0609-20 NY Times Crossword 9 Jun 20, Tuesday

Constructed by: Freddie Cheng
Edited by: Will Shortz

Today’s Reveal Answer: Go Fish

Themed answers are common phrases that might describe what we do to GO FISH:

  • 31D Popular kids’ game … or a hint to 18-, 32-, 37- and 58-Across : GO FISH
  • 18A Item in a game of jackstraws : PICK-UP STICK
  • 32A Attempt to fix something and inadvertently make the situation worse : OPEN A CAN OF WORMS
  • 37A Go easy on the criticism : TAKE A SOFT LINE
  • 58A Join (with) : GET HOOKED UP

… a complete list of answers

Bill’s time: 6m 31s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies

Across

13 Land of rustic innocence : ARCADIA

Arcadia is a mountainous region of ancient Greece that was noted in times past for the innocence and contentment of its people who lived a simple, pastoral life. “Arcadia” has been used ever since as the name of a place offering peace and simplicity.

17 Wilbur Wright’s brother : ORVILLE

Wilbur was the older of the two Wright brothers, and he was born in 1867 in Millville, Indiana. By the time that Orville was born in 1871, the family was living in Dayton, Ohio. The Wrights spent a few years of their youth back in Richmond, Indiana, before settling in Dayton for the rest of their lives. The brothers both died in Dayton; Wilbur in 1912 and Orville in 1948.

18 Item in a game of jackstraws : PICK-UP STICK

Jackstraws are also known as pick-up sticks.

23 San Francisco area, with “the” : … BAY

The San Francisco Bay Area comprises the nine counties that impinge on the San Francisco Bay itself: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano and Sonoma. The region also includes the major cities of San Jose, San Francisco and Oakland.

26 Close-fitting headwear : DO-RAG

Hip-hoppers might wear do-rags (also “durags”) today, but they have been around for centuries. The etymology of “do-rag” is pretty evident, i.e. a piece of cloth (rag) to hold a hairstyle (do) in place.

30 Banded marble : AGATE

A playing marble made from agate is called just that, an agate. Steelies on the other hand, are made from solid steel.

35 Spring mo. : APR

The exact etymology of “April”, the name of the fourth month of our year, seems to be uncertain. The ancient Romans called it “mensis Aprilis”, which roughly translated as “opening month”. The suggestion is that April is the month in which fruits, flowers and animals “open” their life cycles.

45 Pack animal : BURRO

Our word “burro”, meaning donkey, comes from the Spanish word for the same animal, namely “burrico”.

46 Like Sadie, in a Beatles song : SEXY

“Sexy Sadie” is a song written by John Lennon and released by the Beatles in 1968. Lennon wrote the song in India, and its original title was “Maharishi”.

48 Madison Square Garden, e.g. : ARENA

Madison Square Garden (MSG) is an arena in New York City used for a variety of events. In the world of sports it is home to the New York Rangers of the NHL, as well as the New York Knicks of the NBA. “The Garden” is also the third busiest music venue in the world in terms of ticket sales. The current arena is the fourth structure to bear the name, a name taken from the Madison Square location in Manhattan. In turn, the square was named for James Madison, the fourth President of the US.

50 “Dude!” : BRO!

Our term “dude” arose as slang in New York City in the 1880s, when it was used to describe a fastidious man. In the early 1900s, the term was extended to mean “city slickers”, easterners who vacationed in the West. The first use of the term “dude ranch” was recorded in 1921.

52 With 44-Across, band with the #1 hits “Bad Medicine” and “Livin’ on a Prayer” : BON …
(44 See 52-Across : … JOVI)

Jon Bon Jovi was born John Francis Bongiovi, Jr. He is the frontman of the band that took his name, i.e. Bon Jovi.

53 Dandy : FOP

A dandy is a man who is overly fastidious with regard to his personal appearance. There’s a suggestion that the term originated in Scotland, where “Dandy” is a diminutive of the name “Andrew”. Back in the early 1800s, when the use of “dandy” was at its height, the female equivalent was a dandizette.

55 Test for a future Ph.D. : GRE

Passing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is usually a requirement for entry into graduate school here in the US.

57 Summer hrs. : DST

On the other side of the Atlantic, daylight saving time (DST) is known as “summer time”. The idea behind summer/daylight-savings is to move clocks forward an hour in spring (“spring forward”), and backwards in the fall (“fall back”) so that afternoons have more daylight. Here in the US, DST starts on the second Sunday of March, and ends on the first Sunday of November.

62 Be an enthusiastic dweeb, with “out” : GEEK …

Originally, a geek was a sideshow performer, perhaps one at a circus. Sometimes the term “geek” is used today for someone regarded as foolish or clumsy, and also for someone who is technically driven and expert, but often socially inept.

“Dweeb” is relatively recent American slang that came out of college life in the late sixties. Dweeb, squarepants, nerd; they’re all not-nice terms that mean the same thing, i.e. someone excessively studious and socially inept.

68 Brontë’s “Jane ___” : EYRE

Charlotte Brontë was the eldest of the three Brontë sister authors. Charlotte’s most famous work is the novel “Jane Eyre”, which she published under the pen name Currer Bell. The pen name veiled her gender, but preserved the initials of her real name. After “Jane Eyre” was published, Brontë started to move in the same circles as other successful novelists of the day, including William Makepeace Thackeray and Elizabeth Gaskell. Just two years after Bronte died in her late thirties, it was Gaskell who published the first biography of Charlotte Brontë.

70 Like the star on Texas’ flag : LONE

The single star on the state flag of Texas is a reminder of the “lone star” on the 1836 National Standard of Texas. The single gold star on a blue background symbolizes Texas as an independent republic and its struggle for independence from Mexico.

71 Soldiers’ meal : MESS

“Mess” first came into English about 1300, when it described the list of food needed for a meal. The term comes from the Old French word “mes” meaning a portion of food or a course at a meal. This usage in English evolved into “mess” meaning a jumbled mass of anything, from the concept of “mixed food”. The original usage, in the sense of a food for a meal, surfaced again in the military in the 1500s when a “mess” was a communal eating place.

73 Community gym org. : YMCA

The YMCA (the Y) is a worldwide movement that has its roots in London, England. There, in 1844, the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) was founded with the intent of promoting Christian principles through the development of “a healthy spirit, mind and body”. The founder, George Williams, saw the need to create YMCA facilities for young men who were flocking to the cities as the Industrial Revolution flourished. He saw that these men were frequenting taverns and brothels, and wanted to offer a more wholesome alternative.

Down

3 Coronation rod, in Britain : SCEPTRE

A scepter (“sceptre” in Britain and Ireland) is a ceremonial staff, one often held by a monarch.

4 Country between Algeria and Burkina Faso : MALI

The Republic of Mali is a landlocked country in western Africa located south of Algeria. Formerly known as French Sudan, the nation’s most famous city is Timbuktu. Mali is the third-largest producer of gold on the continent, after South Africa and Ghana.

Algeria is a huge country, the second largest in Africa (only Sudan is larger), and the largest country on the Mediterranean. The capital of Algeria is Algiers, and the country takes its name from the city.

Burkina Faso is an inland country in western Africa. The country used to be called the Republic of Upper Volta and was renamed in 1984 to “Burkina Faso”, meaning “the land of upright people”.

6 Jockey’s wear : SILKS

The colorful clothing made from silk that is worn by a jockey is known as “racing silks”. The specific colors and pattern of racing silks are registered to a particular owner or trainer.

7 Capital of Western Australia : PERTH

Perth is the capital city of Western Australia. Perth earned itself the nickname of “City of Light” in 1962 as virtually all the town’s lights were turned on at full power when astronaut John Glenn passed overhead in earth orbit in Friendship 7, so that he could see the city below. The city gave a repeat performance for Glenn in 1998 when he passed overhead in the Space Shuttle in 1998.

8 Sitarist Shankar : RAVI

Ravi Shankar was perhaps the most famous virtuoso (to us Westerners) from the world of Indian classical music, and was noted for his sitar playing. Shankar was the father of the pop singer Norah Jones.

9 Guitarist Clapton : ERIC

Can you believe that the great Eric Clapton only had one chart-topper in the US? In 1974, Clapton released a cover version of the Bob Marley classic “I Shot the Sheriff” and ended up selling more copies of that song than Bob Marley did himself. Clapton is the only person to have been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame three times: once as a member of the Yardbirds, once as a member of the supergroup Cream, and once as a solo artist.

11 Unagi, e.g. : EEL

“Unagi” is the Japanese term for” freshwater eel”, and “anago” is the term for “saltwater eel”.

12 Rap’s Dr. ___ : DRE

“Dr. Dre” is the stage name of rapper Andre Romelle Young. Dr. Dre is known for his own singing career as well as for producing records and starting the careers of others such as Snoop Dogg, Eminem and 50 Cent.

14 Bryn Mawr grad, e.g. : ALUMNA

An alumnus (plural “alumni”) is a graduate or former student of a school or college. The female form is “alumna” (plural “alumnae”). The term comes into English from Latin, in which an alumnus is a foster-son or pupil. “Alum” is an informal term used for either an alumna or alumnus.

Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania is a women’s liberal arts school that was founded in 1885. Bryn Mawr was the first women’s university in the nation to offer graduate education up to the PhD level. While the undergraduate program is open only to females, the school opened up the postgraduate program to males in 1931.

24 Cash box, for short : ATM

Automatic Teller Machine (ATM)

25 “Getting to ___” (guide to negotiating) : YES

“Getting to YES: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In” is a business book designed to explain the “art of the deal”. According to the book, the four steps to a successful negotiation are:

  • Separate the people from the problem.
  • Focus on interests, not positions.
  • Invent options for mutual gain.
  • Insist on using objective criteria.

27 Darth Vader’s original given name : ANAKIN

Anakin “Ani” Skywalker is the principal character in the first six of the “Star Wars” movies. His progress chronologically through the series of films is:

  • Episode I: Anakin is a 9-year-old slave boy who earns the promise of Jedi training by young Obi-Wan Kenobi.
  • Episode II: Anakin is 18-years-old and goes on a murdering rampage to avenge the killing of his mother.
  • Episode III: Anakin is 21-years-old and a Jedi knight, but he turns to the Dark Side and becomes Darth Vader. His wife Padme gives birth to twins, Luke and Leia Skywalker.
  • Episode IV: Darth Vader, comes into conflict with his children, Luke Skywalker and the Princess Leia.
  • Episode V: Darth Vader attempts to coax his son Luke over to the dark side, and reveals to Luke that he is his father.
  • Episode VI: Luke learns that Leia is his sister, and takes on the task of bringing Darth Vader back from the Dark Side in order to save the Galaxy. Vader saves his son from the Emperor’s evil grip, dying in the process, but his spirit ends up alongside the spirits of Yoda and Obi-Wan. They all live happily ever after …

30 Missing letters? : AWOL

MPs (military police officers) often track down personnel who go AWOL (absent without leave).

31 Popular kids’ game … or a hint to 18-, 32-, 37- and 58-Across : GO FISH

Go Fish is a very simple card game, one usually played by children:

Q. Do you have any queens?
A. No.
Q. Go fish!

37 Matador charger : TORO

The term “torero” is used to describe all bullfighters. The term “matador” is reserved for the bullfighter whose job is to make the final kill. Aptly enough, “matador” is Spanish for “killer”.

38 Comic book debut of 1963, with “The” : AVENGERS

The Avengers are a team of superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. The original lineup, which dates back to 1963, consisted of Ant-Man, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor and the Wasp. Soon after their formation, the Avengers rescued Captain America trapped in ice, and thereafter he joined the team. There is a 2012 movie called “The Avengers” that features Iron Man, Captain America, Hulk and Thor.

39 Court call? : SUBPOENA

A subpoena is a writ issued by a court compelling a person to testify before the court, or compelling a person or organization to produce evidence before the court. The term comes from the Latin phrase “sub poena” meaning “under penalty”. The court has the authority to penalize a person or organization that does not comply with the subpoena.

40 Rink great Bobby : ORR

Bobby Orr is regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time. By the time he retired in 1978 he had undergone over a dozen knee surgeries. At 31 years of age, he concluded that he just couldn’t skate anymore. Reportedly, he was even having trouble walking. While still 31 years old, in 1979, Orr became the youngest person inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame. Prior to that, in 1967, Orr became the youngest person named the NHL’s Rookie of the Year.

51 ___ Conference : TED

The acronym “TED” stands for “Technology, Entertainment and Design”. TED is a set of conferences held around the world by a non-profit group called the Sapling Foundation. The conference subjects are varied, and the meetings are often led by big names such as Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Bill Gates and Jane Goodall. The Sapling Foundation then makes recordings of the conferences available for free online with the intent of disseminating the ideas globally. These conferences are known as “TED Talks”.

56 Monopoly payments : RENTS

The commercial game of Monopoly is supposedly a remake of “The Landlord’s Game” created in 1903 by a Quaker woman named Lizzie Phillips. Phillips used her game as a tool to explain the single tax theory of American economist Henry George. The Landlord’s Game was first produced commercially in 1924. The incredibly successful derivative game called Monopoly was introduced in 1933 by Charles Darrow, who became a very rich man when Parker Brothers bought the rights to the game just two years later in 1935.

60 Yemen neighbor : OMAN

Oman lies on the southeast coast of the Arabian Peninsula and is neighbored by the UAE, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Oman is a monarchy, and the official name of the state is the Sultanate of Oman. All of the country’s legislative, executive and judiciary power resides with the hereditary sultan.

Yemen is located on the Arabian Peninsula, and lies just south of Saudi Arabia and west of Oman. Yemen is the only state on the peninsula that is a republic (its official name is the Republic of Yemen). Everyone over the age of 18 gets to vote, but only Muslims can hold elected office. Yemen has seen many rebellions over the centuries, and has been suffering through a Shia uprising since February 2015.

66 End of a co. name : INC

A company that has incorporated uses the abbreviation “Inc.” after its name. By incorporating, a company forms a corporation, which is a legal entity that has legal rights similar to those of an individual. For example, a corporation can sue another corporation or individual. However, a corporation does not have all the rights of citizens. A corporation does not have the Fifth Amendment right of protections against self-incrimination, for example. It is perhaps understandable that the concept of “corporations as persons” is a frequent subject for debate.

Complete List of Clues/Answers

Across

1 Universe : COSMOS
7 Like a future doctor’s studies : PRE-MED
13 Land of rustic innocence : ARCADIA
15 More obviously sad : TEARIER
16 Be under the weather : FEEL ILL
17 Wilbur Wright’s brother : ORVILLE
18 Item in a game of jackstraws : PICK-UP STICK
20 Unit in a superintendent’s bldg. : APT
22 Runaway success : SMASH
23 San Francisco area, with “the” : … BAY
26 Close-fitting headwear : DO-RAG
29 Tiny peeve : NIT
30 Banded marble : AGATE
32 Attempt to fix something and inadvertently make the situation worse : OPEN A CAN OF WORMS
35 Spring mo. : APR
36 Reaction to a gut punch : OOF!
37 Go easy on the criticism : TAKE A SOFT LINE
44 See 52-Across : … JOVI
45 Pack animal : BURRO
46 Like Sadie, in a Beatles song : SEXY
48 Madison Square Garden, e.g. : ARENA
50 “Dude!” : BRO!
51 Superscript number for a cube : THREE
52 With 44-Across, band with the #1 hits “Bad Medicine” and “Livin’ on a Prayer” : BON …
53 Dandy : FOP
55 Test for a future Ph.D. : GRE
57 Summer hrs. : DST
58 Join (with) : GET HOOKED UP
62 Be an enthusiastic dweeb, with “out” : GEEK …
64 Restrict : HEM IN
65 “Get a ___!” : GRIP
68 Brontë’s “Jane ___” : EYRE
69 Make into law : ENACT
70 Like the star on Texas’ flag : LONE
71 Soldiers’ meal : MESS
72 Pulls hard : YANKS
73 Community gym org. : YMCA

Down

1 School lunchroom, informally : CAF
2 Shipment to a refinery : ORE
3 Coronation rod, in Britain : SCEPTRE
4 Country between Algeria and Burkina Faso : MALI
5 Of lyric poetry : ODIC
6 Jockey’s wear : SILKS
7 Capital of Western Australia : PERTH
8 Sitarist Shankar : RAVI
9 Guitarist Clapton : ERIC
10 Place to get a dairy treat : MILK BAR
11 Unagi, e.g. : EEL
12 Rap’s Dr. ___ : DRE
14 Bryn Mawr grad, e.g. : ALUMNA
15 Throw at : TOSS TO
19 Bother : PAIN
20 Bother : ADO
21 Something to do to a balloon or a wheelie : POP
24 Cash box, for short : ATM
25 “Getting to ___” (guide to negotiating) : YES
27 Darth Vader’s original given name : ANAKIN
28 Stare stupidly : GAPE
30 Missing letters? : AWOL
31 Popular kids’ game … or a hint to 18-, 32-, 37- and 58-Across : GO FISH
33 Maryland delicacy : CRAB
34 Snapshot, informally : FOTO
37 Matador charger : TORO
38 Comic book debut of 1963, with “The” : AVENGERS
39 Court call? : SUBPOENA
40 Rink great Bobby : ORR
41 Breaststroke move : FROG KICK
42 Annual White House Correspondents’ dinner, jocularly : NERD PROM
43 Flames that have gone out? : EXES
44 Sharp punch : JAB
47 Until now : YET
49 In the back, nautically speaking : AFT
51 ___ Conference : TED
54 Informal greeting : OH HEY
56 Monopoly payments : RENTS
59 Squeaks (out) : EKES …
60 Yemen neighbor : OMAN
61 Nasty, as a fight : UGLY
62 Beauty : GEM
63 Real looker? : EYE
66 End of a co. name : INC
67 Stew tidbit : PEA

4 thoughts on “0609-20 NY Times Crossword 9 Jun 20, Tuesday”

  1. 26:09 Back to reality. Never heard of “nerdprom”, you don’t want to know how long it took me to figure that corner out…

  2. 7:58, no errors. Cute theme. I’d never heard of “nerd prom”, either. Got it using crosses, looked it up after the fact, suspect its usage will be short-lived (but you never know … 😜).

  3. @DuncanR, I’m glad I wasn’t the only one who struggled with this. The bottom middle was my downfall. 24:18 and happy to finish. A lot of time was spent just staring.

  4. 16:40. Glad I wasn’t the only one to struggle on a Tuesday, but Bill and Nonny’s times bring me back to reality.

    I took a class on negotiations in graduate school – I was allowed to take one free elective university wide to count towards my grad degree. It was one of the most interesting and useful classes I’ve ever taken. I use it almost daily even in situations like buying a car, negotiating for a new AC system or whatever.

    One element left out of the write up’s discussion is the BATNA. You always need to know your Best Alternative To a Negotiated Agreement – i.e. know at what point walking away is more desirable than making a deal. It’s key to any negotiation as is knowing the other side’s BATNA.

    Oh well – the Nevada primary is today so I need to mail in my ballots. I have my legitimate ballot plus a couple of hundred fake ballots I’m submitting…

    Best –

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