an alternative, and Indiana Jones was born.

80 Attraction in 69-Across where crocodiles and alligators uniquely coexist : EVERGLADES (in the southeast)

The Everglades are tropical wetlands that cover much of southern Florida. The area was named “River Glades” by a British surveyor in 1773, and it is suggested that poor transcription of the word “river” led to the use of “ever”. The southern 20% of the Everglades is a protected region that we know as Everglades National Park. The park is the third-largest National Park in the lower 48 states, after Death Valley NP (the largest) and Yellowstone NP.

83 Buffet style : SELF-SERVE

Our word “buffet” comes from the French “bufet” meaning “bench, sideboard”. So, a buffet is a meal served from a “bufet”.

84 Part of the spine : DISC

Our intervertebral discs are composed mainly of cartilage. They perform the crucial functions of separating the vertebrae while allowing slight movement, and also absorbing shock. A “slipped disc” isn’t really a disc that has “slipped”, but rather a disc that “bulges”. If that bulge causes pressure on the sciatic nerve then the painful condition known as sciatica can result.

95 Flake, so to speak : BAIL

The phrase “to bail out” (sometimes just “to bail”) means to leave suddenly. We’ve been using the term since the early thirties, when it originated with airline pilots. To bail out is to make a parachute jump.

99 Supply for kindergarten drawers : CRAYONS

“Kindergarten” is a German term, one translated as “children’s garden”. The term was coined by the German education authority Friedrich Fröbel in 1837, when he used it as the name for his play and activity institute that he created for young children to use before they headed off to school. His thought was that children should be nourished educationally, like plants in a garden.

100 Eponymous saint of “Alamo City” : ANTONIO

The city of San Antonio, Texas was named by Spanish explorers. They came upon a Native American settlement in the area on 13 June 1631, the feast day of St. Anthony of Padua.

102 Seller of over a billion Huggable Hangers on TV : HSN

The Home Shopping Network (HSN) was the first national shopping network, and was launched locally as the Home Shopping Club in Florida in 1982. Its first product was a can opener.

105 Profitability metric, for short : ROI

Return on investment (ROI) measures the gains made from investing, relative to the amount invested.

108 Wine menu section : ROSES

Rosé wines get their color from the skins of the grapes, although the intensity of the color is not sufficient to make them red wines. Of the varying type of rosé wines available, we are most familiar with sweet White Zinfandels. Personally, I am fond of the dry Provençal rosé wines …

109 The two wives and 20 children of Johann Sebastian : BACHS

Johann Sebastian Bach raised a very large family. He had seven children with his first wife, who died suddenly. He had a further thirteen children with his second wife. Of his twenty youngsters, there were four sons who became famous musicians in their own right:

  • Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (aka “the Halle Bach”)
  • Carl Philipp Bach (aka “the Hamburg Bach”)
  • Johann Christoph Bach (aka “the Buckeburg Bach”)
  • Johann Christian Bach (aka “the London Bach”)

112 Yoga pose : ASANA

“Asana” is a Sanskrit word that translates literally as “sitting down”. The asanas are the poses that a practitioner of yoga assumes. The most famous is the lotus position, the cross-legged pose called “padmasana”.

114 Insurance company whose name contains a diphthong : AETNA

In the world of linguistics, a diphthong is a syllable made from two adjacent vowel sounds. Syllables with only one vowel sound are known as monophthongs.

115 “Ivories” : KEYS

The traditional materials used for the manufacture of piano keys were ebony (black) and ivory (white). Ebony is still used, but now for both white and black keys. The white keys are made by covering ebony with white plastic.

119 Where dinars are spent : IRAQ

The dinar is the official currency in many countries, such as Iraq, Tunisia, Bahrain and Serbia. The gold dinar dates back to the early days of Islam, with the name deriving from the Roman currency called “denarius” meaning “ten times” (as it was originally a coin worth ten asses).

