1120-22 NY Times Crossword 20 Nov 22, Sunday

Constructed by: Joe Deeney
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Theme: Fan Club

Themed answers are common phrases reinterpreted as FANS’ responses to phenomena referred to in the corresponding clue:

  • 21A Geometrophiles … : … LOVE TRIANGLES
  • 31A Imagophiles … : … PRIZE DRAWING
  • 46A Gastrophiles … : … FANCY RESTAURANTS
  • 63A Dextropodophiles … : … GET OFF ON THE RIGHT FOOT
  • 79A Autotumulophiles … : … DIG THEIR OWN GRAVE
  • 94A Aurophiles … : … GO FOR THE GOLD
  • 109A Chronomechanophiles … : … LIKE CLOCK WORK

Bill’s time: 19m 47s

Bill’s errors: 3

  • SCRAMS (strays)
  • CHAT (that!)
  • MILLI (Yilli??!!)

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

18 Eventual outlet for Lake Victoria : THE NILE

Depending on definition, the Nile is regarded generally as the longest river on the planet. The Nile forms from two major tributaries, the White Nile and the Blue Nile, which join together near Khartoum, the capital of Sudan. From Khartoum the Nile flows north, traveling almost entirely through desert making it central to life for those living along its length.

Lake Victoria is the largest lake by surface area on the continent of Africa. It was named by English explorer John Hanning Speke in honor of Queen Victoria of the UK. Speke was the first European to set eyes on the lake.

20 Joan of Arc, for one : MARTYR

Joan of Arc (also “Jeanne d’Arc”, her birth name) led the French Army successfully into battle a number of times during the Hundred Years War with England. When she was eventually captured, Joan was tried in Rouen, the seat of the occupying English government in France at that time. There she was burned at the stake having been found guilty of heresy. In fact, after the fire died down, the executioner raked the coals to display the charred body, proving Joan had died, and then burned the corpse again, twice, so that relics could not be collected. The remaining ashes were then cast into the Seine River. Joan of Arc was canonized some 600 years later, in 1920, and is now one of the patron saints of France.

21 Geometrophiles … : … LOVE TRIANGLES

Our word “geometry” comes from Greek. The Greek “geometria” translates as “geometry, measurement of earth or land”. Hence, there is a link between terms like “geography” and “geology”, and the mathematical word “geometry”.

28 Put down in writing : LOG

The word “logbook” dates back to the days when the captain of a ship kept a daily record of the vessel’s speed, progress etc. using a “log”. A log was a wooden float on a knotted line that was dropped overboard to measure speed through the water.

29 Sad ___ : SACK

The slang phrase “sad sack” is used for a person who bungles things, someone who is pathetically inept. The phrase was coined in the twenties but gained popularity during WWII when it was used by a cartoon character in the US Armed Forces magazine “Yank”. The term is probably a shortened form of the much ruder phrase “sad sack of ****”.

33 Old “The beer of quality” sloganeer, in brief : PBR

Pabst Blue Ribbon (PBR) is the most recognizable brand of beer from the Pabst Brewing Company. There appears to be some dispute over whether or not Pabst beer ever won a “blue ribbon” prize, but the company claims that it did so at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893. The beer was originally called Pabst Best Select, and then just Pabst Select. With the renaming to Blue Ribbon, the beer was sold with an actual blue ribbon tied around the neck of the bottle until it was dropped in 1916 and incorporated into the label.

36 Actress Witherspoon : REESE

“Reese” is not actually actress Witherspoon’s given name. She started out life as Laura Jeanne Witherspoon. “Reese” is her mother’s maiden name.

42 Sunny-side-up “suns” : YOLKS

The yolk is the yellow part of a chicken’s egg. The term “yolk” comes from the Old English “geolu” meaning “yellow”.

51 “The Eagle ___ landed” : HAS

We always seem to remember the phrase “The Eagle has landed”, historic words spoken by Neil Armstrong when he put down Apollo 11’s Lunar Excursion Module (LEM) on the surface of the moon. Looking back I have to say that the words preceding “The Eagle has landed” seem to have even more impact. During the descent to the moon’s surface Armstrong used the call sign “Eagle”, indicating that he was communicating from the LEM. After he killed the engines on touching down, Armstrong’s first words home to Earth were “Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.” That switch of call sign from “Eagle” to “Tranquility Base” always sends shivers down my spine …

55 Ready for a drive : TEED UP

A tee is a small device on which, say, a golf ball is placed before striking it. The term “tee” comes from the Scottish “teaz”, which described little heaps of sand used to elevate a golf ball for the purpose of getting a clean hit with a club.

57 Long campaigns : SIEGES

Our word “siege” comes from a 13th-century word for a “seat”. The military usage derives from the concept of a besieging force “sitting down” outside a fortress until it falls.

61 Org. that partners with Lyft and Uber to promote safe ridesharing : MADD

Candace Lightner lost her 13-year-old child to a drunk-driver in 1980. Soon after, Lightner formed the group Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD).

63 Dextropodophiles … : … GET OFF ON THE RIGHT FOOT

“Dexter” is Latin for “right-handed”.

69 Nugget from a noggin : IDEA

Slang terms for “head” include “bean”, “coconut”, “gourd”, “noodle” and “noggin”.

71 Novosibirsk negative : NYET

“Nyet” is Russian for “no”, and “da” is Russian for “yes”.

72 Come out of la-la land with a jolt : SNAP TO

“La-la land” is a euphemism for a state of unconsciousness or a dreamworld.

74 To whom it is said “You have a grand gift for silence …. It makes you quite invaluable as a companion” : WATSON

In the marvelous Sherlock Holmes stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Holmes’ sidekick Dr. Watson is referred to only by his family name, except for two occasions when it is revealed that his first name is John. However, in a third and final mention, Dr. Watson is called “James” by his wife, perhaps indicating a lapse in memory on the part of the author.

83 Bird feeder fat : SUET

Fat, when extracted from the carcass of an animal, is called suet. Untreated suet decomposes at room temperature quite easily so it has to be rendered, purified to make it stable. Rendered fat from pigs is what we call lard. Rendered beef or mutton fat is known as tallow.

85 Symbol of laziness : SLOTH

“Sloth”, meaning “indolence, sluggishness”, comes from the Middle English word “slowe”, which is also the root of our contemporary word “slow”. The animal, the sloth, is so named as it exhibits slow-moving behavior.

86 High winds : GALES

A gale is a very strong wind, one defined by the Beaufort scale as having wind speeds from 50 to just over 100 kilometers per hour.

87 Actress Rowlands : GENA

Gena Rowlands is an actress best known for the films made with her husband, actor and director John Cassavetes. Notably, Rowlands played a lead role opposite James Garner in the weepy, weepy 2004 film “The Notebook”. “The Notebook” was directed by her son Nick Cassavetes. Rowlands was nominated for Oscars for her performances in two films: “Gloria” (1980) and “A Woman Under the Influence” (1974).

88 PC component : CPU

The central processing unit (CPU) is the main component on the motherboard of a computer. The CPU is the part of the computer that carries out most of the functions required by a program. Nowadays you can get CPUs in everything from cars to telephones.

93 “Inside the N.B.A.” channel : TNT

“Inside the NBA” is a postgame show that airs on TNT. The list of regulars on the show includes ex-players Charles Barkley and Shaquille O’Neal.

94 Aurophiles … : … GO FOR THE GOLD

The prefix “auri-” is used to mean “gold”. “Aurum” is Latin for “gold”.

100 Certain fluency-building subj. : ESL

English as a Second Language (ESL) is sometimes referred to as English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and English as a Foreign Language (EFL).

101 Game with cestas and a pelota : JAI ALAI

The essential equipment in the game of jai alai is the pelota (ball) and the cesta (wicker scoop).

102 ___ Rule, true-crime writer : ANN

Ann Rule is a true-crime writer, who comes from a crime-fighting family with sheriffs, a medical examiner and a prosecutor around her as she grew up. She started off writing with a male pen name (Andy Stack) as it was perceived that she would have more success in the genre, after a virtual “sex change”.

107 Tap : SPIGOT

Back in the 15th century, a spigot was specifically a plug to stop a hole in a cask. Somewhere along the way, a spigot had a valve added for variable control of flow.

109 Chronomechanophiles … : … LIKE CLOCK WORK

“Chronos” is the Greek word for time, with the name applying in ancient Greece to a personification of time. He was not a Greek god, although Chronos has often been confused with the Titan Cronus of Greek mythology. The Titan Cronus was often depicted with a scythe, as this was the tool he used to castrate his father Uranus. The confusion of Chronos and Cronus led to the traditional depiction of “Old Father Time” with a scythe.

114 Goosebump-inducing : EERIE

The terms “goose bumps” and “goose flesh” come from the fact that skin which is cold can look like the flesh of a plucked goose.

115 Actress Kaitlin of “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” : OLSON

Deandra “Sweet Dee” Reynolds is a character played by Kaitlin Olson on the sitcom “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia”.

116 Schnozzes : SNOOTS

“Schnoz(z)” is a slang term describing a nose, particularly a large one.

117 Palatial : GRAND

Our word “palace” ultimately comes from the name of Rome’s Palatine Hill, “Mons Palatinus” in Latin. The original “palace” was the house of Augustus Caesar, which stood on the Palatine Hill.

Down

2 High wind : OBOE

The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name “oboe” comes from the French “hautbois” which means “high wood”.

4 Parts of flutes and flowers : STEMS

A flute is a woodwind instrument that doesn’t have a reed. Instead, sound is produced by blowing air across an opening. A flute player is often referred to as a flautist (sometimes “flutist”). Flutes have been around a long, long time. Primitive flutes found in modern-day Germany date back 43,000 to 35,000 years, which makes the flute the oldest known musical instrument.

6 It’s a bad look : STINK EYE

The phrase “stink eye”, meaning “dirty look”, dates back to the early 1970s. A suggestion is that the term comes from Hawaiian slang.

8 Kylo ___ of “Star Wars” : REN

Kylo Ren is the son of Han Solo and Princess Leia Organa in the “Star Wars” universe. The character’s birth name was Ben Solo. He was trained as a Jedi knight by his uncle, Luke Skywalker. However, Ben came to embrace the Dark Side, and changed his name to Kylo Ren. Ren is played by actor Adam Driver.

10 ___ Vanilli (1980s-’90s R&B duo) : MILLI

Milli Vanilli famously won a Grammy and had it revoked when it was discovered that they didn’t even provide the lead vocals for the award-winning recording, and just lip-synced when performing on stage.

12 Poseurs : WANNABES

“Poseur” is a French word that we absorbed into English in the mid-1800s to describe someone who pretends to be what he or she is not. The root French verb “poser” means “to affect an attitude or pose”.

13 Monopoly properties that don’t get hotels, for short : RRS

The four railroad (RR) properties in the Monopoly board game are:

  • Reading Railroad
  • Pennsylvania Railroad
  • B&O Railroad
  • Short Line

14 Sandwich that may include salami, prosciutto and soppressata : ITALIAN HERO

A hero is a submarine sandwich. It originated in New York City in the 1800s among Italian immigrants who wanted an Italian sandwich that reminded them of home. The name “hero” was coined in the 1930s, supposedly by a food critic in the “New York Herald Tribune” when he wrote that “one had to be a hero” to finish the gigantic sandwich. Hero is a prevalent term to this day in New York City, reserved for a submarine sandwich with an Italian flavor.

15 Stockings : NYLONS

The polymer known as “nylon” was developed by Dupont in the 1930s. The first application for the new product was as bristles in toothbrushes, in 1938. The second application became more famous. The first stockings made from nylon were produced in 1940, and since then stockings have been known as “nylons”. The polymer was developed as a replacement for silk, which was in short supply during WWII.

16 Basketball coach Popovich : GREGG

Gregg Popovich took over as coach of the San Antonio Spurs in 1996. He is often referred to as “Pop” or “Coach Pop”. Popovich holds the record for the NBA coach with the longest run of consecutive winning seasons.

19 Lauder of beauty products : ESTEE

Estée Lauder was a very successful businesswoman, and someone with a great reputation as a salesperson. Lauder introduced her own line of fragrances in 1953, a bath oil called “Youth Dew”. “Youth Dew” was marketed as a perfume, but it was added to bathwater. All of a sudden women were pouring whole bottles of Ms. Lauder’s “perfume” into their baths while using only a drop or two of French perfumes behind their ears. That’s quite a difference in sales volume …

20 Secure, as a skiff : MOOR

A skiff is a small boat. The name can be used generically and applied to several unrelated styles of vessel, as long as they are relatively small. The term “skiff” comes from “scif”, the Old High German word for “boat” and a term that also gave us our word “ship”.

27 Passports, e.g., in brief : IDS

As a result of a League of Nations conference in 1920, passports are usually written in French and one other language. French was specified back then as it was deemed the language of diplomacy. US passports use French and English, given that English is the nation’s de facto national language. Spanish was added as a language for US passports in the late nineties, in recognition of Spanish-speaking Puerto Rico.

30 Private affairs? : ARMY LIFE

The lowest military rank of soldier is often a private (pvt.). The term “private” comes from the Middle Ages when “private soldiers” were hired or conscripted by noblemen to form a “private army”. The more generic usage of “private” started in the 1700s.

33 Things Acrobat Reader reads : PDFS

I think that the clue is meant to read “Adobe Reader”.

Adobe Acrobat is the software used to create .pdf files. Most of us are more familiar with the associated application called Adobe Reader, because that’s what we use to read those .pdf files.

35 “Seasons of Love” musical : RENT

“Seasons of Love” is a song from the musical “Rent” that starts out with the line “Five hundred twenty-five thousand, six hundred minutes”. That’s the number of minutes in a year.

37 …—… : SOS

The combination of three dots – three dashes – three dots, is a Morse signal first introduced by the German government as a standard distress call in 1905. The sequence is remembered as the letters SOS (three dots – pause – three dashes – pause – three dots). That said, in the emergency signal there is no pause between the dots and dashes, so “SOS” is really only a mnemonic. Similarly, the phrases “Save Our Souls” and “Save Our Ship” are back-formations that were introduced after the SOS signal was adopted.

43 “Krazy ___” : KAT

“Krazy Kat” is a successful comic strip that ran from 1913-1944 and was drawn by George Herriman.

45 Longtime NASCAR sponsor : STP

STP is a brand name of automotive lubricants and additives. The name “STP” is an initialism standing for “Scientifically Treated Petroleum”.

47 Habitat threatened by bleaching : REEF

A reef is a ridge of stable material lying beneath the surface of a body of water. They can be made up of sand or rock, and also of coral. The largest coral reef on the planet is Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, which stretches over 1,400 miles.

52 Choral voice : ALTO

In choral music, an alto (plural “alti”) is the second-highest voice in a four-part chorus made up of soprano, contr(alto), tenor and bass. The word “alto” describes the vocal range, that of the deepest female singing-voice, whereas the term “contralto” describes more than just the alto range, but also its quality and timbre. An adult male’s voice (not a boy’s) with the same range as an alto is called a “countertenor”.

58 Word repeated in a classic Energizer slogan : GOING

We are all fairly familiar with the Energizer Bunny, I am guessing. The “Bunny” was introduced in 1989 to promote Energizer batteries, by parodying the Duracell Bunny that had been introduced in 1973.

60 The N.B.A.’s Curry, to fans : STEPH

Stephen “Steph” Curry is a professional basketball player who was selected by the Golden State Warriors in the 2009 draft. Steph’s father is former NBA player Dell Curry, and his younger brother is current player Seth Curry. Steph Curry is noted for accuracy in shooting. Curry set the record for three-pointers made in a regular season in 2013, broke that record in 2015, and broke it yet again in 2016. Then, in 2021, he broke the record for career three-pointers.

63 Bloke : GENT

“Bloke” is British slang for “fellow”. The etymology of “bloke” seems to have been lost in the mists of time.

64 Singer born Eithne Pádraigín Ní Bhraonáin : ENYA

Enya’s real name is Eithne Ní Bhraonáin, which can translate from Irish into Enya Brennan. Her Donegal family (in the northwest of Ireland) formed a band called Clannad, which included Enya. In 1980 Enya launched her very successful solo career, eventually becoming Ireland’s best-selling solo musician. And, she sure does turn up a lot in crosswords!

65 Sub-Saharan pests : TSETSE FLIES

Tsetse flies live on the blood of vertebrate mammals. The name “tsetse” comes from Tswana, a language of southern Africa, and translates simply as “fly”. Tsetse flies are famous for being carriers of the disease known as “sleeping sickness”. Sleeping sickness is caused by a parasite which is passed onto humans when the tsetse fly bites into human skin tissue. If one considers all the diseases transmitted by the insect, then the tsetse fly is responsible for a staggering quarter of a million deaths each year.

The name “Sahara” means “greatest desert” in Arabic. The Sahara is just that, a great desert covering almost 4 million square miles of Northern Africa. That’s almost the size of the United States.

79 Announcement of a split decision? : DEAR JOHN

The expression “Dear John letter” originated in WWII among American troops who were serving abroad. The servicemen highly valued letters from girlfriends and wives back home, and almost invariably those missives started out with “Dearest”, or “My Darling” or some other expression of affection. A curt, “Dear John” set the tone for a letter which was likely to contain news of a new love interest in the life of the girlfriend or wife. The contemporary equivalent missive from a male to a female is a “Dear Jane letter”.

81 Baseball Hall-of-Famer Mel : OTT

At 5′ 9″, baseball legend Mel Ott weighed just 170 lb (I don’t think he took steroids!) and yet he was the first National League player to hit over 500 home runs. Sadly, Ott died in a car accident in New Orleans in 1958 when he was only 49 years old. And, according to Wikipedia, “Ott’s name frequently appears in crossword puzzles, on account of its letter combination and brevity.” True that …

84 Card game shout : UNO!

UNO is a card game that was developed in the early seventies and that has been sold by Mattel since 1992. It falls into the shedding family of card games, meaning that the goal is to get rid of all your cards while preventing opponents from doing the same.

87 Preacher’s preaching : GOSPEL

“Gospel” is a term that came to us via Old English. The Old English term is “godspel” meaning “good story”, and referred to the glad tidings announced by Jesus. There are four Gospels in the Christian New Testament: the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

88 X : CHI

The letter chi is the 22nd letter in the Greek alphabet, and the one that looks like our Roman letter X.

92 “The Mod Squad” role : LINC

The 1999 movie “The Mod Squad” was an adaptation of the seventies television show of the same name. The part of Lincoln “Linc” Hayes was played by Omar Epps, Claire Danes played Julie Barnes and Giovanni Ribisi played Peter Cochran.

94 Painter’s primer : GESSO

“Gesso” is the Italian word for “chalk” and gives its name to the powdered calcium carbonate that is used as a primer coat under artistic panel paintings. Gesso is mixed with glue and applied to wood so that it acts as an absorbent surface for paint.

95 Home to many Constables and Sargents : TATE

The museum known as “the Tate” comprises four separate galleries in England. The original Tate gallery was founded by Sir Henry Tate as the National Gallery of British Art. It is located on Millbank in London, on the site of the old Millbank Prison, and is now called Tate Britain. There is also the Tate Liverpool in the north of England that is located in an old warehouse, and the Tate St. Ives in the west country located in an old gas works. My favorite of the Tate galleries is the Tate Modern which lies on the banks of the Thames in London. It’s a beautiful building, a converted power station that you have to see to believe. As of 2018, the Tate Modern was the most visited art museum in the UK.

John Constable is the most English of painters, although during his lifetime his work was more popular in France than it was in his native country. His most famous painting is “The Hay Wain” from 1821, which you can see in the National Gallery in London.

John Singer Sargent was an American artist, one best known for his portrait painting. Sargent trained as an artist mainly in Paris, although he found that he had to leave the city after one of his paintings was deemed “scandalous” by French society. The work was “Portrait of Madame X” (1884), a painting of a noted lady in society that was considered too risque and sensual. After the painting was exhibited, his commissions dried up and Sargent moved to London in order to continue his career. Today the “Portrait of Madame X” is considered by many to be Sargent’s best work.

99 Ninja Turtles’ abode : SEWER

The “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” started out as a parody of comic book superheroes, first appearing in a self-published comic book in 1984. A couple of years later the characters were picked up by someone who built a whole line of toys around the characters, and then television and movies followed. Do you remember the names of all four of the Turtles? Their names were all taken from Renaissance artists:

  • Leonardo
  • Raphael
  • Michelangelo
  • Donatello

104 TV girl with the catchphrase “Swiper, no swiping!” : DORA

“Dora the Explorer” is a cartoon series shown on Nickelodeon. Part of Dora’s remit is to introduce the show’s young viewers to some Spanish words and phrases. Dora’s constant companion is an anthropomorphic monkey named “Boots”, because he always wears red boots. She also hangs out with Isa, an iguana.

105 Emulate the Cheshire cat : GRIN

The Cheshire Cat is a character in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland”. The Cheshire Cat has an expansive grin, and at one point magically disappears in front of Alice, leaving just the grin visible.

Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin,’ thought Alice; `but a grin without a cat! It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!

108 Classic muscle car : GTO

The Pontiac GTO was produced by GM from 1964 to 1974, and again by a GM subsidiary in Australia from 2004 to 2006. The original GTO’s design is credited to Pontiac chief engineer at the time John DeLorean, who later founded the DeLorean Motor Company.

110 Co.’s second-in-command, usually : COO

Chief operating officer (COO)

111 Gunpowder holder : KEG

Gunpowder is the earliest-known explosive chemical. Also called “black powder”, it is a mixture of sulfur, charcoal and saltpeter (i.e. potassium nitrate). The saltpeter is a powerful oxidizing agent, providing the oxygen to burn the sulfur and charcoal, which acts as the fuel in the mixture. Gunpowder was invented by the Chinese in the 8th century.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Tot’s rocker : HORSY
6 Gets lost : SCRAMS
12 Squeeze, as a mop : WRING
17 Die down : ABATE
18 Eventual outlet for Lake Victoria : THE NILE
20 Joan of Arc, for one : MARTYR
21 Geometrophiles … : … LOVE TRIANGLES
23 A little off? : ON SALE
24 Abound (with) : TEEM
25 Member of a colony : ANT
26 Rapture : ELATION
28 Put down in writing : LOG
29 Sad ___ : SACK
31 Imagophiles … : … PRIZE DRAWING
33 Old “The beer of quality” sloganeer, in brief : PBR
36 Actress Witherspoon : REESE
38 “You wanted to see me?” : YES?
39 Cabaret accessories : BOAS
40 Something you sleep through : DREAM
42 Sunny-side-up “suns” : YOLKS
45 In stitches : SEWN
46 Gastrophiles … : … FANCY RESTAURANTS
51 “The Eagle ___ landed” : HAS
54 Close out : SETTLE
55 Ready for a drive : TEED UP
56 Rightmost menu heading, often : HELP
57 Long campaigns : SIEGES
61 Org. that partners with Lyft and Uber to promote safe ridesharing : MADD
62 “Ish” : SORTA
63 Dextropodophiles … : … GET OFF ON THE RIGHT FOOT
68 Come after : ENSUE
69 Nugget from a noggin : IDEA
70 Sinister smiles : SNEERS
71 Novosibirsk negative : NYET
72 Come out of la-la land with a jolt : SNAP TO
74 To whom it is said “You have a grand gift for silence …. It makes you quite invaluable as a companion” : WATSON
78 Small parlor piece? : TAT
79 Autotumulophiles … : … DIG THEIR OWN GRAVE
83 Bird feeder fat : SUET
85 Symbol of laziness : SLOTH
86 High winds : GALES
87 Actress Rowlands : GENA
88 PC component : CPU
91 Even slightly : AT ALL
93 “Inside the N.B.A.” channel : TNT
94 Aurophiles … : … GO FOR THE GOLD
98 The ___ that bind : TIES
100 Certain fluency-building subj. : ESL
101 Game with cestas and a pelota : JAI ALAI
102 ___ Rule, true-crime writer : ANN
103 Periphery : EDGE
107 Tap : SPIGOT
109 Chronomechanophiles … : … LIKE CLOCK WORK
112 Feel like [grrrr] : SEETHE
113 Take care of business : SEE TO IT
114 Goosebump-inducing : EERIE
115 Actress Kaitlin of “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia” : OLSON
116 Schnozzes : SNOOTS
117 Palatial : GRAND

Down

1 “Go no further!” : HALT!
2 High wind : OBOE
3 Go on and on (about) : RAVE
4 Parts of flutes and flowers : STEMS
5 Still : YET
6 It’s a bad look : STINK EYE
7 Palaver : CHAT
8 Kylo ___ of “Star Wars” : REN
9 Red state? : ANGER
10 ___ Vanilli (1980s-’90s R&B duo) : MILLI
11 Sordid : SLEAZY
12 Poseurs : WANNABES
13 Monopoly properties that don’t get hotels, for short : RRS
14 Sandwich that may include salami, prosciutto and soppressata : ITALIAN HERO
15 Stockings : NYLONS
16 Basketball coach Popovich : GREGG
19 Lauder of beauty products : ESTEE
20 Secure, as a skiff : MOOR
22 Zoom : RACE
27 Passports, e.g., in brief : IDS
30 Private affairs? : ARMY LIFE
31 Pummel, as with snowballs : PELT
32 “That was unexpected!” : WOW!
33 Things Acrobat Reader reads : PDFS
34 Hill by a loch : BRAE
35 “Seasons of Love” musical : RENT
37 …—… : SOS
41 Seeks attention, in a way : ACTS OUT
43 “Krazy ___” : KAT
44 Sarcastic response to a complaint : SUE ME
45 Longtime NASCAR sponsor : STP
47 Habitat threatened by bleaching : REEF
48 Brings up : REARS
49 Extra something : ADD-IN
50 What might accompany a wink : NUDGE
52 Choral voice : ALTO
53 Minor disagreement : SPAT
56 New York university that hosted presidential debates in 2008, 2012 and 2016 : HOFSTRA
58 Word repeated in a classic Energizer slogan : GOING
59 Finish by : END AT
60 The N.B.A.’s Curry, to fans : STEPH
62 Fall behind the pack : STRAGGLE
63 Bloke : GENT
64 Singer born Eithne Pádraigín Ní Bhraonáin : ENYA
65 Sub-Saharan pests : TSETSE FLIES
66 Can’t tolerate : HATES
67 Axed : HEWN
72 Obedience school command : SIT
73 Cooking staple : OIL
75 Cooking staple : SALT
76 Cooking place : OVEN
77 Fit snugly : NEST
79 Announcement of a split decision? : DEAR JOHN
80 Word with trip or test : ROAD …
81 Baseball Hall-of-Famer Mel : OTT
82 Shelves for knickknacks : WHATNOTS
84 Card game shout : UNO!
87 Preacher’s preaching : GOSPEL
88 X : CHI
89 Rings : PEALS
90 2005 Scott Westerfeld sci-fi novel with the sequel “Pretties” : UGLIES
92 “The Mod Squad” role : LINC
94 Painter’s primer : GESSO
95 Home to many Constables and Sargents : TATE
96 Like some whiskey barrels : OAKEN
97 Not be straight with : LIE TO
99 Ninja Turtles’ abode : SEWER
102 Came down : ALIT
104 TV girl with the catchphrase “Swiper, no swiping!” : DORA
105 Emulate the Cheshire cat : GRIN
106 Stretched (out) : EKED
108 Classic muscle car : GTO
110 Co.’s second-in-command, usually : COO
111 Gunpowder holder : KEG

6 thoughts on “1120-22 NY Times Crossword 20 Nov 22, Sunday”

  1. 32:16 I always wondered what “STP” stood for. It was important to have an STP sticker on one’s bicycle seat back in the day :- )

  2. 34:59, no errors. Biggest hurdles: entering 87D SERMON before GOSPEL; finding and changing my ‘one square amiss’ 116A SNOUTS to SNOOTS.

  3. 26:31, no errors. Nice Sunday that just seemed to flow for me. DuncanR, I never knew what STP stood for either. I guess I learned something today.

  4. 26:19. Really enjoyed the theme. A few hiccups here and there, but overall a smooth solve.

    I knew what STP stands for because I’m an avid reader of Bill’s write up….

    Yeah yeah yeah “dexter” is Latin for “right”, and every left-handed person (including me) knows that “sinister” is Latin for “left”. Grr

    Not sure what to think of the Showtime series “Dexter” who is a sinister serial killer…..

    Best –

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *