0805-20 NY Times Crossword 5 Aug 20, Wednesday

Constructed by: Michael Paleos
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Everything Bagel

Themed answers each include an ingredient found in an EVERYTHING BURGER:

  • 39A Breakfast order suggested by the answers to the starred clues : EVERYTHING BAGEL
  • 17A *Wicked Witch’s trap for Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” : POPPY FIELD
  • 60A *Colorful architectural features of Moscow’s St. Basil Cathedral : ONION DOMES
  • 10D *Storybook password : OPEN SESAME
  • 29D *Bratty girl in “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” : VERUCA SALT

Bill’s time: 7m 06s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

10 Story of a lifetime, in brief : OBIT

Our word “obituary” comes from the Latin “obituaris”. The Latin term was used for “record of the death of a person”, although the literal meaning is “pertaining to death”.

14 Man with a spare rib? : ADAM

According to the Bible, God created Adam from “the dust of the ground”. Eve was created as Adam’s companion, from Adam’s rib.

16 Hundred Acre Wood resident : POOH

Hundred Acre Wood is where Winnie the Pooh lives with his friends. According to a map illustrating the books by A. A. Milne, Hundred Acre Wood is part of a larger forest, with Owl’s house sitting right at the center. Piglet also lives in the Hundred Acre Wood, in a beech tree next to a sign that says “TRESPASSERS W”. Piglet says this is short for Trespassers William, which is his grandfather’s name.

17 *Wicked Witch’s trap for Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” : POPPY FIELD

In the 1939 movie “The Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy arrives in the Land of Oz after her farmhouse is swept up in a cyclone. The farmhouse comes to ground and kills the Wicked Witch of the East. The Wicked Witch of the West arrives to claim the magical ruby slippers worn by the Wicked Witch Witch of the East. The Good Witch of the North steps in and gives the ruby slippers to Dorothy instead.

20 Canine’s coat : ENAMEL

The outer layer of our teeth is made from enamel. This covers the dentin layer, which supports the enamel.

35 2002 basketball movie starring Lil’ Bow Wow : LIKE MIKE

“Like Mike” is a 2002 movie about three friends who are into playing and watching basketball. Lots of NBA stars appear in this film, with rap star Lil’ Bow Bow (now just “Bow Wow”) playing the lead role.

37 Last word of a famous F.D.R. quote : … ITSELF

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was sworn in as president for his first term, he made a 20-minute inaugural address. The most famous lines of the speech are probably:

So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and of vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory. And I am convinced that you will again give that support to leadership in these critical days.

39 Breakfast order suggested by the answers to the starred clues :

EVERYTHING BAGEL

An everything bagel has everything on it, i.e. a variety of traditional seasonings like poppy seeds, salt, and sesame seeds.

41 Puts through beta testing : DEBUGS

Back in 1947, famed computer programmer Grace Hopper noticed some colleagues fixing a piece of equipment by removing a dead moth from a relay. She remarked that they were “debugging” the system, and so Hopper has been given credit for popularizing the term “bug” in the context of computing.

In the world of software development, the first tested issue of a new program is usually called the alpha version. Expected to have a lot of bugs that need to be fixed, the alpha release is usually distributed to a small number of testers. After reported bugs have been eliminated, the refined version is called a beta and is released to a wider audience, but with the program clearly labeled as “beta”. The users generally check functionality and report further bugs that are encountered. The beta version feeds into a release candidate, the version that is tested just prior to the software being sold into the market, hopefully bug-free.

42 Largest moon in the solar system : GANYMEDE

Ganymede is the largest of Jupiter’s sixty-seven moons, and is the largest moon in the Solar System. Ganymede was discovered in 1610 by Galileo. Astronomer Simon Marius gave the moon the name Ganymede, for Zeus’s lover in Greek mythology.

43 Tickle Me Elmo toymaker : TYCO

The Tyco brand of toys was founded in 1926 as Mantua Metal Products by John Tyler. The first products made were scale model trains using die-cast metal. The company introduced the Tyco brand in the fifties, with “Tyco” standing for “Tyler Company”.

The Tickle Me Elmo toy was a sensational fad in the late nineties, with stores raising prices dramatically above the recommended retail price to take advantage of demand. Reportedly, prices as high as $1500 were paid at the height of the craze. The toy’s manufacturer, Tyco, originally planned to market the “tickle” toy as Tickle Me Tasmanian Devil (after the “Looney Tunes” character), but then went with “Elmo” after they bought the rights to use “Sesame Street” names.

54 Big draw for Icelandic tourism : AURORA

The spectacular aurora phenomenon is seen lighting up the night sky at both poles of the earth (the Aurora Borealis in the north, and the Aurora Australis in the south). The eerie effect is caused by charged particles colliding with atoms at high latitudes.

60 *Colorful architectural features of Moscow’s St. Basil Cathedral : ONION DOMES

The onion dome is a common form for church domes in Russia and Orthodox churches across the globe.

St. Basil’s is the anglicized name for the Cathedral of the Protection of Most Holy Theotokos on the Moat, the magnificent church that sits on Red Square in Moscow. St. Basil’s was confiscated by the state from the Russian Orthodox community in 1928. The church still belongs to the federal government of the Russian Federation, and serves as the State Historical Museum.

63 The Rosetta Stone, e.g. : RELIC

Rosetta is a coastal city and port on the Mediterranean coast of Egypt. The Rosetta Stone is an ancient Egyptian artifact of tremendous importance in deciphering Egyptian hieroglyphics. Carvings on the stone are actually three translations of the same passage of prose, one in Egyptian hieroglyphics, one in Egyptian Demotic language, and one in classical Greek. The stone was discovered by the French military during Napoleon’s 1798 campaign in Egypt. Before the French could get it back to France, the stone somehow ended up in enemy hands (the British), so it is now on display in the British Museum. Ownership of the stone is very much in dispute. The French want it and, understandably, the Egyptians would like it back.

64 Like a shrinking violet : MEEK

Someone who is very shy might be described as a “shrinking violet”. The violet in this case is the flower, and not the girl’s name. The plant Viola odorata is sometimes called a “shrinking violet” because of its habit of hugging the ground as it grows.

66 She won Album of the Year honors in 2012 and 2017 : ADELE

“Adele” is the stage name of English singer Adele Adkins. Adele’s debut album is “19”, named after the age she was during the album’s production. Her second album was even more successful than the first. Called “21”, the second album was released three years after the first, when Adele was three years older. Her third studio album “25”, released in 2015, broke the first-week sales records in both the UK and the US.

67 Elusive parts of rainbows : ENDS

Sunlight reflected by airborne water droplets can produce rainbows. The water droplets act as little prisms, dispersing the white light into its constituent colors. Sometimes we see double rainbows. If we look carefully, we can see that the order of the colors in the first and second arcs is reversed.

Down

1 Marathon finish line : TAPE

The marathon commemorates the legendary messenger-run by Pheidippides from the site of the Battle of Marathon back to Athens, and is run over 26 miles and 385 yards. The first modern Olympic marathon races were run over a distance that approximated the length of the modern-day Marathon-Athens highway, although the actual length of the race varied from games to games. For the 1908 Olympics in London, a course starting at Windsor Castle and ending in front of the Royal Box at White City Stadium was defined. That course was 26 miles and 385 yards, the standard length now used at all Olympic Games. Organizers of subsequent games continued to vary the length of the race, until a decision was made in 1921 to adopt the distance used in London in 1908.

2 Type of wheat noodle : UDON

Udon noodles are made from wheat-flour and are very popular in Japanese cuisines such as tempura.

3 Major oenotourism destination : NAPA

The first commercial winery in Napa Valley, California was established way back in 1858. However, premium wine production only dates back to the 1960s, with the region really hitting the big time after its success at the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976. The story of that famous blind wine tasting is told in the entertaining 2008 film “Bottle Shock”.

In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oeno-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

5 Like Area 51 : OFF LIMITS

The famed Area 51 is a remote base in the USAF Nevada Test and Training Range. There’s no question that Area 51 is an unusual base in that frontline operational units are not deployed there. It seems that it is used for developing and testing new and classified weapons facilities for the US Military and other US agencies like the CIA. The government did not even acknowledge that Area 51 existed until 1995, and this official position fueled a theory that the base is home to UFOs that landed on Earth.

7 Guinness of film : ALEC

Sir Alec Guinness played many great roles over a long and distinguished career, but nowadays is best remembered (sadly, I think) for playing the original Obi-Wan Kenobi in “Star Wars”.

10 *Storybook password : OPEN SESAME

In the folk tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves”, the title character is a poor woodcutter who discovers the magic phrase “open sesame” that opens the thieves’ den.

11 Variety of pear : BOSC

Bosc is a cultivar of the European pear that is grown mainly in the northwest of the United States. It is named for French horticulturist Louis Bosc. The cultivar originated in Belgium or France in the early 19th century. The Bosc is that pear with a skin the color of a potato, with a long neck.

12 Leader of Kappa Lambda Mu? : IOTA

Iota, Kappa, Lambda, Mu is a string of letters in order in the Greek alphabet.

13 Partner of Iron Man and Captain America : THOR

Thor Odinson is a superhero who was introduced to us by Marvel Comics in 1962. The character is based on the Norse god Thor, and comes complete with a magical hammer. Like so many comic book heroes it seems, Thor has made it to the big screen. Actor Chris Hemsworth played the role in the 2011 film “Thor” directed by the great Kenneth Branagh. Branagh must have needed the cash. Thor’s father Odin is played by Anthony Hopkins. He must have needed the cash too …

18 One of two answers in Twenty Questions : YES

The parlor game called Twenty Questions originated in the US and really took off in the late forties as it became a weekly quiz show on the radio. Am I the only one who thinks that there aren’t enough quiz shows on the radio these days? Apart from a couple of great shows on NPR, I have to resort to listening to the BBC game shows over the Internet …

24 Believer in the Five Thieves (lust, wrath, greed, attachment and ego) : SIKH

Sikhism is a religion that was founded in the Punjab region, which straddles the India-Pakistan border. Even though Sikhism was established relatively recently, it is now the fifth-largest organized religion in the world. Sikhism was founded in the 15th century by Guru Nanak.

27 Bit of hardware on denim jeans : RIVET

Denim fabric originated in Nimes in France. The French phrase “de Nimes” (meaning “from Nimes”) gives us the word “denim”. Also, the French phrase “bleu de Genes” (meaning “blue of Genoa”) gives us our word “jeans”.

29 *Bratty girl in “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” : VERUCA SALT

“Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” is a 1964 novel for children penned by British author Roald Dahl. The two main character’s in the story are young schoolboy Charlie Bucket, and chocolate manufacturer Willy Wonka. Dahl was inspired to write the novel by his exposure to the rivalry between Britain’s two major chocolatiers: Cadbury and Rowntree’s.

33 Jason of “How I Met Your Mother” : SEGEL

Actor Jason Segel is best known for playing Marshall on the sitcom “How I Met Your Mother”. Segel is an ordained minister with the Universal Life Church and performed a wedding ceremony on “The Tonight Show” in 2010.

“How I Met Your Mother” is a sitcom that CBS has been airing since 2005. The main character is Ted Mosby, played by Josh Radnor. Mosby is also the narrator for the show looking back from the year 2030 (the live action is set in the present). As narrator, the older Mosby character is voiced by Bob Saget.

34 Iditarod conveyances : SLEDS

The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race covers an incredible 1,161 miles, from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska. The race starts every year on the first Saturday in March, with the first race having been held in 1973. Finishing times range from over 8 days to 15 days or more. The first few races only used a northern route, but then a southern route was added to the roster every second year. It’s kind of a good thing, because when the racers take the northern route they don’t even pass through the town of Iditarod!

40 iPod type : NANO

The iPod Nano was the successor to the iPod Mini and was introduced to the market at the end of 2005. There were seven versions of the Nano, until it was discontinued in 2017.

51 Inducted, as a Mafioso : MADE

In the Mafia, a made man is a fully initiated member. A made man might also be called a goodfella or a wiseguy.

52 Stream of Shakespeare : AVON

There are actually four rivers called the Avon in England, but “Shakespeare’s Avon” lies mainly in Warwickshire, and so is sometimes known as the Warwickshire Avon. The name “Avon” comes from the Old English word “abona” meaning “river”. Stratford-upon-Avon was the birthplace of William Shakespeare.

53 Draw from a Scrabble bag : TILE

The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

55 Foreign city that surrounds a country : ROME

Supposedly, there were seven separate settlements on the top of seven hills east of the River Tiber, prior to the founding of the city of Rome. Tradition dictates that Romulus founded Rome on one of these hills, namely Palatine Hill, and the city came to encompass all seven existing settlements. The most famous hill in modern-day Rome is probably Vatican Hill, but it lies outside of the walled ancient city.

Vatican City is a sovereign city-state that is walled off within the city of Rome. Vatican City is about 110 acres in area, and so is the smallest independent state in the world. With about 800 residents, it is also the smallest state in terms of population. Although the Holy See dates back to early Christianity, Vatican City only came into being in 1929. At that time, Prime Minister Benito Mussolini signed a treaty with the Holy See on behalf of the Kingdom of Italy that established the city-state.

57 Saxophonist’s accessory : REED

The saxophone was invented by Belgian musician Adolphe Sax, hence the name. Sax developed lip cancer at one point in his life, and one has to wonder if his affliction was related to his saxophone playing (I am sure not!). I had the privilege of visiting Sax’s grave in the Cemetery of Montmartre in Paris a few years ago.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Deep-sea catch : TUNA
5 Provide an address : ORATE
10 Story of a lifetime, in brief : OBIT
14 Man with a spare rib? : ADAM
15 Convicted criminal : FELON
16 Hundred Acre Wood resident : POOH
17 *Wicked Witch’s trap for Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” : POPPY FIELD
19 This, in Spanish : ESTO
20 Canine’s coat : ENAMEL
21 High-occupancy vehicle? : CLOWN CAR
23 Family nickname : SIS
25 Some flock members : EWES
26 <<< button: Abbr. : PREV 30 Have a problem with : MIND 32 Suffix with well and good : -NESS 35 2002 basketball movie starring Lil' Bow Wow : LIKE MIKE 37 Last word of a famous F.D.R. quote : … ITSELF 39 Breakfast order suggested by the answers to the starred clues : EVERYTHING BAGEL 41 Puts through beta testing : DEBUGS 42 Largest moon in the solar system : GANYMEDE 43 Tickle Me Elmo toymaker : TYCO 44 "Bummer!" : OH NO! 45 Word after nothing, something and anything : … ELSE 46 "By yesterday!" : ASAP! 48 Sphere : ORB 50 Box-office winner : SMASH HIT 54 Big draw for Icelandic tourism : AURORA 59 Rolling rock? : LAVA 60 *Colorful architectural features of Moscow's St. Basil Cathedral : ONION DOMES 62 Pop sensation : IDOL 63 The Rosetta Stone, e.g. : RELIC 64 Like a shrinking violet : MEEK 65 Bit of progress, metaphorically : DENT 66 She won Album of the Year honors in 2012 and 2017 : ADELE 67 Elusive parts of rainbows : ENDS

Down

1 Marathon finish line : TAPE
2 Type of wheat noodle : UDON
3 Major oenotourism destination : NAPA
4 Switch on a clock radio : AM/PM
5 Like Area 51 : OFF LIMITS
6 Portuguese king : REI
7 Guinness of film : ALEC
8 Rang, as a bell : TOLLED
9 Fund, as a university : ENDOW
10 *Storybook password : OPEN SESAME
11 Variety of pear : BOSC
12 Leader of Kappa Lambda Mu? : IOTA
13 Partner of Iron Man and Captain America : THOR
18 One of two answers in Twenty Questions : YES
22 Passed : WENT BY
24 Believer in the Five Thieves (lust, wrath, greed, attachment and ego) : SIKH
26 Stated one’s case : PLED
27 Bit of hardware on denim jeans : RIVET
28 Just barely manage : EKE BY
29 *Bratty girl in “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” : VERUCA SALT
31 What might be said in a horse voice? : NEIGH
33 Jason of “How I Met Your Mother” : SEGEL
34 Iditarod conveyances : SLEDS
36 “Goodness me!” : MY GOSH!
37 Bliss, they say : IGNORANCE
38 Head for the hills : FLEE
40 iPod type : NANO
44 Weighed in : OPINED
47 Opposite of luego : AHORA
49 Future flower : BUD
50 Dirtied a baseball uniform, in a way : SLID
51 Inducted, as a Mafioso : MADE
52 Stream of Shakespeare : AVON
53 Draw from a Scrabble bag : TILE
55 Foreign city that surrounds a country : ROME
56 Foreboding sign : OMEN
57 Saxophonist’s accessory : REED
58 Names as a price : ASKS
61 It can be extracted from peanuts and coconuts : OIL

18 thoughts on “0805-20 NY Times Crossword 5 Aug 20, Wednesday”

  1. 12:02 I was at about 9 min. but the left-center block was all blank. Never saw the Chocolate Factory or LIKEMIKE and having been a programmer drew a blank / brain fart on DEBUGS, not to mention that the <<< button on our universal remote is labeled "Last", not PREV. So a guess or two there helped me get a toe hold and finish it off.

  2. Have to take exception to the use of the word accessory in 57D. Can’t play the sax without a reed. That’s like saying the tires on my car are accessories.

    1. Agreed. The word “accessory” threw me off for a moment but “reed” fell into play through crosses. Overall, a pretty easy Wednesday.

  3. 20:13, Googled to verify the “V” and “C” of “VERUCA” (which looks to me like a Spanish version of a German word meaning “crazy” … but what do I know?).

    What should I say about this one? Got home in the dark from a long walk. Dead tired. Fingers not working. Decided to do the puzzle anyway. Interrupted by a howling tea kettle and a phone call, during part of which the timer was running. Fat-fingered in a typo that cost me another couple of minutes.

    And the light was in my eyes! (Oh, wait … that excuse is for a different game … 😳.)

    Next time, I’ll go to bed and tackle the puzzle later … 😜.

    I actually slept two extra hours this morning. When I mention that to a certain friend, he will say, “Well, you must have needed it!” (Some day, a few weeks after I shuffle off this mortal coil, he will say, “Hmmm … still dead … he must have needed it!” … 😜.)

  4. 11:28. Much better effort than yesterday’s.

    So let me get this straight – Dorothy’s house was picked up by a cyclone and landed in a POPPY FIELD. Are yellow brick roads, flying monkeys and talking scarecrows, tin men and lions really that much of a mystery? As I understand it, the sequel chronicled Dorothy’s rehab and legal fight after being arrested as the kingpin of the Kansas heroine trade…I guess that part never made it to the silver screen….

    Best –

  5. Jeff, Dorothy’s house landed in Munchkinland, the field of poppies was the last obstacle in their trek to the Emerald City, she didn’t become a heroin heroine until the sequel 🤣

  6. That fake rewind symbol got me for a long time. I was sure it was FRWD for fast rewind… PREV it was.. Absolutely didn’t know VERUCASALT so had to wait for all the crosses to appear.. Then I got flashbacks of the flying monkeys with the OZ reference and froze up. Those monkeys terrified me as a kid. I hid behind the couch when I saw that movie for the first time..
    I came out of it And still got an error. I had AHOHA for 47D.. Don’t judge me..

  7. 12:26 2 errors: SEG(A)L; GANYM(A)DE. Dumb error, wrote in SEGAL first, didn’t correct it when I entered the crossing word, even though I know it is supposed to be GANYMEDE. Oh well. In addition to previous comments on some of the shaky clues; I had a problem with getting from “Rolling rock” to LAVA. Checked the Free Dictionary, was stunned by the many uses/definitions of the word ‘rolling’.
    Studied German in college (over 50 years ago), one of the words that stuck with me is ‘zwiebeltürme’ (onion domes/towers). Learned something about architecture as well as German language.

  8. Took most time in the left-middle. Never heard of VERUCA SALT, but guessed well and finished it off without error, look-ups, electronic bells, or other whatnot.
    Pen and paper solver and prefer it that way — until I decide otherwise.

  9. No errors. It seems that left-center was everyone’s tough spot. Same here. Flew through everything else but slowed to a crawl when I hit due west. Had to really bear down and apply my best techniques. I feel good when I come through the difficult parts successfully.

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