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Pear variety : BOSC
5 Universal, as a motor : AC/DC
9 Short hedge? : OTOH
13 Turner on the radio : DIAL
17 Farm machine equipped with twine : BALER
18 More crafty : SLIER
19 The right one is usually slower : LANE
20 Eclipse : OUTDO
21 Title character for Tyler Perry : MADEA
22 Bright pink shade : HOT MAGENTA
24 Literary friend of Sam, Merry and Pippin : FRODO
25 “___ With Marc Maron” (podcast) : WTF
26 Like a stock quote? : TRITE
28 Attraction in 69-Across that once froze over for 30 hours in 1848 : NIAGARA FALLS (in the northeast)
30 Informally agree to : SHAKE ON
32 Stick in a cup : STIRRER
34 Buyer : VENDEE
35 Sudden arrival : INRUSH
37 Attraction in 69-Across that withstands dozens of lightning strikes a year, familiarly : LADY LIBERTY (in the northeast)
39 Didn’t swipe right? : STOLE
40 Mail insert: Abbr. : ENCL
42 What prices can do : SOAR
43 Turning on the waterworks : TEARY
46 Either end of America? : SCHWA
47 “I goofed,” in slang : MY B
48 Fish fittingly found in “anemone” : NEMO
50 Music genre that emphasizes the offbeat : SKA
51 Stumbler or bumbler : OAF
52 Name that sounds like a letter : KAY
54 Actor Kutcher : ASHTON
60 General meeting place : WAR ROOM
62 School subjects? : STUDENTS
65 Steel boot feature : TOE CAP
67 Occasion for fireworks: Abbr. : NYE
68 Capital city founded by King Harald : OSLO
69 Locale of this puzzle’s attractions (really, all eight of them!) : THE NORTH/SOUTH EAST/WEST
72 Spa service, in brief : PEDI
76 Pro ___ (for now) : TEM
78 Bleep out : CENSOR
79 Unwrapped eagerly : TORE OPEN
81 Voicer of Olaf in “Frozen” : JOSH GAD
85 Typical sock hopper : TEENER
87 British throne room? : LAV
88 Not a good guy : CAD
89 Handled thing : AXE
90 Handling things : ON IT
92 Curt reprimand to a dog : BAD!
94 Wood used to make chess pieces and pool cues : EBONY
96 Scarfs (down) : BOLTS
98 Caribbean music genre : SOCA
101 Name of two “Groundhog Day” characters : PHIL
103 Little rascals : BRATS
104 Attraction in 69-Across overseen by the Navajo Nation : FOUR CORNERS (in the southwest)
107 “Life would be ___ if it weren’t funny”: Stephen Hawking : TRAGIC
109 French eatery : BISTRO
111 Noted name in 2005 news : KATRINA
113 Cause of a driveway stain : OIL LEAK
116 Attraction in 69-Across on the Extraterrestrial Highway : AREA FIFTY-ONE (in the southwest)
118 “Nature of a ___” (1991 Queen Latifah album) : SISTA
120 Originally called : NEE
121 Children’s author Eric : CARLE
122 Biggest portion : LION’S SHARE
124 A little crazy : DOTTY
126 Colonized, as bees might : HIVED
127 Directional heading? : OMNI-
128 Skipjacks and bluefins : TUNAS
129 Perfect places : EDENS
130 Be on the decline? : SLED
131 Spanish for “weight” : PESO
132 Former L.A. center : SHAQ
133 Clinic liquids : SERA

Down

1 Political party founded in Syria : BA’ATH
2 Attraction in 69-Across that’s part of America’s first national park : OLD FAITHFUL (in the northwest)
3 Picture : SEE
4 Attraction in 69-Across that’s almost 2,000 feet deep : CRATER LAKE (in the northwest)
5 Often : A LOT
6 Gives as a reference : CITES
7 Many a lib : DEM
8 Heady? : CRANIAL
9 Owners of an infamous cow : O’LEARYS
10 Citrus with a portmanteau name : TANGELO
11 Person living in London : ONTARIAN
12 Consider : HEAR
13 Comedian Jimmy with a self-described “schnozzola” : DURANTE
14 “Shoulda listened to me!” : I TOLD YA SO!
15 Confuse : ADDLE
16 One way to be cut : LOOSE
17 Some German rides : BMWS
18 They’re very attached to their calves : SHINS
20 Collection during a church service : OFFERTORY
23 Prepare (oneself) for a challenge : GIRD
27 Debauchee : ROUE
29 “Hail,” in old Rome : AVE
31 Have down : KNOW
33 Special attention, for short : TLC
36 “Sup” : HEY
38 Steep : BREW
39 Improvises in a jazz group : SCATS
41 Jazz group, for short : NBA
44 Distributor of 1933’s “King Kong” and “Little Women” : RKO
45 Nigerian staple food : YAM
46 Nothing special : SO-SO
47 “Bulls get angry when they see the color red,” for one : MYTH
49 Meditation aid : MANTRA
53 Small role for Paul Rudd : ANT-MAN
55 Marble, e.g. : STONE
56 Word before fly : HORSE/HOUSE
57 Wyoming’s ___ Range : TETON
58 Yellowish pigment : OCHRE
59 “No,” in a certain dialect : NAE/NAW
61 Default consequence, perhaps : REPO
63 “The lady ___ protest too much …” : DOTH
64 Brut-ish? : SEC
66 Touch gently : PAT/PET
70 Division for a tennis match : NET/SET
71 Persuaded : SOLD
73 Attraction in 69-Across designed to be a “city of the future” : EPCOT CENTER (in the southeast)
74 Academic figures : DEANS
75 Fictional archaeologist with a whip, familiarly : INDY
77 Googled oneself, e.g. : EGO-SURFED
80 Attraction in 69-Across where crocodiles and alligators uniquely coexist : EVERGLADES (in the southeast)
81 Quick boxing move : JAB
82 Tic-tac-toe loser : O-X-O
83 Buffet style : SELF-SERVE
84 Part of the spine : DISC
86 Diamond stat : RBI
91 Deliberated (on) : TOOK TIME
93 Subgenre prefix : ALT-
95 Flake, so to speak : BAIL
97 Came to : TOTALED
99 Supply for kindergarten drawers : CRAYONS
100 Eponymous saint of “Alamo City” : ANTONIO
101 Some clerical workers : PRIESTS
102 Seller of over a billion Huggable Hangers on TV : HSN
103 It’s a trap! : BAIT
105 Profitability metric, for short : ROI
106 Sea eagles : ERNS
108 Wine menu section : ROSES
109 The two wives and 20 children of Johann Sebastian : BACHS
110 Letter-shaped beam : I-RAIL
112 Yoga pose : ASANA
114 Insurance company whose name contains a diphthong : AETNA
115 “Ivories” : KEYS
117 Bomb : FLOP
119 Where dinars are spent : IRAQ
123 “Wait … what?” : HUH?
125 Work on something you love? : ODE

8 thoughts on “0317-24 NY Times Crossword 17 Mar 24, Sunday”

  1. 24:24, no errors. Early on, I entered “THE SOUTHEAST”. As I entered the final character, I thought, “Wait a second. How does that answer work?” And I knew what the gimmick was, but it was too late to fix it, and … the app bought it! So … lucky me!

  2. 43:22 of which 5 was trying to get the app to accept “letter-backslash-letter” in the square. What I would have given for a pencil today!!!

  3. 40:26. Very clever theme.

    When I saw LADY LIBERTY after OLD FAITHFUL, I knew something was up. My first thought was that everything is NORTHWEST of something else so….But that thought was a little too clever. Got the rebus at NAE/NAW and I was off to the races.

    Had no idea about people doing their laundry at OLD FAITHFUL. Good idea.

    Best –

  4. 35:23, no errors. As Bruce said, the app didn’t require rebus entries. Good thing since I skipped over the rebus connections altogether.

  5. Happy St. Paddy’s Day Bill and all!
    Knew it wasn’t right as y’all said didn’t need it. I had the northeast!
    Go Scotty! PGA

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *