0303-24 NY Times Crossword 3 Mar 24, Sunday

Constructed by: Hoang-Kim Vu
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Countdown

Themed, across-answers incorporate a number that drops in the DOWN-direction in the grid. And, we COUNT DOWN from TEN to ONE as we descend the grid. Impressive construction …

  • 1A Loose-fitting garment : TENT DRESS (uses TEN down)
  • 1D – : TEN
  • 24A It might help you keep up with old classmates : ALUMNI NEWSLETTER (uses NINE down)
  • 25D – : NINE
  • 30A Carrier of goods by rail : FREIGHT TRAIN (uses EIGHT down)
  • 32D – : EIGHT
  • 47A Stop on a publicity tour : PRESS EVENT (uses SEVEN down)
  • 48D – : SEVEN
  • 61A Chosen name of five popes : SIXTUS (uses SIX down)
  • 61D – : SIX
  • 71A Break for a bit : TAKE FIVE (uses FIVE down)
  • 72D – : FIVE
  • 80A French desserts whose name translates as “small ovens” : PETIT FOURS (uses FOUR down)
  • 81D – : FOUR
  • 108A Concern at the end of a space journey : EARTH REENTRY (uses THREE down)
  • 109D – : THREE
  • 115A “Take it easy once in a while!” : DON’T WORK TOO HARD (uses TWO down)
  • 116D – : TWO
  • 118A Sonny and Fredo, for two : CORLEONES (uses ONE down)
  • 121D – : ONE

Bill’s time: 18m 59s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

11 Cavs, on a scoreboard : CLE

The Cavaliers are a professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Cavs joined the NBA as an expansion team in 1970.

14 Effects seen on FX, perhaps : CGI

Computer-generated imagery (CGI)

17 Nation on the Red Sea : ERITREA

Eritrea is a country located in the Horn of Africa, and surrounded by Sudan, Ethiopia, Djibouti and the Red Sea. Some scientists believe that the area now known as Eritrea was the departure point for anatomically modern humans who first left Africa to populate the rest of the world.

18 Helmsman on “Star Trek” : SULU

Mr. Hikaru Sulu was played by George Takei in the original “Star Trek” series. Takei has played lots of roles over the years, and is still very active in television. Did you know that he appeared in the 1963 film, “Pt-109”? He played the helmsman steering the Japanese destroyer that ran down John F. Kennedy’s motor torpedo boat. From destroyer helmsman to starship helmsman …

26 Big-eyed baby : OWLET

A baby owl is an owlet. The term “owlet” can also be used for the adults of the smaller species of owls.

34 Player of 45s : PHONO

“Phonograph” was an early name for what became known as a “gramophone” and later “record player”. Famously, the phonograph was invented in 1877 by Thomas Edison.

35 Haim of “Licorice Pizza” : ALANA

Musician Alana Haim is a member of the pop rock band Haim, along with her two sisters Este and Danielle. Alana also took a lead role in the 2021 film “Licorice Pizza” opposite Cooper Hoffman, son of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman. That performance earned her nominations for a Golden Globe and a BAFTA.

37 Iconic role for Carrie Fisher : LEIA

Actress Carrie Fisher was best known for playing Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” series of films. Fisher was the daughter of actress Debbie Reynolds and singer Eddie Fisher. Fisher fell seriously ill on a transatlantic flight at the end of 2016, and then died of cardiac arrest four days later. Famously, her mother and next-door neighbor in Beverly Hills, passed away following a stroke, just one day after her daughter died.

38 Certain porter : REDCAP

“Redcap” is a term used for a railroad station porter here in North America. That term comes from the fact that redcaps wear red caps!

45 Some Kiwis : MAORIS

The Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand. They are eastern Polynesian in origin and began arriving in New Zealand relatively recently, starting some time in the late 13th century. The word “māori” simply means “normal”, distinguishing mortal humans from spiritual entities. The Māori refer to New Zealand as “Aotearoa”.

Unlike many nicknames for people of a particular country, the name “Kiwi” for a New Zealander isn’t offensive at all. The term comes from the flightless bird called the kiwi, which is endemic to New Zealand and is the country’s national symbol. “Kiwi” is a Maori word, and the plural (when referring to the bird) is simply “kiwi”. However, when you have two or more New Zealanders with you, they are Kiwis (note the “s”, and indeed the capital “K”!).

50 When repeated, gung-ho : RAH

“Kung ho” is a Chinese expression meaning “work together, cooperate”. The anglicized version “gung-ho” was adopted by Major Evans Carlson as an expression of combined spirit for his 2nd Marine Raider Battalion during WWII. From there the term spread throughout the Marine Corps and back to America where it persists to this day.

51 Dish often topped with marinara sauce : MEATBALLS

Italians use the term “marinara” not for a sauce, but in the name of a recipe that includes a tomato-based sauce. For example, “spaghetti alla marinara” would be a spaghetti dish, served “mariner’s style”. The tomato sauce that we call “marinara” is called “salsa di pomodoro” in Italy.

60 The “e” of i.e. : EST

“Id est” is Latin for “that is”, and is often abbreviated to “i.e.” when used in English.

63 ___ Equis : DOS

Dos Equis lager was originally brewed in 1897, and back then was called “Siglo XX” (20th century) to celebrate the arrival of the new century. The name was changed later to simply “Dos Equis” (two exes).

69 Alternatives to Pumas : AVIAS

The Avia brand name for athletic shoes was chosen as “avia” is the Latin word for “to fly”, and suggests the concept of aviation. Avia was founded in Oregon in 1979.

76 ___ Rose of Guns N’ Roses : AXL

Guns N’ Roses (GNR) is a hard rock band founded in 1985 that is still going strong. The group was pulled together by Axl Rose, the lead vocalist. The lead-guitar player back then was Tracii Guns, and it was the combination of Axl and Tracii’s “family” names that led to the band being called Guns N’ Roses.

78 Leb. neighbor : ISR

Lebanon (Leb.) shares a border with Israel (Isr.).

80 French desserts whose name translates as “small ovens” : PETIT FOURS (uses FOUR down)

A petit four is a small confection served at the end of a meal, either as a dessert or with coffee. The name “petit four” is French for “small oven”.

84 Thor, e.g. : AVENGER

The Avengers are a team of superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. The original lineup, which dates back to 1963, consisted of Ant-Man, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor and the Wasp. Soon after their formation, the Avengers rescued Captain America trapped in ice, and thereafter he joined the team. There is a 2012 movie called “The Avengers” that features Iron Man, Captain America, Hulk and Thor.

88 Makeup of some sleeves : TATTOOS

Sleeve tattoos cover the arm, or part of the arm.

92 ___ Sremmurd (hip-hop duo) : RAE

Rae Sremmurd is a hip hop act consisting of two brothers from Tupelo, Mississippi: Khalif “Swae Lee” Brown and Aaquil “Slim Jxmmi” Brown. The pair used to perform as Dem Outta St8 Boyz, with the brothers using the names Kid Krunk and Caliboy, along with a third brother known as Lil Pantz. The name “Rae Sremmurd” is a backward spelling of the words making up “EarDrummers”, which is the name of the production company that signed the duo.

93 White Russian ingredient : KAHLUA

A White Russian is a cocktail made from vodka, Kahlua or Tia Maria, and cream, served in an old-fashioned glass with ice. The White Russian is similar to a Black Russian, which is the same drink without the cream. Both cocktails are called “Russian” as they are based on vodka, and both have been around since the late forties, with no one seeming to know which drink came first.

94 Playwright Eugene : O’NEILL

Playwright Eugene O’Neill was born in a New York City hotel room in what is now called Times Square, in 1888. That building no longer exists and there is a Starbucks on the site today, but you can go take a look at the commemorative plaque at the Northeast corner of 43rd and Broadway. O’Neill died in 1953, in room 401 of the Sheraton Hotel on Bay State Road in Boston. His last words were, “I knew it. I knew it. Born in a hotel room, and God damn it, died in a hotel room.” Eugene O’Neill won a Pulitzer for his play “Anna Christie”.

95 Michelangelo masterpiece : PIETA

The Pietà is a representation of the Virgin Mary holding in her arms the dead body of her son Jesus. The most famous Pietà is undoubtedly the sculpted rendition by Michelangelo that is located in St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City. That particular sculpture is thought to be the only work that Michelangelo signed. In some depictions of the Pietà, Mary and her son are surrounded by other figures from the New Testament. Such depictions are known as Lamentations.

97 Camelot figure : MERLIN

Merlin is a figure of legend. He is the wizard in the stories of King Arthur.

Camelot is featured in Arthurian legend. It was King Arthur’s castle and his court.

110 X : CHI

The letter chi is the 22nd letter in the Greek alphabet, and the one that looks like our Roman letter X.

114 ___ Cherry, 1989 Grammy nominee for Best New Artist : NENEH

Neneh Cherry is a rap singer from Stockholm, Sweden. Cherry was born Neneh Karlsson, but she took the name of her stepfather, American jazz trumpeter Don Cherry.

118 Sonny and Fredo, for two : CORLEONES (uses ONE down)

Sonny Corleone was the eldest son of Don Vito Corleone in Mario Puzo’s great novel “The Godfather”. In the movie, Sonny was played by James Caan. Sonny appears as a boy in the movie “The Godfather: Part II”, and is played by director Francis Ford Coppola’s own son, Roman Coppola.

Fredo Corleone is a middle son in the Corleone family that features in Mario Puzo’s “The Godfather”. He was considered the weak son, and was reduced to the role of “gopher”. Fredo was with his father when Don Corleone was shot, and although he tried to retaliate as the shooting took place, he dropped his gun. On the screen, Fredo was played by Italian-American actor John Cazale.

126 Chinese dish eponym : TSO

General Tso’s chicken is an American creation, and a dish often found on the menu of a Chinese restaurant. The name General Tso may be a reference to General Zuo Zongtang of the Qing Dynasty, but there is no clear link.

127 End of days? : ESS

The end of the word “days” is a letter S (ess).

128 You might take them out for a quick spin, informally : EPS

An extended-play (EP) record, CD or download contains more music than a single, but less than a long-play (LP) record.

Down

2 ___TV (network for “Impractical Jokers”) : TRU

“Impractical Jokers” is a show that first aired in 2011 that falls into the “Candid Camera” genre, with the hosts pranking the public.

7 One taking interest in your education? : SALLIE MAE

“Sallie Mae” is a nickname for SLM Corporation that was created in 1972 by the US government as the Student Loan Marketing Association. By 2004, the government had severed all its ties with Sallie Mae. Today, SLM is basically a profit-focused lender.

9 7/ : JUL

Our month of July used to be called “Quintilis” in ancient Rome. “Quintilis” is Latin for “fifth”, and it was the fifth month of the year back then. After the assassination of Julius Caesar, the Roman Senate renamed Quintilis to Julius, in his honor, which evolved into our “July”. The month of August, originally called “Sextilis” in Latin, was renamed in honor of Augustus.

10 Heaps at publishing houses : SLUSH PILES

In the world of publishing, the slush pile is the collection of unsolicited manuscripts that have been submitted by hopeful authors.

11 Edward Jenner used it when developing the world’s first successful vaccine : COWPOX

A vaccine used to be exclusively a modified virus administered to an individual to stimulate the immune system into developing immunity, until mRNA vaccines were introduced to combat COVID-19. British physician Edward Jenner came up with the first vaccine, injecting people with the cowpox virus in order to prevent smallpox. The term “vaccination” comes from the Latin “vaccinus” meaning “from cows”, with “vacca” translating as “cow”.

12 Sigmatism, by another name : LISP

A sigmatism is a lisp, a difficulty in pronouncing the letter S. The term comes from “sigma” (S) and “ism”.

13 The blonde in “Legally Blonde” : ELLE

“LEGALLY blonde” is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon as a girlish sorority president who heads to Harvard to earn a law degree. “LEGALLY blonde” was successful enough to warrant two sequels as well as a spin-off musical that played most successfully in London’s West End (for 974 performances).

15 Exclamation on April Fools’ Day : GOT YA!

April Fools’ Day is celebrated on April 1st in the Western world. In the US (and Ireland) one can make practical jokes all day long if one wants, but in the UK there is a noon deadline. Anyone pranking after midday is called an “April Fool”.

21 Checks for bugs : BETA TESTS

Back in 1947, famed computer programmer Grace Hopper noticed some colleagues fixing a piece of equipment by removing a dead moth from a relay. She remarked that they were “debugging” the system, and so Hopper has been given credit for popularizing the term “bug” in the context of computing.

22 Mlle., in Madrid : SRTA

Madrid is the most populous city in Spain, and is the nation’s capital. It is located very close to the geographical center of the country. Madrid is the second-largest city in the European Union by population, after Berlin. People from Madrid called themselves Madrileños.

30 Distress signal : FLARE

The most commonly used flare gun was invented by an American naval officer, called Edward Wilson Very. He put his name to his invention (from the late 1800s), so we often hear the terms Very pistol, Very flare, and maybe even Very “light”. A Very pistol is indeed a gun, with a trigger and a hammer that’s cocked and can be reloaded with Very flares.

34 Borough of New Jersey noted for its indoor shopping malls : PARAMUS

The borough of Paramus is in New Jersey, although it is a suburb of New York City. Paramus is noted for its retail facilities. The main shopping area has more retail sales annually than any other zip code in the whole of the US.

36 Landed on a licorice space in Candy Land, say : LOST A TURN

The board game Candy Land first went on the market in 1949, and in 2005 was named the most popular “toy” of the whole 1940s decade.

39 Male swan : COB

An adult male swan is a cob and an adult female is a pen. Young swans are swanlings or cygnets.

44 Their eggs are dark green : EMUS

Emu eggs are very large, with a thick shell that is dark-green in color. One emu egg weighs about the same as a dozen chicken eggs. It is the male emu that incubates the eggs. The incubation period lasts about 8 weeks, during which time the male neither eats nor drinks, just lapping up any morning dew that is nearby. While incubating a clutch of eggs, male emus lose about a third of their weight.

46 Camera spec : SLR

The initialism “SLR” stands for “single lens reflex”. Usually, cameras with changeable lenses are the SLR type. The main feature of an SLR is that a mirror reflects the image seen through the lens out through the viewfinder, so that the photographer sees exactly what the lens sees. The mirror moves out of the way as the picture is taken, and the image that comes through the lens falls onto unexposed film, or nowadays onto a digital sensor.

53 Malibu, e.g. : SEDAN

The Chevrolet Malibu was named for the city of Malibu, California. It was produced by General Motors from 1964 to 1983, and was then reintroduced in 1997.

68 Terra ___ : COTTA

In the history of ceramics, earthenware (also “terra cotta”) is a relatively old material. It is porous, and needs a ceramic glaze to make it impervious to liquids. Stoneware was developed later, and is impervious to liquids in its own right due to the higher firing temperature. Porcelain came later still, and is fired at even higher temperatures to produce a stronger, harder and finer material.

70 One doing the lord’s work? : VASSAL

Feudalism was a legal and military system that flourished in medieval Europe. Central to the system were the concepts of lords, vassals and fiefs. Lords would grant fiefs (land or rights) to vassals in exchange for allegiance and service.

83 Language spoken in Luang Prabang : LAO

Luang Prabang is a city in north central Laos that is well known for having many Buddhist temples and monasteries. The name “Luang Prabang” translates as “Royal Buddha Image”.

90 Estuary : RIA

An estuary is a body of water that is connected directly to the open sea as well as to one or more rivers. As such, the water in an estuary is “brackish”, less saline than seawater but more saline than freshwater. The list of significant estuaries in North America includes Chesapeake Bay, Delaware bay, the East River and Long Island Sound.

91 “Three Tall Women” playwright : ALBEE

The 1991 play “Three Tall Women” by Edward Albee won him the 1994 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. The title characters have the inventive names A, B and C.

98 Cold feet and cold shoulder, for two : IDIOMS

To give someone the cold shoulder is to ignore the person deliberately. A little research into the etymology of “cold shoulder” reveals that there’s some dispute over the origin of the phrase. To me, the most credible suggestion is that the term was coined by Sir Walter Scott in his writings, and he simply used the imagery of someone “turning away, coldly”, to suggest the act of ignoring someone. Less credible is the suggestion that unwelcome visitors to a home in days gone by might be offered a “cold shoulder” of mutton, rather than a hot meal.

99 Emperor before the Year of the Four Emperors : NERO

AD 69 was a year of civil war in ancient Rome. The unrest started with the death of emperor Nero in AD 68, after which followed the brief rule of Galba, of Otho, of Vitellius, and of Vespasian all in the same year. As a result, AD 69 became known as the Year of the Four Emperors.

101 Louisiana cooking style : CREOLE

Here in North America, we tend to associate Creole cuisine with Louisiana. However, the term “Creole cuisine” applies to several areas of the world, areas within the reach of the French, Portuguese and Spanish colonial empires. One definition of Creole culture refers to peoples of European origin, born in the New World, and who have integrated with local cultures. As a result, we encounter a variety of Creole-named cuisines beyond Louisiana, in places like Cuba, Brazil, Peru, Jamaica, Réunion and Cape Verde. All the variations share a leaning towards spiciness, the use of simpler techniques in preparing the food (stewing, frying, etc.), and the use of local products in traditional European dishes.

103 “Flick of the Switch” band : AC/DC

The Heavy Metal band known as AC/DC was formed by two brothers Malcolm and Angus Young in Australia. Malcolm and Angus chose the name “AC/DC” after their sister Margaret noticed them on a sewing machine (the abbreviation for alternating current/direct current). The group is usually called “Acca Dacca” down under.

107 Classic soda brand : NEHI

The Nehi cola brand has a name that sounds like “knee-high”, a measure of a small stature. Back in the mid-1900’s the Chero-Cola company, which owned the brand, went for a slightly different twist on “knee-high” in advertising. The logo for Nehi was an image of a seated woman’s stockinged legs, with her skirt pulled up to her knees to hint at “knee-high”.

112 ___-Ball : SKEE

Skee-Ball is the arcade game in which you roll balls up a ramp trying to “bounce” it into rings for varying numbers of points. The game was first introduced in Philadelphia, in 1909.

114 Hush-hush pacts, in brief : NDAS

Non-disclosure agreement (NDA)

119 Some smartphones : LGS

LG is a very large South Korean manufacturer of electronics, chemicals and telecom products. The company used to be known as Lucky-Goldstar, whence the initialism “LG”.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Loose-fitting garment : TENT DRESS (uses TEN down)
8 Things packed for a sleepover, informally : PJS
11 Cavs, on a scoreboard : CLE
14 Effects seen on FX, perhaps : CGI
17 Nation on the Red Sea : ERITREA
18 Helmsman on “Star Trek” : SULU
20 High times for the petroleum industry : OIL BOOMS
23 X, but not Y : NUMERAL
24 It might help you keep up with old classmates : ALUMNI NEWSLETTER (uses NINE down)
26 Big-eyed baby : OWLET
28 Excerpted passage : SNIPPET
29 China’s Sun ___-sen : YAT
30 Carrier of goods by rail : FREIGHT TRAIN (uses EIGHT down)
34 Player of 45s : PHONO
35 Haim of “Licorice Pizza” : ALANA
37 Iconic role for Carrie Fisher : LEIA
38 Certain porter : REDCAP
40 “Right you are!” : EXACTO!
43 Contest : ARGUE
45 Some Kiwis : MAORIS
47 Stop on a publicity tour : PRESS EVENT (uses SEVEN down)
50 When repeated, gung-ho : RAH
51 Dish often topped with marinara sauce : MEATBALLS
54 Dorm décor, often : POSTERS
56 Rave : ENTHUSE
58 Trivial : MERE
59 ___ Paz, 1990 Literature Nobelist : OCTAVIO
60 The “e” of i.e. : EST
61 Chosen name of five popes : SIXTUS (uses SIX down)
63 ___ Equis : DOS
65 Prepare (oneself) : STEEL
66 Fundamentals : ABCS
69 Alternatives to Pumas : AVIAS
71 Break for a bit : TAKE FIVE (uses FIVE down)
73 Ctrl-Z command : UNDO
74 Does some field work : PLOWS
76 ___ Rose of Guns N’ Roses : AXL
77 Standings column : WINS
78 Leb. neighbor : ISR
80 French desserts whose name translates as “small ovens” : PETIT FOURS (uses FOUR down)
82 Flair : ELAN
84 Thor, e.g. : AVENGER
88 Makeup of some sleeves : TATTOOS
89 TV chef who wrote “Semi-Homemade Cooking” : SANDRA LEE
92 ___ Sremmurd (hip-hop duo) : RAE
93 White Russian ingredient : KAHLUA
94 Playwright Eugene : O’NEILL
95 Michelangelo masterpiece : PIETA
97 Camelot figure : MERLIN
100 It can be written in scripts known as naskh and ruq’ah : ARABIC
102 Require : NEED
103 Tree with “eyes” on its bark : ASPEN
106 They can be tapped out : DENTS
108 Concern at the end of a space journey : EARTH REENTRY (uses THREE down)
110 X : CHI
111 Ambitious sort : ASPIRER
114 ___ Cherry, 1989 Grammy nominee for Best New Artist : NENEH
115 “Take it easy once in a while!” : DON’T WORK TOO HARD! (uses TWO down)
118 Sonny and Fredo, for two : CORLEONES (uses ONE down)
123 They’re all pulling in the same direction : CREW TEAM
124 Keep it in mind! : IDEA
125 Classy : ELEGANT
126 Chinese dish eponym : TSO
127 End of days? : ESS
128 You might take them out for a quick spin, informally : EPS
129 Rages : SEES RED

Down

1 – : TEN
2 ___TV (network for “Impractical Jokers”) : TRU
3 Lower, as lights : DIM
4 Hwy. : RTE
5 Coding headache : ERROR
6 Naval engagement : SEA WAR
7 One taking interest in your education? : SALLIE MAE
8 H.S. exam : PSAT
9 7/ : JUL
10 Heaps at publishing houses : SLUSH PILES
11 Edward Jenner used it when developing the world’s first successful vaccine : COWPOX
12 Sigmatism, by another name : LISP
13 The blonde in “Legally Blonde” : ELLE
14 What might unfold at camp : COT
15 Exclamation on April Fools’ Day : GOT YA!
16 Words of clarification : I MEAN
19 “Yeah … pass” : UM … NO
21 Checks for bugs : BETA TESTS
22 Mlle., in Madrid : SRTA
25 – : NINE
27 Wrap up by : END AT
30 Distress signal : FLARE
31 Put on the air again : RERAN
32 – : EIGHT
33 Letter after sigma : TAU
34 Borough of New Jersey noted for its indoor shopping malls : PARAMUS
36 Landed on a licorice space in Candy Land, say : LOST A TURN
39 Male swan : COB
41 Put side by side : APPOSE
42 Relative of a gator : CROC
44 Their eggs are dark green : EMUS
46 Camera spec : SLR
48 – : SEVEN
49 Brought before a jury : TRIED
52 This, in Spanish : ESTA
53 Malibu, e.g. : SEDAN
55 One way to go : SOLO
57 “This guy? We’re together” : HE’S WITH ME
61 – : SIX
62 Accounts : TALES
64 Green-lights : OKS
66 Schedule slot filler: Abbr. : APPT
67 Grim : BLEAK
68 Terra ___ : COTTA
70 One doing the lord’s work? : VASSAL
71 Birch bark and pine cones, e.g. : TINDERS
72 – : FIVE
75 Missing work? : STOLEN ART
77 Exchange words? : WANNA TRADE?
79 Trickle (through) : SEEP
81 – : FOUR
83 Language spoken in Luang Prabang : LAO
84 Government bonds? : ALLIANCES
85 Welcome : GREET
86 Consumer : EATER
87 Set … or word said before set : READY
90 Estuary : RIA
91 “Three Tall Women” playwright : ALBEE
96 Overnight site : INN
98 Cold feet and cold shoulder, for two : IDIOMS
99 Emperor before the Year of the Four Emperors : NERO
101 Louisiana cooking style : CREOLE
103 “Flick of the Switch” band : AC/DC
104 Curt : SHORT
105 Aches (for) : PINES
107 Classic soda brand : NEHI
109 – : THREE
112 ___-Ball : SKEE
113 Education orgs. : PTAS
114 Hush-hush pacts, in brief : NDAS
116 – : TWO
117 Good name, informally : REP
119 Some smartphones : LGS
120 Something bent or lent : EAR
121 – : ONE
122 Norm: Abbr. : STD

10 thoughts on “0303-24 NY Times Crossword 3 Mar 24, Sunday”

  1. 34:59 (!) after finding and fixing a stupid typo. Actually, I’m surprised I had only one typo; this is the sort of puzzle that I find rather tedious to do on my iPad. (Nevertheless, I can appreciate the esthetic value of the final result; it may well end up on my private “Wall of Fame” … 🙂 .)

      1. The answer had to include the “six” in the down answer, hence the complete answer is “Sixtus”

  2. 1:10:43, main mistake was treating it like a rebus puzzle, so I entered the number spelled out in all the across spaces. Once I cleared that out and just spelled the numbers down, then all was good with the world…after over an hour…

  3. 39:16. Took a while to see the theme, then I had to use it a few times when I didn’t otherwise know the answer – e.g. SIXTUS and PETITFOURS.

    Very tedious puzzle at times. Glad I finished at all. Bill doing it in 18 mins really angers…uhhh I mean impresses… me.

    Best –

  4. I put a real long effort into this slog only to wind up with 2 errors in two foreign words…DISGUSTING 👎👎👎👎👎
    End of rant.
    Stay safe😀

  5. Figured it out fairly early. I started with DONT WORK TOO HARD. Then looked at the theme. COUNTDOWN.

    Boom, there it is.

    Still messed up SIXTUS and PARAMUS? I love it when crossword writers and editors use words like NOTED or POPULAR in their clue. “…. of New Jersey NOTED for its indoor shopping mall” ???? If I’ve never heard of it, am I UNNOTED?

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